Simple Website Template - PDF

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					Chapter Website Guide
         Version 1.0

     [Draft Updated July 22, 2010]
                                                                             Chapter Website Template Basics


Contents
  Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 2

  Things for Your Chapter to Consider .................................................................................................... 3

  Getting Started ...................................................................................................................................... 4

  Back End Basic Structure ...................................................................................................................... 4

  Front End Basic Structure/Pages in OUR Wordpress Template ........................................................... 5

  Permissions Levels ................................................................................................................................ 6

  Basic WordPress Features (some things here don’t apply in our template) ............................................. 6

     Creating Content ............................................................................................................................... 6

     Archives and Search .......................................................................................................................... 7

     Discussion and Comments ................................................................................................................ 7

  Introduction to WordPress Terminology ............................................................................................... 8

     Terminology Related to Content ....................................................................................................... 8

  Writing Posts......................................................................................................................................... 9

     Descriptions of Post Fields ............................................................................................................. 10

     Best Practices For Posting ............................................................................................................... 13




Introduction
In 2010, the Minnesota Jaycees won a free website build through the Sierra Bravo Overnight Website
Challenge. We had a team of 10 developers working 24 hours straight on the development of our site.
Since we gave them a tall order, to create a website that will host chapter websites within it, we have
received additional volunteer web development assistance post-event.

As we continue to tweak and develop the site throughout 2010, we will be working with members and
chapters to ensure that the state’s site becomes a better resource to members, and that the chapter website
template is a strong resource to chapters.

This guide is a first draft of a guide to help chapters through the process of using the chapter website
template. We will be tracking bugs and solutions in a google spreadsheet- please use this as a resource as

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you have questions or feedback https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AuEEQWZmW-
DYdEFwR2E0T2RCM19QU2lFNHhWb1VKVmc&hl=en&authkey=CNLugNwD

Or if you need to type this up here’s a bit.ly link: http://bit.ly/dqFUYc


Things for Your Chapter to Consider
    1. GOALS: What do you want the new website to accomplish for your chapter? Set some clear
       purpose and goals for how you want to use it to organize information for your members and the
       public. That said, don’t be afraid to try some things out and get feedback from members as you
       go to see what is most helpful- this is a new tool for all of us afterall…
    2. JUST THE BASICS: The Minnesota Jaycees chapter website template provides chapters with
       the basic tools they need to have a dynamic web presence- while also being a very simple website.
       In this first implementation of our chapter template- there aren’t a lot of bells and whistles. A
       website should be simple, straightforward, and communicate your message clearly.
    3. SOCIAL: Trends in overall website development and website usage are pushing nonprofits to
       take advantage of the free and easy to use communications and social media tools widely available.
       We tried not to recreate the wheel with this website… use your facebook, yahoo listservs, picasa,
       YouTube accounts, and google docs as much as you have been. You want to be where your
       members, potential members, and the public at large ARE. Don’t make them come to you- YOU
       go to them! A website is a central landing page for the “official scoop” on your events and
       activities, it is also a central place where your audience can FIND the links to your Facebook,
       photos, etc.
    4. WHY: Our efforts to rebrand our organization are one part of a strategic effort to stem the tide
       of membership losses- we are branding ourselves to be more appealing to young adults. We have
       to package ourselves to be appealing and to demonstrate our statewide impact- and we all need to
       work together statewide to accomplish this. Additionally, we’ve found that only 1/3 of our
       chapters have a website- and the state organization wanted to be able to provide a free and easy to
       maintain site for chapters to use.
    5. SMALL: Even our small Jaycees chapters need to have a web presence, even if it just a very
       simple, bare bones site with current contact info for your chapter. If you currently have no
       website, the template will be set up for you, so at the very least- so that when they search on the
       web, the public can find a contact for your chapter. Additionally, it is important to note that as
       broadband and computer access expands and speeds up across the state- a formal, consistent web
       presence will become more and more important for survival as a community organization.
    6. BIG: Our larger Jaycees chapters may already have a strong web presence, have made investments
       in technology solutions, may manage multiple event websites, local membership systems, or
       member forums. Eventually, we will be working to bring all chapters, large and small into the state
       website system- knowing that there are some individual needs that chapters have that we will need
       to find work-arounds and solutions for.
    7. EVERONE: Over the next couple of years, we foresee it being a requirement for all chapters to
       use the website template (in some cases using their own tools to augment). In the meantime, using
       the website template is available as an option for chapters as we continue to develop the template
       to best fit the greatest number of chapter’s needs. Chapters that are maintaining their own
       websites will be expected to follow the brand standards that have been laid out regarding the use
       of our logo etc. (found at http://mnjaycees.org/members/chapter-resources/chapter-marketing-
       resources)
    8. WHO: The chapter website template allows for you to have multiple website administrators.
       Your should have one person focus on getting the site built out to start, after that- you can give
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       board members and chapter members various levels of access to add content or comments to the
       site.
    9. PLAN: When starting out with the template think about what kind of information you will store
       there and how often you will update it. There is a “blog” feature which can be treated like the
       chapter’s online newsletter- this is where people will go for the latest chapter news. There is a
       resources section that can house your chapter minutes and other resources for members. Think
       about how you will categorize information and tag it. Since we are using wordpress- you’ll want to
       work through a common set of naming standards for the documents and posts you put up in your
       site. Additionally, you have the ability to set all posts and content to private- so that only your
       members that are logged in will be able to view content. Working through this will be a work in
       progress for you.

Getting Started
Create a user profile on the state site at http://mnjaycees.org/members , then email info@mnjaycees.org
to request access to be an admin for your chapter site.

When access is granted and your template is set up, you will log in at http://mnjaycees.org/members and
click on dashboard. This takes you to a sort of confusing back-end screen within wordpress. Under
Dashboard, click on My Blogs, click on the dashboard for your chapter site. This will take you to the
backend specifically for your site.

Back End Basic Structure
Navigating Wordpress is easy to learn, but can take a bit of getting used to if you aren’t used to reading
blogs (since our website is built in a blogging platform, the terminology can be confusing to some starting
out)- see Terminology in this document. The main thing to think about is that a “post” is the core of how
you will produce content for your site. This is an outline of the back end structure, we do not yet have full
info on all elements as they relate to the chapter template.. we’ll be learning as we go

    1. Posts- Basic place you’ll input content
    2. Event- Post your events
    3. Testimonials- Contributors can input testimonials to be shared on your chapter site about their
        experience as a member
    4. Documents (this is a doc storage, but it duplicates the resources area…. To be fixed)
    5. Photos- Self explanatory
    6. Get Involved (this is used on the state site, but not relevant on the chapter site… To be fixed
    7. Resources (this is a doc storage, but it duplicates the document area…. To be fixed)
    8. Links (we think this is somewhat irrelevant inside the chapter template… To be fixed)
    9. Pages (we think this is irrelevant inside the chapter template…. To be fixed)
    10. Forms- Easy to create forms for inclusion in your event or blog posts
    11. Comments- Where you will moderate comments
    12. Appearance- Customize is the area you can change that contact info and description on the
        chapter home page
    13. Users- Where you can add users and set their admin levels

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  14. Tools (we think this is somewhat irrelevant inside the chapter template)
  15. Settings (we think this is somewhat irrelevant inside the chapter template)
  16. Magic Fields (for advanced users, we aren’t sure these can be used on the chapter template yet)


Front End Basic Structure/Pages in out Wordpress
Template
  1. Home
         a. This section features the latest blog post, testimonials submitted by members, quick links
            to contact info for the chapter, a list of upcoming events, the latest photos posted to the
            site, and an area to post a description of your chapters activities and impact.
  2. Events
         a. This section is a chronological listing of your chapter’s events- when you input an event
            here it rolls up into the calendar listing on the state site (this particular function is not yet
            turned on since we are just starting to get chapters going).
  3. Members
         a. This is a directory listing of your chapter’s members- it pulls the information collected in
            the member profile process such as facebook, twitter, phone number (information shared
            is optional). Chapter officers are rolled to the top of this directory listing so they are easy
            to access right away.
  4. Blog
         a. This is probably the most powerful and helpful function in the chapter site- it can serve
            as your electronic newsletter-giving members and the public up to date information- use
            it to give more detail than what you would on Facebook updates , and also use it as an
            opportunity to produce news items like you would for a newsletter. You can shape how
            your chapter wants to use this. You can categorize the information into things like:
            Alumni & Mentors, Chapter News , Community Impact, Event News, Get Involved,
            Individual Impact, Volunteer Opportunities, Leadership Opportunities. Additionally, you
            can make posts private- so that only members that are logged in can view posts specific
            to members.
  5. Resources
         a. This is meant to be a document storehouse for your chapter and where you can also post
            your PDF or word newsletters.
  6. Photos
         a. This is meant to be an area where you put your best of the best photos- that best
            represent your members, your impact, and your projects. Think of it as the place you’d
            store your photos for use by your local paper for a story on your project. Most chapters
            are using picasa or facebook as a primary location to store chapter photos (you can link
            to these on the home page as well).
  7. Members (second heading needs to be changed to not duplicate the chapter members listing
     above)
         a. This is meant to be a link back to the dashboard area and where you can edit your profile.



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Permissions Levels
Wordpress’ permissions are set up like this:
 • Administrator – Somebody who has access to all the administration features
 • Editor – Somebody who can publish posts, manage posts as well as manage other people’s posts,
    etc.
 • Author – Somebody who can publish and manage their own posts
 • Contributor – Somebody who can write and manage their posts but not publish posts
 • Subscriber – Somebody who can read comments/comment/receive news letters, etc.

For us and our needs- this is what it might translate to ideally for your chapter:
    • Administrator – your techie, your webmaster
    • Editor- your president and/or public relations vice president
    • Author- other VPS or project chairs
    • Contributor- this is where you’d put in the majority of your regular chapter members, and
        possibly any other interested parties
    • Subscriber- someone from the public that you wouldn’t want commenting or necessarily
        interacting with you on your site.

Basic WordPress Features (some things here don’t apply in our template)
Excerpted from: http://codex.wordpress.org/WordPress_Features

Creating Content
Password protection
        So you want to share something with some people, but not everyone? Easy, protect the
        article in question with a password.
Post Slug
        If you are using clean PermaLinks on your website, you can define the link to an
        individual post by using a post-slug.
Post to the future
        You can write a post today and have it appear on the weblog at a future date,
        automatically.
Multi paged posts
        If your post is too long, cut it up into pages, so your readers don't have to scroll to the
        end of the world.
File/picture uploading
        You can upload pictures or files, and link to them or display them in your articles. You
        have the option of creating thumbnails of pictures when you upload them.
Categories
        Organize your posts into categories, and sub-categories, and sub-sub categories...
Emoticons
        WordPress is smart enough to convert character smileys, like ":)" into the graphical image
        counterparts.
Save Drafts
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        Save your unfinished articles, improve them later, publish when you're done.
Previewing Posts
        Before you press the "Publish" button, you can look at the preview for the article you just
        wrote to check if everything is the way you want it. In fact, you can do that at any time,
        since the preview is "live".
Desktop Tools
        You don't have to use a browser to update your weblog, you can use any desktop
        blogging tool that supports the MetaWeblog or Blogger API.
Blog by email
        You can send your posts as an email and have them appear on the weblog.
Bookmarklets
        Add the "Press It!" bookmarklet provided by WordPress to your browser and you have a
        shortcut to create an article with a link to the page currently displayed on your browser!
Sidebar
        If you don't like a bookmarklet, use our friendly browser sidebar, which can be used in a
        similar fashion.
Formatting
        Think of WordPress as something that makes your words smoother, and your pages more
        appealing. WordPress ships with text-formatting plugins that clean up your content and
        add typographic goodness to your articles.

Archives and Search
Archiving
       After you've been blogging for an extended period of time, what matters is how well your
       posts are organized, and for that, WordPress provides you with several ready made
       options to display the archives of your blog, containing all the old posts. You can choose
       from yearly, monthly, weekly, daily, category-wise or author-wise archives, and easily link to the
       archive pages from the main page (or any other page) of your blog, using a template tag to
       generate the links to these archive pages. Since WordPress generates pages dynamically,
       all these archive pages come at no additional space-cost to your server.
Searching
       WordPress has a functional built-in search tool, which allows visitors to your blog to
       search for terms they are interested in, and the search-hilite plugin that ships with WordPress
       can highlight their search terms, so it is even easier for them to find what they were
       searching for. In addition to this, the plugin also does the same for someone who arrives
       at your blog by clicking at a search result in a search engine, such as google. All in all,
       searching is fun, with WordPress.

Discussion and Comments
Community Building
       WP is not the YMCA, but it does help build communities around weblogs, through the
       use of comments, trackbacks and pingbacks, helping you keep in touch with the audience
       and fostering friendship
Allowed html tags


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      Not everyone is evil, but keep those who are in check by limiting which html tags are
      kosher on your weblog. The default html tags allowed by WordPress are a sane choice to
      let people use html in their comments, without compromising the safety of your data or
      server.
Moderation
      For the control freak in all of us, WordPress provides an array of moderation options.
      You can moderate

            •   all comments before they appear on the blog
            •   comments with specific words in them
            •   comments posted from specific IP addresses
            •   comments containing more than some specified number of links.

        All these moderation options keep spammers and vandals in check.
Notification
        WordPress can keep you in the loop by sending you an email each time there is a new
        comment or a comment awaiting moderation.

Introduction to WordPress Terminology
Excerpted from: http://codex.wordpress.org/WordPress_Semantics

Terminology Related to Content

The term Word in WordPress refers to the words used to compose posts. Posts are the principal
element (or content) of a blog. The posts are the writings, compositions, discussions, discourses,
musings, and, yes, the rantings of the blog's owner and guest authors. Posts, in most cases, are the
reason a blog exists; without posts, there is no blog!

Integral to a blog are the pictures, images, sounds, and movies, otherwise know as media. Media
enhances, and gives life to a blog's content. WordPress provides an easy to use method of
inserting Media directly into posts, and a method to upload Media that can be later attached to
posts, and a Media Manager to manage those various Media.

An important part of the posting process is the act of assigning those posts to categories. Each
post in WordPress is filed under one or more categories. Categories can be hierarchical in nature,
where one category acts as a parent to several child, or grandchild, categories. Thoughtful
categorization allows posts of similar content to be grouped, thereby aiding viewers in the
navigation, and use of a site. In addition to categories, terms or keywords called tags can be
assigned to each post. Tags act as another navigation tool, but are not hierarchical in nature. Both
categories and tags part of a system called taxonomies. If categories and tags are not enough,
users can also create custom taxonomies that allow more specific identification of posts or pages
or custom post types.


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In turn, post categories and tags are two of the elements of what's called post meta data. Post meta
data refers to the information associated with each post and includes the author's name and the
date posted as well as the post categories. Post meta data also refers to Custom Fields where you
assign specific words, or keys, that can describe posts. But, you can't mention post meta data
without discussing the term meta.

Generally, meta means "information about"; in WordPress, meta usually refers to
administrative-type information. So, besides post meta data, Meta is the HTML tag used to
describe and define a web page to the outside world, like meta tag keywords for search engines.
Also, many WordPress-based sites offer a Meta section, usually found in the sidebar, with links to
login or register at that site. And, don't forget Meta Rules: The rules defining the general protocol
to follow in using this Codex, or Meta, as in the MediaWiki namespace that refers to
administrative functions within Codex. That's a lot of Meta!

After a post is made public, a blog's readers will respond, via comments, to that post, and in turn,
authors will reply. Comments enable the communication process, that give-and-take, between
author and reader. Comments are the life-blood of most blogs.

Finally, WordPress also offers two other content management tools called Pages and custom post
types. Pages often present static information, such as "About Me", or "Contact Us", Pages.
Typically "timeless" in nature, Pages should not be confused with the time-oriented objects called
posts. Interestingly, a Page is allowed to be commented upon, but a Page cannot be categorized. A
custom post type refers to a type of structured data that different that a post or a page. Custom
post types allow users to easily create and manage such things as portfolios, projects, video
libraries, podcasts, quotes, chats, and whatever a user or developer can imagine.

Writing Posts
Excerpted from: http://codex.wordpress.org/Writing_Posts

Posts are the entries that display in reverse chronological order on your home page. In contrast to
pages, posts usually have comments fields beneath them and are included in your site's RSS feed.

To write a post:

    1. Log in to your WordPress Administration Panel (Dashboard).
    2. Click the Posts tab.
    3. Click the Add New Sub Tab
    4. Start filling in the blanks.
    5. As needed, select a category, add tags, and make other selections from the sections below
       the post. Each of these sections is explained below.
    6. When you are ready, click Publish.




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Descriptions of Post Fields




WordPress Admin Writing Post Advanced Panel - Top of Page

Title

        The title of your post. You can use any words or phrases. Avoid using the same title twice as that
        will cause problems. You can use commas, apostrophes, quotes, hypens/dashes, and other typical
        symbols in the post like "My Site - Here's Lookin' at You, Kid." WordPress will clean it up for the
        link to the post, called the post-slug.

Post Editing Area

        The blank box where you enter your writing, links, links to images, and any information you want
        to display on your site. You can use either the Visual or the HTML view to compose your posts.
        For more on the HTML view, see the section below, Visual Versus HTML View.

Preview button

        Allows you to view the post before officially publishing it.

Publish box

        Contains buttons that control the state of your post. The main states are Published, Pending
        Review, and Draft. A Published status means the post has been published on your blog for all to
        see. Pending Review means the draft is waiting for review by an editor prior to publication. Draft
        means the post has not been published and remains a draft for you. If you select a specific publish
        status and click the update post or Publish button, that status is applied to the post. For example,
        to save a post in the Pending Review status, select Pending Review from the Publish Status drop-
        down box, and click Save As Pending. (You will see all posts organized by status by going to
        Posts > Edit). To schedule a post for publication on a future time or date, click "Edit" in the
        Publish area next to the words "Publish immediately". You can also change the publish date to a
        date in the past to back-date posts. Change the settings to the desired time and date. You must
        also hit the "Publish" button when you have completed the post to publish at the desired time and
        date.

Publish box


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          Visibility - This determines how your post appears to the world. Public posts will be visible by all
          website visitors once published. Password Protected posts are published to all, but visitors must
          know the password to view the post content. Private posts are visible only to you (and to other
          editors or admins within your site)

Permalink

          After you save your post, the Permalink below the title shows the potential URL for the post, as
          long as you have permalinks enabled. (To enable permalinks, go to Settings > Permalinks.) The
          URL is generated from your title. In previous versions of WordPress, this was referred to as the
          "page-slug." The commas, quotes, apostrophes, and other non-HTML favorable characters are
          changed and a dash is put between each word. If your title is "My Site - Here's Lookin' at You,
          Kid", it will be cleaned up to be "my-site-heres-lookin-at-you-kid" as the title. You can manually
          change this, maybe shortening it to "my-site-lookin-at-you-kid".

Save

          Allows you to save your post as a draft / pending review rather than immediately publishing it. To
          return to your drafts later, visit Posts - Edit in the menu bar, then select your post from the list.

Publish

          Publishes your post on the site. You can edit the time when the post is published by clicking the
          Edit link above the Publish button and specifying the time you want the post to be published. By
          default, at the time the post is first auto-saved, that will be the date and time of the post within the
          database.

Post Tags

          Refers to micro-categories for your blog, similar to including index entries for a page. Posts with
          similar tags are linked together when a user clicks one of the tags. Tags have to be enabled with
          the right code in your theme for them to appear in your post. Add new tags to the post by typing
          the tag into the box and clicking "Add".

Categories

          The general topic the post can be classified in. Generally, bloggers have 7-10 categories for their
          content. Readers can browse specific categories to see all posts in the category. To add a new
          category, click the +Add New Category link in this section. You can manage your categories by
          going to Posts > Categories.

Excerpt

          A summary or brief teaser of your posts featured on the front page of your site as well as on the
          category, archives, and search non-single post pages. Note that the Excerpt does not usually
          appear by default. It only appears in your post if you have changed the index.php template file to
          display the Excerpt instead of the full Content of a post. If so, WordPress will automatically use

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       the first 55 words of your post as the Excerpt or up until the use of the More Quicktag mark. If
       you use an Explicit Excerpt, this will be used no matter what. For more information, see
       Excerpt.

Send Trackbacks

       A way to notify legacy blog systems that you've linked to them. If you link other WordPress blogs,
       they'll be notified automatically using pingbacks. No other action is necessary. For those blogs
       that don't recognize pingbacks, you can send a trackback to the blog by entering the website
       address(es) in this box, separating each one by a space. See Trackbacks and Pingbacks for more
       information.

Custom Fields

       Custom_Fields offer a way to add information to your site. In conjunction with extra code in your
       template files or plugins, Custom Fields can modify the way a post is displayed. These are
       primarily used by plugins, but you can manually edit that information in this section.

Discussion

       Options to enable interactivity and notification of your posts. This section hosts two check boxes:
       Allow Comments on this post and Allow trackbacks and pingbacks on this post. If
       Allowing Comments is unchecked, no one can post comments to this particular post. If
       Allowing Pings is unchecked, no one can post pingbacks or trackbacks to this particular post.

Password Protect This Post

       To password protect a post, click Edit next to Visibility in the Publish area to the top right, then
       click Password Protected, click Ok, and enter a password. Then click OK. Note - Editor and
       Admin users can see password protected or private posts in the edit view without knowing the
       password.

Post Author

       A list of all blog authors you can select from to attribute as the post author. This section only
       shows if you have multiple users with authoring rights in your blog. To view your list of users, see
       Users tab on the far right. For more information, see Users and Authors.




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WordPress Admin Writing Post Advanced Panel - Bottom of Page

Note: You can set basic options for writing, such as the size of the post box, how smiley tags are
converted, and other details by going to Settings > Writing. See Writing Options SubPanel.

Best Practices For Posting

You can say or show the world anything you like on your WordPress site. Here are some tips you
need to know to help you write your posts in WordPress.

Practice Accessibility

        To be compliant with web standards for accessibility, be sure to include ALT and TITLE
        descriptions on links and images to help your users, such as <a title="WordPress Codex"
        href="http://codex.wordpress.org/">WordPress Codex</a>.

Use Paragraphs

        No one likes to read writing that never pauses for a line break. To break your writing up into
        paragraphs, use double spaces between your paragraphs. WordPress will automatically detect
        these and insert <p> HTML paragraph tags into your writing.

Using Headings

        If you are writing long posts, break up the sections by using headings, small titles to highlight a
        change of subject. In HTML, headings are set by the use of h1, h2, h3, h4, and so on. By default,
        most WordPress Themes use the first, second, and sometimes third heading levels within the site.
        You can use h4 to set your own headings. Simply type in:

        <h4>Subtitle of Section</h4>

        with double lines before and after and WordPress will make that title a headline in your post. To
        style the heading, add it to your style.css style sheet file. For more information on styling headings,
        check out Designing Headings.
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Use HTML

        You don't have to use HTML when writing your posts. WordPress will automatically add it to
        your site, but if you do want control over different elements like boxes, headings, and other
        additional containers or elements, use HTML.

Spell Check and Proof

        There are spell check Plugins available, but even those can't check for everything. Some serious
        writers will write their posts in a text editor with spell check, check all the spelling and proof it
        thoroughly before copying and pasting into WordPress.

Don’t use too much slang

        Not all the readers will be from your part of the world so make sure people can understand easily.

Make use of comments

        Comments let people share their ideas. Sometimes, they might not be good, but you can ask such
        people to shut up. Most of the times, they will and if they don’t you can delete their comments.
        Blogging like real life, can be both fun and not so fun at times. Be prepared. Also, give your
        people a place to contact you in private if they want to write to you.

Use pictures and videos

        They make the pages colorful and viewers get to see a little of your part of the world. They feel
        connected.

Keep writing

        Don’t stop blogging. If you don’t have anything to write about, chances are, you are still holding
        back. Let loose. Perhaps surf more blogs and maybe you’ll get an idea. You can write about your
        friends, complain about your boss, or simply rant about what’s gone wrong. Yet if nothing else
        works, just write a review on the latest movie, book, or product. Easy actually.

Save your posts

        Save your posts before you press the publish button. Anything can happen with your computer or
        with an internet connection. You don’t need to lose your post.




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