The Role of Information Technology in Primary School by oeb47489

VIEWS: 13 PAGES: 12

More Info
									Essex County Council                           SENCO Manual 2007




                        Essex County Council




          Special Educational Needs




       Roles and Responsibilities in
           Mainstream Schools




                       Information for Schools




Ref:       SM1/5.1
Essex County Council                                          SENCO Manual 2007


PRIMARY SCHOOLS

Identification, assessment and provision in the primary phase is set out in
Chapter 5 of the SEN Code of Practice (2001).

1a) The role of the Head teacher in mainstream primary schools

The head teacher has responsibility for the day-to-day management of all
aspects of the school’s work, including provision for children with special
educational needs (SEN). The head teacher should keep the governing body
fully informed and also work closely the school’s SEN co-ordinator (SENCO)
or SEN team.

The SEN Code of Practice, 2001, states it is good practice for head teachers
to ensure that:
 SENCOs have sufficient time and professional support to carry out their
    duties
 special needs is the responsibility of one member of staff. Many schools
    find it effective for the SENCO to be a member of the senior leadership
    team who will have a duty to provide advice to the head teacher on special
    needs issues- nationally, at Local Authority level and internally
 the SENCO’s costs are set against the core or base budget of the school
    rather than against additional funds delegated to the school for the
    purpose of meeting the particular needs of individual children with SEN
 the SENCO is supported by the use of information technology (ICT) for
    SEN management systems and administrative support for preparing and
    recording individual education plans (IEPs), and that the SENCO is able to
    communicate with other SENCOs via the SENCO Clusters
 the management structures within a school enable the SENCO’s functions
    to be carried out effectively

The head teacher should regularly review and monitor the management of
Special Educational Needs policy and procedures within the school, including
the work of the SENCO.

2a) The role of the Governing Body

The governing body, in co-operation with the head teacher, should:
 determine the school’s general policy and approach to provision for
   children with SEN
 establish the appropriate staffing and funding arrangements
 maintain a general oversight of the school’s work

The governing body need no longer report to parents annually on the school’s
policy for SEN but will include a statement within the prospectus and the
School’s Profile report.

The governing body should appoint a committee or designated governor to
take particular interest in, and closely monitor, the school’s work on behalf of
the children with SEN.

Ref:            SM1/5.1                 1
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                           SENCO Manual 2007


The SEN governor should:
 be familiar with school procedures
 meet regularly with the SENCO to discuss the ways in which such
   procedures are managed and their impact upon the school and individual
   pupils
 endeavour to take the opportunity to receive any training in the area of
   SEN that may be offered
 familiarise themselves with relevant national and local procedures relating
   to SEN

3a) The role of the SENCO in mainstream primary schools

The SENCO, in collaboration with the head teacher and governing body,
helps to determine the strategic development of the SEN policy and provision
in the school.

The SENCO takes day-to-day responsibility for the operation of the SEN
policy and co-ordination of the provision made for individual pupils with SEN,
working closely with staff, parents and carers, and other agencies.

 The SENCO also provides related professional guidance to colleagues with
the aim of securing high quality teaching for pupils with SEN.

The SENCO, with the support of the head teacher and colleagues, seeks to
develop effective ways to overcome barriers to learning and sustaining
effective teaching through:
 the analysis and assessment of pupils’ needs
 monitoring the quality of teaching and standards of pupils’ achievements
 setting targets for improvement

The SENCO should collaborate with curriculum co-ordinators so that the
learning for all pupils is given equal priority, and that available resources are
used to maximum effect.

Responsibilities of the SENCO in mainstream primary schools

In mainstream primary schools the key responsibilities of the SENCO may
include:
 overseeing the day-to-day operation of the school’s SEN policy
 co-ordinating provision for children with special educational needs
 liaising with and advising fellow teachers
 managing learning support assistants
 overseeing the records of all children with special educational needs
 liaising with parents of children with special educational needs
 contributing to the in-service training of staff
 liaising with external agencies including the Local Authority’s support and
    educational psychology services, health and social services and voluntary
    bodies



Ref:            SM1/5.1                  2
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                          SENCO Manual 2007


It is also the SENCO’s responsibility to have an understanding of the
importance of confidentiality and the requirements of the Data Protection Act
(1998).

SENCOs will require time for:
 planning and co-ordination away from the classroom
 maintaining appropriate individual and whole school records of children at
  Essex School Action and Essex School Action Plus and those with
  statements
 teaching pupils with SEN
 observing pupils in class without a teaching commitment
 managing, supporting and training learning support assistants
 liaising with colleagues
 liaising with early education settings and secondary schools

Access to a telephone and an interview room is also desirable. Allocating
administrative staff time to help the SENCO will release the SENCO to use
their expertise more effectively.

 N.B.
 See the National Standards for Special Educational Needs Co-
 ordinators for further clarification of responsibilities and for a framework
 for the development of targeted professional training and performance
 review in relation to SEN.


4a) The role of the Class Teacher in mainstream primary schools

“The key to meeting the needs of all pupils lies in the teacher’s knowledge of
each pupil’s skills and abilities and the teacher’s ability to match this
knowledge to identifying and providing ways of accessing the curriculum for
every pupil.” (SEN Code of Practice, 2001, 6:41)

Pupils with special educational needs are the responsibility of all teachers.

The day-to-day planning and management of the curriculum for all pupils rests
with the class teacher, with the SENCO monitoring the assessment and
management of special needs procedures.

All teachers must therefore:
 take heed of the individual needs of pupils
 familiarise themselves with the targets and strategies outlined in IEPs
 demonstrate in their planning that they are providing opportunities for
    individual learning targets and deploying differentiated strategies, where
    appropriate

Teachers should work closely, in partnership, with the SENCO who may ask
them to provide information about provision made in lessons for individual
pupils and related progress. Teachers may also be required to provide


Ref:            SM1/5.1                 3
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                           SENCO Manual 2007


information and reports for Annual Review procedures, formal assessments,
case conferences and also internal assessments.

In summary the role of the class teacher is to:
 plan differentiated work
 ensure that individual learning targets are incorporated into planning
 plan and oversee the work of any learning support assistant or other
    individual working with a child with SEN
 monitor the progress of pupils with SEN
 provide information to the SENCO about the progress, achievements and
    attainments of the pupils with SEN
 discuss with the SENCO any concerns that they have about pupils with
    SEN or those that they suspect are experiencing barriers to learning
 provide, as necessary, information and reports to other agencies involved
    in supporting an individual pupil
 provide reports for annual reviews and other statutory procedures

5a) The role of the Support Assistant in mainstream primary schools

Learning support assistants (LSAs), or teaching assistants (TAs), play a vital
part in the success of pupils with special educational needs.

Schools will have their own requirements of LSA/TAs according to their
differing situations. However, the value of LSA/TAs in schools is dependent on
them being effectively deployed by teachers and managers inside schools.

The Good Practice Guide (DfES, 0148/2000) defines the role of the learning
support assistant as increasing teachers’ potential to meet the needs of all
their pupils. LSA/TAs provide support to the teacher, as much as to the pupil.
Teachers and managers should provide clear guidance as to how LSA/TAs
should work in their classrooms.

       schools must have clear policies outlining the roles and responsibilities
        of LSA/TAs

       there must be a clear job description for LSA/TAs, drawn up in
        consultation with them and reflecting a balance of responsibilities
        between support to teachers, curriculum, pupils and the school

       LSA/TAs should be involved in the planning of lessons and consulted
        for monitoring purposes, especially when reviewing targets for IEPs.
        However, writing IEPs is the responsibility of the teaching staff within a
        school and not the LSA/TA

       LSA/TAs should be given time within their contracts for preparation,
        meetings, other administrative tasks and training




Ref:             SM1/5.1                 4
First issue:     April 2002
Essex County Council                                         SENCO Manual 2007


       the School Development Plan should take account of the needs of
        LSA/TAs and target the needs of teachers and managers in
        understanding their role in managing support staff

       LSA/TAs should be supported in relation to their induction, mentoring
        and professional development needs

Teachers must oversee and direct the work of LSA/TAs when they are
working in their classroom. It is the teacher whose curriculum and lesson
planning and day-to-day direction sets the framework within which assistants
and other adults work. LSA/TAs need to be informed by the class teacher
about the expectations of the school and class teachers in terms of pupil
progress. If allocated to specific pupils, the class teacher should provide
relevant information on the needs and attainments of those pupils.




Ref:            SM1/5.1                5
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                          SENCO Manual 2007


SECONDARY SCHOOLS

Identification, assessment and provision in the secondary phase is set out in
Chapter 6 of the SEN Code of Practice (2001).

1b) The role of the Head teacher in mainstream secondary schools

The head teacher has responsibility for the day-to-day management of all
aspects of the school’s work, including provision for children with special
educational needs (SEN). The head teacher should keep the governing body
fully informed and also work closely with the school’s SENCO or SEN team.

The SEN Code of Practice states that it is good practice for head teachers to
ensure:
    SENCOs have sufficient time and professional support to carry out their
      duties
    special needs is the responsibility of one member of the senior
      management team (ideally the SENCO) who will have a duty to
      provide advice to the head teacher on special needs issues –
      nationally, at Local Authority level and internally
    the SENCO’s costs are set against the core or base budget of the
      school rather than against additional funds delegated to the school for
      the purpose of meeting the particular needs of individual children with
      SEN
    the SENCO is supported by the use of information technology (ICT) for
      SEN management systems and administrative support for preparing
      and recording IEPs, and that the SENCO is able to communicate with
      other SENCOs via the SENCO Clusters
    the management structures within a school enable the SENCO’s
      functions to be carried out effectively

The head teacher should regularly review and monitor the management of
Special Educational Needs policy and procedures within the school, including
the work of the SENCO.

2b) The role of the Governing Body

The governing body, in co-operation with the head teacher, should:
 determine the school’s general policy and approach to provision for
   children with SEN
 establish the appropriate staffing and funding arrangements
 maintain a general oversight of the school’s work

The governing body need no longer report to parents annually on the school’s
policy for SEN but will include a statement within the prospectus and the
School’s Profile report.

The governing body should appoint a committee or designated governor to
take particular interest in and closely monitor the school’s work on behalf of
the children with SEN.

Ref:            SM1/5.1                 6
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                            SENCO Manual 2007




The SEN governor should:
 be familiar with school procedures
 meet regularly with the SENCO to discuss the ways in which such
   procedures are managed and their impact upon the school and individual
   pupils
 endeavour to take the opportunity to receive any training in the area of
   SEN that may be offered
 familiarise themselves with relevant national and local procedures relating
   to SEN

3b) The role of the SENCO in mainstream secondary schools

The SENCO, in collaboration with the head teacher and governing body,
helps to determine the strategic development of the SEN policy and provision
in the school.

The SENCO takes day-to-day responsibility for the operation of the SEN
policy and co-ordination of the provision made for individual pupils with SEN,
working closely with staff, parents, the Connexions Personal Advisor and
other agencies.

The SENCO also provides related professional guidance to colleagues with
the aim of securing high quality teaching for pupils with SEN.

The SENCO, with the support of the head teacher and colleagues, seeks to
develop effective ways of overcoming barriers to learning and sustaining
effective teaching through:
 the analysis and assessment of pupils’ needs
 monitoring the quality of teaching and standards of pupils’ achievements
 setting targets for improvement

In order to ensure that learning for all pupils is given equal priority and that
available resources are used to maximum effect, the SENCO should
collaborate with:
 heads of department or faculties
 the literacy and numeracy co-ordinators
 pastoral colleagues

Responsibilities of the SENCO in mainstream secondary schools

In mainstream secondary schools the key responsibilities of the SENCO may
include:
 overseeing the day to day operation of the school’s SEN policy
 liaising with and advising fellow teachers
 managing the SEN team of teachers and learning support assistants
 co-ordinating provision for pupils with special educational needs
 overseeing the records of all pupils with special educational needs
 liaising with parents of pupils with special educational needs

Ref:            SM1/5.1                  7
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                          SENCO Manual 2007


   contributing to the in-service training of staff
   liaising with external agencies including the Local Authority’s support and
    educational psychology services, health and social services and voluntary
    bodies

It is also the SENCO’s responsibility to have an understanding of the
importance of confidentiality and the requirements of the Data Protection Act
(1998).

SENCOs will require time for:
 planning and co-ordination away from the classroom
 teaching pupils with SEN
 observing pupils in class without a teaching commitment
 managing effective deployment of other teachers within the SEN team
 managing, supporting and training learning support assistants
 liaising with departmental and pastoral colleagues
 liaising with feeder primary schools
 working with the Connexions personal advisor in relation to transition
  planning
 keeping abreast with developments in the area of special educational
  needs

N.B.
See the National Standards for Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators
for further clarification of responsibilities and for a framework for the
development of targeted professional training and performance review in
relation to SEN.


4b)The role of the Class Teacher in mainstream secondary schools

“The key to meeting the needs of all pupils lies in the teacher’s knowledge of
each pupils skills and abilities and the teachers ability to match this knowledge
to identifying and providing appropriate ways of accessing the curriculum for
every pupil.” (SEN Code of Practice, 2001, 6:41)

Pupils with special educational needs are the responsibility for all teachers.

The day-to-day planning and management of the curriculum of all pupils rests
with the class and subject teachers, with the SENCO monitoring the
assessment and management of special needs procedures.

All teachers must therefore:
 take heed of the individual needs of pupils
 familiarise themselves with the targets and strategies outlined in IEPs
 demonstrate in their planning that they are providing opportunities for
    individual learning targets and deploying differentiated strategies, where
    appropriate


Ref:            SM1/5.1                 8
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                           SENCO Manual 2007


Teachers should work closely, in partnership, with the SENCO. The SENCO
may ask teachers to provide information about provision made in lessons for
individual pupils and related progress. They may also be required to provide
information and reports for annual review procedures, formal assessments,
case conferences as well as internal assessments.

In summary, the role of the class teacher is to:
 plan differentiated work
 ensure that individual learning targets are incorporated into planning
 plan and oversee the work of any learning support assistant or other
    individual working with a child with SEN
 monitor the progress of pupils with SEN
 provide information to the SENCO about the progress, achievements and
    attainments of the pupils with SEN
 discuss with the SENCO any concerns that they have about pupils with
    SEN or those that they suspect are experiencing barriers to learning
 provide, as necessary, information and reports to other agencies involved
    in supporting an individual pupil
 provide reports for annual reviews and other statutory procedures

5b) The role of the Support Assistant in mainstream secondary schools

Learning support assistants (LSAs), or teaching assistants (TAs), play a vital
part in the success of pupils with special educational needs.

Schools will have their own requirements of LSA/TAs according to their
differing situations. However, the value of LSA/TAs in schools is dependent on
them being effectively deployed by teachers and managers inside schools.

The Good Practice Guide (DfES 0148/2000) defines the role of the learning
support assistant as increasing teachers’ potential to meet the needs of all
their pupils. LSA/TAs provide support to the teacher, as much as to the pupil.
Teachers and managers should provide clear guidance as to how LSA/TAs
should work in their classrooms.

       schools must have clear policies outlining the roles and responsibilities
        of LSA/TAs

       there must be a clear job description for LSA/TAs, drawn up in
        consultation with them and reflecting a balance of responsibilities
        between support to teachers, curriculum, pupils and the school

       LSA/TAs should be given time within their contracts for preparation,
        meetings, other administrative tasks and training

       LSAs should be involved in the planning of lessons and consulted for
        monitoring purposes, especially when reviewing targets for IEPs.
        However, writing IEPs is the responsibility of the teaching staff within a
        school and not the LSA/TA


Ref:             SM1/5.1                 9
First issue:     April 2002
Essex County Council                                        SENCO Manual 2007




       the School Development Plan should take account of the needs of
        LSA/TAs and target the needs of teachers and managers in
        understanding their role in managing support staff

       LSA/TAs should be supported in relation to their induction, mentoring
        and professional development needs

Teachers must oversee and direct the work of LSA/TAs when they are
working in their classroom. It is the teacher whose curriculum and lesson
planning and day-to-day direction sets the framework within which assistants
and other adults work. LSA/TAs need to be informed by the class teacher
about the expectations of the school and class teachers in terms of pupil
progress. If allocated to specific pupils, the class teacher should provide
relevant information on the needs and attainments of those pupils.




Ref:            SM1/5.1                10
First issue:    April 2002
Essex County Council                                           SENCO Manual 2007


Job description for SENCO post – EXEMPLAR

School title: Essexshire Community School

Job title: Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator

Responsible to: Headteacher

Responsible for: SEN support team comprising:
                        learning support teachers
                        teaching assistants

Job purpose:
                   To take day-to-day responsibility for the operation of the SEN
                    policy and co-ordination of the provision made for individual
                    pupils with SEN, working closely with staff, parents, carers
                    and other agencies.
                   To determine the strategic development of the SEN policy
                    and provision in the school, in collaboration with the head
                    teacher and governing body.

Main responsibilities:
 To oversee the day-to-day operation of the school’s SEN policy
 To co-ordinate the provision for children with special educational needs
 To liaise with and advise fellow teachers
 To manage learning support teachers and assistants
 To oversee the records of all children with special educational needs
 To liaise with parents of children with special educational needs
 To contribute to the in-service training of staff
 To liaise with external agencies including the Local Authority’s support and
  educational psychology services, health and social services and voluntary
  bodies
 To understand the requirements of the Data Protection Act (1998) and the
  importance of confidentiality

Specific duties:
 To attend Senior Management Team meetings
 To allocate the learning resource budget and capitation
 To appoint learning support staff
 To organise review meetings and assessment processes related to the
  revised SEN Code of Practice
 To write the school SEN policy and related reports and documents
 To liaise with curriculum and other whole school co-ordinators
 To deliver in-service training to school staff as appropriate
 To complete the SEN Provision Review and attend cluster meetings
 To keep abreast of SEN developments through continuous professional
  development and attendance at SENCO conferences



Ref:               SM1/5.1               11
First issue:       April 2002

								
To top