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Webelos Advancement Spreadsheet Pack 353 Leader Handbook

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Webelos Advancement Spreadsheet Pack 353 Leader Handbook Powered By Docstoc
					    Pack 353
Leader Handbook




 Every boy deserves a trained Leader !!

             September 20, 2005
            Marty Verdi – Committee Chair
             Charles Hebert – Cubmaster
          John Westmoreland – Pack Trainer
                                                                            Table of Contents
THE CUB SCOUT DEN LEADER ROLE ............................................................................................................................................. 3
   QUALIFICATIONS ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 3
   RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................................................................................................................................... 3
CUB SCOUTS INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................ 5
   WHAT IS CUB SCOUTS? .......................................................................................................................................................................... 5
   THE PURPOSES OF CUB SCOUTING .......................................................................................................................................................... 5
   MEMBERSHIP .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
MEETINGS .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 6
   PACK MEETINGS ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
   DEN MEETINGS ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
   PACK COMMITTEE & LEADER MEETING ................................................................................................................................................. 7
   DEN MEETINGS IDEAS ............................................................................................................................................................................ 7
SCOUT SPIRIT – IT’S A TEAM THING! .......................................................................................................................................... 9

ADVANCEMENT................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
   ADVANCEMENT OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................................................................. 10
   SPECIFIC ADVANCEMENT REQUIRMENTS .............................................................................................................................................. 11
   REPORTING ADVANCEMENT ................................................................................................................................................................. 11
   ADVANCEMENT POLICIES ..................................................................................................................................................................... 12
UNIFORM GUIDE ............................................................................................................................................................................... 13
   WHEN AND HOW TO WEAR THE UNIFORM - THE BASICS .................................................................................................................... 13
   TIGER CUBS .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
   CUB SCOUTS ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
   WEBELOS SCOUTS ................................................................................................................................................................................ 15
   INSIGNIA GUIDE .................................................................................................................................................................................... 16
   DEN UNIFORM INSPECTION ................................................................................................................................................................... 19
ACTIVITIES .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 20
   AGE-APPROPRIATE GUIDELINES FOR SCOUTING ACTIVITIES ................................................................................................................. 20
   GUIDE TO SAFE SCOUTING .................................................................................................................................................................... 22
   CAMPING & OVERNIGHT TRIPS ............................................................................................................................................................. 22
   WATER ACTIVITIES ............................................................................................................................................................................... 23
COUNCIL & DISTRICT LEADER TRAINING ............................................................................................................................... 24
   YOUTH PROTECTION TRAINING – ONLINE............................................................................................................................................. 24
   FAST START TRAINING – ONLINE .......................................................................................................................................................... 24
   BASIC INDOOR LEADER TRAINING ........................................................................................................................................................ 24
   BASIC OUTDOOR LEADER TRAINING..................................................................................................................................................... 24
   OTHER TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES ........................................................................................................................................................ 25
SCOUTS WITH DISABILITIES ....................................................................................................................................................... 26
   ADVANCEMENT AND RECOGNITION ...................................................................................................................................................... 27
   CUB SCOUT ACTIVITIES ........................................................................................................................................................................ 27
WEB RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................................................................... 28

APPENDIX – FILES ON CD .............................................................................................................................................................. 29




                                                                                                                                                                                                         2
                              The Cub Scout Den Leader Role
Qualifications
If residing in this country but not a citizen of the United States, agrees to abide by the Scout Oath and Law, to respect and
obey the laws of the United States of America, and to subscribe to the BSA statement of religious principle. Is at least 21
years of age and of good moral character. Should be interested in and enjoy working with boys and be able to work with
adults. May be a parent or guardian of a boy in the den. Recommended by the Cubmaster after consultation with parents
and guardians of the Cub Scouts involved, and approved by the pack committee and chartered organization. Registered as
an adult leader of the BSA.



Responsibilities
The Cub Scout den leader's responsibilities are to

       Give leadership in carrying out the pack program in the den.

       Complete Cub Scout den leader Fast Start Training and position-specific Basic Leader Training. Attend monthly
        roundtables.

       Lead the den in its participation at pack meetings. Serve as den host or hostess for den family members at pack
        meetings.

       Work in harmony with other den and pack leaders.

       Help the Cubmaster (or assistant Cubmaster) and pack committee recruit new boys throughout the year.

       Help train the den chief and guide him in working with Cub Scouts. See that he receives recognition for his efforts
        at den and pack meetings.

       Attend the monthly den chief planning meeting for den leaders, assistant den leaders, and den chiefs.

       With the assistant den leader, meet with the den chief and let him help plan den meetings and den activities; allow
        him to serve as den activities assistant.

       Provide meaningful jobs for the denner and assistant denner so that they can learn responsibility and gain
        satisfaction from their efforts.

       Use Boys' Life and Scouting magazines, Cub Scout Program Helps, the boys' handbooks, and other Cub Scouting
        literature as sources for program ideas.

       Collect weekly den dues and turn them in to the pack treasurer at the monthly pack leaders' meetings. Keep
        accurate records of den dues and attendance.

       Maintain a friendly relationship with Cub Scouts; encourage them to earn advancement awards. Keep accurate
        advancement records and see that boys receive recognition for their achievements.

       Stimulate the Cub Scouts' imaginations on the program theme for the month and help the den prepare its stunts
        and exhibits for the pack meeting.

       Promote the religious emblems program.

       Help the den and pack earn the National Summertime Pack Award.

       Help establish a close working relationship with the assistant den leader and den chief, functioning as a den
        leadership team.



                                                                                                                              3
   Develop and maintain a good working relationship and open communication with den families. Use their talents to
    help enrich the den program. Hold den adults' meetings as often as needed to get acquainted with family members
    and strengthen den operation.

   Involve den fathers, uncles, and grandfathers in outings and other den activities so that boys will have additional
    male role models.

   See that a leader is available for all den meetings and activities. Call on the assistant den leader to fill in when
    necessary.

   Take part in the annual pack program planning conference and pack leaders' meetings.

   Help set a good example for the boys through behavior, attitude, and proper uniforming.

   Support the policies of the BSA.




                            The main responsibilities of the Cub Scout den
                            leader can be summarized as follows:
                                    Work directly with other den and pack
                                     leaders to ensure that their den is an active
                                     and successful part of the pack.
                                    Plan, prepare for, and conduct den
                                     meetings with the assistant den leader and
                                     den chief.
                                    Attend the pack leaders' meetings.
                                    Lead the den at the monthly pack activity.




                                                                                                                           4
                                    Cub Scouts Introduction

What Is Cub Scouts?
In 1930 the Boy Scouts of America launched a home- and neighborhood-centered program for boys 9 to 11 years of age.
A key element of the program is an emphasis on caring, nurturing relationships between boys and their parents, adult
leaders, and friends. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA's three membership divisions. (The others are Boy
Scouting and Venturing.)


The Purposes of Cub Scouting
Cub Scouting has nine purposes, to:

       Positively influence character development and encourage spiritual growth

       Help boys develop habits and attitudes of good citizenship

       Encourage good sportsmanship and pride in growing strong in mind and body

       Improve understanding within the family

       Strengthen boys' ability to get along with other boys and respect other people

       Foster a sense of personal achievement by helping boys develop new interests and skills

       Show how to be helpful and do one's best

       Provide fun and exciting new things to do

       Prepare boys to become Boy Scouts


Membership
Cub Scouting has program components for boys in the first through fifth grades (or ages 7, 8, 9, or 10). Members join a
Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to twelve boys. Most dens meet twice per
month for regular meetings.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack
committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization and all
Leaders in the pack.




                                                                                                                          5
                                                    Meetings
Pack Meetings
        Generally, pack meetings are held to recognize and reward dens and individuals for their good Cub Scouting
endeavors. They are sort of pep rallies to generate enthusiasm for the rest of the program. If you think about it carefully,
not much real Cub Scouting takes place at a pack meeting but instead it is the introduction to all the rest of the program:
the den meetings, the home and family activities, the service projects, outdoor action, and even to the Boy Scout program.
You might think of pack meetings as the gateway to Scouting. Without pack meetings, those other things might not
happen at all.

  The pack meeting must provide an arena for your dens to show their stuff. Strong dens perform regularly at pack
meetings in ceremonies, skits and other activities that can be seen and appreciated by parents. When den leaders and
Cub Scouts look forward to their parts in an upcoming pack extravaganza the den meetings take on a focus and
excitement that just makes Cub Scouting fun. When dens have no part in pack meetings, they tend to fill their den
programs with rank advancement - this, in turn replaces the family and parent participation. This can weaken the whole
program and structure of the pack.
Pack meetings are held the last Monday of the month at Burnt Hickory Baptist Church and begin at 7:00pm. (Please see
the calendar) The meeting time and place will not change without prior notification. Changes may be due to holiday,
school vacation, or other Pack, District or Council commitments.

One parent must attend the Pack Meeting with the Scout unless other arrangements have been made in advance with the
Den Leader. Other family members, siblings and guests are always welcome and encouraged to attend. The control of
the siblings is the responsibility of the parents and not the Den Leaders. Pack meeting rules must be followed by all in
attendance; parents, siblings and guests included


Den Meetings
Den meetings are the heart of Cub Scouting. This is where all the work toward advancement happens. This is where
individual relationships are formed and teams are built and strengthened. This is where you get to know your boys and
they get to know you. Make sure all the boys know each person in their den. Use name tags until every boy can name
each member. Den meetings should be planned and structured. In the next section there are many ideas on fun things to
do at your den meetings. There is also a den meeting planning document on the resource CD attached to this document.
Most important thing about a den meeting is that everybody should have FUN!!!
Den Leader (s) conducts meetings with additional help from parent volunteers and occasionally a Boy Scout from a local
Troop may assist as a Den Chief. Rooms are available at Burnt Hickory Baptist Church (submit your request to the
Committee Chair).

For Tiger Cubs, the adult partner must accompany the Tiger Cub to each meeting. The adult partners help with planning
and running of a Den meeting under the direction of the Tiger Den Leader. Monthly field trips to locations associated with
the monthly Cub Scout theme are encouraged. Active participation in the monthly Pack meetings is also expected.

Field trips may be held as planned by the Den Leader or Scout parents. A Local Tour Permit (LTP) may be required
(contact the Committee Chair to check). Failure to complete tour permits may void the blanket insurance honored by the
BSA. Two adults must be present at every Den Meeting and function. No exception - this is the BSA two-deep leadership
policy.

Once a time and location are agreed upon be consistent. Create a schedule for the year and pass it on to parents - this will
ensure better participation.




                                                                                                                             6
Pack Committee & Leader Meeting
        The Pack Committee plans and runs the Cub Scout program under BSA guidelines. Committee members and
Pack Leaders meet the third Tuesday evening of every month at Burnt Hickory Baptist Church. Pack policies, future
events and activities, coming Pack meetings, Pack administration, and a review of previous events are discussed at these
meetings. The Den Leader or Assistant for each den is required to attend these meetings. All parents are welcome and
are encouraged to attend these meetings.


Den Meetings Ideas

        100+ Den Meeting Ideas

      Boys put on sample Den Meeting for parents       Bird-watching Hike
      Indoor track meet                                Mix, bake, frost & eat cupcakes
      Practice physical fitness by playing games       Sidewalk race pinewood derby cars
      Visit newspaper                                  Meet with another den
      Visit telephone company                          HS Athlete speaker
      Visit TV station                                 Go fishing at nearby pond
      Visit a nearby state park                        Bait-casting practic in backyard
      Visit a factory                                  Campfire - roast hotdogs & marshmallows
      Visit elderly folks & share a craft              Boy Scout speaks about Jamboree
      Visit fire station                               Boy Scout speaks about Camporees
      Visit a local historical attraction              Play charades
      Visit the zoo                                    Mother & Son swim party
      Visit a library                                  Start/make a den scrapbook
      Visit a weather station                          Plant a vegetable/flower garden
      Visit an aquarium                                Photographer visits & shows developing process
      Visit a farm                                     Make puppets for a hand show
      Visit a water treatment plant                    Rent a video & operate a mini-theater for family
      Visit an electricity plant                       Go rock collecting
      Visit an airport                                 Make Mother's Day gifts
      Visit police station                             Plan a skit for den to do in classroom during SUFS week
      Sack lunch picnic                                Make neckerchief slides
      Kickball game, using ball of rags or feathers    Make costumes for a skit or Halloween
      Den bowling tournament                           Liar's Contest
      Disabled guest speaks to den                     Buid a paper-mache town, fort, Indian camp
      Dads take den to a sporting event                Find hazards in a nearby two-block area
      Science teacher shows fun projects               Cubmaster speaks to den about making the most of
      Ice/roller skating party                         Scouting
      Parent guest speaker - special hobby             Make Christmas card collage
      Parent guest speaker - about profession          Sports contests (ping-pong, badminton, free-throw shooting,
      Backyard sunrise breakfast                       golf, etc.)
      Work on achievements everyone needs              Fashion animals out of clay
      Night meeting to star gaze                       Build a den window display
      Dinosaur Day - each boy brings his favorite      Build simple bird-houses
      Model Day - each boy brings his best             Make sailboats & race on a small pond
      Geography Day - make maps and walk to local      Make hats
      points of interest                               Jump rope contest
      Joke Day - each boy tells a few jokes            Catch & identify butterflies
      Microscope Day - each boy brings something to    Scrambled Cub Scout words games
      look at                                          Go to baseball game
      Pet Day - each boy brings a pet                  Play ball against another den
      Telephone Day - Boys stay home & call each       Grow crystals
      other passing on relay messages on a pre-        Service project for church or school


                                                                                                                       7
arranged plan                                   Learn a game new to everyone
Game-Making Day - den makes games for           Learn about Scouts in other countries
Game Chest                                      Make a family tree & family flag
Bring a Friend Day - a new recruit?             Learn about different religions
Magic Day - each boy does a magic trick         Sing songs
Collection Day - each boy brings a collection   Compose new song using a favorite tune
Treasure Hunt                                   Learn to tie simple knots
Scavenger Hunt for Cub Scout things             Go to a movie together
Marble shooting contest                         Take a themed hike
Den uniform inspection                          Attend Summer Day camp
Bike safety inspection                          Put on simple carnival for siblings
Bike rodeo                                      Den writes & performs its own skit
Build models using Legos                        Session on First Aid




                                                                                         8
                              Scout Spirit – It’s a Team thing!
What do you think of when you say ―Scout Spirit‖? Scout spirit isn’t an individual thing. It’s a team thing. It’s what you and
your boys develop when you build a strong team. This starts at the den level. This scout spirit comes from that special
bond that develops when you build and execute activities that build up your team. And as in all scouting programs those
activities follow the Cub Scout motto: ―Do your best‖.

Not everybody can be a sports star, hit home runs, score goals or even make straight A’s in school but every boy can be a
star and get excited about cub scouts.

How to promote scout spirit in your den.

        Den Flags – Create a den flag. Always bring it to every event. Have your boys always sit or gather around it.
        (Make a stand too)

        Cheers – Have your boys learn a few cheers. Make sure they have fun doing it and have them memorized.

        Songs – Teach your boys a few songs. Use the Pack songbook or find some of your own. Cubs love to sing silly
        songs.

        Skits – Get a skit that all your boys can participate in and be ready to do it at a pack meeting or campout.




                                                                                                                                 9
                                               Advancement
Advancement Overview
The easiest way to plan advancement activities is to sit down with your assistant den leaders and plan out your year. Sit
down before the meeting and review the book or advancement spreadsheet and understand the requirements that need to
be accomplished. If you don’t understand please ask. There are a number of den leaders from previous years who have
been through these programs before. Decide what requirements for rank and belt loops you want to work on during
meetings and what the boys need to work on at home with their families. Be clear with parents what they should be helping
their sons with. Parents and leaders can sign-off on any requiremnts in the books so keep the boys books up-to-date with
your records. Encourage the boys to bring their books to all den meetings. The bottom line is Understand, Plan and
Communicate…………
Tiger Cubs

                 Tiger Cubs is a simple and fun program for first-grade boys and their families. Tiger Cubs introduces
                 boys and their adult partners to the excitement of Cub Scouting as they "Search, Discover, and Share"
                 together.
                 Tiger Cubs is conducted on two levels. First, the Tiger Cub and his adult partner meet in the home to
                 conduct activities for the whole family. Second, the Tiger Cub and his adult partner meet twice a month
                 with other Tiger Cubs and adult partners in the den, using the planned "big idea" (or theme) for their
                 activity during one of the meetings. Each den meeting is hosted by a Tiger Cub-adult partner team.
                 Tiger Cubs follows a school-year cycle. Boys remain in Tiger Cubs until they complete first grade. At that
                 time, they graduate into a Wolf den and are eligible to participate in Cub Scout summer activities,
                 including Cub Scout Day Camp.

Bobcat Rank

                 All Cub Scouts above the Tiger Cubs rank must first earn the Bobcat badge before they can work on
                 their requirements for the rank for their age, whether they are joining Cub Scouts as a Wolf, Bear or
                 Webelos Scout. Tiger Cubs earn the Tiger Cub rank, then the Bobcat rank.




Wolf Rank

                 The Wolf rank is a part of the program aimed at second graders, or those seven years of age.
                 To earn the Wolf badge a Cub Scout must complete 49 out of a possible 62 tasks that are offered in the
                 Wolf Cub Scout Book - if the Cub Scout has not previously earned the Bobcat badge, it must be earned
                 first. Wolf activities are primarily done at home, and then signed off by the parent after the boy has
                 completed each task. The boy's Wolf Cub Scout Book is then shown to the Den Leader, who records his
                 progress and also signs the boy's book.

                 Once a Cub Scout has earned his Wolf badge, he may work towards earning Arrow Points. While he
                 may work on these at any time, he cannot receive them until after he has earned the Wolf badge.

Bear Rank




                                                                                                                         10
                 The Bear rank is a part of the program aimed at third graders, or those eight years of age.
                 To earn the Bear badge a Cub Scout must complete 12 out of a possible 24 tasks that are offered in the
                 Bear Cub Scout Book - if the Cub Scout has not previously earned the Bobcat badge, it must be earned
                 first. Bear activities are primarily done at home, and then signed off by the parent after the boy has
                 completed each task, and are grouped in four major areas: God, Country, Family and Self. The boy's
                 Bear Cub Scout Book is then shown to the Den Leader, who records his progress and also signs the
                 boy's book.

                 Once a Cub Scout has earned his Bear badge, he may work towards earning Arrow Points. While he
                 may work on these at any time, he cannot receive them until after he has earned the Bear badge.

Webelos

                 The Webelos rank is a part of the program aimed at fourth and fifth graders, or those nine or ten years of
                 age, and is aimed at preparing the Cub Scout for the adventure of being a Boy Scout.
                 To earn the Webelos badge, a Cub Scout must earn specific activity badges, as well as participate in
                 several activities with his den. He must also understand and adhere to some of the requirements of the
                 Boy Scout, all of which are outlined in the Webelos Scout Book - if the Cub Scout has not previously
                 earned the Bobcat badge, it must be earned first. Webelos activities, unlike those of the lower ranks, are
                 primarily done in the den and signed off by his Webelos Den Leader, who also records his progress.

                 Once he has earned his Webelos badge and met certain requirements, the Webelos Scout earns his
                 Compass Points Emblem, and then proceeds to his Compass Points.

                 The final, and highest, award the Webelos Scout can achieve is the Arrow of Light Award. This award
                 tells everyone the Webelos Scout is ready to be a Boy Scout. Only Webelos are eligible to earn this
                 award, which is one of the few awards that may be displayed throughout a Scout's life, both as a boy and
                 an adult.


Specific Advancement Requirments


             Cub Advancement Requirements – (http://www.usscouts.org/advance/cubscout/ranks.html)


             Cub Belt Loop and Pin Requirements – (http://www.usscouts.org/advance/cubscout/a-s.html)




Reporting Advancement
All advancement must be reported monthly via email to the advancement chair one week prior to a pack meeting or at the
leaders meeting. This gives the advancement chair the chance to sort all advancement and purchase awards for the
monthly pack meetings.

Use the following file located on the Leader resource CD to report advancement:

Monthly Advancement.xls




                                                                                                                         11
Advancement Policies
1. All advancement belt loops and pins requirements can only be completed while a registered member of Pack 353.
2. Awards for boys not present at the monthly pack meetings will be given to the den leaders to be awarded at the next
den meeting. Only rank advancement will be carried over to the next pack meeting.

3. Den Leaders (or assistants) must be present at each pack meeting to organize and supervise your den during
advancement presentations.

4. Any mistakes in awards should be held until after the pack meeting and coordinated between the den leader and
advancement chair.

5. A boy is eligible to repeat requirements for belt loops every year but will only be awarded a particular belt loop once
while in Pack 353. Instead of earning multiple belt loops each boy is encouraged to earn other belt loops and associated
pins.

Our 2007-2008 Pack Advancement Chair is:
Rick Valero
thecrunchguy@aol.com
770.528.5712




                                                                                                                             12
                                                Uniform Guide
When And How To Wear The Uniform - The Basics
The official uniforms are intended primarily for use in connection with scouting activities. They should be worn to all unit
events, and may be worn to school, church, or any family function. The uniform may also be worn while participating in a
money-earning project if approved by the local council. It may be worn when selling tickets to such events as scouting
shows that are approved by the council.
The uniform may not be worn by either Scouts or adult leaders when:

       Involved in any distinctly political endeavor

       Appearing on the stage professionally without special approval from the National Executive Board

       Taking part in parades, except when rendering service as a Scout or leader or when officially representing the Boy
        Scouts of America

       Participating in demonstrations not authorized by the Boy Scouts of America
All uniforms, badges, and insignia of the Boy Scouts of America may be used only by members of the Boy Scouts of
America who are registered and in good standing. No alteration of or addition to the official uniform, badges, or insignia, or
the rules and regulations covering the wearing of the uniform, may be authorized by anyone except the National Executive
Board. Badges awarded by organizations other than the Boy Scouts of America may not be worn on the official uniform.
(Exceptions: Historic Trails Award and religious emblems) (See Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America and
the Insignia Guide for additional information on uniform rules and regulations.)

Tiger Cubs
The Tiger Cub wears the traditional blue Cub Scout uniform with the Tiger Cub cap and belt; they may also wear
the optional orange Tiger Cub T-shirt with the Tiger Cub emblem on the front as an activity shirt. Tiger Cub adult
partners may optionally wear the adult Tiger Cub T-shirt or sweatshirt. Tiger Cub Den Leaders wear the official Cub
Scout leader uniform with the Tiger Cub cap and leader neckerchief.
Tiger Cubs may also wear the immediate recognition kit on their pocket.




Cub Scouts
Tiger, Wolf, Bear and Webelos Scouts wear the familiar blue uniform. They may optionally wear the appropriate cap for
their rank and/or belt. Cub Scout Leaders wear the official Cub Scout leader uniform with the leader neckerchief or bolo.
The Cub Scout wears his den number below the flag emblem on the right sleeve. Webelos Scouts may wear a patrol
emblem in place of the den number if the den and pack have elected to use Webelos patrols.




                                                                                                                               13
Tiger neckerchief, slide and cap




Wolf neckerchief, slide and cap




Bear neckerchief, slide and cap




                                   14
                 Webelos neckerchief, slide and cap




Webelos Scouts
Optional Tan/Olive Uniform
Webelos Scouts may optionally wear the Boy Scout tan/olive uniform, wearing the blue Cub Scout shoulder loops on the
epaulets.
Placement of insignia is the same as with the blue Cub Scout uniform, although the Webelos Scout may elect to use the
plastic sleeve to hold their Cub Scout badges of rank on the left pocket (this holder is not intended for use by other Cub
Scouts). If the Webelos Scout elects to wear the new oval Webelos badge, it is worn without other Cub Scout rank insignia
and is attached to the left pocket.




                 Webelos neckerchief, slide and cap




                                                                                                                        15
Insignia Guide
                                                      Sleeves
  The uniform comes with the flag emblem already attached. The remaining patches on the right sleeve are placed in
                                             relation to the flag patch.
                Den Number (right sleeve)
                This patch should be placed centered below and touching the flag patch.
                 Quality Unit Award (right sleeve)
                 If worn, this patch should be placed centered on the flag patch, with the top of the Quality Unit Award
                 located four inches (4") below the shoulder seam. Only one Quality Unit Award may be worn on the
                 uniform.

                 CSP (left sleeve)
                 The Council Shoulder Patch should be centered on the sleeve, touching the shoulder seam.

                 Veteran Unit Bar (left sleeve)
                 When worn, should be centered below and touching the CSP; these bars are available for 25, 50, 55 or
                 60 years.

                 Unit Number (left sleeve)
                 Worn centered below and touching the CSP (or Veteran Unit Bar, if worn).

                 Denner/Assistant Denner Cords (left sleeve)
                 These cords are worn over the left shoulder.

                                                 Webelos Scout Options (right sleeve)

                                     Patrol Patch
                                     Optionally, the Webelos Scout may wear a patrol patch in place of the den number
                                     patch. If this is done, the patch should be placed centered below and touching the
                                     flag patch.

                                     Webelos Colors
                                     The Webelos colors may also be worn on the right sleeve, either attached
                                     immediately below the flag or, if worn, immediately below the den number or patrol
                                     emblem. If the colors are worn, any activity pin(s) the Scout has earned should be
                                     attached to them.


                                                     Right Pocket
                    The uniform comes with the BSA patch already attached above the right pocket.
                 National Summertime Award
                 If worn, this pin should be placed centered on the pocket flap above the button.
                 Temporary Insignia
                 Not necessary for uniform inspections, but if worn should be centered on the pocket.

                 Tiger Cubs BSA Strip
                 Not used anymore

                 Recruiter Strip
                 When worn centered immediately below and touching either the bottom of the pocket or the Tiger
                 Cubs BSA strip.

                                                            Tiger Cub Option




                                                                                                                           16
                   Tiger Cubs Immediate Recognition Kit
                   When worn, attached to the button of the right pocket, with the flap buttoned.




                                       Wolf/Bear Cub Option

                   Progress Towards Ranks
                   When worn, attached to the button of the right pocket, with the flap buttoned.




                                       Webelos Scout Option

                   Compass Points Emblem
                   When worn, attached to the button of the right pocket, with the flap buttoned.




                                   Left Pocket
World Crest
Worn centered between the left shoulder seam and the top of the left pocket.
Medals or Knots
Worn centered above the left pocket, touching the top of the pocket flap. The order in which these
awards are worn is at the wearer's discretion and a maximum of five medals may be worn at a time.
Please note that the only knots that may be worn by a Cub Scout are the religious emblem, lifesaving
and meritorious award knots.

Service Stars
Worn centered above the left pocket, either 3/8" above the left pocket or immediately above any
medals or knots. Cub Scouts use gold background disks behind their service stars, including Tiger
Cub service.



                                                                                                    17
Rank Badges
Cub Scouts wear the ranks which they have earned, including Tiger, Bobcat, Wolf and Bear. Webelos
Scouts wear only their current badge of rank (Bobcat, Wolf, Bear or Webelos) centered on the pocket;
for exceptions to this, see below.

Arrow Points
Gold Arrow Points are worn beneath the pocket, centered below the rank for which they were earned.
Silver Arrow Points are worn in double rows below their respective Gold Arrow Points.

                                      Webelos Scout Options

                   Webelos Scouts Without Tiger Rank (blue shirt)
                   Webelos Scouts who have not earned the Tiger rank may wear all other ranks on
                   their uniform as depicted at the left.




                   Webelos Scouts Without Tiger Rank (tan shirt)
                   Webelos Scouts who have not earned the Tiger rank may wear all other ranks on
                   their uniform as depicted at the left. Note that a temporary rank holder is available
                   for displaying these ranks; this avoids sewing the rank patches on the tan shirt,
                   which may cause an unwanted appearance to the shirt when the boy wears the
                   uniform with the oval patches for Webelos or, later, Boy Scout ranks.




                   Oval Webelos Scouts Rank Patch (tan shirt)
                   Webelos Scouts may elect to wear the oval Webelos Scout rank patch in place of
                   the diamond shaped patch. When this option is selected, no other Cub Scout rank
                   patches are worn on the uniform.
                   Arrow of Light
                   Typically worn on the tan shirt; this award is worn centered below the pocket.




                                                                                                       18
Den Uniform Inspection
Den uniform inspections should be held several times each year. A den chief can be of assistance in helping to check the
boys' uniforms against the official inspection sheet or illustrations on the inside covers of the boys' books for insignia
placement. Two or three weeks prior to the pack's uniform inspection, boys are given copies of the Cub Scout and
Webelos Scout Uniform Inspection Sheet to take home. With help from their families, they check to be sure their uniforms
are correct, with insignia properly placed. Then about a week before the pack inspection, a den uniform inspection is held
to make certain everything is in order. The boys bring their inspection sheets to the pack meeting so they can be marked
by the person in charge of the pack inspection. Inspection sheets are included on your Pack leader resource CD.




                                                                                                                        19
                                                      Activities
Age-Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities
Age- and rank-appropriate guidelines have been developed based on the mental, physical, emotional, and social maturity
of Boy Scouts of America youth members. These guidelines apply to Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout
teams, and Venturing crews. Review the Guide to Safe Scouting on the Leader Resource CD for more details.
                                                                                                          Older Boy Scouts,
                                 Tiger Cubs           Wolf/Bear     Webelos
                                                                                     Boy Scouts            Varsity Scouts,
                              (With Adult Partner)   Cub Scouts     Scouts
                                                                                                            and Venturers
 OUTDOOR SKILLS
 Camping—Day
 Camping—Family
 Camping—Resident
 Camporees                                                           Visit Only
 Conservation Projects
 Cooking Outdoors
 Fire Building
 Fishing
 Fueled Devices
 Hiking—Day
 Hiking—Multiple Day
 Horseback Riding
 Hunting                                                                                                      Venturers Only
 Map and Compass                   Map Only
 Mountain Bike Day Rides
 Mountaineering/Scrambling/
 Cross-Country Travel
 Orienteering
 Pioneering
 Rope Bridges*
 Survival Training
 Winter Camping
                                                                                     * Check requirements for height restrictions.




                                                                                                          Older Boy Scouts,
                                 Tiger Cubs           Wolf/Bear     Webelos
                                                                                     Boy Scouts            Varsity Scouts,
                              (With Adult Partner)   Cub Scouts     Scouts
                                                                                                            and Venturers
 SPORTS
 Field/Wide Games
 Flag Football
 Gymnastics
 Ice Hockey
 Ice Skating
 Martial Arts—Defensive
 Roller Blades/Skates
 Scooters—Nonmotorized
 Skateboarding
 Skiing/Snowboarding
 Sledding/Tubing
 Soccer
 Street Hockey



                                                                                                                                 20
                                                                                                                 Older Boy Scouts,
                                    Tiger Cubs              Wolf/Bear               Webelos
                                                                                                    Boy Scouts    Varsity Scouts,
                                 (With Adult Partner)      Cub Scouts               Scouts
                                                                                                                   and Venturers
TOOLS
Axes
Bow Saws
Hand Ax
Hand Tools
Pocketknife
Power Tools




                                                                                                                 Older Boy Scouts,
                                    Tiger Cubs              Wolf/Bear               Webelos
                                                                                                    Boy Scouts    Varsity Scouts,
                                 (With Adult Partner)      Cub Scouts               Scouts
                                                                                                                   and Venturers
TREKKING
Backpacking—Overnight,
Backcountry
Bike Treks—Day Ride
Bike Treks—Multiple Overnights
Horse Treks
Search and Rescue Missions
Search and Rescue Practice
Ski Touring—Multiple Days
and Nights Carrying Gear




                                                                                                                 Older Boy Scouts,
                                    Tiger Cubs              Wolf/Bear               Webelos
                                                                                                    Boy Scouts    Varsity Scouts,
                                 (With Adult Partner)      Cub Scouts               Scouts
                                                                                                                   and Venturers
SHOOTING
.22 Rifle
Archery—Field
Archery—Target, Action
                                               Council/District Outdoor Programs Only
(Moving targets)
BB Guns                                        Council/District Outdoor Programs Only
Catapults
Shotgun
Slingshots                                     Council/District Outdoor Programs Only




                                                                                                                 Older Boy Scouts,
                                    Tiger Cubs              Wolf/Bear               Webelos
                                                                                                    Boy Scouts    Varsity Scouts,
                                 (With Adult Partner)      Cub Scouts               Scouts
                                                                                                                   and Venturers
AQUATICS
Canoeing—Flat Water                            Council/District Outdoor Programs Only
Canoeing—Flowing Water
                                                                                 Council/District
Kayaking—Flat Water                                                             Outdoor Programs
                                                                                      Only
Kayaking—Flowing Water
Motorboating—Adult Operated                               Council/District Outdoor Programs Only
Motorboating—Youth Operated




                                                                                                                                     21
 Rafting—Flat Water                              Council/District Outdoor Programs Only
 Rafting—Flowing Water
 Rowing—Flat Water
 Rowing—Flowing Water
 Sailboarding
 Sailing—Adult Operated                          Council/District Outdoor Programs Only
 Sailing—Youth Operated
 Discover Scuba Training
 Scuba
 Snorkeling (For swimmers only)
 Surfing
 Swimming
 Tubing
 Waterskiing




                                                                                                                   Older Boy Scouts,
                                      Tiger Cubs              Wolf/Bear               Webelos
                                                                                                  Boy Scouts        Varsity Scouts,
                                   (With Adult Partner)      Cub Scouts               Scouts
                                                                                                                     and Venturers
 CLIMBING
 Belaying
 Bouldering
 Caving (Other than simple
 novice activities)
 Climbing—Commercial
 or Horizontal Wall
 Climbing—Rock
 Climbing—Vertical Wall or Tower
 Initiative Games
 Lead Climbing
                                                                                                A Few Low-Course
 Project COPE                                                                                    and High-Course
                                                                                                    Activities
 Rappelling
 Snow and Ice Climbing

See attached document (age appropriate chart.pdf) included on your Pack leader resource CD


Guide to Safe Scouting
           http://www.scouting.org/pubs/gss/toc.html

Camping & Overnight Trips
All camping and overnight trips, except for those conducted at council or district level events, must be approved by the
Pack committee and the committee chair prior to conducting the event. The event must follow guidelines prescribed in the
Safe guide to scouting. Also, at least one adult must have the Indoor and outdoor leader training certification. The den
leader must complete BSA Trip permits and have it approved by the Pack committee chair and then submitted to the
council.




                                                                                                                                       22
Water Activities
All water activities, except for those conducted at council or district level events, must be approved by the Pack committee
prior to conducting or attending the event. An adult leader that has the BSA Safe Swim Defense certification must present
a plan in accourdance to the rules of The BSA Safe Swim Defense and Safe Guide to scouting prior to the event. Only
those events that strictly adhere to those rules will be approved. Please visit the following site to take the Safe Swim
Defense and/or the Safety Afloat e-learning courses - http://olc.scouting.org/.




                                                                                                                          23
                            Council & District Leader Training




The REQUIRED Leader Training comprises four parts:
Youth Protection Training - Online – all positions

Cub Scout Leader Fast Start Training - Online - Leader Specific training, which is based on the leader's unit-level
position.

Basic Indoor Leader Training - The sessions are delivered by our District in a one-day training event that incorporates all
program areas.

Basic Outdoor Leader Training - The sessions are delivered by our District in a two-day camp based training event that
incorporates all program areas. This is open to all but only required for Webelos Den Leaders and Assistants.

Our goal is to achieve 100 percent trained leaders.


Youth Protection Training – Online @
                 http://olc.scouting.org/
Once you complete the online training submit a copy of completion to the Pack Training coordinator.


Fast Start Training – Online @
                 http://olc.scouting.org/
Once you complete the online training submit a copy of completion to the Pack Training coordinator.


Basic Indoor Leader Training
Indoor Leader Training is conducted by the district twice a year. Basic Leader Training goes far beyond Fast Start
training to give you the information you need to be a successful Leader.

Current training opportuninities:
Foothills Super Saturday (BLT/BALOO) – Sep. 22 – check flyer at http://www.cbdistrict.org/files/Training/CBD_2007-
2008_Training_Schedule.pdf
MLD BLT - Oct. 13 - tentative – check MLD Web site
Copy the pack training coordinator on your email registration. Once you complete the training submit a copy of completion
to the Pack Training coordinator.


Basic Outdoor Leader Training
Outdoor Leader Training is conducted by the district twice a year. Outdoor Leader Training goes far beyond Fast Start
training and Indoor Leader Training to give you the information you need to participate in outdoor camping events.

Current training opportuninities:


                                                                                                                         24
Foothills Super Saturday (BLT/BALOO) – Sep. 22 – check flyer at http://www.cbdistrict.org/files/Training/CBD_2007-
2008_Training_Schedule.pdf
Webelo Scout/Basic Outdoor Training - Oct. 2-4 – tentative
BALOO (Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation) Training – Nov. 17 – 8:30 AM Bert Adams Scout Reservation – AAC
contact - dcarr@atlantabsa.org
Copy the pack training coordinator on your email registration. Once you complete the training submit a copy of completion
to the Pack Training coordinator.


Other Training Opportunities
There are many BSA training opportunities beyond the basic classes listed above. The Mountain Lake District monthly
roundtable is an excellent chance to not only continue your scouter training but also stay abreast of all opportunities within
the district and council. The roundtable provides a forum to share new ideas and concerns and learn from those that have
done it before.
                                           nd
Mountain Lake District roundtable in the 2 Thursday night of each month from 7:30pm - 9pm at Kennesaw United
Methodist Church in Kennesaw, GA.
Training opportunities are constantly changing and are also updated regularly on the following websites.



              Mountain Lake District – Training Page
              (http://www.mountainlakedistrict.com/training.htm)

              Foothills District – Training Page (http://www.foothillsbsa.org/training)


              Covered Bridge District


              Atlanta Area Council


Keep the pack training coordinator up-to-date on any advanced training you plan to take. Once you complete the training
submit a copy of completion to the Pack Training coordinator.


Safety Swim Afloat/Safety Afloat Training - Online

Once you complete the online training print out 2 proof of completion certificates. Make sure you print the proof of
completion or you will have to take it again. Keep one copy and submit the other form to the Pack Training coordinator.
http://olc.scouting.org/
Safe Swim Defense and Safety Afloat Training is required to be updated every two years.


Our 2007-2008 Pack Trainer is:
John Westmoreland
johnwestmoreland@pack353.net
770.919.8277


                                                                                                                            25
                                       Scouts with Disabilities




Although a boy might be disabled in body or mind, he is still a boy-no less and no more-and if he is capable of
understanding the Cub Scout Promise and Law of the Pack, he may be a Cub Scout. Working with boys with disabilities
might mean adapting or extending the ordinary program of activities in order to make it as enjoyable and worthwhile as
possible.

Registration in Cub Scouting of boys over age 11 who are either mentally or physically disabled, including visually and
hearing impaired and emotionally disturbed boys, is permitted, as is their participation in Cub Scout advancement while so
registered.

What should we know about emotional disabilities? It is estimated that 20 percent of all children have emotional difficulties
of some kind or to some degree.

I Want to Join

Some boys will seek you out and ask to join. But most, because of their disabilities, shyness, or restricted mobility, will
depend on the interest and enthusiasm of others to introduce Cub Scouting to them. It might be their friends who are
already Cub Scouts, or their parents who are seeking to enrich their life.

Spreading the news about the opportunities Cub Scouting offers to all boys is best done by people who are interested
enough to let it be known that such boys are welcome in the pack. Every leader should make the effort. You might see a
boy in the park or on the street in a wheelchair or in a leg brace. You might hear about a boy with a disability from other
people. How you hear about such a boy isn't as important as what you do about it. Get in touch with him and invite him to
join.

There Is a Place

Medical and rehabilitation opinion encourages children with disabilities to lead as normal a life as possible. Where it is
possible to do so, many are absorbed into mainstream schools, although many are also in special schools. In Cub
Scouting, we integrate boys with disabilities into ordinary packs whenever possible. And of course there are packs
established in special schools or at hospitals for boys being treated there.

As a Cub Scout leader you might feel hesitant about facing the opportunity to accept a boy with a disability into your den or
pack. But consider for a moment how a disability can in itself be a barrier to many activities enjoyed by other boys. This is
true even when the boy has considerable skills, abilities, and moral strength. Scouting has, over the years, made
thousands of boys happier than they would otherwise have been, by accepting them for what they are, what they can
contribute, and by offering them the friendship and encouragement they need.

These guidelines will be helpful:

    1. Locate new boys by consulting school administrators, teachers, ministers, and public health officials.

    2. Be sure a medical assessment is made so you will know a boy's capabilities as well as his disabilities.

    3. Orient the boys, families, and leaders in your pack so the boy can enjoy a smooth entry into it.

Note: Reading Understanding Cub Scouts with Disabilities will help leaders understand how to work with the disabled boys
in the pack.


                                                                                                                              26
Advancement and Recognition
The advancement program is so flexible that, with guidance, most boys can do the skills. Advancement requirements
should not be watered down or eliminated for boys with disabilities, although the speed at which requirements are
completed and the means of explaining them might need to be adjusted and simplified. It might take longer for a disabled
boy to earn his awards, but he will appreciate them more by knowing he has made the effort. The standard for every boy is
"Has he done his best?"

A Cub Scout who is physically disabled may be given permission by the Cubmaster and pack committee to substitute
electives for a few of the achievement requirements that are beyond his abilities. It is best to include parents in this
process of determining substitutions since they are most familiar with their son's abilities.

Immediate recognition of advancement is even more important for boys with disabilities. The Immediate Recognition Kit,
the den doodle, and the Den Advancement Chart all help provide immediate recognition in den meetings as achievements
and electives are completed. Remember that a month seems like a long time to a boy and that completing requirements
for a badge might seem like forever to him. Be sure to give him periodic recognition at den meetings and prompt
recognition at pack meetings when he earns a badge.

While leaders must be enthusiastic about helping youngsters with disabilities, they must at the same time fully recognize
the special demands that will be made on their patience, understanding, and skill in teaching advancement requirements.


Cub Scout Activities




                           The aim of Cub Scouting for the boy with a disability is to keep everything as near normal as
possible with a program designed to achieve its objectives to serve all boys.

One Cub Scout said: "I have epilepsy. What's your disability?" Right to the point! Every one of us has some type of
disability-it might be a poor attitude, a poor sense of responsibility, or something else that keeps us from doing things other
people can do. It helps to remember this when working with these special boys. What's your disability?

There are limitations to what a boy with a disability will be able to do, and he himself is aware of these. Boisterous games
or activities that require vigorous physical stamina might be beyond his capability. He needs quiet encouragement and
opportunities to do the things he can do. Such a boy could be given the job of assisting with the scoring or helping by
acting as a judge or referee. Boys in wheelchairs can go on hikes, with some of the other boys taking turns as pushers.

One of the first steps in working with boys who have disabilities is to realize they are more like other boys than they are
different. Find out their abilities as well as their limitations. Plan activities in which all boys can participate. These boys are
just as eager for adventure as other boys, and they need challenges to have a satisfying experience.

So a new den member who has special needs should be welcomed into a den with other boys, and spend some time
acquainting them with his disability. An awareness game is a good way to build understanding.

The Boy Scouts of America has several resources available to leaders of boys with disabilities. Including Understanding
Cub Scouts with Disabilities.


                                                                                                                                  27
                                     Web Resources

Mountain Lake District – Our Northwest Cobb District (http://www.mountainlakedistrict.com/)



Atlanta Area Council (www.atlantabsa.org)


Virtual Cub Leader's Handbook - Extends the content of the leader's guide, along with current policy
updates (http://www.geocities.com/~pack215/home.html)

Fast Start Training - The first step in training for all Cub Scout Leaders
(http://olc.scouting.org/index.html)

The Space Place - Earn Cub Scout achievements and electives at this NASA site
(http://spaceplace.jpl.nasa.gov/cubscouts/)

National Office, BSA - The Internet home of the Boy Scouts of America (Official BSA site)
(http://www.scouting.org/)


Guide to Safe Scouting - Provides the rules and regulations for safely issues in the scouting program
(Official BSA site) (http://www.scouting.org/pubs/gss/)


World Headquarters - Resources for all members of the scouting movement. (http://www.scout.org/)




                                                                                                        28
                           Appendix – Files On CD
Pack353 Leader handbook 20070914.doc – This document
Monthly Advancement.xls– Advancement Report due Monthly
Pack roster 091905.xls– Current Pack Roster
Guide to safe scouting.htm
Pack 353 Leader Orientation.ppt


     Pack Specific Documents
Pack 353 Parents Handbook.doc – Pack 353 Parent Handbook
Pack 353 Meeting Plans -themes.doc – Leader Meeting planner with monthly themes and meeting responsabilities
Pack 353 songbook - original.doc – Songbook – used at pack meetings and campouts
Pack 353 Tiger Cub Den Planner.doc – document with current themes and sample monthly tiger activities
Pack 353 Den Planner.doc – A planning document with current themes and monthly activities included.
     Advancement

           Advancement Forms                                Advancement Spreadsheets
       Cub Scout Record Form.pdf                      TigerTrax1.7.xls
       Individual Tiger Cub Record.pdf                Wolftrax1.9.xls
       Tiger Cub Attendance and Dues.pdf              Beartrax1.9.xls
       Tiger Cub Den Records.pdf                      Webelostrax1.7.xls
       Individual Cub Scout Record.pdf                BeltloopPintrax1.3.xls
       Tiger Cub Advancement Report.pdf               RecordTrax1.3.xls
       Tiger Cub Den Meeting Programs.pdf

   Forms
Cub_Scout_Parent_Resource_Survey.pdf
District Short Term Camp-Activity Request Form-071403done.pdf
Local Tour Permit.pdf
CubScout Application.pdf
Leader Application.pdf
Medical-level1 & 2.pdf

   Meeting Planning Guides
A Guide to TIGER CUB MEETINGS.doc
cub_den_meeting_program.pdf
Cub den_meeting_program.pdf

   uniform Guides
Cub & Webelos uniform inspection.pdf

   Leader Knot Forms
Cub Scout Den Leader Award.pdf
CubMaster Award.pdf
Webelos Leader Knot.pdf
Cub Scouter Award.pdf
Tiger Den Leader Award.pdf

   Misc Documents
age appropriate chart.pdf
Complete Cub leader-roles.pdf


                                                                                                          29

				
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Description: Webelos Advancement Spreadsheet document sample