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Mo. Legislature fails to override Nixon
veto on stimulus funds
BY TONY MESSENGER • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2010 12:00 am
JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri lawmakers used a short veto session Wednesday to bring attention to the
sometimes contradictory positions of both major parties on federal stimulus dollars.
Democrats reminded Republicans that they were against the stimulus before they took interest in deciding how
to spend the federal money once it came to the Show-Me State.
Republicans countered that Democrats were in favor of establishing a special fund for stimulus dollars during the
regular session, though they now seemed to be against it.
In the end, the hour-and-a-half debate produced a few political sound bites and no real action. An attempt to
override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a bill that would have created a special fund for stimulus dollars fell far short of
the two-thirds majority needed.
Nixon had vetoed the bill because it contained a provision that would have given a legislative committee
authority on how to spend some of the money. Relying on a Missouri Supreme Court decision, Nixon said the
provision was unconstitutional.
That reasoning swayed many Democrats, who had supported the bill when it passed on the last day of the
legislative session, to vote no this time.
"I am not prepared to vandalize the constitution even a little bit," said Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia.
The motion to override Nixon's veto was made by Rep. Allen Icet, R-Wildwood, the outgoing budget chairman
who can't seek re-election because of term limits. Icet argued that much like a similar bill the Legislature passed
— and Nixon signed — a year previously, this bill would provide more accountability to how stimulus dollars are
spent by making it easier to track them.
But even Icet admitted that the wording of the bill gave him "heartburn."
Democrats said the previous fund the Legislature created to keep track of stimulus funding is already working
the way it was intended.
The specific federal money targeted by the legislation was approved by Congress this summer and is intended
to shore up state budgets, and specifically to protect public sector jobs such as teachers, firefighters and police
officers.
Nixon had already vowed during the legislative session to hold on to that money — Missouri's share is about
$209 million — to help balance the 2012 fiscal budget.
House Speaker Ron Richard, R-Joplin, said that the federal money should be spent this year and not be saved
for future budget problems.
But other Republicans, including Icet, tried to distance themselves from that opinion about it when asked about it
during the debate.




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Mo House fails to override governor's
veto of stimulus bill
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
Posted 2:07 pm Wed., 09.15.10
After more than an hour of debate, the Missouri House failed to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a bill setting
up special accounts to handle the latest round of federal stimulus money that the state is to receive.
The final tally was 85-68 in favor of the override. That's 24 votes short of the 109 needed.
The bill had initially garnered support from all but three members of the House and won unanimous support in
the Senate.
House members seemed most swayed by Nixon's argument that a portion of the bill in question, HB 1903, was
unconstitutional.
Nixon also had maintained that the proposed new accounts duplicated earlier special accounts that the House
set up for handling stimulus money.
The sponsor of the bill, outgoing state Rep. Allen Icet, R-Wildwood, argued that the new accounts were needed
to prevent mingling with earlier federal stimulus aid.
Several Republicans also brought up the controversy over last weekend's film festival held in Warrensburg, Mo.
that was financed with $100,000 in stimulus money. Democrats, while objecting to the festival, countered that the
money that went to pay for it wouldn't have gone into one of the proposed new accounts anyway. The state
Department of Social Services is seeking to get the money back.
Click here to read our earlier account of House Speaker Ron Richard's observations about the veto session,
with additional detail about HB 1903.




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Mo. House fails to override veto of
funding bill
By DAVID A. LIEB
Associated Press Writer
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- House Republicans failed on Wednesday to override Democratic Gov. Jay
Nixon's veto of a bill creating a special account to track federal money received under an extension of the
economic stimulus act.
The House voted 85-68 to override the veto. That fell far short of the 109 votes needed for a two-thirds majority.
Just one Democrat joined majority Republicans in backing the veto override attempt.
Many Democrats echoed Nixon's concern that the legislation was both unnecessary and unconstitutional.
At issue is $209 million of enhanced Medicaid payments that Missouri is to get in 2011 under a six-month
extension of a provision originally included in the 2009 federal stimulus act.
Rather than immediately spending that money, Nixon's administration plans to place it in a fund created for
previous stimulus-act payments and save it for use in Missouri's 2012 budget. It would be up to lawmakers next
year to decide how to spend that money.
The vetoed legislation would have created a separate fund for that money, which Nixon said was unnecessary.
He also raised constitutional concerns about a provision in the bill that would have given a legislative committee
control over the use of any federal Race to the Top education grants. Missouri failed to win any of those grants.
The legislation had passed the House 149-3 in May. But on Wednesday, House Democrats echoed Nixon's
concerns in explaining why they no longer supported the bill.
"I am not prepared to vandalize the constitution even a little bit," said Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia.
Democrats pointed to a 1975 ruling by the Missouri Supreme Court. In that case, the court barred state officials
from carrying out a law that gave a legislative committee and the state administration commissioner authority to
alter appropriations for state departments. The Supreme Court said the law violated the state constitution by
delegating appropriation powers to individual lawmakers that are supposed to be exercised only by the entire
Legislature.
Republicans acknowledged the constitutional concerns but said they were moot because Missouri had failed to
win a Race to the Top grant. They focused instead on the section of the legislation creating a new fund for the
next round of federal aid to states. They said it would prevent the money from being mingled with previous
stimulus-act dollars.
The legislation would create "a clear paper trail about how much the General Assembly appropriates and to
where," said House Budget Committee Chairman Allen Icet, R-Wildwood, who sponsored the bill and the veto
override attempt. "It is about accountability and transparency."
The veto override vote occurred in the House, because that's where the bill originated. Had it been approved by
representatives, senators also would have needed to approve the veto override by a two-thirds vote.




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Mo. lawmakers fail to override veto
Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio (2010-09-15)
JEFFERSON CITY, MO. (St. Louis Public Radio) - An attempt by Missouri lawmakers to override a veto by
Governor Jay Nixon has failed.

The Missouri House tried to revive a bill that would have created a special account for holding federal stimulus
funds. It was sponsored by House Budget Chair Allen Icet (R, Wildwood). He says it would have provided much-
needed oversight into how that money will be spent in Missouri.

"The problem is it gets co-mingled with that previous money," Icet said. "So when people say, 'Well what did you
do with the new money you got from DC?', and the answer is, 'I don't know, it got co-mingled, I can't tell.'"

The bill passed during the regular session with overwhelming bipartisan support. But House Democrats this time
sided with the governor in preserving the veto.

The vote was 85 to 68 to override; 109 votes, a 2/3rds majority, were needed.

Nixon says the bill was unnecessary because of similar legislation he signed into law last year. Fellow Democrat
Jeff Roorda of Barnhart says the governor was right to veto the bill.

"It just seems to me like this is campaign year politics, and it doesn't seem like we're trying to do what's best for
Missourians," Roorda said. "It seems like we're poking a finger in the eye of the governor for doing his job, for
making sure that when he reviews legislation that it's constitutional."

The special fund would have been used to hold around $209 million worth of Medicaid reimbursements.

House Speaker Ron Richard (R, Joplin) wants to spend the money during the current fiscal year, while Governor
Nixon wants to hold it in reserve for 2012.

The bill would have also given a legislative committee authority over spending federal dollars from potential
education grants.




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Posted on Wed, Sep. 15, 2010

Missouri General Assembly recognizes
retiring lawmakers
Jason Noble
KC Star
JEFFERSON CITY | Wednesday was a day of long goodbyes in the Missouri General Assembly.
Meeting for the legislature‘s annual veto session, lawmakers did little of substance, but spent several hours in
each chamber recognizing retiring members and offering fond farewells.
The one-day veto session is the last formal meeting day of the year for lawmakers. House Republicans did
attempt to override Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon‘s veto of a bill concerning stimulus spending, but failed to secure
the necessary two-thirds vote.
This year is a significant one for legislative retirements, due to term limits that restrict lawmakers to eight years in
the House and eight in the Senate. Ten of the 34 senators are termed out this year, as well as 52 of the 163
representatives.
Among Wednesday‘s ceremonies was the induction of former Gov. Warren Hearnes into the Capitol‘s Hall of
Famous Missourians.




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New ad targeting Blunt has help from
one of D.C's "Real Housewives"
BY JAKE WAGMAN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Posted: Wednesday, September 15, 2010 10:51 am
ST. LOUIS -- Democrats have turned the "party crashers" loose on Roy Blunt.
The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has paid for a new ad seeking to paint the Republican Senate
hopeful as a Washington socialite.
The spot features a photograph with Blunt and his wife, Abigail, along with Tareq and Michaele Salahi -- the
polo and wine loving tandem who earned a date in front of Congress after crashing a presidential state dinner
last year.
The photo is not especially prominent in the new ad, but it's also hard to miss, sitting on a dresser as a faux
debutante boasts that "Roy is the life of the party in D.C."
On the same dresser is a picture with just Roy and his wife -- "a powerful tobacco lobbyist." (Abigail Blunt's most
recent disclosure indicates she lobbies for Kraft Foods, which was until 2007 part of Altria, the renamed Philip
Morris company.)
The ad also digs Blunt for his recent real estate purchase in Washington -- D.C. records show the Blunts paid
$1.5 million for a lot in a new development of "estate homes" in northwest Washington.
The picture with the Salahis -- who now, of course, are featured on the capital version of Bravo's "Real
Housewives" reality franchise -- was originally published by Washington Life magazine, which did the piece on
the couple after their party-crashing escapades at the White House. (Which, if you watch the show, you know
wasn't their first time sneaking into a soiree without an invitation.)
The ad hammers on the same theme that Blunt's Democratic rival, Robin Carnahan, has been pushing for
months on the campaign trail -- that Blunt's roots in Washington have grown too deep.
It will be interesting to see if Blunt fires back, especially considering the ad brings Blunt's wife into the debate.
Even in the most bare knuckle political fights, family is often considered out of bounds.




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Outside groups target Blunt, Carnahan
with new ads
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
Posted 2:54 pm Wed., 09.15.10
After a few weeks of generally laying low, outside groups are once again jumping onto Missouri's TV airwaves to
jab at the state's major-party candidates for the U.S. Senate.
American Crossroads, a group co-founded by former Bush adviser Karl Rove (left), is launching a new ad today
that -- like some earlier spots -- attacks Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Robin Carnahan by casting her as too
tight with President Barack Obama.
According to the Washington Post's political blog The Fix , Crossroads is spending $300,000 to run the ad in the
St. Louis and Kansas City TV markets. Crossroads spent even more on its first foray into Missouri last month to
attack Carnahan.
But Carnahan's expected biggest-spending ally, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, also began
airing a particular biting spot today targeting the Republican U.S. Senate nominee, Roy Blunt.
The DSCC ad goes personal, by accusing Blunt of enjoying a luxurious Washington lifestyle that's out of touch
with Missouri. The spot features pictures of the congressman with his wife, Abigail Blunt, a lobbyist who currently
represents Kraft Foods. Abigail Blunt even gets an unusual shout-out from the actress in the ad, who calls her "a
tobacco lobbyist." Abigail Blunt used to lobby for tobacco giant Philip Morris.
The latest news reports indicate that the DSCC plans to spend at least $4 million on ads to help out Carnahan,
who has continued to trail Blunt in most independent polls.




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Republicans tweak Sowers, Dems on
pick-up fever
BY JAKE WAGMAN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Posted: Wednesday, September 15, 2010 4:07 pm
If there is an image more ubiquitous in campaign ads than a farm in the background, it has to be a candidate on
the road -- in their pick-up truck.
Ever since Massachusetts Republican Scott Brown steered his 2005 GMC to an upset for Ted Kennedy's old
seat, candidates on both sides of the aisle have been jumping in their F-150s and Dodge Rams hoping to
capture some of that half-ton magic.
Hoping to take some air out of the tires of the opposition, the Republican National Committee put up a web video
this week featuring a montage of Democrats who have hit the road with a cargo bed behind them -- including
Southeast Missouri Democrat Tommy Sowers, who's ad features both a pick-up truck and a hayfield.
The soundtrack for the clip comes from a speech earlier this year by Barack Obama, who, while stumping for
Brown's Democratic opponent, said to "forget the truck."
"Everybody can run slick ads," Obama said. "Everybody can buy a truck."
Pick-up trucks have become an issue in the Missouri Senate race, too, with Democrat Robin Carnahan --
whose own ads features, that's right, a farm -- criticizing Blunt for driving around in a "rented" truck.
The rebuke is inaccurate, Blunt says -- the truck actually belongs to his campaign.
Meanwhile, Republican Ed Martin really does drive a truck everyday -- it's the one with the "9/11" license plate
and Willie McGee window sticker -- somehow did not include it in his recent ad.
And he didn't have any farms either.




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Carnahan dubs Martin as "Hackman" on
web and with signs
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
Posted 12:44 am Thu., 09.16.10
U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan is embracing some unusual campaign tactics as he battles Republican Ed Martin,
arguably the St. Louis congressman's toughest rival since his first contest in 2004.
Like many state and regional candidates this year, Carnahan has set up a special web site to attack Martin. But
this site -- www.EdHackmanMartin.com -- goes for humor instead of the jugular, by setting up a Pacman-style
game that uses Martin's head.
In an even more unusual move, the congressman's campaign also is posting signs around the 3rd District that
attack Martin by name. "No More Ed Martin Hackman,'' the signs declare.
The signs and the web game focus on the controversy that surrounded Martin for two years during his old job as
chief of staff to then-Gov. Matt Blunt. Martin and his staff admitted routinely destroying office e-mails, including
some that critics said needed to be saved to comply with state open-records and record-preservation laws.
Martin fired a staff lawyer, Scott Eckersley, who said he warned that e-mails were being mishandled. Eckersley
sued Martin, Blunt and other aides. Then-Attorney General Jay Nixon set up a special investigation team,
resulting in another round of legal action.
Martin resigned, presumably at Blunt's behest. Several newspapers also filed open-records requests, and joined
one of the lawsuits, in order to get access to tens of thousands of e-mails that Blunt's office had initially declined
to release.
The legal battles cost Missouri taxpayers more than $2 million, but Martin rightly notes that the court settlements
included no findings of wrongdoing. (Eckersley, who won an apology from the state and a $500,000 settlement,
is now running for Congress as a Democrat in southwest Missouri's 7th District.)
But back to the "Hackman" game. Carnahan's campaign said its point is no joke.
"The website uses a funny theme to highlight the seriousness of Ed Martin‘s personal bailout, costing taxpayers
$2.4 million dollars for destroying government emails, firing a whistleblower and then trying to cover it up as
Governor Matt Blunt‘s Chief of Staff," said Angela Guyadeen, Carnahan's communications director.
"Although Ed Martin is trying to turn over a new leaf so he can appeal to voters who may not know about his
past, this website will set the record straight on Ed Martin‘s history of playing by his own rules for his own benefit
at taxpayer expense."
Martin said Wednesday that he viewed the game and signs as "flattering, but counterproductive."
Carnahan, said Martin, "is desperate to talk about anything but his record. He's run to yard signs and video
games, when most people want jobs."




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The debate debate: Candidates jockey
for political advantage in scheduling
public forums
By Jo Mannies, Beacon political reporter
Posted 11:25 am Wed., 09.15.10
Amid a toxic atmosphere of attack ads, biting websites and accusations of corruption and incompetence,
perhaps it's hardly surprising that the campaigns for many area candidates on the Nov. 2 ballot are still debating
over whether to debate.
Likely because of the sniping, this fall's negotiations over debates are particularly tense, said Linda McDaniel,
co-president of the St. Louis League of Women Voters, which has been tapped to organize or moderate many of
them.
"It seems to be more combative than before," Daniel said. "Maybe it's just a reflection of the partisanship and
lack of civility that we're seeing all over the country."
And the scheduling of debates has always been subject to traditional gamesmanship and political jockeying, said
Dave Robertson, a political science professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.
"Candidates consider whether they have more to lose than gain," he said.
So far, the two major-party contenders for the U.S. Senate -- Republican Roy Blunt and Democrat Robin
Carnahan -- have agreed to one face-to-face meeting, on Oct. 15 at the Lake of the Ozarks before the Missouri
Press Association.
Spokesmen for both campaigns say talks are continuing, with Carnahan's campaign adding that it hopes more
debates or forums will be scheduled.
It's also unclear if any the Blunt-Carnahan debates or forums will be broadcast on TV or radio.
Behind the scenes, there's been talk that the Missouri Senate race is among a handful being considered by
NBC's Meet the Press. The Sunday morning news program is spotlighting several nationally prominent U.S.
Senate contests -- and their major-party candidates -- before the Nov. 2 election.
But the matter of debates also is a hot topic for less lofty contests, particularly on the regional level.
Carnahan/Martin agree to Third District forums
So far, the League of Women Voters has helped arrange for two public events next week featuring the
candidates for the 3rd District congressional seat, including Democratic incumbent Russ Carnahan and
Republican Ed Martin.
The first is at 7 p.m., Fri., Sept. 24 at Forest Park Community College. The second is slated for 7 p.m., Sun.,
Sept. 26 at the Arnold Community Center.
McDaniel emphasizes that both meetings will be forums, not true debates. Carnahan and Martin will answer
questions collected from the audience and asked by a moderator, but won't engage much with each other.
Martin is pressing for more joint appearances or actual debates, but Carnahan's staff says it's unclear if his
congressional or campaign schedule will allow any more match-ups.


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The two also are appearing this Friday morning on KMOX Radio (1120 AM) -- but not together. Martin contends
that host Charlie Brennan wanted the two to appear together, but because of Carnahan's objections,
Brennan ended up featuring each candidate separately. Carnahan's camp says KMOX offered two options, and
they accepted the separate-appearance option.
Meanwhile, former Gov. Bob Holden has been tapped to help facilitate a debate agreement in the heated St.
Louis County executive contest between Democratic incumbent Charlie Dooley and Republican challenger Bill
Corrigan.
Corrigan complained after a forum last week that Dooley appeared to be resisting debates. Corrigan has
proposed at least four. Dooley has agreed to one, and spokesman Katie Jamboretz denies any foot-dragging.
"We're going to get a date set," she said. "It'll happen."
Dooley initially announced that he hoped that the one debate with Corrigan would be televised, but so far no
takers have emerged.
In the 8th congressional district, in southeast Missouri, Republican incumbent Jo Ann Emerson and Democratic
rival Tommy Sowers have agreed to four debates, although he is pressing for more.
The four will be in: Cape Girardeau on Oct. 11, Poplar Bluff on Oct. 13, Rolla on Oct. 17, and Park Hills on
Oct. 18.
American and state political history is full of episodes where debates were seen as crucial in altering a contest's
momentum or elevating one contender at the expense of another.
Robertson said a key common thread in many of those face-offs is a stronger-than-expected performance by a
lesser-known challenger. As a result, candidates deemed to be in the lead may worry about the risk, he said.
When it comes to negotiations over debates, said Robertson, "Often, frontrunners are tempted to avoid the
things."




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Group wants input for 7th District
debate
Springfield News-Leader
September 16, 2010
Y.O.U.N.G. Conservatives of America in Springfield is asking the public to submit questions that might be used
in a proposed Oct. 19 debate between candidates running for Congress in the 7th District.
To submit a question, go to http://www.theyoungconservativesofamerica.org.
President John Lilly said his group is still working out details of how the debate will work, including looking for a
larger room than the one where the group normally holds its regular meetings, the Cox North Fountain Plaza
room. He would like for people outside his organization to be able to attend.
"I have started calling around. It's tough finding another room. We get that plaza room for free. It's tough finding
another room bigger you can get for free. If we can get a bigger room, that would be great."
Lilly, a physician, said he hopes to get the board of Y.O.U.N.G. Conservatives together this weekend or Monday
to start making decisions. After they get details worked out, they'll present them to the candidates, Democrat
Scott Eckersley, Republican Billy Long and Libertarian Kevin Craig, for approval.
In June, the group held a debate for Republican candidates in the primary and was able to make it through about
12 questions in two hours, plus time for opening and closing statements from six participating candidates, Lilly
said.
The group is considering webcasting the event on its own website, but is still making sure it has the technical
capabilities to do that.
Lilly said his group was started about three years ago by radio personality Vincent David Jericho, though Jericho
is no longer involved. The group has between 200 and 300 people on its e-mail list. The group does not endorse
candidates, and is not affiliated with a national group. Y.O.U.N.G. stands for "Yesterday's Oath Under Noble
Guardians." Membership is not restricted by age.
This column is compiled from the News-Leader's Inside Missouri Politics blog. To see the blog, go to
news-leader.com/mopolitics




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Gingrich to speak at Missouri Western
ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) -- Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is proving to be a big draw at Missouri Western
State University.
The school said in a news release it has a waiting list of people who want to hear the Georgia Republican speak
during a reservations-only dinner Oct. 6. The event sold out two weeks before the reservation deadline.
Gingrich will also appear the following day at a free public event at the St. Joseph school.
His appearances will coincide with the university's annual Convocation on Critical Issues.




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Posted on Wed, Sep. 15, 2010

Under new rules, Missouri strip clubs
have more cover … but fewer customers
By DAVE HELLING and JASON NOBLE
The Kansas City Star
At noon on a recent weekday, Natalie Beary — wearing underwear more modest than you‘ll find in most lingerie
catalogs — plopped coins into a jukebox, climbed onto a stage, and started to dance.
Usually, two or three dozen men might be at the Shady Lady adult lounge to watch Beary and her co-workers
sway to the music while removing most of their clothes.
But not on this day. The room on Kansas City‘s East Side was empty. It‘s a casualty, manager Joe Spinello said,
of Missouri‘s nearly three-week-old law sharply restricting sexually oriented entertainment.
―Our headcount is down almost 80 percent,‖ Spinello said. ―We don‘t have a product to offer.‖
And that product isn‘t likely to return anytime soon, he admitted, at his bar or any of the other adult entertainment
venues across the state.
After failing to convince a circuit court judge and an appeals court to put a temporary stop to the law, the
industry‘s legal team says the new rules — which broadly restrict nude or semi-nude entertainment — won‘t face
full legal arguments until early November, with a trial now set for next February.
With expected appeals, the law is likely locked into place for months to come.
―The businesses are open. The girls are there,‖ said Richard Bryant, one of the adult industry‘s lawyers. ―But
things are a little different.‖
In fact, many of the state‘s live adult entertainment venues have adopted a strategy similar to the Shady Lady‘s.
By having employees and freelance dancers wear swimsuits or underwear, the bars are not considered ―sexually
oriented‖ businesses and can stay open past midnight, serve liquor with a proper license, and offer close contact
between dancers and customers.
Clubs still can offer semi-nude dancing — defined as exposed female breasts or bottoms of either sex — but
they must close at midnight, can‘t serve alcohol, and their dancers must stay on a stage without touching
patrons. Total nudity is now prohibited.
―The definitions in the bill talk about how much clothing you have to have on to be considered nude or semi-
nude,‖ said Steven Leonard, a spokesman for Big Louie‘s entertainment complex near Ft. Leonard Wood, which
announced its swimsuit policy last week. ―All of our employees will be perfectly clothed.‖
Sen. Matt Bartle, the Lee‘s Summit Republican who sponsored the new laws, said he hasn‘t paid much attention
to how clubs had adapted to the rules.
―I never believed these businesses would shut down,‖ Bartle said. ―I don‘t doubt there‘s a way they can comply
with the new law and remain in business. But how they‘re doing that, I don‘t really know.‖
Bartle also said he‘s focused on the continuing court case.
―Although it‘s the law of the state right now, the court system (is) working through and analyzing the bill, and
there‘ll be finality when that‘s over with,‖ he said.


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Authorities, however, have started enforcing the new rules. Officers in St. Joseph this week arrested two people
at Blondie‘s, a nightclub, after male dancers there allegedly performed in the nude and alcohol was served, both
potential violations of the new law.
So far, Kansas City police have issued no citations under the new standards. Police spokesman Rich Lockhart
said officers have monitored adult clubs, but are still studying the full implications of the law‘s requirements and
the city‘s own adult entertainment ordinances.
Bryant said several adult bookstores and movie houses, which also face restrictions under the law, have closed
or reduced hours. Dance clubs and cabarets in Kansas City and St. Louis also are reporting increased
competition from clubs in Kansas and Illinois, where there are more customers and bigger tips.
Shady Lady‘s Spinello said he‘s lost most of his work force.
―When the law went into effect, I had 55 girls that Friday night. One week later, I had 13. They all went to
Kansas,‖ he said.
Owners and operators of several adult entertainment clubs in Kansas could not be reached for comment. But the
Kansas Legislature — which debated but narrowly failed to pass adult entertainment restrictions last spring —
may be prompted to revisit the issue in light of the Missouri law, one state senator said.
―If you curb a lot of that activity, you have an impact on crime,‖ said state Sen. Karin Brownlee of Olathe, a
Republican. ―It would seem that Kansas may need to step up, because it sounds as though our (adult) business
is increasing.‖
While the court case in Missouri continues, some in the adult entertainment industry have talked about taking
steps to speed up the legal review.
Spinello, for example, said there have been discussions of intentionally violating the law to test its
constitutionality, or of suing the state for lost business, a case that could bring the clubs millions of dollars if they
succeed. The clubs also may ask the state Supreme Court for a review.
There also has been talk of asking the legislature to rescind the measure when it meets next year, although such
a lobbying effort would be difficult now that the law has taken effect.
―The legislature doesn‘t want to hear it,‖ Spinello said. ―The Republican leadership pushed this thing through, not
that Democrats helped that much.‖
Amid all the talk of continuing challenges to the new Missouri law, there is growing acceptance that the adult
entertainment landscape has changed, at least for the foreseeable future.
Beary said she‘s more comfortable dancing in her underwear — similar rules are in effect in Virginia, where
she‘s from — but she admits it‘s tougher to earn a living with the new rules in place.
―I‘ve lost a lot of money,‖ she said. ―The customers, if they can‘t see boobs or your butt, they don‘t want any
dances.‖




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Bans on fake pot do little to deter
business
St. Joseph News-Press
By Alan Scher Zagier/Associated Press
Thursday, September 16, 2010
COLUMBIA, Mo. — Authorities in 13 states thought they were acting to curb a public health threat when they
outlawed a form of synthetic marijuana known as K2, a concoction of dried herbs sprayed with chemicals.
But before the laws took effect, many stores that did a brisk business in fake pot had already gotten around the
bans by making slight changes to K2‘s chemical formula, creating knockoffs with names such as ―K3,‖ ‗‘Heaven
Scent‖ and ―Syn.‖
―It‘s kind of pointless,‖ said University of Missouri sophomore Brittany May after purchasing a K2 alternative
called ―BoCoMo Dew‖ at a Columbia smoke shop. ―They‘re just going to come up with another thing.‖
Barely six months after Kansas adopted the nation‘s first ban on K2, even police acknowledge that the laws are
all but meaningless because merchants can so easily offer legal alternatives.
Until a year ago, products such as K2 were virtually unknown in the United States. Clemson University chemistry
professor John Huffman developed the compounds in 1995 while researching the effect of cannabinoids, the
active compounds found in marijuana.
Huffman had little reason to believe his lab work would morph into a commercial product. He calls users of K2
and its chemical cousins ―idiots,‖ noting the lack of research into the substance‘s effects, which include reports of
rapid heartbeats and high blood pressure. It‘s often labeled as incense with warnings against human
consumption.
Yet Huffman has little faith that the bans designed to combat the problem will deter manufacturers or consumers.
―It‘s not going to be effective,‖ he said. ―Is the ban on marijuana effective?‖
He also doubts that law enforcement agencies will be able to devote the necessary resources to identify such
complex creations as ―1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole,‖ the substance‘s scientific name. The compound sold as
K2 also is known by the scientific shorthand of JWH-018, a nod to its creator‘s initials.
―The guy in the average crime lab isn‘t really capable of doing the kind of sophisticated tests necessary‖ to
identify the substance, he said.
The bans were adopted by lawmakers or public health officials in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa,
Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and Tennessee.
Missouri state Sen. Kurt Schaefer, a Republican from Columbia, acknowledges that the marketplace has quickly
adapted to his state‘s ban. He also firmly believes that the new law, along with a wave of media reports, is an
effective deterrent, especially for potential users under 18, and their parents.
―We‘ve at least minimized the threat to public safety,‖ he said.
The Missouri statute identifies five synthetic cannabinoids by name, but leaves out many others.




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Police and public health experts say that users seeking the more benign high associated with marijuana may be
unprepared for the synthetic version. Users of K2 describe a more intense but shorter high, with effects lasting
about 20 minutes as opposed to several hours.




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Posted on Wed, Sep. 15, 2010

No new election in razor-thin Missouri
House race
By MICHAEL MANSUR
The Kansas City Star
Jackson County Judge W. Stephen Nixon has ruled in favor of John Joseph Rizzo, the one-vote winner in the
Democratic primary for the 40th District seat in the Missouri House.
Nixon declined to order a new election, as Rizzo‘s opponent, Will Royster, had requested. Nixon ruled ―credible
evidence proves that there was no voter misconduct and there was no voter fraud with regard to this election.‖
But the election remains a bit in doubt: Royster and his attorneys filed an appeal Wednesday.
Royster has alleged that numerous errors in the voter registry book and the illegal assistance of several Somali
voters by Somali interpreters were enough to require a new election, especially given the margin of a single vote.
In his ruling released by the court Wednesday, Nixon acknowledged irregularities at the Aug. 3 polls located at
the Kansas City Museum and Garfield Elementary School, calling them ―suspicious.‖
Even though election judges made mistakes, Nixon ruled, the evidence was insufficient to establish any voter
fraud, including unregistered voters casting ballots.
Phil Willoughby, attorney for Royster, said Wednesday that an appeal of Nixon‘s decision would be filed within
hours.
―We appreciate the full hearing that Mr. Royster received,‖ he said. ―But we respectfully disagree that the vast
amount of illegal activities in this election did not rise to the level of requiring a new election.‖
Rizzo called Nixon‘s opinion ―lock solid,‖ and noted that Nixon had assessed all attorney fees to Royster.
Royster ―shouldn‘t have even brought this lawsuit,‖ Rizzo said.
Rizzo said evidence showed election judges made errors, but voters did not, so they shouldn‘t be punished.
―Everyone‘s vote should count, if they‘ve done everything right,‖ he said.
Royster filed the lawsuit, requesting a new election and a hand re-count, after Rizzo had been declared the
winner by three votes. A re-count ordered by the Missouri secretary of state last week narrowed the margin to
one vote.
Nixon also rejected a hand re-count for Royster.




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Posted on Wed, Sep. 15, 2010

Missouri governor was intended target
of stabbing at MCC-Penn Valley
By CHRISTINE VENDEL and MARÁ ROSE WILLIAMS
The Kansas City Star
The student accused of stabbing a college dean in the neck Tuesday in Kansas City actually wanted to stab
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, according to sources close to the investigation.
In fact, Casey Brezik thought he had stabbed Nixon — until police told him otherwise while interrogating him
Tuesday night, the sources said.
The news that he had wounded a college official, and that the official had survived, disappointed Brezik, the
sources said.
The 22-year-old Raytown resident hatched his plan after learning that Nixon was to speak at Metropolitan
Community College-Penn Valley at 10 a.m. Tuesday, the sources said. Brezik wore a bullet-resistant vest to
class that morning. Nixon travels with Highway Patrol troopers.
Brezik did not have a particular beef with Nixon, the sources said, but wanted to harm him because he was a top
government official.
Nixon arrived at Wheeler Downtown Airport shortly before the 9:35 a.m. stabbing. He canceled his visit to the
campus at 3201 Southwest Trafficway.
Nixon has been told about Brezik‘s statements to police, a spokesman said Wednesday night. The spokesman
declined to comment beyond that.
Diagnosed four years ago with paranoid schizophrenia, Brezik had been attending Penn Valley for only three
weeks. Campus officials had not considered him a threat to harm anyone, said MCC Chancellor Mark James.
Brezik‘s relatives have described him as an anarchist, and he ranted about various political topics on his
Facebook page.
He is accused of stabbing the campus dean of instruction, Al Dimmit Jr., in the hallway outside the computer lab
where a lectern had been set up for Nixon‘s speech about high-speed Internet access projects. Brezik also
allegedly nicked James in the chest with the knife as James wrestled with him.
In a news conference Wednesday at the college, Dimmitt‘s son, Andrew, said his father was ―recovering well,‖
and that he was ―looking forward to returning as soon as he is able to Penn Valley.‖
James told reporters at the same news conference that he would focus on ―bulletproofing‖ the campus security
plan, and improving student and staff emergency notification.
―I am determined to learn what we can from the situation,‖ said James, who came to MCC after a 30-year law
enforcement career, including stints as a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper; a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives agent; and director of Missouri‘s Department of Public Safety and Homeland Security.
After the stabbing, about 45 minutes passed before MCC electronically notified employees on all five campuses
of what had happened. Because employees must opt in to get an emergency notification, not all 1,500 staff at
Penn Valley got the word.



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An electronic message did not go out to students until Wednesday morning, and then only to students who had
signed up for notifications, James said. He said he was planning a campuswide discussion to learn where the
notification system may have failed and to take suggestions.
MCC is looking to beef up its behavioral intervention team to help identify students who might pose a danger to
themselves or others, James said.
He also thanked his staff for its ―bravery and compassion,‖ during and after Tuesday‘s incident.
When Brezik appeared Wednesday in Jackson County Circuit Court, onlookers could see an anarchist symbol
tattooed on his right hand and a star, hammer and sickle tattooed on his left hand.
Brezik has battled mental illness for years, relatives said Wednesday. His biological father, Raymond Florio, said
Brezik talked about ―big brother watching‖ and harbored anti-government views.
Diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia in 2006, Brezik spent time in at least four mental hospitals, according to
court records filed by his mother in Greene County, Mo., in 2007.
His mother filed paperwork to become Brezik‘s court-appointed guardian when he was 19 because he was
―disabled and incapacitated.‖ The papers said Brezik had a history of ―lack of personal hygiene, delusional
thoughts, drug abuse, erratic behavior and homelessness.‖
His mother requested that the case be dismissed on Sept. 19, 2007, two days after Brezik was sentenced to
prison on a drug-possession conviction.
Florio said he and Brezik‘s mother tried to get help for Brezik, but were limited because Brezik was an adult and
was not willing to seek treatment. Florio said he thought the system let Brezik down.
―I‘m not trying to downplay the situation,‖ Florio said. ―It‘s very serious and very grave. … It‘s just really frustrating
to see someone you care about go through this. … But what can you do until a situation of this proportion
happens?‖
Florio said he was glad Brezik‘s options would be limited behind bars.
―Maybe now the help will be forced upon him,‖ Florio said.
Brezik‘s demeanor Tuesday night in the Kansas City jail concerned police, who kept him in waist shackles and in
a separate cell overnight.
On Wednesday morning, he wore a two-piece blue jail uniform and shackles as police led him into court for his
first appearance to face four felony charges. Police brought him in separately from seven other inmates who had
arraignments scheduled. The others sat in the front row while Brezik sat alone in the back row until the judge
called his name.
The judge entered not guilty pleas for Brezik.
Brezik stared blankly and appeared dazed during much of the hearing. But he answered quickly and politely
when the judge asked him questions.
At one point during the reading of the formal charges, Brezik lifted his finger as if he wanted to say something,
but he did not.
The judge set Brezik‘s next court appearance for Oct. 6.




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Slashing suspect suffered from mental
illness, mother said
Ex-Springfield man charged in slashing of college dean.
Kathryn Wall • News-Leader • September 16, 2010
A former Springfield resident appeared Wednesday in a Jackson County courtroom on charges that he slashed
the throat of a community college dean in Kansas City.
Casey Brezik, 22, was arraigned on four charges -- two counts of first- degree assault and two counts of armed
criminal action -- after allegedly wielding a knife and assaulting two men shortly before Gov. Jay Nixon was
scheduled to appear at the school.
Faculty members and students tackled Brezik after the stabbing Tuesday morning at Penn Valley Community
College, where a crowd was gathering for a press conference with Nixon.
Although it was his first court appearance in the Kansas City area, Brezik is no stranger to the Greene County
court system.
A 2006 graduate of Glendale High School, Brezik was charged with marijuana possession after a 2005 traffic
stop for a license plate violation.
Charges in the case came in 2006, and Brezik spent the following two years in and out of drug court after
multiple violations of his drug treatment program, court records show.
In 2007, Brezik's mother, Heather Brezik, filed a probate case in Greene County court asking to be named his
legal guardian. Court documents show she claimed he was mentally unstable.
"(Casey Brezik) has a history of lack of personal hygiene, delusional thoughts, drug abuse, erratic behavior and
homelessness," court records in the guardianship case said.
Heather Brezik filed the guardianship case in July 2007. In August, she asked for a psychiatric evaluation of her
son, saying he had been previously diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, court records show.
"(Casey Brezik) has been treated for psychiatric problems at Cox North Hospital, St. John's Hospital-Joplin, St.
John's Hospital-Springfield and Burrell Behavior Health," documents asking for the evaluation said.
In September, the case was dropped by Brezik's mother. Court documents do not list a reason.
Heather Brezik could not be reached for comment Wednesday.
The Kansas City Star reported that Casey Brezik "stared blankly and appeared dazed" during Wednesday's
hearing, at which the judge entered not guilty pleas for the four charges. Brezik was a student enrolled for three
weeks at the community college.
According to court documents in the case, Casey Brezik is accused of slashing the throat of Albert Dimmit.
Dimmit remained hospitalized in good condition on Wednesday and is expected to recover.
Brezik is also charged with assaulting Mark James, chancellor the Metropolitan Community College system.
James said he was nicked by the knife as he tried to help Dimmit.




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Former governor Hearnes officially
inducted into Hall of Famous
Missourians
Wednesday, September 15, 2010 ~ Updated 1:04 PM
The Associated Press
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Warren Hearnes, the state's first governor to serve consecutive terms, was
inducted posthumously Wednesday into the Hall of Famous Missourians.
Hearnes, who served as governor from 1965 to 1973, advocated for more state spending for mental health,
education and social services. During his tenure, Missouri's budget for mental health increased from $26 million
to $86 million. Higher education funding increased by 204 percent to $145 million, and K-12 education spending
climbed 167 percent to $389 million.
To boost spending on education and mental health, Hearnes broke his campaign pledge not to raise taxes. He
also helped secure passage of the state constitutional amendment that allowed Missouri governors to serve
back-to-back terms.
Hearnes died in August 2009 at his home in Charleston in southeastern Missouri.
Betty Hearnes said her husband served in public office because he wanted to help people. She called his career
a "journey of public service" that took him through all three branches of state government. Hearnes started his
political career in 1950 as a Democratic state representative before becoming secretary of state. He also was a
circuit judge in southeast Missouri after being governor.
"I thank you for this tribute that you have bestowed upon Warren this morning," Betty Hearnes said. "To be
recognized by your peers is an honor."
A bronze bust of Warren Hearnes was unveiled Wednesday during a ceremony in the House chamber that
included family members and state elected leaders. Several dozen people have inducted into the Hall of Famous
Missourians, including Mark Twain, Harry S. Truman and George Washington Carver. Inductees are selected by
the House speaker.
The bust of Hearnes was commissioned by former House Speaker Bob Griffin, who attended the ceremony.
Gov. Jay Nixon said Hearnes left a legacy of action and compassion while serving as governor during a time of
turbulence in the 1960s. Nixon said Hearnes helped transform the state by improving education and mental
health care and signing the Missouri's first civil rights act.
"Warren Hearnes was a man who in rising to meet the challenges of his time became a leader of the ages,"
Nixon said.
The bust will be displayed permanently on the third floor of the Capitol.




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Nixon lauds public-private teams in
winning Internet dollars
Dennis Rich
Sedalia Democrat


Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon used a Wednesday stop in Sedalia to tout the latest round of federal stimulus dollars
awarded to statewide broadband Internet projects.
―In this competition with other states, our Missouri projects have been well-prepared because of this public-
private     partnership,‖     Nixon       said     during      a     visit    to      ProEnergy      Services.
His visit comes on the heels of Monday‘s announcement of $57.6 million in American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act funding that will go toward expanding high-speed Internet access to rural Missouri.
―The benefits for education, health care, public safety, commerce and consumers will be felt for decades to
come,‖ Nixon said.
Sho-Me Technologies, a subsidiary of Sho-Me Power, a Marshfield electric cooperative that offers service to
homes in central and southern Missouri, was awarded a $26.6 million grant from the U.S. Commerce
Department‘s National Telecommunications and Information Administration, or NTIA.
Jerry Hartman, Sho-Me‘s manager of administrative services, said by telephone on Wednesday that the
company will use the award to help construct a nearly 1,400-mile fiber optic network that will reach 30 Missouri
counties, including Pettis.
―Sedalia is on one of the routes of that network. The project will provide connectivity and large bandwidth
availability. This backbone is a middle-mile project and is open to last-mile providers that would then tap into this
‗interstate‘ to extend to the consumers the availability of broadband and its applications,‖ Hartman said.
Hartman said Sho-Me is waiting for a final word on a start date but expects it to begin by the end of the year. The
project should take between 12 and 18 months to complete.
Hartman said the project will include 500 miles of new construction, as well as an already-existing 880 miles of
in-kind fiber network the company has laid over the past 14 years. He said the new construction will allow the co-
op to tie all of the lines together into a comprehensive network.
Scott Holste, a Nixon spokesman, said ProEnergy was chosen as one of three legs on a tour that also included
stops in Hermann and Harrisonville because of the Sedalia company‘s global reach. Holste said ProEnergy will
be tied directly into the network once it is in place.
―ProEnergy is an example of a business that does compete in a global market. We are very happy the expansion
of broadband access will enable them to be more competitive,‖ Holste said.
ProEnergy co-owner Cara Canon said the company was glad to host the governor and is excited about the
potential benefits of expanded high-speed Internet access.
―When this is completed it will help our business extremely. This will be wonderful for us,‖ Canon said. ―One of
the biggest problems we have is downloading site plans for projects. It takes us forever, especially when we are
downloading plans from overseas. It can take up to 15 minutes, sometimes longer, to download a set of plans,‖
Canon said.


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Monday‘s announcement also included $26 million (a $13 million grant and a $13 million loan) from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture‘s Rural Utilities Service to Cass County to construct a 1,286-mile fiber optic network to
provide broadband access to 90 percent of the county; and a grant of $5 million from NTIA to the Missouri
Department of Higher Education to create 23 public computing centers at seven of the state‘s community
colleges.
Holste praised State Fair Community College, which already has a computing center, as being on the forefront of
the effort to provide public access to what many see as an essential tool for business and economic
development.




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Posted on Wed, Sep. 15, 2010

Missouri auditor takes a bite out of
speed trap in Randolph
By GLENN E. RICE
The Kansas City Star
Randolph has been caught — in its own speed trap.
State auditors said Wednesday that the Clay County village has relied too much on money it generated from
traffic tickets for its operating revenues, making it the first town in Missouri accused of violating the ―speed trap‖
law.
Also known as the Macks Creek law, it prohibits municipalities from generating more than 35 percent of total
operating revenues from traffic fines and court costs collected for violations on state and federal roads.
Traffic fines and court costs accounted for 75 to 83 percent of Randolph‘s $270,043 in annual revenues last
year, auditors found.
―It was clear right away the amount of money that they brought in was in excess of the law,‖ said Missouri
Auditor Susan Montee. ―I am not sure they understood that the law was out there. The reason for the law is to
keep municipalities from having incentives to write tickets.‖
Although the law has been in place since 1995, this is the first time it has been applied, Montee said.
Randolph is located along Interstate 435 and Missouri 210, just west of the Ameristar Casino. Auditors found
that the village of 47 residents filed 3,132 traffic cases in 2009.
Municipal Court Judge Gregory Dorsey said the use of the term speed trap implies that authorities improperly
enforced traffic laws.
―It is my understanding and experience that the Randolph Police Department does not cite a person unless they
are traveling at least 10 mph over the posted speed limit,‖ Dorsey said. ―I don‘t think that reflects an improper
enforcement of traffic laws.‖
The law is named after a small central Missouri town that once was known as a speed trap. At one time,
speeding ticket fines reportedly provided two-thirds of the town‘s budget.
On Wednesday, Montee said her staff found poor accounting and inadequate recordkeeping of Randolph traffic
tickets.
Auditors found four boxes that contained more than 600 tickets for defendants who failed to show up in court and
for whom warrants had not been issued.
Dorsey said the court clerk had resigned in August 2009 and many of the accounting and recordkeeping
problems occurred when others had to fill in.
Randolph failed to track how much it collected in fines and tickets issued on state and federal highways. It
appeared that Randolph collected between $39,575 and $53,878 too much, according to the audit.
That extra money must be turned over to the Missouri Department of Revenue and then distributed to schools,
Montee said.



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Mo. Highway Patrol starts anti-texting
campaign
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- The Missouri State Highway Patrol is promoting a campaign against texting
while driving by decorating its vehicles with stickers.
Missouri law forbids drivers 21 and younger from sending text messages.
The Highway Patrol says all drivers should follow that prohibition. The patrol says cell phone use contributed
1,780 traffic accidents in Missouri last year.
All Highway Patrol vehicles are getting stickers that show a red circle with a strike through the letters "D," "W"
and "T" - for "driving while texting.




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Mo. getting $500,000 bonus for
boosting adoptions
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Missouri is getting a $500,000 bonus from the federal government for increasing
the number of foster care children who were adopted.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Service uses 2007 as a baseline year and gives states $4,000 for
every child adopted beyond their best year's totals. Additional bonuses are given for adoptions of special-needs
children or those 9 and older.
Missouri is getting $510,180 as a result of increasing its adoptions in 2009. That amount ranks Missouri 22nd out
of 38 states receiving the bonus payments.




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Next step for city school board remains
an open question
By Dale Singer, Beacon staff
Updated 10:00 am Wed., 09.15.10


As the committee assigned to help figure out what's next for St. Louis Public Schools winds up its work, one of
the main questions it is asking is: How should the city school board be chosen, by election or by appointment?
But based on the discussion the five members had on Monday afternoon, as important as how is the question of
who.
The committee led by William H. Danforth and Frankie Freeman came up with the recommendations that led to
the city schools being run by a Special Administrative Board starting in 2007. It was reconvened last year by
Chris Nicastro, Missouri's commissioner of elementary and secondary education, to come up with ideas on what
the next step should be.
Committee members seemed to agree that going back to an elected board at some point is probably the best
road to take. But when the changeover should take place, how the transition would work and who would be the
best type of person to serve on the new board remain open questions.
Lawyer Ned Lemkemeier, who led the discussion, said he would prefer that the SAB remain in place until the city
schools regain their accreditation -- a process likely to take several years, based on the latest preliminary data
released by state education officials earlier Monday.
He said that the state should measure any progress made by the city schools against their performance this
school year and praised what he has seen under the direction of Superintendent Kelvin Adams.
Board member Donald Suggs agreed, saying:
"It seems like we're on the right path, and the last thing I want to see is for us to disrupt that."
Michael Middleton said he worries about what kind of people will be persuaded to run for the board once the
SAB gives way to an elected board.
"In St. Louis in this era," he said, "which method is most likely to produce the best people, election or
appointment? I'm not sure we can legislate responsible behavior."
Freeman added, "How do you assure the competence and the stability?"
Danforth said the idea of a mixed board, some appointed and some elected, doesn't seem to have support from
anyone.
At what is supposed to be its final meeting on Oct. 8, Danforth said he hoped the committee will have a draft
report of recommendations to submit to Nicastro and the state school board.
The difficulty in coming up with those ideas might be was underscored by the results of two focus groups -- one
made up of teachers, the other made up of parents -- that was presented to the committee by UMSL professor
Terry Jones. You can see details of the presentation below.
Comparing results of the discussions held last month with similar groups that were convened four years ago,
Jones ran through several conclusions:


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Weak leadership in the city schools is an obstacle to success.
The problems do not necessarily reside with the SAB or with the current superintendent but are deeper and
more systemic, leading to a perception of instability.
Many people are skeptical about the future success of the city schools.
Board members are too often seen as having political agendas that may not have the schools' best interests at
heart.
The city schools too often seem to be impatient and fail to stick to policies that may yield positive results.
"They have seen board after board not doing what they should be doing," Jones said.
As far as the challenges that the schools face, Jones listed these:
Coming up with a single strategy for success, then sticking to it.
Finding ways to measure progress in a reliable manner.
Reconciling disparities among different schools in different parts of the city.
A lack of confidence that any progress will continue.
On the issue being pondered by the Danforth committee, whether the board should be elected or appointed,
Jones said people retain an attachment to the concept of an elected board, but they remember the drama and
dysfunction that past boards suffered from.
They also said that if board members are appointed, they would prefer the appointments be made by legislators,
not by the governor or the mayor, but Jones qualified that statement by saying individuals wanted their particular
legislator to do the appointing, not the legislative body as a whole. See the entire presentation here:
Parent and Teacher Opinions Regarding St. Louis Public Schools




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No drama for Obama talk
This year, speech to students stirs little controversy.
By Catherine Martin
Columbia Daily Tribune
Wednesday, September 15, 2010
Controversy surrounded President Barack Obama‘s speech to the nation‘s students last fall, but his second
annual talk passed quietly by in Columbia.
At Hickman High School, teachers showed the speech on a classroom-by-classroom basis, most opting to show
a recorded version.
―They can discuss and talk about it better in a classroom,‖ said Tranna Foley, one of Hickman‘s media
specialists. ―It‘s just better to teach in a small group.‖
But at noon yesterday when the president spoke live to students across the country, most Hickman students
were at lunch. They had the option to watch the speech live in the media center, but it was not playing on the
large screen in the school‘s commons, where many students gather during lunch hour.
Only two students watched the speech live in the media center, and the rest of the roughly 10 to 15 students
present appeared disinterested.
Riley Lewis and Stephanie Jackman, both seniors, sat and watched attentively through the whole speech, in
which Obama told students to work hard and dream big.
―He makes it relatable,‖ Jackman said of the speech. ―It‘s like he‘s not just the president; it‘s like you know him.‖
In the speech, Obama told students he was proud of them and to keep up their good work.
―I‘m sure a lot of parents tell their kids that every day, … but he‘s the president,‖ Jackman said.
Although Jackman said she planned to tell her mom to have her sister watch the speech, she admitted she
probably wouldn‘t have watched had she not already been in the library.
Lewis, who recently moved from Canada, had not planned to watch the speech either, but he said he was
excited when it started. ―I just moved here in July, and this is my first chance to hear the president talk,‖ he said.
He said he found Obama relatable as the president reflected on his school days, admitting he was not always a
good student.
―Anyone could be the president.‖ Lewis said.
At Rock Bridge High School, teachers also had the option to play the speech in their classrooms, but the school
also showed it live in the Performing Arts Center. Principal Mark Maus said eight teachers signed up to watch
the speech live.
All parents in the district were sent an opt-out form for their children, but no students at Rock Bridge opted out of
the speech, spokeswoman Michelle Baumstark said. One student opted out at Hickman.
In the 17 schools from which Baumstark received numbers on the opt-outs, a total of 127 students opted out of
the speech.




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Jefferson Junior High School Principal Gregery Caine said his school will show a recorded version of the speech
in all social studies classes Friday, adding the school district strongly encouraged all schools to show the
speech.
―Last year, it was basically teacher option if they wanted to show it or not,‖ he said. ―This year, it was kind of an
expectation. We didn‘t want to be the only building not showing it.‖




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MISSOURINET

Veto override fails (AUDIO)
by Bob Priddy on September 15, 2010


Republicans do not have two-thirds of the votes in the Missouri House, and that‘s why the House has failed to
override Governor Nixon‘s veto of a bill passed in May. Party-line voting has upheld the governor‘s veto of a billt
hat would have given the legislature control over spending of federal stimulus money. House Speaker Ron
Richard of Joplin announced the bill had come up 24 voes short.
Speaker Richard announces the vote :07 mp3″
The Governor and Democrats maintained a provision in the bill made it onconstitutional despite the
overwhelming approval by lawmakers in May. Representative Brian Nieves of Washington snidely attacked
Governor Nixon and Democrats.
Nieves :28 mp3
But Columbia representative Chris Kelly, a Demcorat, says there‘s another technicality that made him oppose
the override attempt.
Kelly :34 mp3
The Senate did not try to override any bills. Lawmakers won‘t be back in Jsession again until January.




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Film festival highlights veto override
debate (AUDIO)
by Bob Priddy on September 15, 2010
The use of federal stimulus money for a Warrensburg film festival has become part of the discussion of a
constitutionality of a bill Governor Nixon has vetoed.
House Republicans have come up short of the number needed to override the veto of 1a bill putting federal
stimulus money distribution under legislative control. Now it‘s handled through the executive branch.
The situation seems odd to Representative J. C. Kuessner of Eminence who recalls when house budget
Chairman Allen Icet of Wildwood opposed state acceptance of the federal money to begin with.
Kuessner & Icet :29 mp3
 Democrats say the system is working well as-is and the bill is not needed–and certainly isn‘t needed with a
separate unconstitutional provision.
But House budget chairman Allen Icet says a film festival financed with $100,000 of stimulus money funneled
through the Social Services Department makes no sense.
 Icet comments :10 mp3
But Democrats like Jeff Roorda of Barnhart says the department is recalling that money…
Roorda :09 mp3
Republicans argue the provision the governor says is unconstitutional is a moot issue because no money will go
into that fund. Democrats say that does not excuse overriding a veto to pass a law with an unconstitutional
provision in it.
The veto override needed 109 votes. It got 85.




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Gov. Hearnes inducted into Hall of
Famous Missourians [AUDIO]
by Jessica Machetta on September 15, 2010
Missouri‘s 46th governor, Warren Eastman Hearnes, was inducted into the Hall of Famous Missourians today.
The ceremony and unveiling of a bronze bust was held in the chambers of the Missouri House of
Representatives at the Missouri Capitol.
is widow, Betty Hearnes, recalled their visit to the Capitol — and that chamber — 62 years ago after Warren had
been overseas serving in the armed services for quite some time.
Hearnes was a Charleston, Mo., native. He served as governor from 1964 to 1973. He died in August 2009. He
joins the ranks of famous Missourians such as Samuel Clemens, Walter Cronkite, and Sacajawea.
His widow, Betty Hearnes, says they visited to the Capitol as newlyweds. That was 62 years ago. She started off
by saying ―he was a skinny guy‖ … even if he didn‘t stay that way. Once a public servant, always a public
servant, she said, noting that she is still proud to be considered as such.
The bronze bust was commissioned by former House Speaker Bob Griffin. It‘s rumored he‘s raising private funds
for a few others in the future. Only House speakers can request certain people be honored in the third floor
rotunda, which features famous Missourians.
Betty Hearnes reached out and touched the likeness of her husband‘s face when the bronze bust of him was
unveiled. She noted that the artist had even included the scar on his left cheek. Even as she clutched a tissue in
her right hand, her voice never wavered throughout the event. Maybe once, when she talked about his love for
the House.
Sculptor William J. Williams of Bellows Falls, Vt. created the bust, as well as 25 others in the hall, including the
first one – Samuel Langhorne Clemens.
Griffin said Hearnes contributions to education, mental health, civil rights, the arts, tourism, the environment and
economic development still touch the lives of all Missourians today.
Hearnes ceremony featuring Speaker Ron Richard, Governor Nixon, former Speaker Bob Griffin, Historian Gary
Kremer, and Former First Lady Betty Hearnes [31:58 min.]




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BLOG ZONE
Cleaver in line to be next Congressional
Black Caucus chair
KC Star Prime Buzz
Steve Kraske
Congressman Emanuel Cleaver is making plans to be the next chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus,
Roll Call reports todday.
Cleaver of Kansas City is now the group‘s first vice chair. That positions him to move into the top slot in the
next Congress.
Rep. Barbara Lee, a California Democrat, holds the chairmanship now, but the office is typically held for only
two years.
From the article:
Cleaver has not made his intentions public, but a Democratic lobbyist with close ties to the caucus said Cleaver
has been sharing plans to seek the CBC post in conversations with Members and others with CBC connections.
The lobbyist said Cleaver told him firsthand he intended to run for chairman and predicted that Cleaver would not
draw any competition.
―I don‘t think anybody is going to run against him,‖ the lobbyist said. ―So this may be a year of
acclamation again.‖


Read more: http://primebuzz.kcstar.com/entries/cleaver-line-be-next-congressional-black-caucus-
chair/#ixzz0zhWEF3mK




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Veto session ends as quickly as it begins
Posted on September 15, 2010 by Roseann Moring
SNL Inside Politics Blog
The veto session is over save for a bit of speechmaking on the part of outgoing legislators.
The only bill that was discussed for an override was HB 1903, which would have set aside separate funds from
any new stimulus money and any Race to the Top money.
Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed the bill because he said it would be redundant and because some parts might be
unconstitutional.
A veto requires a two-thirds majority to override, so the almost completely party-line vote was not enough to
override the veto in the House. Rep. Jamilah Nasheed, a St. Louis Democrat, voted with Republicans, making
the vote 85-68.
The Senate didn‘t take up any bills.
Rep. Sara Lampe, D-Springfield, defended Democrats‘ switch to a no vote.
―The process of moving from the legislative branch to the governor‘s desk gave the opportunity for that bill to be
looked at closely,‖ she said.




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EDITORIALS … & Letters to the Editor
St. Louis Public Schools should stay
with Special Administrative Board
The Editorial Board | St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Posted: Wednesday, September 15, 2010 9:00 pm
Change is afoot, again, at St. Louis Public Schools. This time, the change may be that rare commodity in urban
education: Stability.
When the State Board of Education stripped the district of accreditation in February 2007, a three-member
Special Administrative Board was appointed to take control of the deeply troubled district.
State intervention, however, is a temporary condition. Special administrative boards, under state law, do not
have unlimited shelf lives.
Last August, Missouri Commissioner of Education Chris L. Nicastro reconvened a five-member advisory
committee on St. Louis Public Schools led by former Washington University Chancellor Dr. William H. Danforth
and civil rights attorney Frankie Freeman.
Ms. Nicastro asked the committee to ―develop recommendations regarding the future direction of the school
district,‖ with a special emphasis on reaching ―consensus about what constitutes adequate progress for the
district to move forward without state supervision.‖
The committee conducted a series of interviews over the last year and soon will conclude its work. A public
meeting on Monday focused on preparation of its draft report to be presented in October.
The members — who also include St. Louis attorney Ned Lemkemeier, University of Missouri-Columbia Deputy
Chancellor Michael Middleton and St. Louis American publisher Dr. Donald Suggs — appear to have reached a
consensus on the central question.
They said that state supervision of St. Louis Public Schools should continue and the Special Administrative
Board should remain in place until the district regains accreditation.
This advice clearly represents the best course for public education in St. Louis. The State Board of Education‘s
intervention in 2007 was long overdue and now represents the most profound, promising and sustained
opportunity in decades for St. Louis Public Schools.
The Special Administrative Board has restored order to the district‘s chaotic and dysfunctional day-to-day
operations. It has brought stability and regularity to district finances. It has acted deliberately and decisively in
vexing but unavoidable matters, such as the need for staff reductions and school closings — providing real
opportunities for community involvement in these decisions.
District enrollment continues to decline, but the losses have leveled off compared to precipitous drops
experienced in the years before the SAB.
The SAB hired Kelvin Adams, an energetic and confidence-inspiring superintendent who has won broad support
from teachers, state education officials and civic and business leaders. He just began his second full school year
as superintendent.



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Student test results released in July showed gains. Improvements in scores, while limited, extend across grade
levels and subjects.
St. Louis Public Schools still faces daunting challenges, but, measured by any reasonable standard, the district
has reversed course and is achieving modest yet real improvements.
That turnaround is directly attributable to state intervention. As long as progress continues, the SAB should
remain in place until the job is completed and full district accreditation is restored.
The Freeman-Danforth committee had hoped to develop a plan that would ―result in a permanent governing
body of able people, who are dedicated to the welfare of the students and accountable for the success of the St.
Louis Public Schools and with a sensible and realistic means for ending up there.‖
Paradoxically, extending the SAB‘s temporary service may be the most effective means of moving the district
toward a permanent system of stable and effective governance.
It will give policymakers time to observe and discern what has worked for the SAB and put that toward devising
other reforms.
The SAB‘s structure as a three-person board, for example, limits the factionalism that destroyed the credibility of
the elected board, especially considering that members can discuss district business only at open public
meetings.
This structure might be considered for whatever board — elected or appointed — follows the SAB.
The Freeman-Danforth committee made no recommendations in its December 2006 report regarding whether
the St. Louis public schools should keep state accreditation. It stuck to the facts and proposed guiding principles
to help state policymakers weigh the best options.
This represents a sound approach for how the committee can deal with the question of long-term governance. It
should focus on facts and guiding principles.
Conclusions from the 2006 committee report remain highly relevant.
• St. Louis‘ children were ―not being well educated‖ by a long series of elected boards.
• Constant board turnover ―brought different priorities, different directions.‖
• Elected board members had ―been disputing publicly with each other, with the superintendent and with the
mayor‖ and the ―infighting‖ and ―attempts to assign blame to others‖ contributed to a loss of public confidence in
the district.
• They failed to establish ―good working relations with metropolitan or state political leadership or the community
— all of which are necessary for a successful school system.‖
• They had ―been making decisions about personnel and contracts that ... should be made by the
superintendent, causing management to be difficult and inefficient.‖
Some of those oversight problems have been rectified by the appointed SAB. Ms. Freeman, Mr. Danforth and
their committee should detail how that was achieved — and then describe how an elected or appointed board
might continue such progress under permanent governance of St. Louis Public Schools.




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Why destabilize St. Louis?
By State Senator Robin Wright-Jones, Guest Columnist
The St. Louis American

Wednesday, September 15, 2010 11:27 PM CDT
Voters will soon get the opportunity to head to the polls in November to consider several propositions and
choose who should represent them on both the national, state and local level. One particular issue that I would
like to address is Proposition A, a ballot initiative that has the possibility of eliminating certain city earnings taxes.

More specifically, this ballot issue would amend Missouri‘s law to ―repeal the authority of certain cities to use
earnings taxes to fund their budgets; require voters in cities that currently have an earnings tax to approve
continuation of the tax at the next general municipal election and at an election held every five years thereafter;
require any current earnings tax that is not approved by the voters to be phased out over a period of 10 years;
and    prohibit    any     city    from   adding   a     new     earnings    tax    to   fund     their   budget.‖

This proposal could eliminate certain city earnings taxes, including the City of St. Louis, which reported earnings
tax revenue of $141.2 million in 2010. If passed, this measure will impact taxes by removing certain cities‘
abilities to fund their budgets through earnings taxes. The only exception is that voters in cities that currently
have an earnings tax, such as the City of St. Louis, may vote to continue such taxes.

Nowhere in the ballot initiative does it mention a specific plan to replace these cities‘ earnings taxes. The loss of
the tax would destabilize the largest producer of State revenue, the City of St. Louis – the economic hub of our
region. In this economic climate, is that really the right thing to do? It seems that we are running fast to re-
arrange the deck chairs on a ship called Missouri. I am opposed to Prop A and will work for its defeat.

State Senator Robin Wright-Jones (D – St. Louis) represents the 5th Senatorial District in the Missouri Senate.




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Study finds 235 journalists made
political contributions
BY STEVE PARKER > Deputy managing editor/News
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Posted: Wednesday, September 15, 2010 12:51 pm
OpenSecretsblog reports that 235 people "who identified themselves on government documents as journalists,
or as working for news organizations," have donated more than $469,900 to federal political candidates,
committees and parties this election season.
OpenSecrets reports that an analysis by the Center for Responsive Politics found:
People identifying themselves as working for hard news outlets such as the Washington Post, the New York
Times, the New York Post, News Corp., Vanity Fair and Reuters are among the listed donors. Also listed are
employees from outlets offering lighter fare -- ESPN, Vogue -- or community news...
The study found that 65 percent of the donations went to Democrats.
No one from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch is on the list of donors.
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch's ethics policy for news and editorial employees explicitly states: "Campaign
contributions, either cash or in-kind, should not be made."
OpenSecrets reports:
Despite the potential for controversy, some journalists who've made political contributions reject the notion that
their interests are conflicting, saying their action as private citizens and as journalists are not mutually exclusive.
Paul Tharp, a business reporter for the New York Post, last year donated $750 to Rep. Michael McMahon (D-
N.Y.), the Center's analysis of Federal Election Commission records show. Tharp said his two donations
represent a "satisfaction with [McMahon's] public service" and his work with the arts.
"Just because I am a reporter doesn't mean I give up my rights," Tharp said. "I have an interest in public service,
but not politics. I cover business."
OpenSecrets reports:
Major news outlets look dimly upon their journalists participating in politics.
The Associated Press, the New York Times, Reuters, ABC News and other media companies have specific
guidelines for employees that pertain to activities that could jeopardize the perception of journalistic integrity --
including making political donations. These outlets do not distinguish among types of employees -- direct political
participation is forbidden, at least without the permission of a supervisor.
The Society of Professional Journalists likewise features a conduct code that recommends journalists "avoid
conflicts of interest, real or perceived" and "remain free of associations and activities that may compromise
integrity or damage credibility."
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch's ethics policy mirrors SPJ's conduct code. Some excerpts from the policy:
"The Post-Dispatch recognizes that all staff members enjoy free speech and other basic rights. The Post-
Dispatch encourages outside civic activities that do not come into conflict with a journalist's work assignment....


          News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov
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               MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS

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...But reporters and editors should leave no room for doubt about their impartiality and must keep in mind how
their actions might affect the credibility of the Post-Dispatch as a whole. ...
...The litmus test on whether a public, political or civic activity is proper should be whether the community might
legitimately view that activity as representing a conflict of interest and whether it could be viewed as tainting the
newspaper's reputation for independence and objectivity.




          News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov
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Voices: Debate the issues
By The Associated Press Special to The Globe
NEOSHO, Mo. — This week, Democratic congressional candidate Scott Eckersley will be in Neosho, Anderson
and Pineville to debate his Republican opponent, Billy Long.

Both campaigns had agreed to debate at each of the 10 county seats of the Seventh District, but, without
explanation, Mr. Long withdrew from the debates. Mr. Eckersley will be present at each of the county seats to
meet with the public (Thursday in Neosho, and Friday in Anderson/Pineville), but will not be able to debate the
issues.

I realize that Mr. Long is fed up with everything that is happening in Washington, but the voting public needs to
know his positions on the issues. While he has been endorsed by the tea party, I am curious if he supports the
positions of such candidates as Sharon Angle and Rand Paul. Do you support the abolition of Social Security
and Medicare, Mr. Long? If so, how do you plan on funding them for those who are retired or nearing retirement?
Do you support the abolition of the Department of Education and returning all funding to the states? If so, how
can we assure the future of our country? States have already cut education budgets to the bone while class
sizes increase and the quality of public education falls. Do you support eliminating the Environmental Protection
Agency, while our natural resources, air and water continue to be polluted? Personally, I am fed up with your
continuous avoidance of the issues. The voters of the Seventh District, not only friendly businesses, need to
know your stand on the issues.

Come on, Billy Long, debate Scott Eckersley and let us know your position on the issues. What have you got to
be afraid of by giving your views on the important issues facing this country?

Jim Hight

Neosho




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USA TODAY MISSOURI NEWS
Monday, September 13 — Columbia — A program aimed at helping Boone County inmates get jobs when
they're released has been awarded a federal grant. The reintegration program has received a $346,022 Second
Chance Act grant. The state Department of Corrections applied for the grant from the U.S. Justice Department
and had to provide a 50% match.
Tuesday, September 14 — Carthage — Beginning Oct. 1, correspondence between inmates at Jasper County
Jail and their families will be restricted only to postcards. The jail will join several others across the state and the
country that allow only postcards for casual correspondence with inmates. The policy is to lower the chances of
introducing contraband.
Wednesday, September 15 -- St. Louis — State judges are the first in the country to see the price tag for the
sentences they hand out. Judges are being given data about how much sentences for specific defendants will
cost the state. Defense lawyers said the information could spur alternative sentencing.

Thursday, September 16 – no update




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