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Where Can Ex Offenders Find Job Employment in Indiana

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Where Can Ex Offenders Find Job Employment in Indiana Powered By Docstoc
					Developing a Workforce
     For Re-Entry

    Theory & Assessment
Doug Evans, OWDS, GCDF       PEN Products, Indiana
Francis Abbott, OWDS, GCDF   LDPSC-PE, Louisiana
Lisa Williams, OWDS          PEN Products, Indiana
              Track Overview
• National Institute of Corrections Training
• All Industries Team of 12
• Offender Workforce Development
• Modules focus on the process from sentencing
  through the re-entry transition
Why in Correctional Industries?
 Benefit of Workforce Development in CI
          • Daily operation
          • Customers
          • Bottom line
          • Offender worker
          • Staff
                      Harley Lappin
• “Post release success of offenders is as
  important to public safety as inmates’
  secure incarceration”

• “Prison Industries is the BOP’s most
  important correctional program because it
  has been proven to substantially reduce
  recidivism”
Director Federal Bureau of Prisons
March 10, 2009 US House of Representatives sub-committee hearing
                  Theory
“An explanation or model that covers a
substantial group of occurrences and has
been confirmed by a substantial number
of experiments and observations.”
    • Krumboltz – Learning Theory
    • Schlossberg – Transition Theory
    • Holland – Trait and Factor Theory
    • Super – Developmental Theory
             Donald Super
• Developmental theory

• Identify life roles

• Rainbow model
• Average offender stats – family, education,
  work, etc.
  (how are offenders lives impacted by upbringing…)
Super’s Developmental Theory
Examines how people develop over a long
period of time across the life span

  1. Life divided into age related stages
  2. If tasks of a given stage are completed than one is on
     schedule or mature.
  3. If tasks of a given stage are not completed than one is
     off schedule or immature.
Super’s Life Roles
 1.   Son / Daughter
 2.   Student
 3.   Worker
 4.   Spouse / Partner
 5.   Homemaker
 6.   Parent
 7.   Leisurite
 8.   Citizen
 9.   Offender
Super’s Career Rainbow
                Factors in Roles
• People choose their roles
• Selecting roles and the activities in them is the way
  to control one’s life
• Activities or events in one role often affect other
  roles
• Career is a combination of activities in all roles at a
  specific time
                 Career Planning
• Career: a person's progress or general course of action
             through life or through a phase of life, as in some
             profession or undertaking

• Occupation: an activity that serves as one's regular source
                   of livelihood


• Job:     a specific task done as part of the routine of one's
           occupation
     What causes
  failure or success
in a person’s career?
  John Holland – Career Choice
People can be described as a combination of
  2 or more of 6 types:
          1.   Realistic
          2.   Investigative
          3.   Artistic
          4.   Social
          5.   Enterprising
          6.   Conventional
  John Holland – Career Choice
Environments can also be described as a
  combination of 2 or more of 6 types:
          1.   Realistic
          2.   Investigative
          3.   Artistic
          4.   Social
          5.   Enterprising
          6.   Conventional
                  (jobs, worksites, schools, etc.)
                    Holland Code
       Realistic                   Investigative



Conventional                           Artistic




     Enterprising                  Social
              Green Lawn Care Co.
      Lawn Care                  Lawn Care
       Laborer    R       I       Specialist




Book Keeper   C                 A    Landscape
                                      Designer


                                Customer
 Business Owner   E       S   Service/Sales
                          Print Shop
Shipping/Packaging
                                       Quality Assurance
  Press Operator      R           I     ISO Compliance
      Bindery


                                             Desktop Publisher
Estimator/
                                             Graphic Designer
 PIC Clerk     C                         A


                                         Customer Service
Utility Journeyman                       Career Resource
                      E           S
Project Coordinator
                    Furniture Shop
   CNC Operator                  Inspector
    Fabricator      R        I


Engineer                              Project Design
Assistant       C                A



    Project                      Customer Service
  Coordinator       E        S   Career Resource
John Holland – Career Choice

    When a person is able to find
 employment where the types match
        he/she is likely to be
      satisfied and productive
The Interests and Skills Checklist
Varied Profile
High Flat Profile
Low Flat Profile
   Why Career Planning?
• 1996 NYDOL reports 89% who violated
  probation or parole were unemployed

• 2007 Department of Justice reports 85%
  ex-offenders who were re-arrested were
  unemployed
          NCIA Mission
The mission of the National Correctional
  Industries Association is to promote
excellence and credibility in correctional
    industries through professional
 development and innovative business
solutions that improve public safety and
       successful offender reentry.
          Employment




          Ex-Offender
Support             Activities
                      Career Process Model
                                           1. Become aware               Assessment
                                             of the need to
                                             make a choice
              7. Get a job

                                                                        2. Take a snapshot
                                                                            of yourself
                                         Resources:
                                      On-the-job Training,
                                    Assessments, Volunteers
6. Get the required                    Websites, Mentors
    education or                  Community agencies, Parole,
      training                             WorkOne                           3. Identify
                                                                            occupational
                                                                            alternatives



                5. Choose among                    4. Get information
                   alternatives                     about identified
                                                       alternatives
 Wrap-Up
    and
Evaluations
Developing a Workforce
     For Re-Entry

             Job Readiness
Regina Banks, OWDS, GCDF, CALPIA, California
Anthony Newman, OWDS, GCDF, PHILACOR, Philadelphia
Heidi Senethavilay, OWDS, GCDF, FMWCC, Nevada
Developing a Workforce
     For Re-Entry

             Job Readiness
Regina Banks, OWDS, GCDF, CALPIA, California
Anthony Newman, OWDS, GCDF, PHILACOR, Philadelphia
Heidi Senethavilay, OWDS, GCDF, FMWCC, Nevada
       Workshop Overview
     By the end of this workshop you
             will have learned
• What is barrier planning
• How facilitation skills help reach job readiness
  goals
• How barrier planning and facilitation skills
  effective transition interview
Career Process Model
                             1. Become aware of
                             the need to make a
                                   choice

         7. Get a job

                                                         2. Take a snapshot
                                                             of yourself
                              Resources:
                          On-the-job Training,
                            Assessments,
6. Get the required           Volunteers
   education or
      training            Websites, Mentors
                         Community agencies,
                           Parole, WorkOne                 3. Identify
                                                         occupational
                                                          alternatives


       5. Choose among
          alternatives
                                    4. Get information
                                     about identified
                                        alternatives
Offender Workforce
    Development

Barriers Planning
       Barriers Planning
• Identifying and Managing Barriers
• What are Barriers?
• Society and the Offender
          Barrier Planning
          Internal Barriers
• Self-Concept      • Internal Locus of Control
• Self- Knowledge   • Negative Belief or Attitudes
• Self-Efficacy     • Planning and Decision
                      Making
          Barrier Planning
             Reality Barriers
• Sexism              • Limited Work Experience
• Racism              • Physical, Mental and
• Limited Education     Emotional Disabilities
      Barrier Planning
    Organizational Barriers

Identified by the Diversity Experts
   • Organizational
   • Individual
    Organizational Barriers
         Individuals Barriers
•   Negative Attitudes
•   Discrimination and Prejudice
•   Stereotyping
•   Racism
•   Bias
•   Organizational Culture
Barriers Common to Offenders

• Knowledge or adherence to norms of
  society
• Positive role models when released
• Access to training that would provide or
  upgrade job skills
• Documents needed during job search
Barriers Common to Offenders
 •   Appropriate Clothing
 •   Transportation
 •   Employer Acceptance of Ex-offenders
 •   Emotional Support From Family or Friends
Identifying Barriers

•   Records
•   Personal Knowledge
•   Structure Interview
•   Transition Interview
    • Solar Skills
    • Facilitation Skill
         Barriers Planning

  Readiness to Set Goals and Assume
            Responsibility
• A Process
• Intervention
• Acceptance
       Barrier Planning
Minimizing or Removing Barriers

   •   Advocacy
   •   Leadership Roll
   •   Support Services
   •   Legislation
   •   Referral Services
   Resolutions to Barriers
Necessity pushes us past the barriers of
           our own thinking

          • Our Task
          • Strike Balance
          • Define “We”
  Offender Workforce
      Development

  Understanding and
Using Facilitation Skills
         Facilitation Skills Use?

 Acceptance ~ Relating to people just as they are.
  Sympathy ~ Understanding based upon shared
              experience.
   Empathy ~ Putting yourself in another
              person’s shoes.
Genuineness ~ Concept related to trust.
SOLAR Methods of Facilitation
S quarely face the parson
O pen posture
L ean toward the other person
E ye contact
R elaxed
               Facilitation Skills
                        Reflecting
Paraphrasing what an offender has said
•   Parroting back
•   Reflecting echoes and essence of verbal message
•   Includes an understanding
•   Enables offenders to feel understood
                         Attending
Known as listening with the whole body
                Facilitation Skills
              Closed-Ended Questions…
Advantages ~
  • Easy for offenders to answer
  • Yield or clarify information quickly
Disadvantages ~
  •   Restrict to brief answers
  •   Keep the questioner in control
  •   May feel like an interrogation
  •   Can be heard as advice or criticism
                Facilitation Skills
                Open-Ended Questions
Advantages ~
  •   Invite offenders to explore thoughts/feelings
  •   Give offenders some control
  •   Convey interest and respect
  •   Provide unexpected information
Disadvantages ~
  • May take offenders off topic
  • May lead to a series of “I don’t know” responses.
            Facilitation Skills
Reasons for Open and Closed Ended Questions

 Closed                  Open
 • Cap information       • Get information
 • Slow down dialogue    • Encourage self reflection
 • Confirm information   • Release information
              Facilitation Skills
                 Transferable Skills
Help the offender understand they have skills even if
they have not held taxable employment.
           Facilitation Skills

Correctional Supervisor primary focus is
helping offenders get and keep job.

Facilitation skills can be a powerful tool for
accomplishing these goals.
         Facilitation Skill
Diversity ~
• Identifiable differences between and
  within members of various groups.
Stereotype ~
• Assuming all members of a certain group
  share the same characteristics.
          Facilitation Skills

Juvenile Offenders ~ Special Challenges
 • Dynamics of adolescence
 • Belief that “getting caught” was the problem
Older Offenders ~ Challenges
 • Numbers are rapidly growing
 • Considered a minority group
                Facilitation Skills
                       Ethnic Identity
Degree an individual views membership
   • Positive
   • Central part of his/her personal identity
                       Acculturation
Level an individual gives up unique characteristics
   • Minority culture
   • Values and characteristics
                         Ethnicity
Diversity
   • Social
   • Cultural themes
 Offender Workforce
     Development

Transitional Interviewing
      Transitional Interviewing
What is an the goal of transitional interviewing

    • To assess readiness for transition
    • To facilitate the development of an action
      plan for the transition
     Transitional Interviewing
What is the goal of supervision in Correctional
                   Industry
 • Holding offenders accountable for conditions
 • Encouraging positive behavior change
How Transition Interviewing Fit?
Supports Correctional Industry Supervisors
• In offenders outcome
• Opportunity for case management model
Emphasizes frontline staff influence on the
             change process
• Changes the frontline staff’s role from that of a
  mere observer and reporter.
     Transition Interviews
   Assess the offenders readiness to
• To own their responsibility and accountability
• Get a picture of the offender
• Identify or clarify the offenders career goals
    Transition Interviews
Assess the offenders readiness to
•   Develop an action plan for transition
•   Identify obstacles
•   Identify needed resources
•   Match offender’s needs with services
Transition Interviewing
 Development of an action plan
   Allows offender to take charge
   Action Planning
 Concrete Action Planning
Conceivable      Measurable
Believable       Desirable
Achievable

     Gets Offenders
       Involvement
       Feedback
       Commitment
       Action Planning
  Allows offender to take charge in
Long Term
• Short Term
• Back-up planning
   • Involvement
   • Feedback
   • Commitment
• What, Who and by When
                             Action Plans
  What Would an Action Plan Look Like?
Name: ______________________________        Date: ___________________


Long-term goal:_________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
    Short-term goal:______________________________________________________
Steps to reach goal:

    What?                     Who?                 When?
    _____________________________________________________________________________
    _____________________________________________________________________________
    _____________________________________________________________________________
Transitional Interview Guide
   • Summary of Current Situation
   • Self-Characteristics
   • Support System
 Transitional Interview Guide
What Would an Transitional Interview
        Guide Look Like?
Summary of Current Situation
  • Attitude
  • Work skills and experience possessed
  • Remaining barriers
  • Specific job possibilities
  • Services still needed related to the above
 Transitional Interview Guide
What Would an Transitional Interview
        Guide Look Like?
Self-Characteristics
   • Level of motivation to succeed in the transition
   • Readiness to set goals
   • Readiness to assume responsibility for self
   • Services still needed related to the above
 Transitional Interview Guide
What Would an Transitional Interview
        Guide Look Like?
Support System
   • Persons who will provide emotional support
   • Plans for housing and food
   • Plans for clothing
   • Plans for child care (if relevant)
 Transitional Interview Guide
What Would an Transitional Interview
        Guide Look Like?
 Support System
   • Plans for transportation to interviews and jobs
   • Documents needed
   • Job interview training provided
   • Possible employers
Transitional Interview
       Built On
   Builds on Career Assessment
Understand and Identifying Barriers
       Use Facilitation Skills
Transitional Interview
Career Assessment Summary
        Action Plans
           SOLER
Transitional Interview Guide
Let’s Review
Questions?
 Wrap-Up
    and
Evaluations
Developing a Workforce
     For Re-Entry
             JOB PLACEMENT
Susan Cunningham, OWDS, GCDF, LCSW, TRICOR
Tracy Roberts, OWDS, GCDF, Utah County Sheriff’s Office
Vicki Cox, OWDS, GCDF, Ohio Penal Industries
Gerald Schartner, OWDS, GCDF pending, Vermont
Correctional Industries
     Objectives of this Workshop


• Describe the sources of occupational and
  educational information need by individuals to
  make career choices and changes
 The OWDS in the Career Planning Process


• Explain the steps and offender responsibilities
  and what you can do to assist
• Offer activities and resources that may help
• Assist the offender to use the information
• Refer offenders for assistance from others
  Career Process Model
                                          1. Become aware of the
                                          need to make a choice


                7. Get a job

                                                                               2. Take a snapshot of
                                                                                      yourself

                                            Resources:
                                        On-the-job Training,
                                      Assessments, Volunteers
 6. Get the required
education or training
                                         Websites, Mentors
                                       Community agencies,
                                         Parole, WorkOne
                                                                                3. Identify
                                                                               occupational
                                                                               alternatives



                    5. Choose among
                       alternatives                 4. Get information about
                                                     identified alternatives
        Occupational Research
• Use a least two sources, and preferably more,
  to collect data about occupations
• It is also helpful to conduct informational
  interviews with a least two people who work
  in the occupation
Databases for Career Work
           The Labor Market
• An exchange between buyers (employers) and
  sellers (employees)
• The labor market is a dynamic relationship
  which can be affected by many trends and
  changes
    Sources of Labor Market Information
•   The Occupational Outlook Handbook
•   The Guide for Occupational Exploration
•   O*Net
•   America’s Career InfoNet
 Occupational Outlook Handbook
• Nature of the Work
• Working conditions
• Employment – How many jobs and where
  they are located
• Training and other qualifications
• Job outlook
• Earnings and related occupations
• Sources of additional information
Guide for Occupational Exploration
• Designed by the US Employment Service
• Tool for effective job search
• Relates to interests, skills, values, school
  courses and activities of the requirements of
  occupations
• Directly related to Holland groups
       America’s CareerInfoNet
• Available on-line
• Contains information on fastest-growing
  occupations, those with the most openings,
  those that are declining, and those that pay
  the highest salaries
• Allows search for jobs by keywords or by job
  family and state
                    O*Net
• Replaces the Dictionary of Occupational Titles
• Extensive on-line document
• Contains characteristics on more than 900
  occupations
• Valuable for career exploration and job
  placement
             Exploring the O*Net
•   Skills
•   Generalized Work Activities
•   Interests
•   Work Styles
•   Work Context
•   Experience and Training
                          O*Net
•    Job Zone – Education for each zone
    1. May require high school diploma or GED
    2. High school diploma and may require some
       vocational training or job related course work
    3. Training in vocational schools, related on-the-job
       experience, or an associate’s degree
    4. Four-year bachelor’s degree and or 204 years of
       work experience
    5. Bachelor’s degree and or graduate school plus
       experience
           Exploring the O*Net
• Summary Report
  – Task
  – Tools & Technology
  – Knowledge
  – Skills
  – Abilities
  – Work Activities
  – Work Contest
        Exploring the O*Net
– Job Zones
– Interest
– Work Styles
– Work Values
– Related Occupations
– Wages & Employment Trends
  • National
  • State & national
   Offender Job Placement Model
• Introduction to the world of work
  – Culture of work
  – Characteristics of a successful worker
  – Career interest assessments
  – Pro-social behaviors
  – Matching career interest skills to occupation
  – Workforce preparation
  – Communication skills& decision making skills
  – Introduction to the Successful Living Plan
         Offender Career Centers
•   Resource centers
•   Offender supported
•   Link to DOL
•   Resumes
•   Interviewing
•   Career exploration
•   Self sufficiency
        Small Group Discussion
• Benefits of career tools
• Challenges of offender career development
• Strategies of implementation

• Large group reports out
                 Summary
• Information is key to successful Job Placement
• Different categories of information are
  available
• The OWDS plays a critical role
Developing a Workforce
     For Re-Entry

               Job Retention
Carol Tortarelli, PRIDE, Florida
Julie Perrey, TRICOR, Tennessee
Michael Colwell, Washington Correctional Industries
         Workshop Objectives
• Learn how previous workshops lay a foundation for
  offender job retention
• Understand planning strategies that can be
  incorporated into the retention planning process
• Recognize common job loss indicators
• Identify decision-making styles
The Importance of Job Retention - the
 positive attachment to employment
               over time

• Lack of employment leads to criminal activity
• The majority of parole or probation violators are
  unemployed at the time of re-arrest
• Workforce programs that include a job retention
  component have the best chance of reducing
  recidivism
 How do previous workshops prepare
us to assist an offender in maintaining
              employment?
 • Job Assessments- Career
   Theory, Interest Profiler
 • Job Readiness- Facilitation Skills, Transition
   Interviewing
 • Job Placement- Labor Market Resources, Community
   Collaboration
            Job Assessments

Assessment of Offender Skills, Interests,
  Strengths and Talents
Assessment of Job Match and Job Quality
Measurement of Social Skills, Problem-Solving
  Skills, Realistic Work Expectations
                Job Readiness

Facilitation Skills-
• Can Improve Job Retention by Creating an
  Environment That Enables Offenders to Discuss Their
  Personal Motives and Values
   – Be Available and Responsive
• Can Be Used to Encourage the Development of
  Future-Oriented Thought and Behavior
               Job Readiness
Transition Interviewing-
Case Management Models Include Activities that
Address Most Commonly Reported Barriers to
Successful Employment:
   – Substance Abuse
   – Lack of Transportation
   – No Understanding of Workplace Culture
   – Lack of Meaningful Support
               Job Readiness

Transition Interviewing-
• Expect Offender Responsibility and Accountability
• Modify Employment Programs to Respond to Unmet
  Offender Needs
             Job Placement

Labor Market Resources- One Stop Career
  Centers, The O-NET, State Labor Market
  Statistics, other internet resources
               Job Placement
Community Collaboration-
• Make Alternative Sources of On-Going Support
  Available to Offenders
   – Example: Transition Management Council
• Set Up Referral Systems and Improve Access to
  Community Resources
   – Example: HERN
 Job Retention Planning Strategies

Relapse Prevention Model-
Relapse is a breakdown or setback in a person’s
  attempt to change or modify any behavior.
Relapse prevention aims to curb the occurrence of an
  initial lapse or to prevent its escalation into full
  relapse
 Job Retention Planning Strategies

Relapse Prevention Model-
• Target Behavior is Maintaining Employment
• Initial Lapse is Occurrence of Signs That Typically
  Indicate Impending Job Loss
• Total Relapse is Job Loss
              Job Loss Indicators
•   Substance Abuse
•   Inability to Locate the Offender
•   Reports of Job Dissatisfaction by the Offender
•   Chaotic Family Life
•   Missed Appointments
•   Offender Behavior- staying out late
•   Family Expressions of Concern
Job Retention Planning Strategies
• Retention Planning-
  – Identifies barriers to job retention and creates a
    plan to minimize them
• Contingency Planning-
  – Creates a crisis intervention plan to respond to job
    loss indicators
• Advancement Planning-
  – Sets career goals and creates an action plan to
    achieve those goals
 Job Retention Planning Strategies

Improve Job Retention By:
• Including Cognitive Assessments and Interventions
• Encouraging Offenders to Identify Their Own High
  Risk Situations/Relapse Triggers- Analyze and
  Minimize Barriers That May Occur
 Job Retention Planning Strategies
Improve Job Retention By:
• Improving Offenders’ Sense of Self control and Self-
  Efficacy By Preparing Them for High Risk Situations
• Using a Problem-Solving Model to Assist Offenders
  to Develop a Relapse Prevention Plan
 Job Retention Planning Strategies
Improve Job Retention By:
• Having Offenders Rehearse or Practice the Behaviors
• Enhancing Offender Commitment to Carry Out Plans
 Job Retention Planning Strategies
Improve Job Retention By:
• Encouraging the Offender to Carry Out the Plan and
  Share the Expectation That He will Be Able To Do So
• Providing Re-Employment Assistance
        Decision-Making Styles
Understanding different decision-making styles
can better prepare you to assist offenders to
improve their job retention outcomes.
  • Planful- use a step by step process
  • Painful- become frustrated
  • Intuitive- think quickly about possible outcomes
         Decision Making Styles
• Impulsive- choose quickly without evaluating
  alternatives
• Compliant- make choices to please others
• Delaying- take a long time or never make a decision
• Fatalistic- believe they have no control
• Paralytic-shun decision-making as they fear change
  Other Partners in the Retention
             Process
• DC Transition and Release Officers
• Parole Board
• Community Corrections
• Community Partners
 Other Partners in the Retention
            Process
The Employer
  It is equally important for retention to match the
  offender not only with the right job opportunity, but
  with the right employer
      Other Partners in the Job
         Retention Process
The Job Developer/Case Manager must send the
employer an offender who will be a good match
not only skill-wise, but who will fit in with the
culture/personalities of the workplace
A successful first placement with an employer
will open the door for future offender
placements
        Other Partners in the Job
           Retention Process
• Invite businesses to be private sector reviewers of
  your industry training programs
• Invite employers to prison job fairs
• Assure employers that you are available to them to
  provide support should any problems arise with your
  program participant
• Recognize and reward your employers
   Correctional Industry Training
                          +
     A Defined Re-Entry Program
                  =
• New “Life” Opportunities
• Successful Employment
• Family Connection
• Community Participation
• Reduced Recidivism

				
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Description: Where Can Ex Offenders Find Job Employment in Indiana document sample