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					 CALIFORNIA PARTNERSHIP
       ACADEMIES


REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS


GRADE 10 IMPLEMENTATION
        GRANTS


         FOR 2009-10



     California Department of Education

             February 1, 2009
Contents


Introduction ................................................................................................................... 3
Green Academies Overview ......................................................................................... 4
Goods Movement and Logistics Academies Overview ........................................... 15
"The Governor's Career Technical Education Initiative"Academies Overview ..... 21
California Partnership Academy Model Overview .................................................... 26
Considerations for Applicants ................................................................................... 28
Critical Dates ............................................................................................................... 29
CPA Eligibility and Selection Process....................................................................... 29
    Eligibility and Funding ............................................................................................. 30
    Roles and Responsibilities of a Grantee .................................................................. 31
    Application Process ................................................................................................. 32
        A. Intent to Submit Form ..................................................................................... 32
        B. Application Submission .................................................................................. 32
        C. Site Visit ......................................................................................................... 32
        D. Application Review ......................................................................................... 32
    Technical Assistance ............................................................................................... 33
    Appeal Process ........................................................................................................ 34
Completing the CPA Application ............................................................................... 35
    Forms....................................................................................................................... 35
    Program Narrative ................................................................................................... 36
        Section I. Overview of the Proposed California Partnership Academy ............... 36
        Section II. Career Technical Focus..................................................................... 37
        Section III. At Least 50 percent At-Risk Enrollment ............................................ 37
        Section IV. Student Recruitment, Selection, and Counseling ............................. 38
        Section V. Attendance, Credits, and Graduation ................................................ 38
        Section VI. Structure and Program Management ............................................... 39
        Section VII. Advisory Committee ........................................................................ 41
        Section VIII. District and Industry Match ............................................................. 42
        Section IX. Use of Funds .................................................................................... 42
        Section X. Timeline, Budget, and Budget Narrative ............................................ 43
        Application Checklist .......................................................................................... 44
Appendixes
    Appendix 1: California Partnership Academy Law ................................................... 45
    Appendix 2: California Partnership Academy/Program Assurances ........................ 51
    Appendix 3: Budget Categories and Budget Narrative Examples ........................... 53
    Appendix 4: California Partnership Academy RFA Technical Assistance
        Webcast ............................................................................................................. 56
Forms:
  Form A: Intent to Submit Form ................................................................................. 57
  Form B: 2009-10 CPA Grant Signature Page ........................................................... 58
  Form C: School Demographic and Geographic Information ..................................... 59

                            High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                      1
Form D: California Partnership Academy Program of Study Chart ........................... 60
Form E: 2009-10 Implementation Grant Budget Page .............................................. 61
Rubric ....................................................................................................................... 62




                        High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                        2
                                       Introduction


This Request for Applications (RFA) contains three options for California Partnership
Academies (CPA):

1. Green and Clean Academies: up to 61 grants available (AB 519)
2. Goods Movement and Logistics Academies: at least four grants will be awarded in
   this category (AB 2855)
3. Academies in all industry sectors: up to 58 grants available (SB 70)

The following introduction gives specific information pertaining to each of these options.
The body of the RFA is the same for all applications since education code pertaining to
the requirements for implementation and funding of the CPA model is consistent across
all industry sectors. The differences will be in the career focus of each grant application,
the associated business and postsecondary partnerships, the career technical
education (CTE) and academic courses participating in the academy, and the content of
academy program components and activities.


All academies funded through this RFA will receive funding for the years 2009-10
through 2011-12. These academies will be required to attend an Institute for New
Academies during the summer of 2009.


Each section in the introduction contains a list of resources that may be helpful in
planning the academy program and in applying for this grant opportunity.




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                         3
                            “Green” Academies Overview
Law

Assembly Bill 519 (2007-08) provides funds from the Public Interest Research,
Development, and Demonstration Fund to support the development and operation of 61
CPAs for three years, 2009-10 to 2011-12.

   ―The bill would require grantees to create partnership academies that focus on
   clean technology and energy businesses and provide skilled workforces for the
   products and services for energy or water conservation, or both, renewable
   energy, pollution reduction, or other technologies that improve the environment in
   furtherance of state environmental laws.‖ (AB 519)

Career Focus

There is a differentiation between Green/Clean careers and being a green-practicing
individual or business. The difference is between the career focus vs. end-user
practices – between the work one does vs. the individual or organizational practices as
end-users of green technology and green ideals. This RFA pertains to CPAs that focus
on Green/Clean careers. While ―end-user‖ knowledge and practices to achieve a
greener environment are important, they should not be the primary focus of this
application.

Number of Grants

Up to 61 grants will be awarded.

Contents of this section

In this overview, we will propose some definitions and descriptions of Green Careers,
suggest some approaches for providing and/or developing the required sequence of
career technical education courses and postsecondary partnerships, a green career
pathway map, and refer you to some additional resources in Addendum C to assist you
in planning your program and writing this proposal. The information and resources
provided in this RFA are not intended to be exclusive – they are simply resources of
which the writers of this RFA are aware.

Defining Green Careers

   ―A green career is a job or series of jobs for which the common thread is
   environmental protection and preservation. This includes jobs that are focused
   on sustainability objectives. However, it doesn’t matter what sector one works in.
   It also doesn’t matter whether it’s a hands-on field job, or a lab or office job, or
   something else. What matters is whether the job is contributing in a positive way
   to the preservation and protection of the environment. And you can’t necessarily

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        4
   determine that by the job or occupation title! Many green jobs have the word
   environment (or environmental) in the title, but you still need to research that
   specific job and that specific employer before you can be sure that it’s a true
   green job.‖ (Jim Cassio, Green Careers Resource Guide, 12/07,
   www.cassio.com (Outside Source))

Attached is a list of Green Occupations identified through the U.S. Department of
Labor’s O*NET system (Addendum A) and a list of Green Occupations by Career
Cluster (Addendum B).

The California Economic Strategy Panel uses the following definition of Cleantech,
―Cleantech is a new technology that spans a broad range of products, services and
processes that lower performance costs, reduce or eliminate negative ecological
impact, and improve the productive and responsible use of natural resources.‖
(http://cleantechnetwork.com/index.cfm?pageSRC=CleantechDefined (Outside Source) ).
A list of Green Industry Segments can be found on Addendum B.

Describing Green/Clean Careers

Green/Clean careers are found in all industry sectors and can be the focus for many
new as well as traditional jobs and careers. Therefore, it is necessary for the purpose of
this RFA, for the applicant to clearly describe how the proposed career focus for the
academy will meet the objective of either (1) addressing new areas of the economy or
career area that are focused on green or (2) addressing the transitioning of an existing
career area to use green practices, technology and services. The applicant will need to
describe in detail the proposed content of the sequence of CTE courses and the
postsecondary programs with which the secondary CTE courses align.

According to the California Economic Development Department (EDD) Web site
(http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/contentpub/GreenDigest/States-Green-
Definitions.pdf (Outside Source)) careers considered to be Green/Clean fall under the
following categories:

   Green or Clean is any activity or service that performs at least one of the following:

         Generating renewable energy
         Recycling existing materials
         Energy efficient product manufacturing, construction, installation, and
          maintenance
         Education, compliance, and awareness
         Natural and sustainable product manufacturing

   Generating and storing renewable energy includes alternative energy generated by,
   but not limited to:


                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                          5
         Wind
         Solar
         Water
         Biofuels
         Biomass
         Hydrogen fuel cells

   Recycling existing materials includes corporations involved in the collection and
   processing of recyclable materials, including those running a recycling or wastewater
   plant. Includes environmental clean-up and remediation (does not include
   companies that recycle paper, glass, and cans in a bin.).

   Energy efficient product manufacturing, distribution, construction, installation, and
   maintenance includes companies involved in the research, development, and
   manufacturing of products such as solar panels, energy efficient light bulbs, and
   vehicles. It also includes construction companies that install and repair these
   products in new or existing residential or commercial real estate, as well as real
   estate planning and land development.

   Education, compliance, and awareness includes:

         Training providers for curricula such as solar panel installation, energy
          auditing, sustainability management, and environmental careers
         Environmental consulting
         Governmental/legislative compliance
         Conservation and wildlife programs
         Trading and offsets
         Social assistance

   Natural and sustainable product manufacturing includes companies that create
   products using natural materials. Also includes businesses that produce safe,
   nontoxic products; bamboo products; products out of previously-recycled materials;
   and agricultural firms that practice sustainable farming.

Sequence of Career Technical Education Courses

While we encourage creativity and responsibility in the development of the CTE
sequence of courses, we realize that this is a new and developing arena. In order to
assist schools in developing and/or locating course resources for this relatively new
career focus, the California Department of Education (CDE) has arranged for the
following resource. We are not requiring the use of these resources – schools are
encouraged to create or use any curricular resources that best meet the objectives of
their academy programs. We are only offering these resources to facilitate effective
courses based on rapidly evolving industry needs. We will also be working on green
curriculum development during the Summer Institute.


                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                         6
Tenth grade CTE course

The tenth grade course in an academy sequence is usually focused on career
exploration of all aspects of an industry. This course also frequently focuses on
foundation and beginning level skills needed for success in the industry and in
preparation for the junior and senior level CTE courses. Students are made aware of
career opportunities; the various steps in each career ladder; and the skills, knowledge
and attributes required in each field. This is accomplished through curriculum, speakers,
field trips, projects, community service, etc. The industry in this case is ―Green‖, and is
by its nature very broad and expanding.

   1. The Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies (Ford PAS) has made available
      curriculum for interested green academies. The Ford PAS project has created
      rigorous project-based curriculum that investigates key green themes and
      integrates critical thinking, problem solving, interaction with business and
      industry, and career exploration. The following are some of the green-themed
      modules:

          a.   We All Run on Energy
          b.   Energy From the Sun: Biomass
          c.   Is Hydrogen a Solution?
          d.   The Nuclear Revolution
          e.   Closing the Environmental Loop
          f.   Planning for Efficiency

       Ford PAS will provide professional development, during the summer of 2009, and
       ongoing professional development support for academies choosing to implement
       this curriculum.

   2. There are also curricular resources from the industry, from community colleges
      from ROCPs, and from other curriculum providers.

   3. We encourage your academy to research available resources and develop a
      logical sequence of courses that align with post-secondary certificate and degree
      programs focusing on similar green career opportunities.

   4. We have also provided a beginning list of curricular resources in Addendum C.

Eleventh and Twelfth grade CTE courses

The eleventh and twelfth grade CTE courses in an academy sequence focus on career
preparation and experience in the career field. The objectives are preparation for skilled
employment, industry-recognized certification (if available), and preparation for
post-secondary education opportunities. We realize that, since the green industries are
new and evolving, there may not be sufficient resources available through the local
education agencies and Regional Occupation Centers and Programs (ROCP)s to

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        7
provide these courses or instructors. Therefore, we recommend researching available
Regional Occupation Program (ROP), postsecondary, and technical training programs
with which you might partner. The following may be of assistance:

   1. The CDE, ROCP Unit has recently received a $259,000 contract from the
      Workforce Investment Board to develop and implement a "sustainable
      construction education project" in partnership with the Los Angeles County Office
      of Education and the Los Angeles Trade and Technical College. This project will
      be a sustainable statewide effort to develop and implement "green curriculum"
      into the secondary CTE classroom. The purpose of this project will be
      multifaceted. First, it will gather CTE teachers statewide to train them in current
      "green" building technologies, processes, and methodologies based upon input
      from business, industry, and green associations. Second, "green" sustainable
      construction practices/programs and "green" curriculum will be developed and/or
      integrated into current CTE programs for our middle schools, high schools and
      ROCP's in California. Thirdly, it will provide students with the opportunity to
      become aware of and prepare for employment in the new and evolving "green"
      environment. For more information on this project, please email Dennis Guido,
      Administrator, ROCP and Workforce Development Unit at dguido@cde.ca.gov.

   2. One of the resources available is the Alternative Transportation Technologies &
      Energy initiative (ATTE) project of the California Community Colleges. This
      organization is interested in partnering with schools and academy ROCP
      instructors and will provide teacher training in the following areas:

         a. Advanced Transportation Technologies:
                i. Alternative Fuel Technology
               ii. Rail (Heavy & Light)
              iii. GPS/ GIS
              iv. Autonomous vehicle (land, sea, air) and Robotic Technologies

         b. Energy:
                i. Wind Tech Training
               ii. Solar PV/Thermal
              iii. Biodiesel
              iv. Geothermal
               v. Energy Efficiency
              vi. Green Building and Leadership in Energy and Environmental
                   Design (LEED)

         c. If you would like additional information, or if you are interested in
            participating in this partnership, please contact Peter Davis at
            619-473-0090 or by email at outrchpd@me.com, or contact Karen Shores
            at kshores@cde.ca.gov or (916) 319-0478.




                  High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       8
3. Many community colleges, green industries, and ROCPs may be interested in
   partnering with your program and/or share their curriculum.

4. Some other sources of organizations specializing in green training and education
   can be found on the Environmental Defense Fund Website at
   www.edf.org/cagreenjobs, ―Green Jobs Guidebook,‖ pp. 45-48. This publication
   provides employment, career and educational opportunities information with
   specific job profiles.




               High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                    9
Alignment with Postsecondary Education

Academies are required to align their courses, course sequence, and course content
(both academic and CTE) with postsecondary education programs in like or similar
fields of study, so that students are prepared to continue their education at the
postsecondary level. This can be accomplished through strategic planning of course
content and sequence based on postsecondary requirements; through collaboration
with postsecondary institutions in the forms of dual credit, dual enrollment, and/or
articulated courses; and/or through creative arrangements for sharing and providing
targeted course instruction, course content, materials, facilities, etc.

The ―Green Jobs Guidebook‖ is one source that provides an excellent description of the
California postsecondary education and training opportunities currently available. We do
not know if these programs focus on green – only that they have the potential to do so
and offer the education needed for a student to achieve a degree or certificate in his/her
desired field of study. Please visit the Environmental Defense Fund Web site at
www.edf.org/cagreenjobs (Outside Source), pp. 47–53 of the ―Green Jobs Guidebook‖,
for a description and lists of CA postsecondary programs and colleges that have green-
related programs.

California Green Jobs Career Pathway

―A simplified career pathway map-such as the one below that diagrams the green jobs
marketplace – lays out the steps involved with progressing through a career, from
education and formal job training to skills enhancement and promotion.‖ (―Green Jobs
Guidebook‖, p. 54)




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                     10
Addendum A: Identifying Green Occupations
The O*NET system (from the U.S. Department of Labor) is the nation's primary source of occupational information,
providing comprehensive information on key attributes and characteristics of workers and occupations. The Federal
Government’s occupational taxonomy divides the U.S. workforce into about 900 different occupations. Using the
O*NET database, occupations with significant biology knowledge and environmental monitoring requirements were
identified.

Occupations were also included on the basis of job tasks that involve preserving and protecting the environment.
Then, to reduce this list of occupations to a manageable size, most health care and animal care occupations with
high biology knowledge requirements were eliminated.

Finally, administrative support occupations were not included, although that’s not to suggest that a secretary with an
environmental consulting firm isn’t working in a green job!

Here is the list of 77 Green Occupations - not a magic number by any means - but perhaps a good starting point in
the identification of occupations that can most easily open the door to a green career:
1. Agricultural Engineers                                       40. Fish and Game Wardens
2. Agricultural Inspectors                                      41. Forest and Conservation Technicians
3. Agricultural Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary                42. Forest and Conservation Workers
4. Agricultural Technicians                                     43. Forest Fire Fighters
5. Animal Scientists                                            44. Forest Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors
6. Aquacultural Managers                                        45. Forest Fire Inspectors & Prevention Specialists
7. Atmospheric and Space Scientists                             46. Foresters
8. Atmospheric, Earth, Marine, and Space Sciences               47. Forestry and Conservation Science Teachers,
Teachers, Postsecondary                                         Postsecondary
9. Biochemists and Biophysicists                                48. Geographers
10. Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary                  49. Geography Teachers, Postsecondary
11. Biological Technicians                                      50. Geological Sample Test Technicians
12. Biologists                                                  51. Geophysical Data Technicians
13. Biomedical Engineers                                        52. Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers
14. Chemical Technicians                                        53. Government Property Inspectors & Investigators
15. Chemistry Teachers, Postsecondary                           54. Hazardous Materials Removal Workers
16. Chemists                                                    55. Health Educators
17. Civil Engineering Technicians                               56. Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary
18. Civil Engineers                                             57. Hydrologists
19. Commercial Divers                                           58. Industrial Safety and Health Engineers
20. Construction Carpenters                                     59. Lawyers (Environmental Law)
21. Construction Managers                                       60. Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists
22. Electrical Engineers                                        61. Medical and Health Services Managers
23. Electricians                                                62. Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists
24. Engineering Managers                                        63. Microbiologists
25. Engineering Teachers, Postsecondary                         64. Municipal Fire Fighters
26. Environmental Compliance Inspectors                         65. Municipal Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors
27. Environmental Engineering Technicians                       66. Natural Sciences Managers
28. Environmental Engineers                                     67. Nuclear Monitoring Technicians
29. Environmental Science and Protection Technicians,           68. Nursery and Greenhouse Managers
Including Health                                                69. Occupational Health and Safety Specialists
30. Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary               70. Park Naturalists
31. Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including         71. Range Managers
Health                                                          72. Soil and Plant Scientists
32. Epidemiologists                                             73. Soil and Water Conservationists
33. Farm and Home Management Advisors                           74. Training and Development Managers
34. Farmers and Ranchers                                        75. Tree Trimmers and Pruners
35. Fire Inspectors                                             76. Water and Liquid Waste Treatment Plant and System
36. Fire Investigators                                          Operators
37. Fire-Prevention and Protection Engineers                    77. Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists
38. First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Animal Husbandry
and Animal Care Workers
39. First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Aquacultural
Workers

Cassio, Jim, ―Green Careers Resource Guide‖, 12/07, p. 4, www.cassio.com (Outside        Source)

                         High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                            11
Addendum B: Green Occupations by Career Cluster (This list is not exclusive. It is
intended to provide examples of occupations that can be focused on green)
Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources                  Government & Public Administration
• Agricultural Inspectors                              • Environmental Compliance Inspectors
• Agricultural Technicians                             • Government Property Inspectors and
• Animal Scientists                                    Investigators
• Aquacultural Managers                                Health Science
• Environmental Engineering Technicians                • Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists
• Environmental Engineers                              • Medical and Health Services Managers
• Farmers and Ranchers                                 • Occupational Health and Safety Specialists
• Fire Inspectors                                      Law, Public Safety, Security & Corrections
• First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Animal            • Fire Inspectors
Husbandry and                                          • Fire Investigators
Animal Care Workers                                    • Fish and Game Wardens
• First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Aquacultural      • Forest Fire Fighters
Workers                                                • Forest Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors
• Forest and Conservation Technicians                  • Forest Fire Inspectors and Prevention Specialists
• Forest and Conservation Workers                      • Lawyers
• Foresters                                            • Municipal Fire Fighters
• Geological Sample Test Technicians                   • Municipal Fire Fighting and Prevention
• Geophysical Data Technicians                         Supervisors
• Nursery and Greenhouse Managers                      Manufacturing
• Park Naturalists                                     • Civil Engineering Technicians
• Range Managers                                       • Commercial Divers
• Soil and Plant Scientists                            Science, Technology, Engineering &
• Soil and Water Conservationists                      Mathematics
• Tree Trimmers and Pruners                            • Agricultural Engineers
• Water and Liquid Waste Treatment Plant and           • Atmospheric and Space Scientists
System                                                 • Biochemists and Biophysicists
Operators                                              • Biological Technicians
• Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists                   • Biologists
Architecture & Construction                            • Biomedical Engineers
• Construction Carpenters                              • Chemical Technicians
• Construction Managers                                • Chemists
• Electricians                                         • Civil Engineers
• Hazardous Materials Removal Workers                  • Electrical Engineers
Business, Management & Administration                  • Engineering Managers
• Training and Development Managers                    • Environmental Science and Protection
Education & Training                                   Technicians,
• Agricultural Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary        Including Health
• Atmospheric, Earth, Marine, and Space Sciences       • Environmental Scientists and Specialists,
Teachers,                                              Including Health
Postsecondary                                          • Epidemiologists
• Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary           • Fire-Prevention and Protection Engineers
• Chemistry Teachers, Postsecondary                    • Geographers
• Engineering Teachers, Postsecondary                  • Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and
• Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary        Geographers
• Farm and Home Management Advisors                    • Hydrologists
• Forestry and Conservation Science Teachers,          • Industrial Safety and Health Engineers
Postsecondary                                          • Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists
• Geography Teachers, Postsecondary                    • Microbiologists
• Health Educators                                     • Natural Sciences Managers
• Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary           • Nuclear Monitoring Technicians
• Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists
Cassio, Jim, ―Green Careers Resource Guide‖, 12/07, p. 8, www.cassio.com (Outside   Source)

                       High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                  12
Addendum C: Green Resources

Green Informational Resources

  BW Research Partnership and Los Angeles Trade-Tech, ―Clean Technology,
  Workforce Challenges and Opportunities‖, February 2008,
  http://www.lattc.edu/dept/lattc/acaaffairs/files/Clean_Technology_Report.pdf
  (Outside Source)

  California Economic Development Department, ―Understanding the Green
  Economy‖, http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/?pageid=1032 (Outside Source)

  California Economic Strategy Panel, ―Clean Technology and the Green Economy‖,
  March 2008,
  http://www.labor.ca.gov/panel/pdf/DRAFT_Green_Economy_031708.pdf (Outside
  Source)

  California Energy Commission ―Energy Quest‖, www.energyquest.ca.gov (Outside
  Source)

  California Energy Commission, http://www.energy.ca.gov/ (Outside Source)

  California Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.calepa.ca.gov/ (Outside
  Source)

  Cassio, Jim, ―Green Careers Resource Guide‖, December 2007, www.cassio.com
  (Outside Source)

  Environmental Defense Group, ―Green Jobs Guidebook‖, 2008,
  www.edf.org/cagreenjobs (Outside Source)

  Next 10, ―California Green Innovation Index‖, 2008,
  http://www.next10.org/pdf/GII/Next10_FullFindings_EN.pdf (Outside Source)

  Pacific Gas and Electric, ―PG&E Power Pathway‖,
  www.pge.com/careers/powerpathway (Outside Source)

  Pacific Gateway,
  http://www.longbeach.gov/cd/workforce/adult_employment/education_training.asp
  (Outside Source)

  Sacramento Municipal Utility District, ―Our Green Community‖,
  http://www.ourgreencommunity.org/ (Outside Source)




                 High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                   13
Green Curricular Resources

  BC Hydro: http://www.bchydro.com/education/ (Outside Source).

  California Environmental Protection Agency, The Education and the Environment
  Initiative (EEI) Curriculum,
  http://www.calepa.ca.gov/Education/EEI/Curriculum/Default.htm (Outside Source)

  The Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies – Ford PAS: http://www.fordpas.org/
  (Outside Source)

  NESEA Education: http://www.nesea.org/education/materials.html (Outside Source)

  PG & E Powerpathway: http://www.pge.com/about/careers/powerpathway/networks/
  (Outside Source)

  U.S. Department of Education (Environmental Curriculum Projects):
  http://www.ed.gov/teachers/how/tech/international/guide_pg7.html (Outside Source)




                 High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      14
              Goods Movement and Logistics Academies Overview:

Law

AB2855 requires that one focus for newly funded California Partnership Academies be
Goods Movement and Logistics until at least one goods movement partnership
academy has been established in each of the four transportation corridors established
by the state. (Addendum D)

      AB2855, Section 3, commencing with Section 54760 of Education Code:
      (a) Commencing with the 2009-10 school year, . . . the Superintendent shall
      issue grants for the establishment of partnership academies . . . dedicated to
      educating pupils in goods movement occupational areas, such as port and
      terminal operations, pollution prevention, performance and low-emission vehicle
      technology, transportation computer systems, fleet conversion, and the servicing
      and maintenance of those technologies, shipping, logistics, trucking, rail, air, and
      security, until no less than one goods movement partnership academy has been
      established in each of the four transportation corridors established by the state.

      (b)(3) In order to be eligible for funding pursuant to this article, the coursework
      and internship or preapprenticeship programs of the proposed academy shall
      focus significant time on the use of emerging technologies and state-of-the-art
      equipment. The proposed academy shall demonstrate this through its efforts to
      obtain input from industry and professional trade organizations.

      (B) Staff development opportunities also shall be included in the academy plans
      to ensure that teaching staff has the opportunity to be educated in the use of
      emerging technologies and to become familiar with new equipment and current
      practices in the field

In this section, we will provide a brief definition of California’s goods movement and
logistics industries, a description of goods movement/logistics careers, some possible
sources of career education providers and curriculum in this area, some trade
organizations with which you may wish to partner, and some postsecondary
opportunities with which you may wish to align. The information and resources provided
in this RFA are not intended to be exclusive – they are simply resources of which the
writers of this RFA are aware.

Number of Grants

At least four CPA grants with a goods movement and logistics focus will be awarded,
with at least one in each of California’s four transportation corridors.




                  High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                           15
Defining and Describing Logistics Careers

   ―Logistics: The process of planning, implementing, and controlling procedures for
   the efficient and effective transportation and storage of goods including services,
   and related information from the point of origin to the point of consumption for the
   purpose of conforming to customer requirements. This definition includes
   inbound, outbound, internal and external movements.‖ (California Transportation
   and Logistics Institute, http://www.laedc.com/catli/glossary/l.html (Outside Source))

The following is information about the ―Goods Movement and Logistics Industries‖ from
the California Economic Development Department (―Careers in the Logistics Industry‖,
Bonnie Graybill, EDD, Presentation to LIMI Advisory Group, 2006)

      Definition:

      1. California’s ―goods movement and logistics industries‖ is a network of
         industries associated with moving goods into and out of California’s:
            a. Ports
            b. Cargo airports
            c. Transfer of goods from one mode of transportation to another
            d. Movement of goods to other states and countries

      2. Logistics Components:
            a. Transportation Services
            b. Logistics Support
            c. Warehousing and Storage
            d. Supply Chain Management

      Description of Careers and Occupations:

      1. Logistics Industries Growth Rates:
            a. Estimated growth rate: 18.4 percent
            b. Estimated 62,700 average annual job openings for these occupations
            c. Logistics industry annual average pay is often somewhat higher than
                average pay across all industries

      2. Careers and Occupations:
            a. Includes a large number and variety of occupations, from airline pilots
               to truck drivers, from customer service to hand packagers:
                     i. Warehousing and Storage
                    ii. Air Transportation and Support Industries
                   iii. Freight Trucking and Support Industries
                  iv. Rail Transportation and Support
                    v. Water (Deep Sea, Coastal, Inland) Transportation and Support
                  vi. Road Transportation and Support

                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        16
                  vii.    Warehousing and Storage
                  viii.   Delivery, Couriers, Messengers
                   ix.    Process, Physical Distribution and Logistics Consulting
                    x.    Safety and Security

             b. Education requirements range from on-the-job-training to professional
                level degrees and certificates.


Career Technical Education Providers

The primary source of career technical education in this industry sector for secondary
education is your local ROCP. Other sources of courses and curriculum may be found
through local community colleges, private postsecondary schools, trade schools, and
community outreach programs. A beginning list of resources is in Addendum E.

Alignment with Postsecondary Education

Since goods movement and logistics can include and cross many industry sectors, the
postsecondary program with which you align should be specific to the industry focus of
your program. For example, a logistics academy focused on transportation would seek
postsecondary programs with a transportation focus. A logistics academy focused on
international trade, marketing, warehousing, or manufacturing would seek a
postsecondary program focused on these careers. Postsecondary alignment can be
with an apprenticeship program, technical training school or program, community
college, college, or university. Some web-links are provided in Addendum E.




                  High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        17
Addendum D: Goods Movement Action Plan; Business, Transportation & Housing
Agency and California Environmental Protection Agency; January 2007, Figure I-1




                High School Initiatives/Career Education Office              18
Addendum E: Goods Movement and Logistics Resources

Informational Resources:

Logistics Training Consortium of Southern California: http://www.ltcsocal.com/logistics-
distribution-career-paths.html (Outside Source)

Economic Development Department, Logistics Jobs in California:
http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/article.asp?PAGEID=4&SUBID=150&ARTICLEI
D=623&SEGMENTID=1 (Outside Source)

Tradeport: Information and resources on international trade: http://www.tradeport.org/
(Outside Source)

Education and Curricular Resources:

California Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROCPs):
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/rp/

California Department of Education ROCP Quick Reference Guide:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/si/rp/quickref.asp

California Department of Education ROCP Staff Directory:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/rp/directory.asp

California Community Colleges Vocational and Technical Education Act (VTEA)
Industry and Technical Education Website for Logistics Technology:
http://www.cclogtech.org/resource_library%20/california_jobs.htm (Outside Source)

City of Long Beach, Pacific Gateway Workforce Investment Network:
http://www.longbeach.gov/cd/workforce/adult_employment/education_training.asp
(Outside Source)

California Department of Education Industry Standards:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/ctestandards.pdf

Postsecondary Resources:

Education Portal: http://education-portal.com/logistics_training.html (Outside Source)

California Transportation and Logistics Institute, http://www.catli.org/ (Outside Source)

California Community Colleges: Transportation and Logistics Institute: article
http://archive.cccco.edu/divisions/esed/catli/catli.htm (Outside Source)

Education Portal: http://education-portal.com/logistics_training.html (Outside Source)

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                          19
California Transportation and Logistics Institute, http://www.catli.org/ (Outside Source)

Trade Organizations:

Trade Associations and Organizations: Transportation and Logistics:
http://www.workspace-resources.com/work/transportation/tran01.htm (Outside Source)

The Federation of International Trade Associations: http://www.fita.org/ (Outside Source)




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                          20
          “The Governor’s Career Technical Education Initiative” (SB 70)
                             Academies Overview

Law

SB 70: The Governor’s Career Technical Education Initiative, 2005, Scott:

   ―This bill would require the Board of Governors of the California Community
   Colleges to assist economic and workforce regional development centers and
   consortia, including middle and junior high schools or high schools and regional
   occupational centers and programs, to improve linkages and career-technical
   education pathways between high schools and community colleges for the
   benefit of pupils and students in both education systems, as described.‖

SB 70 has allowed for the development of 150 CPAs over a three-year funding
cycle. This is the third and final funding cycle for this bill.

Career Focus

This funding source encourages applications from all industry sectors. These include
but are not limited to:

Agriculture and Natural Resources Industry Sector
  A. Agricultural Business Pathway
  B. Agricultural Mechanics Pathway
  C. Agriscience Pathway
  D. Animal Science Pathway
  E. Forestry and Natural Resources Pathway
  F. Ornamental Horticulture Pathway
  G. Plant and Soil Science Pathway

Arts, Media, and Entertainment Industry Sector
   A. Media and Design Arts Pathway
   B. Performing Arts Pathway
   C. Production and Managerial Arts Pathway

Building Trades and Construction Industry Sector
   A. Cabinetmaking and Wood Products Pathway
   B. Engineering and Heavy Construction Pathway
   C. Mechanical Construction Pathway
   D. Residential and Commercial Construction Pathway




                  High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      21
Education, Child Development, and Family Services Industry Sector
  A. Child Development Pathway
  B. Consumer Services Pathway
  C. Education Pathway
  D. Family and Human Services Pathway

Energy and Utilities Industry Sector
  A. Electromechanical Installation and Maintenance Pathway
  B. Energy and Environmental Technology Pathway
  C. Public Utilities Pathway
  D. Residential and Commercial Energy and Utilities Pathway

Engineering and Design Industry Sector
  A. Architectural and Structural Engineering Pathway
  B. Computer Hardware, Electrical, and Networking Engineering Pathway
  C. Engineering Design Pathway
  D. Engineering Technology Pathway
  E. Environmental and Natural Science Engineering Pathway

Fashion and Interior Design Industry Sector
   A. Fashion Design, Manufacturing, and Merchandising Pathway
   B. Interior Design, Furnishings, and Maintenance Pathway

Finance and Business Industry Sector
   A. Accounting Services Pathway
   B. Banking and Related Services Pathway
   C. Business Financial Management Pathway

Health Science and Medical Technology Industry Sector
  A. Biotechnology Research and Development Pathway
  B. Diagnostic Services Pathway
  C. Health Informatics Pathway
  D. Support Services Pathway
  E. Therapeutic Services Pathway

Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation Industry Sector
  A. Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition Pathway
  B. Food Service and Hospitality Pathway
  C. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation Pathway




                 High School Initiatives/Career Education Office         22
Information Technology Industry Sector
   A. Information Support and Services Pathway
   B. Media Support and Services Pathway
   C. Network Communications Pathway
   D. Programming and Systems Development Pathway

Manufacturing and Product Development Industry Sector
  A. Graphic Arts Technology Pathway
  B. Integrated Graphics Technology Pathway
  C. Machine and Forming Technology Pathway
  D. Welding Technology Pathway.

Marketing, Sales, and Service Industry Sector
  A. E-commerce Pathway
  B. Entrepreneurship Pathway
  C. International Trade Pathway
  D. Professional Sales and Marketing Pathway

Public Services Industry Sector
  A. Human Services Pathway
  B. Legal and Government Services Pathway
  C. Protective Services Pathway

Transportation Industry Sector
   A. Aviation and Aerospace Transportation Services Pathway
   B. Collision Repair and Refinishing Pathway
   C. Vehicle Maintenance, Service, and Repair Pathway

California Department of Education Industry Standards:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/ctestandards.pdf

Number of Grants

Up to 58 grants will be awarded.

CTE Providers

The primary source of career technical education in California for secondary education
is your local ROCP. Other sources of courses and curriculum may be found through
local community colleges, private postsecondary schools, trade schools, and community
outreach programs.



                  High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                  23
Alignment with Postsecondary Education

All California Partnership Academies are required to align with postsecondary programs
of study that allow students to continue their education in the target career focus area.
The postsecondary education programs with which each academy chooses to align
depends on the logical next steps in a particular career pathway, local and regional
postsecondary education resources, and local and regional school to school
agreements and relationships. We encourage you to explore all venues of
postsecondary education opportunities, including, but not limited to apprenticeships,
community colleges, private postsecondary institutions, colleges, universities, trade
schools, adult education programs, and military programs.

Resources

Please see Addendum F




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                     24
Addendum F: Career Academy, Curricular, and Postsecondary Alignment
Resources – All Academies

California Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROCP’s):
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/rp/

California Department of Education ROCP Quick Reference Guide:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/si/rp/quickref.asp

California Department of Education ROCP Staff Directory:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/rp/directory.asp

National Career Clusters: www.careerclusters.org (Outside Source)

Career Academy Support Network: http://casn.berkeley.edu (Outside Source)

College Tools: http://collegetools.berkeley.edu/ (Outside Source)

National Career Academy Coalition (www.ncacinc.org) (Outside Source)      `

California Partnership Academies (www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/cpagen.asp)

National Academy Foundation (www.naf.org) (Outside Source)

ConnectEd: The California Center for Career and College:
http://www.connectedcalifornia.org/ (Outside Source)

California State Center Consortium: http://statecenter.com/ (Outside Source)

Statewide Career Pathways: Creating School to College Articulation:
www.statewidecareerpathways.org (Outside Source)

CTE Online: http://www.cteonline.org/ (Outside Source)

California Careers Resource Network: http://www.californiacareers.info/ (Outside Source)




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                    25
                  California Partnership Academy Model Overview
                                    For All Applicants

The California Legislature has deemed the California Partnership Academy (CPA)
program a highly effective bridge between public education and the private sector. The
CPA program successfully combines traditional academics with Career Technical
Education (CTE). Many ―at-risk‖ CPA high school students are being inspired to
academic and social growth; stirred to maintain focus while developing crucial skills;
and ultimately motivated to graduate on time and pursue further education, skilled
occupations, or both. Currently, CPAs are flourishing in almost 300 high schools,
capturing the imagination and curiosity of students by focusing on diverse and important
career fields, such as computer technology, agriculture, digital arts, finance,
international business, environmental science, biotechnology, electronics, advanced
manufacturing and logistics, engineering, construction, hospitality, and space
exploration. CPAs are making a powerful, positive contribution as our state strives to
meet the 21st century economic mandate of a skilled, educated, highly capable, and
competitive workforce.

The CPA model is a three year program for grades ten through twelve and structured as
a school-within-a-school. Fashioned after the Philadelphia Academies of the late 1960s,
CPAs made a debut in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1980s. Academies create a
close, family like atmosphere in which academic and CTE are integrated, and viable
business and postsecondary partnerships are established. Emphasis is placed on
student achievement with an eye to the future; decisive postsecondary educational
focus and refined career plans are valued goals. CPAs have been carefully evaluated
and shown to have a beneficial impact on school performance.

Funding for this Request for Application (RFA) is authorized through the Governor’s
Career Technical Education Initiative, Senate Bill SB 70, 2009-10 budget, and
administered by the California Department of Education (CDE) in coordination with the
Chancellor’s Office of the Community Colleges.

A CPA is required to include the following elements:

      Voluntary. Teams of both students and teachers who share an interest in the
       career focus of the academy and work together for an extended period of time.

      Career focus. The career technical focus of an academy is determined by an
       analysis of the local labor market, particularly fields that are growing and healthy,
       offer opportunities with career mobility, and feature companies willing to support
       the program. CTE is kept broad, focusing on industries rather than specific jobs.
       Students can view all aspects of the focus industry as they investigate career
       possibilities of personal interest.




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        26
   Curriculum. The curriculum is focused on a career field and coordinated with
    related academic and career technical classes. The integration of an academic
    and career technical curriculum, aligned with the academic and CTE standards,
    is a key ingredient.

   Staffing. Teachers ask to participate in the program usually because of an
    interest in the career theme of the academy and/or an interest in working with a
    team of teachers in a collegial atmosphere. Teachers are required to have a
    common planning period to meet regularly to: (a) plan the program activities and
    curriculum; (b) coordinate with business representatives; (c) meet with parents;
    and (d) assess student and program progress.

   Student selection. Students voluntarily apply, are interviewed, and are selected
    on the basis of need and interest. About 50-60 students are typically selected for
    entry each year, enough to makeup two sections of a sophomore class. At least
    50 percent of students selected for entry must meet criteria for ―at-risk‖ students
    as described in this RFA.

   Business involvement. Each academy has a partnership with employers who
    will: (a) serve on an academy steering committee; (b) help to develop the career
    technical curriculum; (c) provide speakers for academy classes; (d) host field
    trips to give students a perspective of the workplace; (e) provide mentors who
    serve as career related role models and personal points of contact; and
    (f) provide job shadowing, internship, and other work experience opportunities.

   Partnership. The business community, community college(s), other
    postsecondary education, community organizations, and the school district form
    a partnership to: (1) provide students with opportunities for mentorship,
    internship, articulated career paths and other means of enhancing an
    understanding of the world of work; and (2) assist teachers in developing
    curricula that also mirrors modern careers.

   Motivational activities. The activities, with private sector participation,
    encourage students’ active involvement in their education to enhance both
    academic growth and career preparation.

   Mentorship. In the eleventh grade, academy students are matched with
    mentors. Mentors are usually employees of participating businesses who
    volunteer to be a ―career related and/or caring adult‖ in the student’s life.

   Internships. After their junior year, students are placed in internships. These
    internships typically take place during the senior year but may be scheduled
    during the summer after the junior year to accommodate scheduling challenges
    and workplace opportunities. Students apply for these positions as they would in

                High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      27
    the open market. For example, they prepare résumés, complete job applications,
    and have interviews. An internship is focused on advancing a student’s
    knowledge and understanding of the career field and the diverse aspects of an
    industry.

   Postsecondary articulation. SB 70 CPA programs must develop curricular
    paths, including sequenced CTE courses that go beyond high school graduation
    and lead to a variety of degree and certificate programs. Articulation with the
    community college system is critical and required.

   Assessment. CPAs are required to submit an annual report in October of each
    year, providing detailed student and program data. This report determines
    amount of funding earned for the previous school year. SB 70 CPAs will also be
    required to participate in a comprehensive evaluation of the Governor’s Career
    Technical Education Initiative (SB 70).


                        Considerations for Applicants

   Applications must demonstrate a clear and substantial plan for meeting the
    requirements of a CPA, as outlined in California Education Code (EC) sections
    54690–54696.

   Information about the CPA model is available on the CPA Web page at
    http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/cpagen.asp. EC sections 54690–54696 are
    available at this Web site and included in this RFA as Appendix 1.

   Information about the Governor’s Career Technical Education Initiative (SB 70) is
    available on the California Community College System Office Web page
    at: http://website.cccco.edu/Portals/4/CTE_Legislative_Report.pdf
    (Outside Source).

   Scoring will be weighted toward sites that do not have an existing CPA program
    and do not have alternative funding sources supporting the CPA program.
    However, high schools that currently have a CPA may apply for funding in
    another career technical area.

   CPA grantees are expected to adhere to the program assurances that are
    legislatively mandated, education code 54690 – 54697, including participating in
    evaluations to ensure the success of the CPA (see Appendix 2). Schools that
    may find it difficult to comply with the legal assurances of this program should
    carefully consider them before submitting an application for this grant.

   Applicants should review the general assurances and certifications that apply to
    all programs. Applicants should download the general assurances and
    certifications from the official Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/fo/fm and keep

                High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      28
       them on file to be available for compliance reviews, complaint investigations, or
       audits. (Please note: applicants that participate in the Consolidated Application –
       ConApp—should already have a copy of the general assurances and
       certifications on file.)

      The signed grant application submitted to the California Department of Education
       (CDE) is a commitment to comply with the assurances, certifications, terms, and
       conditions associated with the grant.

      The Intent to Submit form should be submitted to the High School
       Initiatives/Career Education Office no later than March 9, 2009. Submitting this
       page does not obligate the school or district to submit an application. Although
       omitting this form does not preclude an application, it does help with RFA
       processing.

      Completed applications must be postmarked on or before March 30, 2009.

      The proposal narrative must not exceed 15 single sided pages, in 12 point type,
       double spaced, with one inch margins. All required forms must also be included
       in the application. Up to ten pages of letters of collaboration, including those from
       partners and the school district, may be provided as evidence requested in the
       RFA. Up to five optional pages of printed material (timeline, charts, or other
       evidence) may be included to support a high-quality proposal.

                                     Critical Dates
                             RFA released ..... February 1, 2009
    RFA Technical Assistance Workshop ..... February 2009
               Intent to Submit Form Due ..... March 9, 2009
  Application Submission Postmark Date ..... March 30, 2009
          Application Review & Site Visits ..... April 1 – 24, 2009
                 Notice of Intent to Award ..... April 2009
                            Appeal Period ..... May 2009
             Distribute grant award letters ..... May – June 2009


                     CPA Eligibility and Selection Process

This RFA is intended for first year, grade ten, academy implementation grants only.
The purpose of this implementation grant is to provide funds to support academy
programs that are beginning implementation in grade ten in the fall of 2009-10
and that have not been receiving CPA funds. Applicants must show how they will
achieve compliance with first-year CPA required components in 2009-10. Applicants

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        29
must also show their plan for achieving compliance with all CPA required components in
subsequent years.

Eligibility and Funding
Any California public school district operating one or more comprehensive high schools
is eligible to submit an application for an implementation grant. A district already
operating one or more Academies with state grant funds may seek new CPA grants for
additional academy(ies); however, the new academy(ies) must have a different career
focus. Scoring will be weighted in favor of schools currently lacking a funded academy.
Charter Schools that are a comprehensive high school with an enrollment of sufficient
size and a program of appropriate scope are encouraged to apply for a CPA grant.

Applicants must be familiar with the required components of the CPA model. Senate
Bill 44, the state legislation authorizing the CPAs may be viewed on the CPA Web page
at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/cpagen.asp. Applicants should also review California
EC sections 54690-54696, which are included in this RFA (see Appendix 1).

Funding for a CPA outlined in EC Section 54691(c) is based on each student in the
academy: (1) achieving 80 percent positive student attendance; (2) obtaining 90
percent of the credits each academic year in courses that are required for
graduation; and (3) successfully graduating after the twelfth grade.

Only high schools that commit to starting a new California Partnership Academy in
the fall semester of 2009-10 for grade ten may apply for this implementation grant.
Assurance that all tenth grade CPA components will be operational is required.
Programs meeting these requirements may apply for funding at the $42,000 level,
based on enrollment of at least 30 students at $1400 per qualified student for the
first year of operation (though it is advisable to enroll 60-70 students each year to
provide for attrition and for student performance requirements for funding). A viable,
thorough, well-written application with supporting evidence of all RFA criteria being
met will be required for this level of funding. Subsequent annual grant awards are
contingent upon the inclusion of funding for CPAs in the State Budget Act.

Current legislation supports the expansion of the CPA program. It provides funding to
cover the school years 2009-10 through 2011-2012.

Funding over three years will be based on the following formula:

First year of funding (grade ten implementation)
        $1400 per qualifying student for up to 30 students for a maximum of $42,000

Second year of funding (grades ten and eleven)
     $1200 per qualifying student for up to 60 students for a maximum of $72,000

Third year of funding (grades ten, eleven and twelve)
       $900 per qualifying student for up to 90 students for a maximum of $81,000

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       30
As the legislation and funding for these academies sunsets in 2011-2012, a
sustainability plan for the academy, once state funding ends, should be addressed in
the grant application.

A ―qualifying student‖ is one that meets all performance criteria, and participates in all
academy program components, as listed in EC sections 54690–54695 (Appendix 1). To
account for attrition and student performance, it is it is wise to begin grade ten with
60-70 students.

Roles and Responsibilities of a Grantee
Acceptance of a CPA implementation grant by a school district obligates the local
education agency to have a first year academy program fully functioning at the time of
funding (fall semester 2009). The Academy must include all critical Academy
components required for first year (grade ten) programs identified in California EC
sections 54690-54696 and listed in this RFA.

Grant recipients are required to attend the CPA Conference annually, and are required
to attend the Summer Institute for new CPAs. The date and location of this event will be
provided once grant awards are determined. Grant recipients must submit an annual
report required of all funded academies. This report, due on or before October 15 of
each year requires information such as evidence of compliance with CPA funding
requirements; participating student achievement data (attendance, credits, grade point
averages, and assessment scores); percentage of students meeting ―at-risk‖ criteria and
how this is determined; evidence of matching support from the district and business
partners; and other information related to the academy model and student achievement.

The California Department of Education (CDE) staff will provide technical assistance,
training, and materials to grant recipients. The CDE staff will provide forms and
directions for the data collection required in the annual report. The annual report is
posted by late July of each year on the CDE Web site at
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/cpagen.asp.




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       31
Application Process
The application process consists of two components:

   Submission of the Intent to Submit
   Submission of the completed CPA application

A. Intent to Submit Form

   Form A is the initial document indicating interest in a CPA grant. It should be
   faxed or postmarked on or before March 9, 2009.

B. Application Submission

   The completed CPA Application must be postmarked or delivered to the CDE on
   or before March 30, 2009. Applications will be reviewed in April 2009. Formatting
   requirements for the application will be found in this RFA. Submit the original
   signed application and three complete copies to:

                      California Partnership Academy Application
                     High School Initiatives/Career Education Office
                          California Department of Education
                               1430 N Street, Suite 4503
                             Sacramento, CA 95814-5901

C. A Site Visit

   The visit is the final evaluative step. A visit is scheduled only for applications
   achieving a score deemed ―fundable‖ in the paper screening and for whom
   additional or clarifying information is required before a final determination can be
   made. Only those applicants who require a site visit will be notified and visited in
   April 2009. Applicants for these implementation grants will be expected to use this
   site visit to showcase their readiness to implement a CPA. Visiting teams will want
   to meet: (1) the teachers and students in the academy; (2) members of the
   academy advisory committee; (3) representative business partners; and (4)
   representative postsecondary partners. The team will also want to see: (1)
   documentation of the 100 percent match from both the district and business
   partners; and (2) verification that at least 50 percent ―at-risk‖ students are enrolled
   in the program.

D. Application Review

   The CDE will screen applications for completeness and reserves the right to
   disqualify incomplete applications. Applications disregarding formatting instructions
   described in the RFA (font, margins, etc.) will not be read, and those exceeding
   maximum length will be marked with a red line where the application should have


                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                           32
   ended. Reviewers will not read beyond the red line. Extra attachments beyond those
   permitted by the RFA will also be ignored by the reviewers.

   Applications will be scored using a rubric, included in this packet, as a common
   standard. Critical sections of the application are weighted to validate their
   importance. The rubric delineates the points possible for each narrative section,
   depending on the quality of the response and pertinence to the question. A panel of
   field colleagues, staff from the CDE, Chancellors Office of the CDE, and the
   California Community Colleges will review all CPA applications in April 2009.

   Scoring will focus on content and substance of the narrative rather than writing style
   and presentation; therefore it is more important to have examples, statistics, and
   anecdotal evidence than to use key phrases or ―buzz words.‖ An application should
   be organized to follow the RFA sections and presented with clarity so that a reviewer
   can easily understand what the proposed program will achieve. Ratings will be
   compiled, and the highest scoring proposals will be recommended for funding. Some
   sites will require a site visit for additional or clarifying information. Every effort will be
   made to ensure that the selected proposals represent the diverse education
   community in California in terms of demographics, geography, setting (urban/rural),
   and career technical area of focus. Scoring will be weighted toward sites not
   currently supporting an academy other than the program proposed in the application
   and that do not receive funding to support programs of this nature. Preference will
   be given to applications showing evidence of well developed alignment and
   articulation with California Community Colleges.

Technical Assistance
Technical assistance is available by contacting any of the following persons:

Karen Shores
916-319-0478
kshores@cde.ca.gov
Fax: 916-319-0168

Christopher Mattson                 Machelle Martin
916-319-0472                        916-319-0473
cmattson@cde.ca.gov                 mamartin@cde.ca.gov
Fax: 916-319-0168                   Fax: 916-319-0168

RFA Technical Assistance Workshops will be held in February 2009. See Appendix 4
for location and directions. Information about the RFA Technical Assistance Workshop
will be available on the CPA Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/cpagen.asp.




                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                           33
Appeal Process
Should a district not receiving a grant wish to file an appeal, it must do so within ten
calendar days following notification of awards by submitting a letter explaining
specifically why the district believes their application should be reconsidered for funding.
Letters of appeal should be sent to:

                               Patrick Ainsworth, Director
                Secondary, Postsecondary and Adult Leadership Division
                          California Department of Education
                               1430 N Street, Suite 4503
                                Sacramento, CA 95814

The CDE staff will review the appeal and render a decision within 30 calendar days of
the receipt of the appeal. The decision of the CDE is final. There is no further appeal
process.




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        34
                        Completing the CPA Application

Forms

Intent to Submit a CPA Application. The Intent to Submit form (Form A) should be
faxed or mailed to the CDE by March 9, 2009.
Length Limitation. Applicants must limit the program narrative section of the grant
application to 18 single sided pages. The 18 page limit does not include the
three page budget narrative or any other required forms or attachments.
Font and Page Format. Applications must be on 8 ½" x 11" paper, double spaced with
one inch margins. Please use an easy to read, 12-point font that does not exceed six
lines per inch (Times New Roman or Arial is preferred). Footer with the school name
and pagination are required on all pages.
Attachments. Only the following attachments will be accepted with the narrative:
  Forms B through E included in this RFA.

  Letters of collaboration. Up to ten letters including those from business and
    community partners, postsecondary institutions, and the school district.

  Attachments requested within the narrative section of the application:
    Section IV: Evidence of student, parent, and teacher interest in the academy
    Section VI: School schedule with academy classes highlighted
    Section VII: Advisory committee roster

  Up to five optional pages of printed material (timeline, charts, or other evidence) may
    be included.

Note: Any content resulting in excess pages or attachments, unacceptable font types,
margins, or spacing will be ―redlined‖ and disregarded by readers. Any application that
is incomplete (i.e., does not include the required pages, forms, attachments and
narrative) will not be reviewed.

Number of Copies Required. Applicants must provide a signed original and three
copies on 8 1/2" x 11" white paper. The application and attachments should be stapled
for submission. Please do not use binders, covers, flat folders, sleeves, or cover letters.

Cost of Preparing Application. The costs for preparing and delivering an application
shall be the sole responsibility of the applicant. The State of California and the CDE will
not reimburse for such costs.

Application Checklist. The checklist should ensure the application includes the
necessary forms, program narrative and supporting documentation, budget page, and

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       35
budget narrative in the order requested. The checklist is for the applicant’s use and
should not be submitted with the application. To be considered complete, the
application should include the following forms, attached at the end of the RFA, as part of
the application packet:

    Form B: Signature Page. A cover page that is signed by the superintendent and
     the high school principal. Signatures on this page commit the district and school
     administration to adhere to the program elements and assurances.

    Form C: Site/Community Information. School demographic and geographic
     information and a one page narrative about the community.

    Form D: California Partnership Academy Program of Study

    Form E: Budget Page. The Budget Page must be signed by the site principal,
     the site CPA contact, and a district fiscal person who has reviewed the proposed
     first year grant budget. The Budget Narrative describing the implementation
     expenditures must be explained on Form E. The budget narrative should not
     exceed three pages and does not count against your 18 page limit on the
     application narrative. Use the format provided in Appendix 3.


Program Narrative – Critical Components
Applications lacking the essential narrative and budget components will not score high
enough to be considered for funding. Please address the questions, provide the
components, and use the attachments that are described in each section of this RFA.
They are intended to guide the writing of the application and must be addressed in the
narrative; however, simply stating the components or questions back in a narrative
format will not achieve the ―adequate or above‖ score necessary to be considered for
funding. The narrative must be limited to a total of 18 pages—anything beyond this
page total will neither be read nor evaluated. All applications will be evaluated using the
scoring rubric included in the RFA. For reference, the CPA law is provided as
Appendix 1.


Section I. Overview of Proposed California Partnership Academy

Provide an overview of the nonfunded academy program to be implemented in the fall
of 2009-10. This overview may be up to three pages and should clearly describe the
career focus of the academy and under which category this grant is applying (green,
goods movement and logistics, or another industry sector funded through SB 70).
Describe the district, the school, its community, the reason for choosing your career
focus, and the history and current status of this partnership academy’s development.



                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       36
Section II. Career Technical Focus

The career technical focus of an academy should be broad, addressing an industry and
all aspects rather than narrowly focused on a specific ―job.‖ The academy’s theme must
have real growth potential in the California economy, be based on labor market
information, and be able to attract local support to ensure adequate participation in, and
sustainability of, the CPA program.

   Narrative: Please describe the career technical focus of your academy and
   how that choice was made. Provide economic data showing the anticipated
   growth of that industry and potential employment opportunities locally and
   within California. Describe potential postsecondary education opportunities
   and career ladders available in this career focus area.


Section III. At Least 50 percent “At-Risk” Enrollment

California EC sections 54690 and 54691 state:

For purposes of this [program], ―at-risk‖ students means students enrolled in high school
that are at risk of dropping out of school, as indicated by at least three of the following
criteria:

     1. Past record of irregular attendance.

     2. Past record of underachievement in which the student is at least one year
        behind the coursework for the respective grade level.

     3. Past record of low motivation or a disinterest in the regular school program.

     4. Disadvantaged economically.

A school district operating an academy that is unable to enroll enough ―at-risk‖ students
[as defined in 1-4 above] to constitute one-half of the participating students may enroll
non-at-risk students that meet any of the following criteria:

 (A) Scoring in the 40th percentile or below in mathematics or English Language Arts
     on the California Standards Tests.

 (B) Maintaining a grade point average of 2.2 or below, or the equivalent of a C-.
     Non-at-risk students enrolled may not exceed one-half of the students enrolled in
     an academy.

   Narrative: Using these criteria, please provide data showing your school and
   district’s “at-risk” population.

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       37
Section IV. Student Recruitment, Selection and Counseling

The narrative should address the following questions:

√ How do you disseminate the information about your program and recruitment effort?

√ How do you use non-academy staff at your site, as well as stakeholders to promote
  enrollment in your program?

√ How do/will you ensure that you have adequate enrollment and that at least 50
  percent of your incoming class meet required CPA ―at-risk‖ criteria?

√ Do you have an interview process? What is it like? Who participates? (Attach any
  forms, questionnaires, or other tools developed to aid this process in appendix—this
  will not count against your 18 page maximum.)

   Narrative: Academies are required to serve students enrolled voluntarily, who
   are taught by faculty who volunteer to be part of the CPA team. Describe your
   academy’s recruitment process for both students and staff, including:

Attachment 1: Please provide evidence of student, parent, and teacher interest in
this academy. Evidence may be provided in the form of student surveys, parent
letters, parent academy support club participation, teacher signatures
designating support, testimonial letters, etc. This attachment will not be counted
against your 18 page limit or your five page attachment limit.


Section V. Attendance, Credits, and Graduation

One of the strengths of CPAs over the years is that funding is tied to student and
program success. EC Section 54691 states:

For purposes of this application, a student qualified for meeting funding requirements is
one who:

 1. Is enrolled in an academy for the tenth grade

 2. Obtains 90 percent of the credits each academic year in courses that are required
    for graduation.

 3. Successfully completes a school year during the tenth grade with an attendance
    record of no less than 80 percent.




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                     38
 4. Successfully completes a school year during the eleventh grade with an
    attendance record of no less than 80 percent.

 5. Successfully graduates after the twelfth grade.
    .
 6. A student enrolled in an academy who successfully completes only one semester
    with regard to enrollment, attendance, and credits, within the school year is
    considered qualified for that semester and the district may receive one-half of the
    funds specified for that student.

   Narrative: Please describe the ability of your program to achieve the targeted
   credits and attendance described in this section. What support strategies,
   program policies, motivational enrichment activities, and creative curricular
   development and delivery plans will be employed to ensure maximum student
   success?


Section VI. Structure and Program Management

   Narrative: Please describe how you will implement each of the following
   components required of a CPA.

The school district shall provide an assurance that each academy will be established as
a ―school-within-a-school‖ with the following components:

 1. Academy teachers shall work as a team in planning, teaching, and troubleshooting
    program activities.

 2. Academy teachers shall have a common planning period to exchange student and
    educational information.

 3. A lead teacher should be designated to oversee the overall academy operations
    and coordinate the required components. Whenever possible, this teacher should
    be allocated a planning period, in addition to the normal planning period for
    full-time teachers, and be supported as a part of the district's matching funds.

   Narrative: Numbers 1-3 speak to the development and operation of the CPA
   team. Describe the members of your academy team and the processes you will
   use to plan and implement programs and projects, prioritize needs and
   expenditures, and share the workload.

 4. Classes in the academy program shall be limited to academy students.

   Narrative: The legislation requires that CPA classes must enroll only CPA
   students. This requirement sometimes proves difficult for counseling and


                  High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                     39
   administration. What strategies might you use to ensure compliance with this
   rule?

 5. In grades ten and eleven instruction shall be provided in at least three academic
    subjects each school year that prepare the students to earn a regular high school
    diploma.

 6. Academy shall provide a CTE class at each grade level (grades ten, eleven, and
    twelve) related to the academy's chosen industry sector. These classes should
    consist of a coherent sequence of courses that articulates with the community
    college system and optionally with other elements of postsecondary education.
    These courses should also prepare students with industry certification and/or for
    skilled employment whenever possible.

 7. During the twelfth grade, the number of academic classes may vary, providing at
    least one academic and at least one CTE academy class.

 8. Teachers shall integrate and apply curriculum so that all academic subjects
    contribute to an understanding of the occupational field, and so that
    CTE classes contribute to an understanding of the applications of academic
    knowledge and skill in the target industry.

   Narrative: Numbers 5–8 pertain to required academy courses, articulation with
   postsecondary education, preparation for certification and/or employment,
   and the integration of academic and CTE. Describe the academic and CTE
   courses offered in your academy program and why these courses were
   chosen. Describe the logical sequence of your CTE courses planned for
   grades ten through twelve, the planned course content, and how they lead to
   industry certification, align with community colleges and other postsecondary
   education programs, and/or prepare your students for skilled employment
   opportunities. Give examples of how career focused instruction will be infused
   into your academy’s core academic classes and an example of how core
   academics will be integrated into your career technical classes. Include brief
   descriptions of any planned integrated and/or project-based curricula.

 9. Whenever possible, these classes should be block scheduled in a cluster to
    provide flexibility to academy teachers.

   Narrative: Number 9 pertains to the scheduling of academy classes and the
   advantage of blocking these classes together. Please describe your school’s
   scheduling framework (e.g., six-period day, 4 X 4, etc.) and where within that
   schedule your academy classes will be offered.

Attachment 2: Please include a diagram or chart showing your school’s schedule,
and indicating where your academy courses will fit into the school’s master

                  High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       40
schedule. The school schedule will not be counted against your 18 page narrative
limit or your five page attachment limit.

Form D: Please complete Form D, “Program of Study”. This chart should name
the academic and CTE courses to be offered within the academy, the
postsecondary course of study with which you are aligning your program, and
the career ladders possible for this industry sector and pathway. This form will
not be counted against your 18 page narrative limit or your five page attachment
limit.

10. Students shall be provided with a mentor from the business community during the
    eleventh grade year.

11. Students will be given an opportunity for an internship or work-based learning
    experience related to the academy's occupational field or other unrelated
    work-based learning experience to improve employment skills during the summer
    following the eleventh grade or during the twelfth grade year.

   Narrative: Describe your planned mentorship and internship programs.
   Include your planned methods of recruiting mentors and internship providers,
   activities to be shared by students and mentors, and methods of evaluating
   the experience for students and adults. Please describe your plan for these
   programs, including responsible faculty, participating business partners, and
   the structure envisioned for each.

12. Students will be provided with additional motivational activities with private sector
     involvement to encourage academic and occupational preparation.
   Narrative: Describe the motivational and enrichment activities your team will
   implement to help students maintain a focus on their education and goals.


Section VII. Advisory Committee

Each participating district shall establish an advisory committee consisting of individuals
involved in academy operations, including school district and school administrators, lead
teachers, and representatives from the focus industry, community colleges, other
elements of postsecondary education, private sector, parents, and students.

   Narrative: Please describe the guidance and support that will be provided by
   your academy advisory committee. Note: The academy should have an
   advisory committee specifically focused on the academy program. It is not
   acceptable to share an advisory committee with other school, district, or
   Regional Occupational Program (ROP).




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      41
Attachment 3: Please provide a roster of the members of your advisory
committee, their affiliations, positions, and contact information. This roster will
not be counted against your 18 page limit or your five page attachment limit.


Section VIII. District and Industry Match

To be eligible to receive funding, a district shall provide all of the following:

√ An amount equal to a 100 percent match of all funds received through this grant in
  the form of direct and in-kind support provided by the district.

√ An amount equal to a 100 percent match of all funds received through this grant in
  the form of direct and in-kind support provided by participating businesses or other
  community organizations.

   Narrative: Please describe the anticipated source, type, and value of district
   and industry matching funds and services and how each will be used by your
   academy program. Share an example of a way your district administration will
   provide substantial support for your program. Likewise, share an example of a
   way your business partners will provide meaningful and ongoing support for
   your academy program.

Attachment 4: Please provide up to ten letters of support from the district, school,
partnering businesses, postsecondary education, ROP, and other supporting
organizations and individuals that describe specific services, materials,
participation in required components, and/or supplemental funding that will be
committed to the academy program. Please DO NOT provide writers with a
suggested format, as that practice results in nearly identical letters. Each letter
should be unique to the writer and/or organization and, when available, should be
on letterhead and include contact information.


Section IX. Use of Funds

The school district shall provide an assurance that state funds provided by the
partnership academies program shall be used only for the development, operation, and
support of partnership academies.

   Narrative: Please provide a description of the planned uses of the funding
   provided through this grant, demonstrating use of all expenditures for the
   academy program (minus the CDE approved district indirect percentage). How
   will these expenditures ensure that the academy model is implemented fully
   and will achieve the goals of student engagement, achievement, and
   preparation for postsecondary education and employment?



                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      42
   In this section you should also describe your plan for sustainability of the
   academy program after 2011-12, when funding for these academies sunsets.


Section X. Timeline, Budget, and Budget Narrative

The timeline, budget and budget narrative should describe activities and expenditures
for the 2009-10 school year. These documents should cover from
July 1, 2009–June 30, 2010. Applications must show, on a monthly basis, how all the
necessary activities to develop and/or refine the required components of a state-funded
partnership academy have been (or will be) completed. This section must list the
activities to be undertaken, planned date of accomplishment, and person assuming
responsibility. Grant recipients are required to attend the Summer Institute for new
academies (dates and location to be determined) and the annual California Partnership
Academy Conference, which is held in March of each year. Section X will not be
counted against the narrative 18 page limitation.

Each applicant must submit a signed Budget Page, Form E, accompanied by a
narrative not to exceed three pages. Proposed expenditures of grant funds must
demonstrate appropriate use for the implementation of the academy and clearly be tied
to the application narrative. School district match of 100 percent of the grant award and
business/industry/community match of 100 percent of the grant award, both in real and
in-kind support, must be indicated on Form E. Grant funding is only for program
implementation and must not supplant current fixed costs. Items such as food and
garments allocated to students are discouraged, food and lodging expenses for
students are not allowed, and out of state travel for students and staff is not an
allowable expense.

The budget narrative must include a brief description that justifies each expense. The
school district match and business/community match must also be explained in the
narrative.
The budget narrative must include a description of:

 Other CPAs in the school and district.

 Alternative funding sources and amounts that are currently supporting the
  academy program for which this application is intended.

Use the format for category narrative descriptions provided in Appendix 3.

After grants are awarded, the CDE staff will assist in revising and finalizing use of funds,
if necessary.




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       43
                                      Application Checklist

                                  Phase 1: Intent to Submit
Intent to Submit, Form A, should be postmarked or faxed to the CDE by March 9, 2009
FAX 916-319-0168.
     Form A: Letter of Intent to Submit, sent to CDE on ___________________________
                                Phase 2: Application Submission
The application for a CPA implementation grant must be delivered to the CDE or postmarked on
or before March 30, 2009. The application must include the following components to be
considered complete and eligible for review:
COMPONENT 1: SIGNATURE PAGE AND DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
    Form B: Cover and Signature Page. The information on the cover page is complete, and the form
     is signed by the superintendent or designee and the school principal.
    Form C: School Demographic Data, Geographic Information, and Community Description.
     The demographic and geographic information is complete, and a one-page narrative about the
     community is included.
    Forms B and C are complete and appear as the first two pages of the application.
COMPONENT 2: PROGRAM NARRATIVE AND SUPPORT DOCUMENTATION
    The Program Narrative: The narrative describes the California Partnership Academy that will be
     implemented in 2009-10, addresses the questions in the RFA, and meets all formatting
     requirements:
      Limited to 18 pages, single sided. Narrative beyond 18 pages will not be read.
      Double spaced
      Easy-to-read 12-point font so text does not exceed 6 lines per inch
      8 ½ x 11‖ paper with 1‖ side, top, and bottom margins
      Numbered pages include a footer with school name on each page.
      Stapled (do not use binders or folders when submitting proposal).
    Form D: Program of Study
    Attachments requested in Sections IV, VI, VII, and VIII
    Letters of Collaboration. Up to 10 letters that provide evidence of support from community/
     business partners, community college partners, and persons in the school district are attached.
    Evidence to Support the Program Narrative (optional). Up to five pages of printed material
     (charts or other evidence) that supports statements made in the program narrative are attached.
COMPONENT 3: TIMELINE, BUDGET PAGE AND BUDGET NARRATIVE
    Form E: Budget Page. The budget page is complete with cost amounts in the correct categories
     and appropriate signatures, including the signature of a District Fiscal Contact.
    Budget Narrative: Up to three pages of budget descriptions that correspond to Form E, Budget
     Page, and justify each expenditure.
    Timeline corresponds to activities described in narrative and includes implementation of all grade
     10 critical components and planning for subsequent years’ program components.

   Mail original application and three (3) copies to:

    California Partnership Academy Application
    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office, California Department of Education
    1430 N Street, Suite 4503, Sacramento, CA 95814


                     High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                      44
                               Appendix 1
                  California Partnership Academy Law
Education Code Section 54690. (a) The Legislature hereby finds and declares that the
partnership academies program has proven to be a highly effective state-school-private
sector partnership, providing combined academic and occupational training to high
school students who present a high risk of dropping out of school, and motivating those
students to stay in school and graduate. Partnership academies are functioning in 45
high schools spread throughout the state, with occupational training successfully offered
in over 15 different skill fields, including such diverse skills as electronics, computer
technology, finance, agribusiness, graphic arts and printing, international business, and
space. Partnership academies in San Mateo County have been honored with two
national awards for excellence, and the California Partnership Academies have been
given high accolades in various textbooks and studies addressing vocational programs.

(b) The Legislature finds the partnership academies are in the forefront of school efforts
to integrate academic and vocational education and that they can be effective in
providing an integrated learning program and high motivation toward pursuing skilled
occupational fields to students at risk of dropping out of school and to students not
motivated by the regular educational curriculum. Further, the Legislature finds the
partnership academies can make a very positive contribution towards meeting the
needs of the state for a highly skilled and educated work force in the 21st century.

(c) Therefore, the Legislature hereby states its intent to expand the number of
partnership academies in this state's high schools, hereafter to be known as California
Partnership Academies; to broaden the availability of these learning experiences to
interested students who do not meet the full criteria of ―at-risk‖ students; and to
encourage the establishment of academies whose occupational fields address the
needs of developing technologies.

(d) For purposes of this article, ―at-risk‖ students means students enrolled in high school
who are at risk of dropping out of school, as indicated by at least three of the following
criteria:

   1. Past record of irregular attendance.
   2. Past record of underachievement in which the student is at least one year behind
      the coursework for the respective grade level.
   3. Past record of low motivation or a disinterest in the regular school program.
   4. Disadvantaged economically.

(e) The State Department of Education may expend no more than five percent of the
funds received to carry out this article on administrative expenses.

54691. Commencing with the 1993-94 fiscal year, from the funds appropriated for that
purpose, the Superintendent of Public Instruction shall issue grants to school districts


                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                         45
maintaining high schools that meet the specifications of Section 54692, for purposes of
planning, establishing, and maintaining academies, as follows:

(a) The superintendent may issue a maximum of 155 grants per year for purposes of
planning partnership academies. The Superintendent of Public Instruction, when issuing
the grants to school districts, shall ensure that the grants are equitably distributed
among high-wealth and low-wealth school districts in urban, rural, and suburban areas.
Each planning grant shall be in the amount of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).

(b) For the 1993-94 fiscal year, and each fiscal year thereafter, the superintendent may
issue grants for the implementation and maintenance of existing academies or
academies planned pursuant to subdivision (a). Implementation and maintenance
grants shall be calculated in accordance with the following schedule:

 1. Districts operating academies may receive one thousand four hundred dollars
    ($1,400) per year for each qualified student enrolled in an academy during the first
    year of that academy's operation, provided that no more than forty-two thousand
    dollars ($42,000) may be granted to any one academy for the initial year.
 2. Districts operating academies may receive one thousand two hundred dollars
    ($1,200) for each qualified student enrolled in an academy during the second year
    of that academy's operation, provided that no more than seventy-two thousand
    dollars ($72,000) may be granted to any one academy for the second year.
 3. Districts operating academies may receive nine hundred dollars ($900) for each
    qualified student enrolled in an academy during the third and following years of that
    academy's operation, provided that no more than eighty-one thousand dollars
    ($81,000) may be granted to any one academy for each fiscal year.

(c) For purposes of this article, a qualified student is a student meeting the at-risk
criteria specified in Section 54690 and who is enrolled in an academy for the 10th, 11th,
or 12th grade, obtains 90 percent of the credits each academic year in courses that are
required for graduation, and does any of the following:

 1. Successfully completes a school year during the 10th grade with an attendance
    record of no less than 80 percent.
 2. Successfully completes a school year during the 11th grade with an attendance
    record of no less than 80 percent.
 3. Successfully graduates after the 12th grade.

A student enrolled in an academy who successfully completes only one semester with
regard to enrollment, attendance, and credits within the school year is considered
qualified for that semester and the district may receive one-half of the funds specified
under subdivision (b) for that student.

(d) (1) a school district operating an academy that is unable to enroll enough at-risk
students, as defined in Section 54690, to constitute one-half of the participating
students may enroll non-at-risk students that meet any of the following criteria:

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                         46
 A. Scoring in the 40th percentile or below in mathematics or English language arts on
    the standardized test administered pursuant to Article 4 (commencing with Section
    60640) of Chapter 5 of Part 33.

 B. Maintaining a grade point average of 2.2 or below, or the equivalent of a C-.

 C. Meeting any three of the four criteria set forth in subdivision (d) of Section 54690.

 D. Fulfilling any of the actions described in paragraphs (1), (2), or (3) of
    subdivision (c).

(2) Non-at-risk students enrolled pursuant to paragraph (1) may not exceed one-half of
the students enrolled in an academy.

(e) At the end of each school year, school districts that have been approved to operate
academies pursuant to this article shall certify the following information to the
Superintendent of Public Instruction:

 1. The operation of each academy in accordance with this article, including sections
    54692 and 54694.
 2. The number of qualified students enrolled during the just completed school year,
    by grade level, for each academy operated by the district.
 3. The amount of matching funds and the dollar value of in-kind support made
    available to each academy in accordance with subdivisions (a) and (b) of Section
    54692.

(f) The superintendent shall adjust each school district's grant in accordance with the
certification made to him or her pursuant to subdivision (d) or in accordance with any
discrepancies to the certification that may be revealed by audit. Notwithstanding the
provisions of this section, the superintendent may advance up to 50 percent of the funds
as he or she deems appropriate to districts that are approved to operate, or plan to
operate partnership academies.

(g) Funds granted to school districts pursuant to this article may be expended without
regard to fiscal year. However, the funds must be expended for the maintenance and
operation of academies.

54692. In order to be eligible to receive funding pursuant to this article, a district shall
provide all of the following:

(a) An amount equal to a 100 percent match of all funds received pursuant to this article
in the form of direct and In-Kind support provided by the district.




                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                            47
(b) An amount equal to a 100 percent match of all funds received pursuant to this article
in the form of direct and In-Kind support provided by participating companies or other
private sector organizations.

(c) An assurance that state funds provided by the partnership academies program shall
be used only for the development, operation, and support of partnership academies.

(d) An assurance that each academy will be established as a ―school within a school.‖
Academy teachers shall work as a team in planning, teaching, and troubleshooting
program activities. Classes in the academy program shall be limited to academy
students as specified in subdivision (d). Each participating district shall establish an
advisory committee consisting of individuals involved in academy operations, including
school district and school administrators, lead teachers, and representatives of the
private sector.

(e) Assurance that each academy student will be provided with the following:

 1. Instruction in at least three academic subjects each regular school term that
    prepares the student for a regular high school diploma. These subjects should
    contribute to an understanding of the occupational field of the academy.
 2. A ―laboratory class‖ related to the academy's occupational field.
 3. A class schedule that limits the attendance to the classes required in paragraphs
    (1) and (2) to pupils of the academy. Whenever possible, these classes should be
    block scheduled in a cluster to provide flexibility to academy teachers. During the
    twelfth grade the number of academic classes may vary.
 4. A mentor from the business community during the pupil's 12th grade year.
 5. An internship or paid job related to the academy's occupational field or work
    experience to improve employment skills, during the summer following the 11th
    grade. A student that must attend summer school for purposes of completing
    graduation requirements is exempt from this paragraph.
 6. Additional motivational activities with private sector involvement to encourage
    academic and occupational preparation.

(f) Assurance that academy teachers have a common planning period to interchange
student and educational information. Whenever practical, the planning period should be
in addition to the normal planning period for full-time teachers and be supported as a
part of the district's matching funds.

54693. The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall establish eligibility criteria for
school districts that apply for grants pursuant to this article. When establishing criteria,
the superintendent shall consider the commitment and need of the applicant district.
The superintendent may consider district indicators of need such as the number or
percent of pupils in poverty or with limited English proficiency, and the dropout rate.




                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        48
54694. The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall develop guidelines with respect to
the California Partnership Academies. The guidelines shall include, but not be limited to,
enrollment provisions, application procedures, and student eligibility.

54695. (a) The ninth grade teachers and counselors in schools maintained by school
districts approved to operate academies pursuant to this article shall identify students
eligible to participate in an academy.

(b) Teachers and counselors in schools maintained by school districts approved to
operate academies pursuant to this article, business representatives, and academy
students of academies that are operating in the area shall be encouraged to make
presentations to prospective students and their parents.

(c) The staff of each academy shall select students from among those who have
expressed an interest in the academy and whose parents or guardians have approved
the student's participation.

54696. The Legislature finds that each new academy requires technical assistance for
the academy team, administrators, teachers, and private sector participants in the
multiple aspects of the academy program that differ from the standard high school
program. To provide for the transfer of the experiences gained in the operation of
currently successful academies to new academies, the Superintendent of Public
Instruction shall develop a technical assistance team whose members have prior
involvement in successful academy operation and make their expertise available, as
necessary, to each new academy during its first two years of operation.

54697. (a) The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall select an entity (the
―evaluating entity‖) to conduct a long-term evaluation of the Partnership Academies
conducted pursuant to this article using a random assignment of pupils into program
and control groups. The participation of any school district in this long-term evaluation is
voluntary.

(b) In order to qualify for participation in the evaluation of any Partnership Academy as
described in subdivision (a), a school district shall demonstrate that the number of
pupils seeking admission to the academy, who qualify for admission under applicable
criteria, exceeds the number of openings in the academy.

(c) The evaluation shall be conducted on a basis that results in no net cost to the state
or to any participating school district. The evaluating entity is responsible for obtaining,
from other sources, any funding that is necessary for the purposes of subdivision (a).

(d) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the evaluating entity shall have access to
pupil records, to the extent permitted by federal law, as necessary to perform the
evaluation. The evaluating entity shall ensure that all personally identifiable information
regarding any pupil and his or her parent or guardian remains confidential.



                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        49
(e) The evaluating entity shall coordinate its evaluation activities under subdivision (a)
with the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and provide the superintendent with the
results of the evaluation upon completion. The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall
submit the results of the evaluation to the Legislature.




                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      50
                          Appendix 2
     California Partnership Academy Program Assurances
EC Section 54692 specifies the elements that must be included in a California
Partnership Academy. The superintendent’s and principal’s signatures on the CPA
Application Cover Page signify that they have read the following assurances and will
provide these program elements.

Program Assurances: To be eligible to receive state funding for implementation of a
California Partnership Academy program, a district shall provide all of the following:

(a) An amount equal to a 100 percent match of all funds received in the form of direct
and In-Kind support provided by the district.

(b) An amount equal to a 100 percent match of all funds received in the form of direct
and In-Kind support provided by participating companies or other private sector
organizations.

(c) An assurance that state funds provided by the partnership academies program shall
be used only for the development, operation, and support of partnership academies.

(d) An assurance that each academy will be established as a ―school within a school.‖
Academy teachers shall work as a team in planning, teaching, and troubleshooting
program activities. Classes in the academy program shall be limited to academy
students Each participating academy shall establish an advisory committee consisting
of individuals involved in academy operations, including school district and school
administrators, lead teachers, parents, representatives of participating companies and
other private sector organizations, and representatives of postsecondary education.

(e) Assurance that each academy student will be provided with the following:

 1. Instruction in at least three academic subjects each regular school term that
    prepares the students for a regular high school diploma. These subjects should
    contribute to an understanding of the occupational field of the academy.
 2. A Career Technical Education class related to the academy's occupational field.
 3. A class schedule that limits the attendance in the academy academic and career
    technical education classes to pupils of the academy. Whenever possible, these
    classes should be block scheduled in a cluster to provide flexibility to academy
    teachers. During the twelfth grade the number of academic classes may vary.
 4. A mentor from the business community during the students’ eleventh grade year.
 5. An internship or Work-Based learning experience related to the academy's
    occupational field, or other unrelated work-based learning experience to improve
    employment skills, during the summer following the eleventh grade or during the
    twelfth grade year.
 6. Additional motivational activities with private sector involvement to encourage
    academic and career preparation.

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       51
7. Assurance that academy teachers have a common planning period to exchange
   student and educational information. Whenever practical, the planning period
   should be in addition to the normal planning period for full-time teachers and be
   supported as a part of the district's matching funds.




                 High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                       52
                                           Appendix 3
         Budget Categories and Budget Narrative Examples
Each budget category is described below followed by an example of a budget
expenditure narrative. The descriptions and line items may or may not apply to your
specific CPA program; they are simply examples.

Object
Code                         Description                               Narrative Example
1000     Certificated Salaries                                Example: Site Coordinator: 1/6 x
         Certificated salaries are salaries that require a    $42,000 annual salary = $7,000.
         credential or permit issued by the Commission        The Site Coordinator will serve
         on Teacher Credentialing. List all certificated      one release period per day as a
         project employees, including percentage or           facilitator for the project and, along
         fraction of full time equivalent (FTE) and rate of   with coordination, provide
         pay per day, month and/or annual salary. Note:       technical assistance, coordinate
         Funds in this category are not intended to           meetings, and provide other
         supplant current fixed costs.                        services to meet the objectives of
                                                              the project.
2000     Classified Salaries                                  Example: Part-time secretary: 20
         Classified salaries are salaries for services that   weeks, 15 hours per week @ $11
         do not require a credential or permit issued by      per hour = $3,300. The secretary
         the Commission on Teacher Credentialing. List        will provide general clerical
         all classified project employees, including          support for the project, performing
         percentage of full time equivalent, FTE, and rate    a wide variety of technical,
         of pay per day, month and/or year. Note: Funds       clerical, and support services in
         in this category are not intended to supplant        the areas of administrative
         current fixed costs.                                 assistance, budget development,
                                                              maintenance/record keeping, and
                                                              general office procedures
3000     Employee Benefits                                    Examples: Certificated Benefits:
         Record employer’s contributions to retirement        Site Coordinator $7,000 @ 25% =
         plans and health and welfare benefits. List and      $1,750.
         include the percentage and dollar amount for         Classified Benefits: Part-time
         each employee benefit being claimed.                 secretary $3,300 @ 9% = $300
4000     Books and Supplies                                   Examples: Health-themed novels
         Record expenditures for books, supplies, and         for Advanced English, 20 @
         other noncapitalized property/equipment              $50.00 ea.=$1000
         (movable personal property of a relatively           Anatomical models for Advanced
         permanent nature that has an estimated useful        Health studies 4@ $405 each
         life greater than one year and an acquisition        =$1620
         cost less than the LEA’s capitalization threshold    DNA lab and teaching activity lab
         but greater than the LEA’s inventory threshold).     = $1300
         This category includes expenditures for books
         and supplies (e.g., textbooks, other books,
         instructional materials). This category also

                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                               53
Object
Code                         Description                              Narrative Example
         includes supplies used in support services and
         auxiliary programs, publications, and
         subscriptions necessary to operate a project
         office. A listing of all equipment, including the
         serial and model numbers, purchased with any
         portion of these grant funds, must be recorded
         and maintained in the file.
5000     Services and Other Operating Expenditures
         Record expenditures for services, rents, leases,
         maintenance contracts, dues, travel, insurance,
         utilities, legal, and other operating expenditures.
         Travel & Conference: Include expenditures
         incurred by and/or for employees and other
         representatives of the LEA for travel and           Example of travel and conference:
         conferences, including lodging, mileage,            Site coordinator to attend high
         parking, bridge tolls, shuttles, and taxis and      school regional support workshop,
         conference registration expenses necessary to       October 17–18, 2002, in Ontario,
         meet the objectives of the program. Receipts        at a cost of $358. [$130
         are required to be kept on file by your agency for  registration fee + $168 for 2 nights
         audit purposes. Bus transportation for students     lodging + $40 per diem (meals) +
         should be listed here.                              $20 mileage (60 miles x $.34 per
         Contracting Services: Services provided to the      mile) = $358]
         school by outside contractors appear under this     Example of subcontract
         category. Identify what, when, and where            information:
         services(s) will be provided. Appropriate           Two trainers to provide technology
         activities include conducting workshops,            training @ $100/day x 10 days =
         training, and technical assistance activities.      $2,000
6000     Capital Outlay                                      Example:
                                                             First payment on Genesis
         Record expenditures for sites, buildings, and
                                                             Systems (includes tanks and
         equipment, including leases with option to
                                                             filtering equipment for chemical
         purchase that meet the LEA’s threshold for
                                                             lab in the aquaculture room) =
         capitalization. (Equipment is movable personal
                                                             $10,000
         property that has both an estimated useful life
                                                             1 colored laser printer - $5,000
         over one year and an acquisition cost that meets
                                                             1 network server - $8,000
         the LEA’s threshold for capitalization. Refer to
                                                             Note: See grant award letter for
         the district’s threshold amount for capitalization,
                                                             restrictions on capital outlay, if
         anything less than this amount should be posted
                                                             any.
         in Object Code 4000). A listing of all equipment,
         including the serial and model numbers,
         purchased with any portion of these grant funds,
         must be recorded and maintained in the file.
         This category also covers sites, improvement of
         sites, buildings, and improvement of buildings.




                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                            54
Object
Code                        Description                            Narrative Example
7000     Indirect if applicable (not to exceed CDE         Suggested formula: X + ___% X =
         approved rate). Indirect costs are not assessed   $42,000
         on expenditures for capital outlay.               $42,000 minus X = amount of
         http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/ac/ic/                   indirect costs allowed
                                                           (___% X = CDE approved rate for
                                                           your district times X)




                    High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                      55
Appendix 4
                    California Partnership Academies
                   RFA Technical Assistance Webcast

        A CPA Grant Information Webcast will be provided and archived on
                        February 19, 2009, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM


Information For Participants in Live Webcast:
Name: California Partnership Academies Grant Webcast
Where:    http://breeze.cde.ca.gov/wo65375/ (Outside Source)
When: 02/19/2009, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Participants log in as a GUEST

Technical Note for Participants
This webcast supports Flash plugin versions 6 to 9. The latest version of Flash 10 is
currently not supported. To view the presentation, you must downgrade your Flash
plugin to version 9 or below.

What Version of Flash Do I have?
http://kb.adobe.com/selfservice/viewContent.do?externalId=tn_15507 (Outside Source)

How do I downgrade? (Windows Only)
http://www2.cde.ca.gov/software/flash/
Run uninstall_flash_player.exe
Run flashplayer9r124_winax.exe

The live webcast is limited to 99 viewers. If you are not able to log in, the entire webcast
will be archived. The archived access URL address will be released after the live
webcast.

                 Information on the accessing the archived webcast
                will be available through the high school e-mail list --
                                      Subscribe at:
                      http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/hsmail.asp
           CPA announcements will also be posted on the CDE Web site:
                  http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/cpaannounce.asp
A Grant workshop will be held on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at the California Department of Education, 1430 N Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. This
workshop will be held in Room 1101 (Board Room). Please RSVP to Catena Rodgers,
Office Technician, at 916-319-0892 or by e-mail at crodgers@cde.ca.gov.

                   High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                        56
                             Form A: 2009-10 Intent to Submit
Please return this document to the California Department of Education by March 9, 2009.
Fax to 916-319-0168. If mailed, please postmark by March 30, 2009, and send it to the
address below. Submitting this page does not obligate the school or district to submit an
application.
Mail to: California Department of Education, High School Initiatives/Career Education
Office, California Partnership Academy, 1430 N Street, Suite 4503, Sacramento, CA 95814
Please print or type information above the line.

Green Academy             Goods Movement/Logistics Academy         Other Industry Sector Academy


School Submitting the Application                                   Career Focus of Academy


Principal's Name                                                    Principal’s E-mail


School Mailing Address                                              School Telephone/ School FAX


City                                       Zip                      County/District/School (CDS) Code


Site Contact Person                        Title            Contact's Telephone                      FAX


Contact E-mail                                                      School Website
District Information


District Name                                                       County Name


Name of District Superintendent                                     District Telephone


District Mailing Address                                            City                    Zip


District Contact Person                                             Title


District Contact Telephone                              District Contact E-mail

This high school will request $42,000 for a grade 10 California Partnership Academy that meets all
requirements of the California Education Code.



Signature of District Superintendent or Designee                                            Date


                       High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                57
      Form B: 2009-10 California Partnership Academy Grant Signature Page
Please print or type information above the line. Original signature must appear on the signature line.
School CDS (County/District/School) Code:
      School Information

                                                                                      http://
High School Name                                                                      School Web Page

                                                                                      $42,000
Full CPA Name                                                                         Funding Level

 Green Academy  Goods Movement and Logistics Academy                Other Industry Sector Academy (SB70)
Please indicate the Category of Academy Funding under which you are applying


School Mailing Address                                                                School Telephone/Fax numbers


City, ZIP Code                      Academy Career Technical Focus                    Industry Sector


Academy Coordinator                                 Telephone                         E-mail address


Principal’s Name                                    Telephone                         E-mail address

      District Information


Name of School District                                                               County


District Superintendent’s Name                      Telephone/Fax numbers             E-mail address


District Mailing Address                            City                              ZIP Code


District Contact Person and Title                   Telephone                         E-mail address

I support this application for a California Partnership Academy at the school listed above. I assure that the district and
school applying for a California Partnership Academy Grant will adhere to the intent and letter of California Education
Code sections 54690–54697. This administration has reviewed the assurances in Appendix 2 of the Request for
Application and will adhere to these requirements as we implement the California Partnership Academy.



Signature of District Superintendent                                                                                Date


Signature of Site Principal                                                                                         Date

                             High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                     58
                                                                                  Form C
   Form C: School Demographic Data, Geographic Information, and
                     Community Description
For the CPA application to be complete, please supply the information requested below.

  Demographic Data
  Total Student Enrollment in the School:


                                             Number                  Percent of Total Enrollment
  Total Number/Percent of Students
  identified as Limited-English Proficient

  Total Number/Percent of Students
  identified as Economically Disadvantaged

           Racial/Ethnic Composition                  Number         Percent of Total Enrollment
  Asian

  Black, not Hispanic Origin

  Hispanic

  Native American

  Pacific Islander

  White, not Hispanic Origin

  Other:



  School Geographic Information


  Check only one
  Urban, Inner City
                                                       Rural
  Urban
                                                       Rural, Geographically Remote
  Suburban
                                                       Other: describe



  Community Description


 Provide a ONE-PAGE NARRATIVE about the geographic area in which the
 school is located. Include information about the community,
 businesses/industries, and local colleges/universities.



                      High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                              59
                                                                                FORM D: CALIFORNIA PARTNERSHIP ACADEMY, PROGRAM OF STUDY
School:                                                                                  Academy:
Industry Sector:
Pathway
Indicate courses planned for the Academy with an asterisk ( * ) and preceed course name with the word "Academy", i.e. *Academy English 10
EDUCATION




                                                                                                                                                                                       SAMPLE
                LEVELS
                         GRADE




                                 English/ Language        Social Studies/ Social                                      Career and Technical Courses   Other Required Courses,
                                                                                           Mathematics     Science                                                               Occupations Relating
                                        Arts                     Science                                              and/or Degree Major Courses    Recommended Electives
                                                                                                                                                                                   to This Pathway

                         Interest Inventory Administered and Plan of Study Initiated for all Learners.
                                                                                                                                                                               Occupations: Indicate Level
                            9                                                                                                                                                  and Type of Education
                                                                                                                                                                               Required (technical training,
                                                                                                                                                                               certificate, associate degree,
                                                                                                                                                                               baccalaureate degree or
                           10                                                                                                                                                  higher)►
      SECONDARY




                           11

                         Indicate articulation/dual credit/dual enrollment courses with a pound sign (#)


                           12

                         Recommended postsecondary major or degree/certificate goal:

                         Year
                          13
      POSTSECONDARY




                         Year1
                           4


                         Year
                          15


                         Year
                          16

                                                                                      High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                                       60
              Form E: 2009-10 Implementation Grant Budget Page
Each California Partnership Academy applicant must submit this Budget Page along with
a budget narrative (not to exceed three pages each for 2009-10) that explains all
expenditures under each category. A 100% match of funds (cash or in-kind) must be
evident from both the school district and community/business partners.
 District Name:                                           CDS Code:


 High School Name:                                        Principal Name:


 CPA Program Name:                                        CPA Coordinator:


 Amount Requested:                                        District Fiscal Contact:


                                                          Sources of local match
                                                                   (Cash or In-kind)
                                                                            Private, Public,
                                          California                           Nonprofit
                                    Partnership Academy   District Funds Sectors Funds         Budget Item
       Expenditure Codes                   Funds           Equal 100%         Equal 100%         Totals
 1000 Certificated Salaries

 2000 Classified Salaries

 3000 Employee Benefits

 4000 Books and Supplies

 5000 Services and other
 operating expenditures (other
 than Travel expenditures)

 5200 Travel & Conferences


 6000 Capital Outlay
 7000 Indirect Charges
 (CDE approved rates apply)
 Totals                                         $42,000


Principal Signature                                                                    Date


CPA Coordinator Signature                                                              Date


District Fiscal Contact Signature                                                      Date



                       High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                61
                                                                 Rubric

Section I: Overview of Proposed California Partnership Academy
        Makes a Strong Case               Makes an Adequate Case                      Makes a Limited Case             Makes a Minimal Case
               (4 points)                          (3 points)                                (2 points)                       (1 point)
Concise, but revealing general        Acceptable description of planned       Description of model program is         Minimal description of
description of the planned program    program, with brief description of      too limited to provide a clear idea     program or its structure.
that seeks to be a funded CPA.        program focus and structure.            of its intent or functioning. Though
Includes description of Career                                                career focus may be named, the
Technical Education (CTE)                                                     view of its structures is incomplete,
focus/theme, and of the structures,                                           general, or too confusing to help in
staffing, students, and support                                               understanding the program well.
systems.
Compelling history of program’s       The history of the program and its      A limited history of the program        Program history is
context within community, district,   context are adequately described        and its context are described, and      minimal, context is either
and school. Review of early           and includes features or evidence       description of program evolution        too brief or nonexistent,
development fully describes choices   that shows how the earliest form of     makes unclear its transition from       and doesn’t give a
made and rationale, early             the program has transitioned into its   the beginning to current form.          convincing picture of
stakeholders and their roles, and     current form.                                                                   growth.
transitions into program’s current
form.
Convincingly defines intent behind    Adequately addresses the intent         Reasons for developing proposal         Fails to provide a
proposal development and clearly      behind applying for this grant and      are unclear or ill-defined, as is the   convincing notion of
shares stakeholder’s vision of        the expected changes as a funded        vision of how the program will          intention for seeking
program’s future as a funded CPA.     CPA.                                    change if funding is granted.           funding or vision of
                                                                                                                      program growth if
                                                                                                                      funding is granted.




                                         High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                           62
Section II: CPA Career Technical Focus
       Makes a Strong Case                Makes an Adequate Case                Makes a Limited Case            Makes a Minimal Case
             (8 points)                           (6 points)                           (4 points)                      (2 point)
Convincing description of the         The method used to select the        The method used to select the     The method used to select
process to determine most             academy’s career focus is            academy’s career focus is         the career focus is unclear
credible CTE focus possible.          adequately described and             vaguely described. Limited        or not explained. There is
                                      includes adequate evidence of        professional resources/experts    no evidence that
There is a clear description of the
                                      an acceptable process                appear to have been consulted     resources/experts were
professional resources/experts
                                      conducted by a group of              to provide advice.                used or consulted.
consulted to ensure that what is
                                      knowledgeable local
proposed will represent the state
                                      stakeholders and professional
of the art in the career area.
                                      resources.
There is compelling statistical and   There is reasonable evidence         There is limited evidence that    There is no evidence that
anecdotal evidence that the           the chosen career technical          the career technical area:        the career technical area:
chosen career technical area          area:
                                                                            Is in a field that has growth    Is in a field that has
clearly:
                                       Is in a field that has growth        potential in the California       growth potential in the
   Is in a field that has growth       potential in the California          economy.                          California economy.
    potential in the California         economy.                            Meets the needs of the local     Meets the needs of the
    economy.                           Meets the needs of the local         economy.                          local economy.
   Meets the needs of the local        economy.                            Garners the support of local     Garners the support of
    economy.                           Garners the support of local         industries/ businesses.           local industries/
   Garners the support of local        industries/ businesses.             Provides preparation for both     businesses.
    companies/businesses.              Provides preparation for both        career entry-level positions     Provides preparation for
   Provides preparation for both       career entry-level positions and     and postsecondary education.      both career entry-level
    career entry-level positions        postsecondary education.                                               positions and
    and postsecondary education.                                                                               postsecondary education.
It is clear that this focus and the   There is some evidence that the      There is limited evidence that    There is minimal or no
content of the career technical       focus and content of the             the focus and content of the      evidence that the focus
theme and related classes align       career technical class support       career technical classes align    and content of the
with academic and CTE                 academic and CTE standards           with academic and/or CTE          career technical class align
standards. Career pathways are        and the potential for development    standards and are part of a       with either academic or
described, and alignment with         of career pathways and/or            planned or existing career        CTE standards or is part of
postsecondary education is            postsecondary alignment.             pathway.                          a planned or existing
existent or planned.                                                                                         career pathway.




                                          High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                   63
Section III: At-Risk Enrollment
       Makes a Strong Case                     Makes an Adequate Case                 Makes a Limited Case             Makes a Minimal Case
              (4 points)                                 (3 points)                           (2 points)                        (1 point)
Thorough description of statistical      Acceptable description and             Description and/or statistical data   Descriptive and/or
data regarding at-risk population at     statistical data regarding at-risk     on site population are incomplete,    statistical data on student
school site, and clear availability of   population at school site, and         missing, or lacks detail or           population is missing,
student clientele on which a CPA         availability of student clientele on   substantiation necessary to           incomplete, or
program could have a valuable            which a CPA program could have an      achieve a clear idea of student       unacceptable.
impact.                                  impact.                                need for a CPA program.
Meticulous collection of evidence        Good collection of evidence includes   Evidence is incomplete. Some or       Little or no reference to
includes comprehensive high              attendance, academic, graduation,      all of the following statistics are   site data on general
school’s attendance, academic,           and standardized test statistics.      inadequate or missing entirely:       school population or at-
graduation, and standardized test        Economic factors, including            attendance, grades, graduation        risk factors.
statistics, as well as available         free/reduced lunch figures, were       rates, test scores, or economic
economic factors such as                 also included.                         determiners.
free/reduced lunch figures.




                                            High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                       64
Section IV: Student/Staff Recruitment, Selection, and Counseling
         Makes a Strong Case                  Makes an Adequate Case                    Makes a Limited Case              Makes a Minimal Case
                (4 points)                              (3 points)                              (2 points)                        (1 point)
Highly productive recruitment            Recruitment strategies appear           Recruitment strategies appear         Recruitment plan is vague
strategies are detailed and              sufficient to recruit enough students   somewhat limited and may result       or insubstantial, and it
emphasize a plan to recruit a            for program implementation,             in difficulties recruiting enough     appears inadequate to
substantial number of students for       including at least 50% identified as    students for program                  attract either sufficient
program implementation, including at     at-risk according to the criteria in    implementation. Effort to focus       enrollment or an at-risk
least 50% identified as at-risk          Education Code Section 54690(d).        recruitment on at-risk students       clientele of 50%.
according to the criteria in Education   A good effort at student recruitment    may be particularly lacking.          Recruitment may be
Code Section 54690(d). An                is made and includes academy                                                  shouldered by a small
                                                                                 Recruitment is largely the
impressive effort at student             staff, as well as some non-                                                   number of academy staff or
                                                                                 responsibility of limited number of
recruitment is made, not only by         academy staff, stakeholders, and                                              merely placed in the hands
                                                                                 academy staff, who may have
academy staff, but by non-academy        academy students.                                                             of counseling or other site
                                                                                 student assistance.
site staff, stakeholders, and academy                                                                                  staff.
students, exhibiting broad program
appeal and solid public relations
efforts.
The recruitment interview process        The recruitment interviews process      Recruitment interviews, forms,        Evidence of recruitment
(and associated forms, brochures,        (and associated forms, brochures,       brochures, and applications as        interviews, forms,
and applications) as described is a      and applications) as described are      described are limited,                brochures, or applications
vital aspect of the academy program.     a consistent and adequate means         inconsistent, or nonexistent.         are limited or nonexistent.
Interview teams include multiple         of introducing potential academy        Interviews as described are
stakeholders, and the approach is        students to the program and             largely a casual event and may
respectful and professional.             acquainting staff to applicants.        sometimes be conducted
                                         Interview teams may sometimes           primarily by other students.
                                         include multiple stakeholders.
Recruitment plan for needed              Staff recruitment is less grounded      Staff recruitment, though             There is little guidance or
academy staff is clearly articulated     in policy than is student               voluntary, lacks a planned            no policy or coherence
and professional. Academy staff is       recruitment, but staff always           procedure. May be conducted on        regarding staff recruitment
never assigned to serve but              becomes part of the program on a        a personal level without              and limited evidence that
volunteers willingly.                    voluntary basis.                        protocols. Staff additions are        academy staff serves
                                                                                 generally voluntary.                  voluntarily.
Attachment 1: Ample testimony to         Attachment 1: Some evidence of          Attachment 1: Documents               Attachment 1: Documents
program viability is evident in          support for program is attached as      exhibiting stakeholder and            of support for this program
surveys, support letters, and other      evidence to program viability.          community support for program         are not in evidence or
documents included as attachments.                                               are limited.                          inconsequential.

                                             High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                         65
Section V: Attendance, Credits, and Graduation
       Makes a Strong Case                 Makes an Adequate Case                     Makes a Limited Case            Makes a Minimal Case
             (4 points)                            (3 points)                                (2 points)                         (1 point)
Clear description of programs that    Reasonable Clear description of           Some evidence that there is intent   Little or no compelling
will be implemented to provide        programs that will be implemented         to provide programs to support       evidence that specific
specific support to improve student   to provide specific support to            student achievement.                 student support programs
achievement, attendance, and          improve student achievement,                                                   will be implemented.
graduation rate.                      attendance, and graduation rate.
Excellent evidence of sound           Acceptable evidence that sound            Some evidence of an effort to use    Lacks evidence of efforts
educational strategies, policies,     educational strategies, policies, and     or plan educational strategies,      being taken to research
and activities that will be used      activities will be used to aid student    policies, and activities to aid      useful strategies, policies,
effectively to maximize student       success.                                  student success.                     or activities to aid student
success.                                                                                                             success.
Plans that facilitate student         Plans that facilitate student             Plans that facilitate student        Little or no sense that
motivation are described in detail,   motivation are described, but little or   motivation are mentioned but not     team has planned or
are related to academy career         no detail is provided.                    described.                           pondered motivational
focus, provide multiple                                                                                              activities.
opportunities for recognition, and
should make excellent use of CPA
funding augmentation.




                                          High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                       66
Section VI: Structure and Programmatic Management
          Makes a Strong Case                  Makes an Adequate Case                  Makes a Limited Case              Makes a Minimal Case
                (12 points)                             (9 points)                            (6 points)                        (3 points)
Excellent description of team              Good description of team,              Some aspects of team                Limited description of team
members, structure, and dynamics.          members, structure, and dynamics.      membership and structure are        membership and structure.
Clear explanation of how leadership        Shows how leadership and               described, though they are          Team leadership and
and teamwork will facilitate smooth,       teamwork will facilitate smooth,       somewhat vague concerning           structure description is
shared completion of tasks.                shared completion of academy           how leadership and teamwork         vague or nonexistent.
Administrative support exemplified by      tasks. Administrative support          are structured and tasks are        Administrative support
facilitating team development and          exemplified by facilitating team       shared. Administrative support      lacking as evidenced by time
effectiveness and providing time in        development and effectiveness and      may be lacking as evidenced by      devoted to team
schedule for development of                providing time in schedule for         time devoted to team                collaboration.
necessary teamwork and activities.         development of necessary               collaboration.
                                           teamwork and activities.
Clear commitment to maintaining            Acknowledged intent to maintain        Claims intent to maintain           Claims intent to maintain
academy-pure classes. Clear,               academy-pure classes. Adequate         academy-pure classes but may        academy-pure classes, but a
positive strategies in place to            plans in place to maintain             lack plan to ensure this. Plan to   plan to ensure this is lacking.
maintain compliance and gain site          compliance and gain site staff         maintain site staff compliance      Plan to maintain staff
staff cooperation.                         cooperation though they may be         and cooperation may be              compliance and cooperation
                                           vague or incomplete.                   simplistic or unrealistic.          is unrealistic or nonexistent.
Vividly depicts the planned academic       Accurately describes the planned       Lists planned course offerings.     Academy’s planned course
and CTE course offerings and               course offerings, but explanation of   Some course sequences may           offerings seem haphazard
indicates precisely how and why            how and why choices were made          seem illogical or random.           and illogical or lack
these class choices were made.             may be vague or unclear.               Limited explanation of              relevance to career focus.
                                                                                  determining process.                Some or all requirements (3
                                                                                                                      academic/1 CTE course per
                                                                                                                      year) may be ignored.
A plan for a logical sequence of CTE       A plan for a logical CTE course        CTE course sequencing,              No recognizable CTE course
courses, including a clear capstone        sequence, including a capstone         certification, and/or alignment     sequencing, certification,
course, leads to industry certification,   course, and leading to industry        plans are very basic.               and/or alignment plan or
aligned postsecondary program(s),          certification, aligned postsecondary                                       program.
and/or preparation for skilled             program(s), and/or preparation for
employment. Plan is clearly                skilled employment, is loosely
described.                                 described.




                                               High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                      67
Section VI: Structure and Programmatic Management (continued)
        Makes a Strong Case                   Makes an Adequate Case                    Makes a Limited Case             Makes a Minimal Case
               (12 points)                            (9 points)                                (6 points)                     (3 points)
Excellent example(s) of where fusion     Fusion of CTE and core academic          Some basic crossover of CTE         Melding of disciplines
of CTE and core academic                 instruction may be somewhat              and core academic instruction       between core academic and
instruction will take place, including   rudimentary. Includes some               may be planned, but is not well     CTE courses is very limited
project-based integrated curricula.      project-based integrated curricula.      described.                          or nonexistent.
Clear, concise explanation of site       School site schedule is described,       Either site schedule or current     Schedules are missing,
schedule structure, with current and     as are current and planned               and planned academy schedule        inaccurate, or incomplete.
planned academy courses described        academy courses. May lack                may be incomplete or
in context.                              context between the two.                 inaccurate, so that context is
                                                                                  difficult to determine.
Form D clearly describes a well-         Form D clearly describes a well-         Form D is completed and names       Form D is missing or
planned, logically sequenced course      planned, logically sequenced             three years of academy courses,     incomplete.
of study, shows planned alignment        course of study but does not show        but it does not demonstrate a
with postsecondary education, and        planned alignment with                   logical sequence, nor does it
career options by level of education     postsecondary education, and             show alignment planning.
and training.                            career options by level of education
                                         and training.
Superior description of planned          Planned mentoring program for            The mentoring component for         Mentoring component for
mentoring program, with clear            grade 11 students is described           grade 11 students is in the early   grade 11 students is either
evidence of commitment for a             clearly. Minimal or vague                planning stages. Commitments        non-existent or too vague to
sufficient number of mentors from the    commitments for mentors from the         for mentors from the business       indicate sufficient attention to
business community, for grade 11         business community are provided.         community are not provided.         implementation of this
students.                                                                                                             component.
Detailed description of planned          Internship and/or work-based             A plan for Internship and/or        Plan for internship and/or
internship program and/or work-          learning experience program              work-based learning experience      work-based learning
based learning experience related to     currently is planned in some form,       program is minimal, lacking         experience program is not
the academy's occupational field, or     but insufficient detail is provided to   evidence of potential for           provided.
other work-based learning to improve     indicate a comprehensive, well-          implementation success. Letters
employment skills, during the            implemented program plan. Letters        from industry partners do not
summer following the 11th grade or       from business community                  address this component.
during the 12th grade year. Clear        regarding internship and/or work
evidence of commitment for               experience positions are vague,
internship and/or work experience        insufficient, or lacking commitment.
positions from the business
community.

                                             High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                         68
A wide variety of interesting and       Some interesting and effective        Motivational activities are          Limited planning of
effective motivational activities are   motivational activities are planned   planned to help students             motivational activities. Vague
planned or being used to help           or being used to help students        maintain focus, but they may         connection to academy
students maintain focus on goals and    maintain focus on goals and enrich    have little relationship to career   theme. No evidence of
enrich their appreciation of            their appreciation of education.      theme. Minimal business partner      business partner
education. Many of these include        Some include business partners,       involvement.                         involvement.
business partners and are related to    and are related to academy’s
academy’s career theme.                 career theme.


Section VI: Structure and Programmatic Management (continued)
        Makes a Strong Case                 Makes an Adequate Case                 Makes a Limited Case               Makes a Minimal Case
             (12 points)                             (9 points)                           (6 points)                         (3 points)
Attachment 2, school schedule with      Attachment 2, school schedule, is     Attachment 2, only academy           Attachment 2, school
highlighted academy classes, is         provided, but academy classes are     schedule is provided with no         schedule with academy
included.                               not highlighted.                      indication of how it fits into the   classes, is not included.
                                                                              whole school schedule.




                                            High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                     69
Section VII: Advisory Committee
         Makes a Strong Case               Makes an Adequate Case                   Makes a Limited Case              Makes a Minimal Case
                (8 points)                            (6 points)                             (4 points)                       (2 points)
 Academy has an advisory              The advisory committee is                The advisory committee is            The advisory committee is
 committee composed of                adequately described and includes        described in a limited way and       not currently functioning; it
 representatives of all academy       representation of some, but not all,     includes little evidence of          may or may not be in the
 stakeholders including school and    stakeholders involved in the             representation by crucial            early stages of planning.
 district administrators, lead        academy’s operations. This group         stakeholders. It may actually be
 teachers, representatives of         is not affiliated with other education   an advisory committee that
 postsecondary education,             groups.                                  serves a separate purpose or
 representatives of the business                                               program (e.g., ROCP or district
 and industry partners, parents or                                             CTE committee).
 family members, and community
 members. This committee is not
 affiliated with other educational
 groups.

 The advisory committee is clearly    Proposal includes descriptions           Description of type of               Description of role of
 described and includes ample         and/or examples of means and             assistance—methods, activities,      advisory committee is not
 representation of all stakeholders   activities by which this group           etc., — received from this group     provided.
 involved in the academy’s            supports the academy.                    is limited or vague.
 operations, and amply describes
 methods and activities by which
 guidance and support is provided
 by this group.

 Attachment 3: An impressive          Attachment 3: A reasonable roster        Attachment 3: A limited roster of    Attachment 3: If requested,
 roster of advisory committee         of advisory committee membership         advisory committee membership        roster is included, but it is
 membership is attached, and          is attached and includes member          is attached, which may not have      too limited to be useful.
 includes member affiliation,         affiliation, position, and contact       some requested inclusions, such
 position, and contact information.   information.                             as member affiliations, positions,
                                                                               or contact information.




                                          High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                           70
Section VIII: District and Industry Match
       Makes a Strong Case                   Makes an Adequate Case                     Makes a Limited Case               Makes a Minimal Case
              (4 points)                               (3 points)                               (2 points)                         (1 point)
The applicant has clearly outlined      Applicant makes an adequate              Limited argument made to show         Little or no argument made to
how it will achieve both the school     argument for how they will achieve       how academy will achieve either       show how academy will
district and industry partner           both district and industry partner       district or industry partner          achieve either district or
matching funds requirement of           matching funds requirements. Most        matching funds. Some information      industry partner matching
established CPAs. Narrative             information pertaining to the source,    pertaining to the source, type, and   funds. May contain some
shows source, type, and value of        type, and value of the match is          value of the match may be             information pertaining to the
these matching funds. Strong            included. Site, district, and business   included, but the support of site,    source, type, and value of the
evidence and examples of                partners have given adequate             district, and/or business partners    match, but the support of site,
anticipated site, district, and         evidence of their support for the        does not appear to be substantial     district, and/or business
business support for the                program as demonstrated by their         judging from the evidence             partners does not appear to
partnership academy and all             actions.                                 exhibited here.                       be substantial judging from
required components are included                                                                                       the evidence exhibited.
here.
Excellent letters of support from all   Adequate letters of support are          Letters of support are limited,       Letters of support, if attached,
stakeholder groups are attached.        attached from a reasonable variety       tepid, or both. They may fail to      are weak or inconsequential.
Letters are individual (not             of stakeholder groups.                   reflect a variety of stakeholders.    May come from interests
formulaic) and include contact                                                                                         without interest in, or
information.                                                                                                           connection to, academy
                                                                                                                       career focus.




                                                High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                       71
Section IX: Use of Funds
      Makes a Strong Case                  Makes an Adequate Case                Makes a Limited Case               Makes a Minimal Case
             (4 points)                            (3 points)                           (2 points)                          (1 point)
Excellent plan for use of CPA          Reasonable plan for use of CPA      Somewhat limited expenditure        Plan for expenditures may ignore
funds. Contains a clear, viable        funds. Contains a responsible       plan for CPA funds. May not grasp   balance between careful use of
plan for expenditure of all funds to   plan for spending CPA funding to    CPA program compliance issues       funding and achieving
ensure thorough compliance.            achieve compliance.                 or clearly explain how funding      compliance.
                                                                           may be used to alleviate these
                                                                           issues.
Provides evidence of clear             Acceptable for presumption of       Appears to have some level of      Rules regarding CPA
understanding of CPA expenditure       understanding of CPA expenditure    understanding of CPA expenditure expenditures may be overlooked
rules, including those related to      rules, including those related to   rules, including those related to  or ignored in narrative.
supplementing versus                   supplementing versus                supplementing versus
supplanting, extra planning time       supplanting, extra planning time    supplanting, extra planning time
for a lead teacher, and needed         for a lead teacher, and needed      for a lead teacher, and needed
expenditures in support of all         expenditures in support of all      expenditures in support of all
aspects of the CPA program             aspects of the CPA program          aspects of the CPA program
implementation.                        implementation.                     implementation. Lack of attention
                                                                           to the funding needs of specific
                                                                           program components and some
                                                                           questionable proposed
                                                                           expenditures leave doubt as to the
                                                                           effective and appropriate use of
                                                                           funds.




                                              High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                72
Section X: Timeline, Budget and Budget Narrative (Includes Form E, Budget Page and Budget Narrative)
        Makes a Strong Case                  Makes an Adequate Case                  Makes a Limited Case               Makes a Minimal Case
              (4 points)                             (3 points)                             (2 points)                          (1 point)
A comprehensive timeline that          An adequate timeline that shows         A sparsely itemized timeline         The timeline is minimal or is
shows all academy activities from      many academy activities from July       shows some academy activities        missing. Benchmarks and
July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010, is      1, 2009 to June 30, 2010, is            from July 1, 2009 to June 30,        dates do not show the
presented. Specific benchmarks and     presented. Benchmarks and dates         2010, but is incomplete.             activities needed to develop
dates show, on a monthly basis, all    show the necessary activities to        Benchmarks and dates show a          and/or refine required CPA
the necessary activities to develop    develop and/or refine the required      few of the necessary activities to   components. There is no
and/or refine the required CPA         CPA components. In most cases,          develop and/or refine the            indication of responsibility or
components. The persons                persons responsible for each activity   required CPA components.             target dates for CPA activities.
responsible for each activity and      and planned date of completion are      Target dates and responsibility      The timeline would provide
target dates are clearly indicated.    indicated. The timeline would           are unclear. The timeline would      minimal or no guidance to a
Timeline provides clear guidance to    provide adequate guidance to a          provide only limited guidance to     CPA management team.
the CPA management team.               CPA management team.                    a CPA management team.
A complete Budget Page, Form E, is     A complete Budget Page, Form E, is      Budget Page, Form E, is           Budget Page, Form E, is
provided. Proposed expenditures        provided. Proposed expenditures of      incomplete. Proposed              incomplete or missing.
clearly demonstrate appropriate use    grant funds demonstrate acceptable      expenditures of grant funds fail  Proposed expenditures
of funds and are clearly tied to the   use for the implementation of the       to demonstrate appropriate use    demonstrate inappropriate use
attached application narrative.        program and are generally tied to       for developing a CPA and are      of funds. There are minimal
Evidence is clear that funds, either   the budget narrative. School district   tied to the application narrative ties to the application
real or in-kind, are matched 100%      and business/community match of         only in a limited way. School     narrative. District and/or
by both the school district and        100% of the grant award, both in        district and/or business match of business match does not
business/community.                    real and in-kind support, is evident.   100% is incomplete or unclear.    achieve 100%.
The budget narrative includes brief    The budget narrative includes           The budget narrative includes     The budget narrative
descriptions that clearly justify each adequate descriptions to justify each   inadequate descriptions to justifydescriptions fail to justify each
expense. There is clear reference to   expense. There is a reference to the    expenses. Funding for the         expense. Funds for the
the Summer Institute for New           Summer Institute and the annual         Summer Institute and the annual   Summer Institute and the
Academies and to the annual            California Partnership Academy          CPA Conference may not be         annual CPA Conference are
California Partnership Academy         Conference, and funds are allotted      addressed or be deficient to      not included.
Conference, and funds are allotted     for that purpose.                       fund attendance by whole team.
for that purpose.
 Budget Narrative provides a description of other California Partnership Academies in the school and district.
 Budget Narrative provides a description of grants and other alternative funding sources, including amount of funds that are currently
   supporting the program for which this application is intended.




                                            High School Initiatives/Career Education Office                                                       73

				
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