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					                       Executive Report
                           on Corporate
                             Culture

                               STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL




                                           O R G A N I S A TI O N

                                    Sample Company


                                           D A TE
                                     Date of report




Prepared for:
Sample Company
Mr/Ms Sample
Position


Prepared by:
Sarah Kearney
National Consulting Manager
SHL Australia
Level 19, 99 Walker Street
North Sydney, NSW 2060
Contents




1.   Introduction................................................................................................... 3

          Description of Reports ............................................................................ 3
          Context of the Survey ............................................................................. 3

2.   Background on CCQ and demographics ...................................................... 5

          Brief Background on the Corporate Culture Questionnaire .................... 5
          Description of the Comparison group .................................................... 5
          Brief summary of demographics............................................................. 6

3.   Profile of SAMPLE COMPANY‟s culture ...................................................... 8

          Interpretation of the Culture profile ......................................................... 8
          Overall SAMPLE COMPANY Culture profile .......................................... 9

4.   Highlights and observations ....................................................................... 10
5.
5.   Main report by domain ................................................................................ 11

          Performance Domain ........................................................................... 11
          Human Resources Domain .................................................................. 16
          Decision Making Domain ..................................................................... 21
          Relationships Domain .......................................................................... 27

6.   Overall conclusion ...................................................................................... 30




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                                                  Page 2
    PART ONE – CORPORATE CULTURE QUESTIONNAIRE

                               SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION



Description of Report

Part One – Corporate Culture Questionnaire

The first part of this report details the findings from the CCQ component of the culture
study. The overall company‟s results are described as well as any relevant internal
differences. Throughout this interpretation, reference is made to the qualitative comments
attached to the surveys. A number of recommendations are also included in this report to
help address some of the issues raised.

Part Two – Extra Questions

A number of additional questions were included in this survey. These questions were
targeted at specific issues that relate to SAMPLE COMPANY. Frequency histograms are
included to illustrate what the overall responses were to these questions.

Appendix One – Comments

An extremely large number of qualitative comments were enclosed with the surveys.
These comments have been entered (verbatim) into a document. They are not clustered
into themes or topics.

Although the comments are referred to throughout the body of part one of the report, these
comments should be read as very strong evidence to support the more quantitative
findings.


Objectives of the Corporate Culture Study at SAMPLE COMPANY

   Provide a „stake in the ground‟ so that changes in SAMPLE COMPANY‟s culture can
    be targeted, prioritised and then measured.

   Identify areas of the company‟s culture which require further exploration so that
    initiatives devised ensure the culture is more closely aligned with the corporate goals.

   Provide a basis and insight into developing change management strategies.

   Form the basis of a Leadership Capability or Competency model.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                           Page 3
                              SECTION 2 - BACKGROUND




Brief Background on the Corporate Culture Questionnaire

The Corporate Culture Questionnaire (CCQ) was developed over the course of several
years during the early 1990‟s. The instrument has strong practitioner and academic
validation and captures the essence of corporate culture in a comprehensive set of
situations.

The instrument contains 134 items which have been created to measure a range of
management and cultural concepts. The CCQ allows organisations to compare the
perceptions held within their organisation with views held within other organisations. In
doing so benchmarking can be achieved.

Detailed information can be provided on all aspects of the design and development of the
CCQ.

Descriptions of the Comparison Group

A considerable number of corporate culture studies have been conducted using the CCQ.
These studies have primarily occurred within English speaking countries i.e. UK, Australia,
New Zealand, however, a number of studies have also occurred in Holland, France,
Germany, Switzerland and Spain.

The organisations included in the comparison group range from large private and public
companies to government organisations . Industry sectors represented include finance and
banking, manufacturing, retail, transport (rail & air), insurance, publishing, consultancies
and hospitals.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                           Page 4
Brief summary of demographics

The total number of employees invited to complete the CCQ and additional questions was
1000. These employees were randomly selected from the entire population of SAMPLE
COMPANY. Of these, a total of 605 people responded to the CCQ which is equivalent to a
60% response rate. This is considered to be a moderately good response rate for this type
of survey.

The characteristics of the overall population which responded are shown below in real and
percentage terms. Note that figures do not always add up to 605 as not everyone provided
details on their demographic background.


         Gender              No. of respondents to           Proportion of
                                      CCQ                 Respondents to CCQ
Male                                  458                        71%
Female                                131                        29%


          Profile             No. of respondents to          Proportion of
                                       CCQ                Respondents to CCQ
Aboriginal or TSI                        8                       24%
NESB                                    27                       32%
Disability                              21                       25%
Disability with WRA                      9                       19%
Not of the above                       511


    Length of Service         No. of respondents to          Proportion of
         (Tenure)                      CCQ                Respondents to CCQ
<3 years                                83                       51%
3-6 years                              109                       17%
7-14 years                             152                       16%
15-20 years                             93                       15%
>21 years                              152


       Level/Grade            No. of respondents to          Proportion of
                                       CCQ                Respondents to CCQ
Management                              10                       34%
Supervisor                             104                       31%
Other - uniformed                      422`                      34%
Other – non-uniformed                   49


      Function/Role           No. of respondents to          Proportion of
                                       CCQ                Respondents to CCQ
Vehicle Officer                        270                       3%
Senior Frontline Staff –               138                       15%
Level 4
Frontline Staff                         73                         28%
Transport Officer                        7                         62%
Ops Centre Office                       29
Trades                                  11
Admin/Clerical                          35
Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                      Page 5
Management                              16

        Location             No. of respondents to      Proportion of
                                      CCQ            Respondents to CCQ
Rural Ops Centre                       23                   11%
Rural Area                            304                   23%
Metro Ops Centre                       32
Metro Area                            187
Rural Corp/Trades                       9
Metro Corp/Trades                       9
Other                                  20


The management of SAMPLE COMPANY need to ascertain whether these sample
demographic figures are representative of the population demographics.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                              Page 6
                     SECTION 3 – PROFILE OF SAMPLE COMPANY



Interpretation of the culture profile

Instead of simply reporting raw average scores, which are open to misinterpretation or
over-interpretation the data is considered in comparison to the results obtained from
previous users of the CCQ (a “norm” group).

Interpretation of the profile chart is relatively straightforward. Scores of 5 or 6 represent
areas where the culture of SAMPLE COMPANY is not markedly different from that of most
organisations. Scores of 4 or 7 represent slight tendencies (slightly less or slightly more
than other organisations respectively).

Scores of 3 or 8 represent clear or definite characteristics of the culture at SAMPLE
COMPANY, which are markedly different from other organisations. Scores of 1 and 2, or 9
and 10 are highly salient or marked features of SAMPLE COMPANY where that particular
characteristic is very much less in evidence (for 1 or 2) or very much more in evidence (for
9 or 10) than in other organisations.

It is important to note that there is no right or wrong cultural profile nor is there one
particular profile which represents a global „high performing‟ organisation. All organisations
are different in terms of their industry, people, and practices. As such, an organisation
needs to consider its strategic and business and objectives and its external environment
and then decide which cultural profile is desired to help support the achievement of those
objectives.

The scores derived from the responses to the CCQ are described in relation to 23 scales.
These scales are clustered into four “domains” which represent the broad thrust of the
organisations‟ cultural emphasis. The domains are called:

The Performance Domain                      Describing the type of emphasis that the
                                            organisation‟s output is given.

The Human Resources Domain                  The organisation‟s stance on employee
                                            welfare and development.

The Decision Making Domain                  The speed, direction and location of
                                            decision-making.

The Relationships Domain                    Describing the degree of co-operation
                                            and communication in the organisation.

Scale Descriptions, which give an account of the meaning and potential implications of
each of the 23 scales can be found in the full technical report.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                           Page 7
OVERALL SAMPLE COMPANY CULTURE PROFILE – FEBRUARY 2001

 Very Low   Fairly Low   Moderate   Fairly High   Very High

 1     2     3     4     5     6        7   8     9     10

 .     .            .          .        .   .     .      .    Concern for quantity
             X
 .    .x     .      .          .        .   .     .      .    Concern for quality




                                                                                            Performance
.x     .     .      .                       .     .      .    Use of new equipment

.x     .     .      .                       .     .      .    Encouragement of creativity

 .     .     .x     .                       .     .      .    Customer orientation

 .     .     .      .    x                  .     .      .    Commercial orientation


 .x    .     .      .                   .   .     .      .    Concern for employees




                                                                                            Human Resources
 .     .x    .      .                   .   .     .      .    Job Involvement

 .x    .     .      .                   .   .     .      .    Concern for career
                                                              development
 .x    .     .      .                   .   .     .      .    Emphasis on performance-
                                                              related rewards
 .     .x    .      .                   .   .     .      .    Concern for equal
                                                              opportunities

 .     .     .                              .     .x     .    Degree of formalisation

 .     .x    .                              .     .      .    Employee influence on
                                                              decisions




                                                                                            Decision Making
 .x    .     .                              .     .      .    Decision-making
                                                              effectiveness
 .x    .     .                              .     .      .    Concern for the longer term

 .x    .     .                              .     .      .    Rate of change

 .     .     .     x                                     .    Environmental concern

 .     .     .           x                  .     .      .    Concern for safety


 .x    .     .                              .     .      .    Vertical relations between
                                                              groups
 x.    .     .                              .     .      .    Lateral relations between
                                                                                            Relationships




                                                              groups
 .     .     .x                             .     .      .    Interpersonal co-operation

 .x    .     .                              .     .      .    Communication effectiveness

 .x    .     .                              .     .      .    Awareness of organisational
                                                              goals




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                       Page 8
                    SECTION 4 – HIGHLIGHTS AND OBSERVATIONS



The results from this culture study suggest that SAMPLE COMPANY has huge potential to
impact positively on the culture and internal working environment within the company.

Although there is no „right‟ culture profile, the extreme views held by employees suggest
that they are dissatisfied with a number of elements within the company. 60% of those who
received questionnaires not only took the time to answer the questions but almost all of
them provided comprehensive qualitative comments.

These qualitative comments are clearly aligned and consistent with the objective and
quantitative data. They reinforce and „add perspective‟ to the questionnaire results.

The most important recommendation proffered regarding these results is that something
happens. This whole survey seems to be regarded with suspicion and employees seem
very disenchanted that anything positive will occur as a result of the survey.

Some actions need to occur to re-build employees‟ faith that their views are important and
that the management team have listened to their responses. There needs to be a strong
commitment to addressing at least some of the concerns and issues raised.

Comments made in the Newspaper (date) regarding the direction of SAMPLE COMPANY
indicate that changes and restructures are imminent and that quality and service need to
improve to keep up with world standards. This findings from this report should dove tail into
these proposed changes and help ensure that initiatives are targeted and prioritised.

The views reported by employees could be interpreted as a cry for help. So much effort
and energy has been invested in providing this information that employees clearly want to
voice their perceptions but they also remain optimistic that things could change for the
better. The initiatives introduced as a result of this study should have the following criteria:

    High impact
    High priority
    High profile

Motivation levels will be improved if staff feel their views have been heard and actioned.
Their sense of belonging will increase and this should impact on their loyalty and level of
commitment to the company.

At the end of part one of this report is a series of recommendations designed to address
some of the issues documented in this study. It would appear that the timing of this report
and planned changes is excellent.

The results of this survey may be disappointing but the outcome could be extremely
positive.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                              Page 9
                    Section 5 – Main Report by Domain
                           Performance Domain
CONCERN FOR QUANTITY

Definition:        Emphasis on Productivity & Targets

1     2       3       4    5    6     7     8      9     10

.     .       .x      .         .     .     .      .     .      Concern for quantity


Overall Organisational Perceptions

SAMPLE COMPANY does not seem to have a strong emphasis on quantity. This sample
group do not see a strong emphasis on the level of output or the amount of work delivered.
Overall productivity is not regarded as a key issue and in comparison to other organisations
people do not see themselves as having to meet challenging targets or deadlines.

Significant Internal Differences

   Location – Employees located at Metro Corp/Trades consider the emphasis on quantity
    of work to be higher than at other locations.

   Level/Grade – Other – non-uniformed perceive the focus on quantity to be considerably
    higher than other staff, especially Supervisors, who regard this dimension lower than
    the other grades.

    Gender – Males regard the concern for quantity even lower than females.

Interpretation and Summary

It seems that the drive to achieve and deliver targets is not a strong cultural component
within SAMPLE COMPANY. The culture has some way to go to be seen as highly
productive or high performing. Other dimensions are clearly regarded as more important,
e.g. adherence to processes and procedures. Given that many free text comments
suggest that certain areas of the company are overworked, this cultural perception may be
more an indication of inefficiencies.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                        Page 10
CONCERN FOR QUALITY

Definition:       Emphasis on excellence and achievement of high standards

1     2       3     4      5      6     7      8      9      10

.     .X      .     .             .     .      .      .      .      Concern for quality


Overall Organisation Perceptions

The views regarding this cultural dimension suggest that quality is not a highly valued
concept within SAMPLE COMPANY. Quality awareness is well below that in other
organisations and attention to detail in the delivery of service is not a high priority.

Significant Internal Differences

   Gender – Males perceived the focus on quality as being lower than the views held by
    females.

    Level/Grade – Other – non-uniformed regard the concern for quality as being higher
    than other groups, with Management and Supervisors perceiving quality is considerably
    lower than other groups.

    Function/Role – Management and Frontline Staff regarding the focus on quality as
    significantly lower than other roles, especially Transport Officers, who consider quality
    as being a more important aspect of the culture.

    Tenure – Those employees who have worked for SAMPLE COMPANY for less than 3
    years regard the focus on quality as higher than all other tenure categories.

    Profile – Employees who describe themselves as having a disability with WRA regard
    the concern for quality as significant lower than other profile categories

Interpretation and Summary

Overall SAMPLE COMPANY employees believe that quality, excellence and high
standards are of little importance. This is quite a concerning perception as cultural values
generally dictate what sort of behaviour is appropriate. Many of the free text comments
indicate that people feel that quality is not an integral part of the service and is frequently
compromised. Generally, when quantity of work is not valued there is a corresponding
higher value placed on quality. This is clearly not the case within SAMPLE COMPANY,
with both the standards and amount of work being regarded as unimportant.

The implications of these perceptions need to be explored further given the nature of the
industry.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                             Page 11
USE OF NEW EQUIPMENT

Definition:       Emphasis on use of new equipment & technology

1      2      3     4     5     6      7     8     9      10

.X     .      .     .     .     .            .     .      .     Use of new equipment


Overall Organisational Perceptions

SAMPLE COMPANY is perceived by staff as placing very little emphasis on the use of
new equipment. This suggests that the organisation is slow to implement new technologies
(e.g. computers) and that up-to-date equipment and procedures are generally unavailable.
The value placed on the use of new equipment is considerably lower than that of other
organisations.

Significant Internal Differences

    Gender - Females see SAMPLE COMPANY as having a stronger emphasis on the
     accessibility and implementation of new equipment than males.

     Location - Employees located at Rural Ops Centre regard the availability and use of
     new equipment as considerably higher than other locations groups, with Rural areas
     regarding this dimension as extremely low.

    Function/Role - Frontline Staff, Vehicle Officers and Senior Frontline Staff employees
     perceive new equipment and technology as considerably less available than other roles
     within SAMPLE COMPANY.

     Tenure – The availability of new equipment is regarded more positively by employees
     with less service (less than 3 years) than all other tenure categories.

    Level/Grade – Managers regard the use of new equipment as considerably more
     positive than other levels within SAMPLE COMPANY.

     Profile – Aboriginal employees regard access to new equipment as considerably higher
     than all other profile categories.

Interpretation and Summary

The overall perception within SAMPLE COMPANY is that up to date equipment is not
available when needed and SAMPLE COMPANY do not take advantage of recent
developments in techniques and technology. This perception is so extreme that the
message further suggests inefficiencies.

The internal differences suggest that the management team regard this more positively,
suggesting that perhaps at this level there is more opportunity to utilise technology.
However, the Frontline Staff and Vehicle Officers clearly believe that this does not filter
through to their working environment. This perception is reinforced a number of times
throughout the free text comments, with a large proportion of respondents citing this issue
as a high priority and critical area that needs addressing.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 12
ENCOURAGEMENT OF CREATIVITY

Definition:        Focus and encouragement of innovation and ideas


1     2        3      4    5     6     7     8     9      10

.X    .        .      .    .     .     .           .      .     Encouragement of
                                                                Creativity


Overall Organisational Perception

This result suggests that innovation and creativity is not a highly valued concept within
SAMPLE COMPANY. Employees are sending a very strong message that the company
does not provide support for ingenuity and originality and in fact may actively discourage
new ideas.

Significant Internal Differences

          Level/Grade – The management team regard this dimension much more positively
          than all other levels within SAMPLE COMPANY.

          Tenure – Employees who have worked for SAMPLE COMPANY for less than 3
          years perceive innovation as being more positively encouraged than longer serving
          employees.


Conclusion

Both the questionnaire and free text data indicates that employees within the company are
not encouraged to be creative or to make innovative suggestions. Many employees seem
disillusioned with the company and feel that ideas for improvement are generally ignored.
Many people admit to no longer making suggestions as they have rarely seen their ideas
implemented nor are they acknowledged for making attempts to offer suggestions.

The more longer-serving employees are even more pessimistic regarding innovation.
However, managers do not see this as much of a problem than other levels, although their
perceptions are still not positive when compared to the views held in other organisations.
Managers either regard themselves as being open and receptive to ideas or at the more
senior levels ideas are encouraged but this is not filtering through to the rest of the
company.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                       Page 13
CUSTOMER ORIENTATION

Definition:        Focus on customer needs & service

1     2       3      4    5     6      7     8      9     10

.     .       .X     .    .            .     .      .     .      Customer orientation


Overall Organisational Perception

Employees perceive only a small amount of importance being attached to customer needs
by the company. Compared to other organisations customer service is not regarded as a
priority. This suggests that the customer (or patient) is not a strong cultural driver, with
their needs being less of a basis for decision-making.

Significant Internal Differences

Tenure - Employees who have been employed by SAMPLE COMPANY for less than 3
years perceive a higher emphasis on customer needs with longer serving employees being
more pessimistic on this dimension.

Interpretation and Summary

The value placed on customers throughout SAMPLE COMPANY is quite low, there is
some awareness of the importance of customers but this is not a strongly held belief.

Interestingly, many of the qualitative comments suggest that individuals exhibit a high
degree of concern and care for customers (patients) but this is despite rather than because
of the support provided by the culture within the company. Many employees stated that the
lack of funding and investment combined with cost cutting exercises were actually
jeopardising the quality of care and customer service and this is why people do not regard
this as an important or valued cultural dimension.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 14
COMMERCIAL ORIENTATION

Definition:       Degree of commercial awareness

1     2       3     4    5    6      7     8     9     10

.     .       .     .    .    .      X     .     .     .     Commercial orientation




Overall Organisational Perception

SAMPLE COMPANY‟s focus on commercial factors is perceived as being moderately
important with a similar emphasis as in other organisations. As SAMPLE COMPANY is
not a revenue generating organisation this results suggests that the company is quite
focused on the bottom line and cost controlling.

Significant Internal Differences

   Location - Employees who are based at Rural Corp/Trades perceive a higher emphasis
    on commercialism than other geographic locations.

   Function/Role – Managers and Transport Officers regard the company as being less
    commercial than other functional areas.

    Level/Grade – Managers regard the service as being less commercial than other
    functional areas.

Interpretation and Summary

These results suggest that overall, although not in the business of making money or
generating profits, there is a fairly strong emphasis on cost control and bottom line
considerations with SAMPLE COMPANY. Interestingly, managers see this as being less
valued than other employee groups.

The qualitative comments suggest that staff believe management to be too focused on cost
control whereas the survey results indicate that the management team could prefer the
company to be more cognisant and aware of the commercial constraints with which the
company operates.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                      Page 15
                    Section 5 – Main Report by Domain
                        Human Resources Domain
CONCERN FOR EMPLOYEES

Definition:       Consideration for employees

1      2      3     4      5     6      7     8     9      10

.X     .      .     .      .            .     .     .      .     Concern for employees



Overall Organisational Perception

This extreme score suggests that employees within SAMPLE COMPANY do not feel
valued at all. The message here is that there is little support for people, even when they
have problems and management is unconcerned about the welfare of its employees.

Significant Internal Differences

    Length of Service - Employees with under three years‟ service perceive a stronger
     emphasis on employees‟ welfare and people practices than longer serving employees.

    Function/Role – Transport Officers regard this area more positively than the rest of the
     organisation.

    Level/Grade – Managers perceive this area more positively than other levels within the
     company.

Interpretation and Summary

Employees do not feel that management shows any respect or concern for its workforce.
Senior managers perceive this area more positively, indicating that either they as a team do
value employees or that they feel valued by the company. This „level‟ difference is not
dissimilar to perceptions held within other organisations where managers view this scale
more positively than other employees. However, even with the higher average rating on
this scale, managers do not see this as a positive dimension, with their position on the
profile still being considerably lower than the views held in other organisations.

The tenure difference is less obvious to interpret. This difference may indicate that
employees undergo a „honeymoon‟ period when they first join SAMPLE COMPANY and
have a positive view of the value placed on employees in the way they are introduced to
the company (i.e. interviews, inductions and training). However, the longer serving
employees feel less valued.

The qualitative comments provided in this survey definitely reinforce a sense of little
concern for employees. Many feel that they are regarded as „cogs‟ rather than people and
that their welfare is not a high priority issues for any of the management team. Examples
were even provided as to the lack of consideration or counsel provided when employees
had experienced trauma or injury through work.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                          Page 16
JOB INVOLVEMENT

Definition:       Enthusiasm & motivation for the job

1     2       3      4    5      6     7      8     9      10

.     .X      .      .    .      X     .      .     .      .      Job Involvement


Overall Organisational Perception

Employees within SAMPLE COMPANY feel considerably less enthusiastic and motivated in
their jobs than most other employees in other organisations. This means that the
motivation level is probably quite low within the company and it is unlikely that people
actively enjoy their work. Because they do not find their work interesting, stimulating or
rewarding they are unlikely to invest their energy or make special efforts in their job.

Significant Internal Differences

   Length of Service - Staff with less than 3 years of service, perceive a higher job
    involvement within the organisation than longer serving employees..

   Profile - Employees with a disability with WRA view this area even more negatively than
    other profile categories.

    Function/Role – Managers do not perceive the company as being a motivating
    environment to work in nor do they regard others as being highly involved in their jobs.

    Level/Grade – Managers and supervisors see the culture as being less motivational
    than Other grade categories.

Interpretation and Summary

In general, employees at SAMPLE COMPANY do not seem to derive a degree of
enjoyment from the work they do. Managers are even less involved and enthusiastic about
their jobs and the working environment.

Many of the qualitative comments categorically state that morale and motivation is
extremely low within the company.

There is a concerning interaction occurring with the management team‟s perceptions and
the comments employees have made regarding the capability and style of the management
team. The majority of employees are attributing the lack of motivation to the management
team, whereas the management team seem to be the group least motivated or enthusiastic
about their jobs. The comments seem to indicate that the non-management employees
derive at least a degree of satisfaction from the intrinsic nature of their job whereas this
seems to be lacking at the management level and the effect is quite negative on the morale
in general.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                          Page 17
CONCERN FOR CAREER DEVELOPMENT

Definition:       Commitment to training & development of staff

1      2      3      4    5     6     7     8      9     10

.X     .      .      .          .     .     .      .     .     Concern for career
                                                               development

Overall Organisational Perception

Overall, this has emerged as an extremely negative view within SAMPLE COMPANY.
This indicates that staff do not see any value or commitment placed on their development
needs or career progression.


Significant Internal Differences

    Length of Service - Employees with less than 3 years service perceive the concern for
     training and development as being higher than the majority of longer serving
     employees. This is not a linear trend however, as employees who have worked for
     SAMPLE COMPANY for more than 21 years also regard this dimension more positively
     that the tenures between 3 and 20 years. .

    Level/Grade – Managers perceive the concern for career development as being higher
     and thus more positive than other levels within the company.

Interpretation and Summary

Ironically, only those people who have progressed with SAMPLE COMPANY (managers)
regard this cultural dimension as being less extreme. Although perceiving training,
development and career progression as being more evident that other levels within the
company, managers do not perceive these areas as more positive as in other
organisations. In fact, their profile position would still be below other organisations.

Many of the staff have commented that the training, development and career opportunities
within the company are inadequate. However, many seem to hold the view that it is better
for other groups, but not themselves. This suggests that people think that „others‟ are
receiving training, but they themselves are not. There does, however, seem to be general
agreement that the management team are lacking strong leadership skills and many have
suggested that the company would benefit from building the capability of this group.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                       Page 18
EMPHASIS ON PERFORMANCE-RELATED REWARDS

Definition:       Rewards and recognition based on achievements

1      2      3      4    5      6      7     8      9      10

.X     .      .      .           .      .     .      .      .     Emphasis on
                                                                  performance-related
                                                                  rewards

Overall Organisational Perception

In general, the perceptions regarding performance related rewards is extreme. Suggesting
that people do not think that they are paid or rewarded based on their performance. People
are not recognised for their achievements and the company is not presenting as a
meritocratic environment.

Significant Internal Differences

    Length of Service - Employees with less than 3 years service consider the recognition
     for effective performance as being higher than longer serving employees.

    Location - Employees based at Metro Ops Centre regard this dimension more
     negatively than any of the other location categories

Interpretation and Summary

There is a definite perception within SAMPLE COMPANY that there are other factors
besides performance that will dictate pay and promotion. This may be a legacy of a strong
public service culture, or in fact may still be the prevailing view and practice. If this is the
case, the position may be both an accurate and appropriate reflection of the company.

However, the implications of this perception may be that good performers could feel
frustrated or resentful that their rewards are undifferentiated from poorer performers. This
scale is also strongly linked with concern for employees.

If there is limited flexibility in changing the formal structure of the reward scheme, SAMPLE
COMPANY may need to consider more creative means of acknowledging and recognising
strong performance. This can also be influenced through the recognition that managers
display to their staff, with the qualitative comments clearly indicating that this is not a
feature of the management style within the company. Many comments suggest that strong
performers are taken for granted with less effective performance issues being ignored.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                           Page 19
CONCERN FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES

Definition:       Fair and unbiased treatment of all staff

1     2       3      4     5     6     7     8      9     10

.     .X      .      .     .           .     .      .     .      Concern for equal
                                                                 opportunities

Overall Organisational Perception

The perceptions regarding equal opportunities are very negative within SAMPLE
COMPANY. Employees do not regard the treatment of people as being fair to all across
the different groups within SAMPLE COMPANY.

Significant Internal Differences

   Tenure – Employees who have worked for SAMPLE COMPANY for longer than 15
    years consider the EEO policies and practices to be less effective than newer members
    of staff.

   Location – Employees working in Metro Ops Centre regard this dimension more
    negatively than other location categories.

   Profile – Aboriginal employees and those with disability with WRA regard this dimension
    as slightly less positive than other profile categories. However, this difference is not
    statistically significant.

Interpretation and Summary

It would seem from these results that people within SAMPLE COMPANY regard the
policies and practices relating to the fair treatment of people as disappointing. Areas such
as selection and career progression are not regarded as fair to all. Many of the comments
enclosed with the questionnaire suggest that EEO policies exist in name only and people
pay „lip service‟ to the concept but do not apply them in reality. Many believe that
affirmative action has resulted in women receiving preferential treatment over men.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 20
                         Section 5 – Main Report by Domain
                              Decision Making Domain

DEGREE OF FORMALISATION

Definition:       Emphasis on Formality and Bureaucracy

1     2       3      4     5     6      7      8      9      10

.     .       .      .     .     .             .      .X     .     Degree of formalisation



Overall Organisational Perception

The prevalent perception within SAMPLE COMPANY is that the organisation is extremely
systematised and structured with clear rules and regulations. Consistency in work
processes and practices appear to be valued more so than in other organisations. The
extremity of this dimension suggests such a high degree of fomalisation and bureaucracy is
probably resulting in inflexibility and inefficiencies.

Internal Differences

   Location – Employees located at Rural Ops Centre regard this dimension as
    considerably higher than all other staff.


Interpretation and Summary

These findings suggest that processes and practices are characterised by a high degree of
formality and bureaucracy.

The amount of rules and procedures governing practices is significantly higher than in other
organisations, and this extreme view does suggest an over emphasis on forms, procedures
and rules.

The qualitative comments clearly support the questionnaire findings, with a high degree of
consistency regarding the bureaucratic nature of the SAMPLE COMPANY. Individuals do
not see flexibility in work practices and this was clearly confirmed by the profile position for
creativity and innovation.

Given the nature of the industry in which SAMPLE COMPANY is involved, some degree of
formalisation would clearly be necessary to ensure a level of consistency of operational
responses. However, the management team need to explore whether this extreme view is
an obstacle to the achievement of future goals and objectives.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                             Page 21
EMPLOYEES INFLUENCE ON DECISIONS


Definition:       Autonomous working practices

1     2       3      4    5      6     7      8     9      10

.     .X      .      .    .            .      .     .      .      Employees influence
                                                                  on decisions




Overall Organisational Perception

In terms of autonomy and decision making discretion, employees at SAMPLE COMPANY
do not regard this as a strong cultural value. Employees are unlikely to feel empowered to
make their own decisions and do not report experiencing a strong degree of freedom when
deciding how to do their jobs.

Significant Internal Differences

   Function/Role – Management and Administrators report a lower feeling of
    empowerment and autonomy than other function categories.

   Location – Employees located at Rural Corp/Trades regard this dimension more
    positively than other location categories.


Conclusion

The overall message from this dimension is that decision making is highly centralised and
handled directively, without widespread participation. People do not feel that they have the
autonomy or support from management to decide how best to implement their daily tasks.
People feel closely supervised with very little devolvement of responsibility or authority from
management.

Once again, the nature of the work in which SAMPLE COMPANY is involved may require a
more directive approach to ensure that all employees respond to situations in a consistent
manner. However, extremes do suggest that employees may be finding this approach
somewhat restrictive. Research indicates that employees who have minimal involvement in
the way they perform their tasks tend to be less motivated than employees who participate
and feel involved in the decision making process.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                          Page 22
DECISION-MAKING EFFECTIVENESS

Definition:       Speed, quality and outcome of decisions

1      2      3      4    5      6     7     8      9     10

.X     .      .           .      .     .     .      .     .     Decision-making
                                                                effectiveness

Overall Organisational Perception

Employees report a low degree of confidence in the effectiveness and quality of decision
making within SAMPLE COMPANY. It seems that there is little consultation when
decisions are made and they are often characterised by excessive caution, inconsistency
or delay.

Significant Internal Differences

    Length of Service - Employees who have more recently joined SAMPLE COMPANY
     view decision making as being more effective than longer serving employees.

    Gender – Males regard the decision making quality less optimistically than females.

Interpretation and Summary

This is an extreme perception and indicates a consistent and strong message from
employees that they regard decision making as poor within SAMPLE COMPANY. Many of
the qualitative comments refer to the way decisions are made within the company, with
many stating that both the quality and speed of decisions is concerning. People believe
that decisions are delayed so as to avoid being blamed for making the wrong decision.
When decisions are made they are generally in isolation of the people being affected which
makes people feel removed and un-involved in the process.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                        Page 23
CONCERN FOR THE LONGER TERM

Definition:       Commitment to planning ahead

1      2      3      4    5     6     7     8      9     10

.X     .      .           .     .     .     .      .     .      Concern for the
                                                                longer term

Overall Organisational Perception

The prevailing view within SAMPLE COMPANY is that there is a low level of commitment to
long term planning. This suggests that SAMPLE COMPANY is regarded as being more
considerably more reactive and short term focused than other organisations.

Significant Internal Differences

    Length of Service - Employees who have more recently joined SAMPLE COMPANY
     view the long term planning as being more positive than longer serving employees.

    Profile – Aboriginal employees regard the emphasis on long term planning more
     positively than other profile categories.

Interpretation and Summary

Being perceived as having such an extremely low profile on this dimension suggests that
SAMPLE COMPANY is very reactive in style, only concerned with the „here and now‟ and
immediate „fire fighting‟.

The qualitative comments strongly support this profile result with many employees
indicating that the management only focus on immediate issues and there is very little
priority given to the long-term future of people and the company. Proactive and strategic
management are not highly visible components of this culture.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                        Page 24
RATE OF CHANGE

Definition:       The degree to which work practices are changing and evolving

1     2       3      4    5     6      7     8      9     10

X     .       .      .    .     .            .      .     .      Rate of change

Overall Organisational Perception

The widely held view within SAMPLE COMPANY is that the organisation is experiencing
minimal change. There appears to be a reluctance to embrace new methods or
approaches and resistance to the introduction of improved systems or structures appears
evident.


Significant Internal Differences

   Function/Role – Administration staff perceive more change within SAMPLE COMPANY
    than any other functional category. Frontline Staff hold the lowest perceptions on this
    dimension.

   Location – Rural Ops Centres perceive more than change than any other location
    category with Metro Corp/Trades holding the lowest perception on this dimension.

   Level/Grade – Non-uniformed employees see more change than uniformed employees.

   Tenure – Longer serving employees regard change as being slightly more apparent
    than newer employees.

Interpretation and Summary

Compared to the rate of change happening within other organisations, SAMPLE
COMPANY appear to be experiencing very little change. Even though there are some
small internal differences regarding the rate of perceived change, these groups still see
change as extremely low when externally benchmarked.

Many comments refer to changes occurring within the community, within the broader public
sector and within other emergency services e.g. Police and Fire. However, employees
clearly believe that SAMPLE COMPANY is not keeping up with these changes and
operates in an extremely reactive manner.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 25
ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN

Definition:        Commitment to ecological issues

1     2        3      4     5     6     7      8     9      10

.     .        .      .X    .     .     .            .      .     Environmental
                                                                  concern

Overall Organisational Perception

There appears to be a moderate commitment to ecological issues within SAMPLE
COMPANY. Some consideration is given to issues of conservation, pollution and
environmental protection, however, this is not regarded as a high priority and many other
organisations regard this dimension as more important than SAMPLE COMPANY.



Significant Internal Differences

          Profile – Aboriginal employees regard this dimension as more highly valued than
          other profile categories.

          Function/Role – Frontline Staff and Vehicle Officers regard this dimension as being
          less important within the company than other functional categories.

          Location – Metro Corp/Trades regard this dimension as being more highly valued
          than other location categories.

          Level/Grade – Uniformed employees consider Environmental issues to be of less
          value within the company than other Grades.

          Tenure – Longer serving employees regard this dimension more positively than
          other tenure categories.



Interpretation and Summary

This scale takes on more or less importance based on the nature of the client‟s industry.
SAMPLE COMPANY has emerged as moderate, with no extreme views either way. There
may be a desire to increase the emphasis on this area but it probably is not essential for
the achievement of critical goals within SAMPLE COMPANY.

This more moderate perception is reinforced through the qualitative comments in that very
few employees take a strong position on this issue nor have they highlighted this as a
critical topic that needs addressing. There are clearly more concerning areas for
employees within SAMPLE COMPANY with the external environment being a lower priority
at this point in time.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                          Page 26
CONCERN FOR SAFETY

Definition:       The degree of risk for customers and staff

1     2       3      4     5    6     7     8     9      10

.     .       .      .     X    .     .     .     .      .     Concern for Safety

Overall Organisational Perception

The survey results indicate that there is a moderate emphasis on the degree of safety. The
perception is similar to those held within other organisations suggesting that decisions
reflect a degree of concern for the work force and customer safety.

Significant Internal Differences

   Profile – Employees describing themselves as having a disability with WRA regard this
    dimension as less highly valued than other profile categories.

   Function/Role – Transport Officers and Trades perceive much more value placed on
    this dimension than any other functional category. .

Interpretation and Summary

Given the nature of the industry in which SAMPLE COMPANY operates a higher
perception in this area might have been expected. The views suggest that no more value
is placed on safety than is the case in other organisations.

Many of the qualitative comments suggest that employees feel there is a lack of concern for
both their own safety and the safety of patients. Some of the decisions made, lack of
investment and general attitude of management indicate to staff that their safety is not a
high priority and they suggest that the public is at risk because of such attitudes.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                       Page 27
                 Section 5 – Main Report by Domain
                       Relationships Domain

VERTICAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GROUPS

Definition: Communication between levels

1      2     3      4     5      6      7      8     9      10

.X     .     .            .      .      .      .     .      .      Vertical Relationships
                                                                   between groups

Overall Organisational Perception

Employees within SAMPLE COMPANY tend to view the relationships between different
hierarchical levels as extremely negative. This indicates that relationships between
management and staff are less than harmonious and highly likely to be lacking in trust and
openness.

This result is so extreme that there is a high probability that the culture is plagued by
conflict and hostility.

Significant Internal Differences

    Length of Service - Employees who have recently joined SAMPLE COMPANY and
     those who have worked there for 21+ years have more positive impressions of the
     vertical relations.

    Location – Employees who describe themselves as being located in the „Other‟
     category regard vertical relations more positively than other location .

Interpretation and Summary

A less than positive view has emerged regarding the vertical relations between
management and non-management. This suggests a high degree of suspicion of the
management team from staff. Even the management team do not see this dimension as
being more positive which is quite unusual.

There were a vast array of negative comments from staff regarding the management team,
including aspects such as management skills, communication, fairness, prejudices,
decision making, treatment of staff, care for staff, etc. The quantitative analysis combined
with the qualitative comments clearly highlight this as an area needing attention.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                            Page 28
LATERAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GROUPS

Definition: Communication and collaboration at the same level


1     2        3     4     5     6      7     8     9     10

.X    .        .     .     .            .     .     .     .      Lateral relationships
                                                                 between groups




Overall Organisational Perception

Relationships between groups at the same level within SAMPLE COMPANY are perceived
negatively by all employees included in this sample. . Inter-department rivalry or conflict is
high and groups do not work together in a collaborative or cooperative manner.

Significant Internal Differences

          Tenure - People who have worked for SAMPLE COMPANY for less than 3 years
          see this dimension more positively than longer serving employees.

          Location – Metro Ops Centre regard lateral relations more negatively than other
          groups in other geographic locations.

          Profile – Employees with a disability with WRA regard lateral relations more
          negatively than other profile categories

          Function/Role – Trades see this dimension more negatively, with Transport Officers
          having slightly more positive views on lateral relations than other functions.


Interpretation and Summary


Within SAMPLE COMPANY there appears to exist a potentially harmful sense of hostility
between groups or sections. People are often destructively critical of other departments
and other groups are often blamed for deficiencies within the organisation. Groups
probably compete for resources and may even engage in political activities to be positioned
more positively than other departments.

Often when there is a strong „us and them‟ mentality between management and staff
(which clearly exists within SAMPLE COMPANY) there is a corresponding sense of
comradeship with employees at the same level. This is not the case within the company.
These extremely negative views could be presenting significant obstacles for the
achievement of organisational goals and efficiencies.





Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 29
INTERPERSONAL COOPERATION

Definition: Individual employee working effectiveness


1     2        3     4     5     6      7     8     9     10

.     .        .X    .     .     .            .     .     .     Interpersonal
                                                                cooperation




Overall Organisational Executive Team Perception

Compared to other organisations interpersonal relations amongst individuals are regarded
as less positive. Conflicts may not be easily resolved and individuals do not always work
well or effectively together. .

Significant Internal Differences

          Level/Grade – Managers perceive interpersonal cooperation less positively than
          other grades within SAMPLE COMPANY.

          Tenure – Longer serving employees have rated this dimension less highly than
          other tenure categories.

          Profile – Employees with a disability with WRA perceive interpersonal relations
          more negatively than other profile categories.

          Function/Role – Managers perceive interpersonal cooperation as being less positive
          than other functional categories.



Interpretation and Summary

Within the Relationships domain, this is the most positively perceived dimension. This
suggests that relationships are not quite so negative when individuals deal with other
individuals. However, the perception is still lower than that held in other organisations and
work requiring collaboration between individuals may be ineffectively performed.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                           Page 30
COMMUNICATION EFFECTIVENESS

Definition: The degree tow which information is shared within the organisation


1     2       3     4    5      6     7      8     9      10

.X    .       .     .    .      .     .            .      .     Communication
                                                                effectiveness




Overall Organisational Perception

There is clearly a strong cultural perception that communication effectiveness is not valued
within SAMPLE COMPANY. People do not feel that they are kept up to date nor that
information is widely shared. Channels of communication are unclear and the information
provided is not always relevant, specific or timely.


Significant Internal Differences

          Tenure – Employees who have worked for SAMPLE COMPANY for less than 3
          years hold a slightly more positive view regarding communication and its
          effectiveness.


Conclusion

An extremely low score on this scale suggests either deliberate withholding of information
or merely inadequacy in this regard. In both cases, the consequences are likely to be
demoralisation, mistrust and reduced operational effectiveness.

Many comments suggest that the channels of communication are not effective or
appropriate with some suggesting that there is an element of closed communication rather
than an open style. Many state that they find out about changes or events via informal
communication, however, the responses to the additional questions suggest that this is not
their preferred medium of communication, with more formal avenues being preferred.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 31
AWARENESS OF ORGANISATIONAL GOALS

Definition: Clarity regarding the strategic direction of the organisation


1     2        3     4     5     6      7     8     9      10

.X    .        .     .     .     .      .           .      .      Awareness of
                                                                  organisational goals




Overall Organisational Perception

The key objectives and strategic goals of SAMPLE COMPANY have not clearly been
disseminated and understood by employees. There is a lack of awareness of the key
strategic and commercial issues facing the company.

Significant Internal Differences

          Gender: – Females report a higher degree of awareness of organisational goals.

          Grade/Level: – Supervisors report the lowest degree of awareness of organisational
          goals.

          Function/Role: - Managers and Frontline Staff seem to be less aware of the
          organisational goals than other functional categories.

          Tenure: - Employees who have joined the company within the past 3 years report a
          higher degree of awareness of organisational goals than longer serving employees.

Conclusion

This result is clearly indicating that employees are unaware of or unclear about what the
SAMPLE COMPANY is trying to achieve and what the main challenges are achieving these
goals. Generally, managers report a higher level of knowledge and awareness of the
strategic direction than other employees. This is because they are closer to the direction
setters and decision makers. This is not the case within the company, with managers
reporting quite low level awareness of the strategic direction. If the management team are
unclear of the priorities it is highly unlikely that the appropriate messages will be filtering
through the remaining levels.

Many of the qualitative comments suggest that there is inconsistency between word and
deed. Whereby certain values are espoused but the practice and behaviour is not
supportive of these values. This seems to have resulted in a high degree of cynicism
regarding the real priorities and challenges within the company.




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                          Page 32
                   Section 6 – Overall Conclusions


The overall cultural profile of SAMPLE COMPANY has emerged as reasonably positive,
especially given the current business agenda and context. However, there are a couple of
areas that warrant further investigation or they may not represent the desired culture.
These include the views regarding decision-making effectiveness and the vertical relations
between management and non-management. The majority of employees believe the
speed and effectiveness of the decisions making is relatively low. Furthermore, non-
management staff believe that there is a lack of trust and openness between themselves
and management. Further exploration of these areas are required to fully understand these
perceptions.

Currently, staff view SAMPLE COMPANY‟s concern for longer term planning as relatively
low. This may be appropriately during the next 12 months considering that there are so
many critical, short-term projects occurring. However, increased communication around
the longer-term plans and vision for the organisation will be necessary in the future.

A number of results reinforce the direction and changes occurring at SAMPLE COMPANY.
For example, there seems to be a higher value attached to commercial focus and people
also perceive a reasonable rate of change occurring.

Many of the survey areas are viewed as moderate and do not differentiate SAMPLE
COMPANY from other organisational perceptions. These moderate views do not
necessarily suggest a strong need for attention or change. However, SAMPLE COMPANY
may wish to more strongly reinforce some of the cultural areas which are aligned with the
values within SAMPLE COMPANY (CONNECTS) as these do not appear to be strongly
influencing the culture at this stage.

The primary recommendations from this survey include:

 Develop a cultural profile which represents the desired culture within SAMPLE
  COMPANY and will support the achievement of business objectives.

 Highlight and prioritise the key gaps which exist between the actual profile and the
  desired profile

 Conduct further investigations e.g. focus groups or interviews, to understand the
  qualitative nature of the perceptions in key gap areas.

 Initiate actions to help close the gaps eg focus more on the performance management;
  review the reward and recognition of certain behaviours; enhance the career
  development initiatives and leadership competencies; give greater priority to process
  improvement via BIP; give greater focus to behaviours relating to the Connects values.

 Develop appropriate communication channels which will assist in more effective
  decision making and business awareness.

 Devolve accountability and decision making.

 Communicate SAMPLE COMPANY‟s longer term direction to staff

Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                        Page 33
 Communicate survey findings and any relevant management initiatives




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                   Page 34
                         Section 7 - Recommendations

At the broadest level, the most important recommendation to be made from this report is
that some actions are taken and that staff are informed that these actions are a direct result
of this survey.

The following are a number of clear steps to help address some of the major issues raised
in this report as well as ways to ensure that people feel their views have been heard and
are having an impact on shaping the future of the company.

A small committee should be created to help drive change within the company. This
report should be used in conjunction with the company‟s strategic objectives, philosophy
and values to help highlight and prioritise the actions that need to be taken. A change
program could be created and called ‘20/20 Vision’. This program should focus on
addressing 20 issues within a 20-week timeframe. These issues do not necessarily need
to be resolved or fixed within the 20 weeks but they do need to have activity occurring
aimed at resolution.

The members of this committee should include: CEO, General Manager, Operations
Manager and other selected leaders who are committed to driving change within the
company. External representation should be considered to enhance the dynamics of the
team and to provide a different and objective perspective i.e. no vested interest in the
outcome – other than wanting a positive result!

All staff should receive a short letter (communication) from the CEO stating that the
survey has been conducted. Thank those who were selected to respond for taking the time
to fill in the questionnaire and providing other insightful comments regarding the company.
State categorically in this letter that a number of issues were raised and these are being
investigated further. It needs to be noted in an open and frank manner that there are
clearly areas for improvement. There needs to be a definite commitment that some actions
will arise from results of this survey. Not all actions will be fixable but a combined effort
between management and staff should see at least some of the challenges being
addressed and improved in the short-medium term.

A leadership competency model needs to be created immediately. This can then be used
as the measurement criteria for leadership development. The results of this survey
combined with other job analysis techniques should form the template for the leadership
model.

Management involvement in solutions. The 20 managers attending the Management
Development program in April should receive a copy of this report. As part of their pre-
work for this program they should be required to read this report and produce a short
document outlining three high priority areas for the company and what actions they would
recommend to address these issues.

The recommendations made by this management group should form part of the
assessment so that this group can be assessed against criteria such as strategic thinking
ability, problem solving, innovation and creativity, commercial ability.

These recommendations should then be forwarded to the 20/20 Vision committee in order
to evaluate the ideas for actual implementation. These ideas (combined with existing
ideas of the committee) should form the basis for the top 20 ideas. If 3 ideas are presented
Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 35
by each of the 20 management team, the committee should have 60 ideas to evaluate
(although some ideas may form part of a similar theme).

Once the ideas for implementation are agreed in principle a broad tactical and
implementation plan should be created. This plan should not only include the actions and
plans but should also include the critical success factors and criteria associated with this
strategic change initiative. This will enable the company to evaluate the degree of change
and success.

Some of these initiatives may be within the power or responsibility of the committee
members to implement. However, other project teams may need to be established to drive
certain initiatives (this will help build a more consultative and collaborative culture). The
committee should remain in tact to monitor and evaluate progress.

Communication of the 20/20 Vision strategy (or alternative) should be communicated to
staff as soon as it is agreed. Regular updates should be provided to ensure that staff
remain aware of the change activity and reference should constantly be made to the survey
so that staff continue to feel a sense of ownership over the changes.

Other recommendations that the ‘20/20 Vision’ committee may want to consider as
options include:

Development of strong people leadership skills. Although the assessment of the 20
mangers has not occurred yet is seems apparent from the culture survey that there is a
definite need to develop people leadership skills in managers and supervisors. These
levels need to know how to provide feedback, how to coach staff, how to deliver difficult
messages and how to praise and recognise strong performers. SHL conduct one or two
day workshops on this skill and could discuss this further if the committee decided to
explore this as an option.

Appraisal schemes and performance management systems may need to be reviewed.
This process may be outdated and not supportive of the desired direction of the company.
Managers may not only lack the skills to effectively manage their staff but they may also be
lacking the tools such as appraisal processes to properly conduct more formal feedback
meetings. These processes are critical if issues such as career management and
succession planning are to be an integral part of the HR strategy.

There are a whole range of other recommendations that could be explored but these ideas
are more appropriately addressed in a discussion forum. The degree of financial
investment and the flexibility for change are two critical issues that need to be raised and
clarified before too many ideas are enthusiastically proposed!




Executive Report on Corporate Culture                                         Page 36

				
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