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									                                     State of New Jersey
Chris Christie                    Office of the Attorney General           Paula T. Dow
  Governor             DEPARTMENT OF LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY                Attorney General
                               Juvenile Justice Commission
Kim Guadagno                                  P.O. Box 107              Veleria N. Lawson
Lt. Governor                        Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0107        Executive Director


         JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION COMMITTEE
                         Notice of Availability of Funds


TO:              County Youth Services Commissions,
                 Mayors, Freeholder Directors

FROM:            Kylthia Roberts, Manager
                 Program Development and Prevention Services Unit

DATE:            March 15, 2010

RE:              Notice of Funding Availability- Title V Incentive Grants for Local
                 Delinquency Prevention Programs

The Juvenile Justice Commission (JJC) in conjunction with the New Jersey Governor’s
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Committee announces the
availability of $300,000 in FFY07 & FFY08 Title V Funds and FFY08 JJDP Formula
Grant funds to provide delinquency prevention programs based on a risk and resource
assessment process. These funds will provide 15 months of programming, from July 1,
2010 to September 30, 2011. A 50% match is required in cash or in-kind
contributions.

The goal of New Jersey’s Title V – Community Prevention Grants Program is to reduce
delinquency by supporting collaboration that allows communities to provide their
children, families and institutions with the knowledge, skills and opportunities necessary
to foster a healthy and nurturing environment, which in turn leads to the development of
a productive and responsible citizenry.

       Please read this Notice carefully. This notice will also be posted on the
               New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission’s website at:

                              www.nj.gov/oag/jjc/index.html



                                                                                               1
MANDATORY POTENTIAL APPLICANTS’ MEETING

In an effort to assist candidates in applying for these funds, a prospective applicants’
meeting will be held on Thursday, March 25, 2010 at 2:00 p.m., at the Middlesex
County Fire Academy, in classroom # 4, located at 1001 Fire Academy Drive in
Sayreville. A representative from the lead agency is encouraged attend. Please see
pages 40 and 41 for directions to the Middlesex County Fire Academy. Registration is
required.     Please     contact     Thurayya     Peagler     at    609-341-5349      or
Thurayya.Peagler@njjjc.org by March 22, 2010 to register.


Please come to the prospective applicants’ conference prepared to discuss this notice
in its entirety. Please read the notice in advance and review any exiting data or risk and
resource assessments for the geographic area(s) to be served.

A.    Eligible Applicants

      The applicant must be a unit of local government. A unit of local government is
      defined as any city, county, township, town or borough.

      In addition, the following points should be noted regarding eligible applicants:

      •      State agencies and universities are not eligible to apply.

      •      Police departments and school districts are not eligible to apply directly. A
             city or county would be the eligible applicant and recipient of funds on
             behalf of the department or district.

      •      Non-profits are not eligible to apply directly. A unit of local government as
             a Title V recipient can designate a non-profit as an implementing agency.

B.    Eligibility Criteria

      1. Units of local government must be in compliance with the core requirements of
         the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act. The core
         requirements of the JJDP Act mandate:
               The removal of status offenders and non-offenders from secure
                  detention and placement;
               Removal of juvenile offenders from adult secure facilities;
               Sight and sound separation of accused delinquents from adult
                  offenders in secure institutions; and
               Reducing the overrepresentation of minority youth in the juvenile
                  justice system.
      Certification of compliance with the above must be received from the Juvenile
      Justice Commission’s Office of Program Development and Prevention Services.
      Potential applicants should contact Richard Case at 609-341-5071 or
      Richard.Case@njjjc.org and indicate the geographic area that the application will
      cover (i.e. municipality or county). After verifying compliance, the applicant will
                                                                                        2
           be notified of the jurisdiction’s compliance and documentation will be provided.
           This documentation must be attached to the application upon submission.
           2. Establish and provide documentation reflecting the membership of the local
              Prevention Policy Board (henceforth to be the PPB). A full description of the
              PPB can be found on page 15.
           3. Develop and submit a local three (3) year Delinquency Prevention Plan.
           4. Certify a 50% cash or in-kind match.
           5. Have no history of suspension, termination or debarment from contracting with
              State, Federal or County government for deficiencies in performance of any
              award, or having all past issues resolved satisfactorily, as demonstrated by
              written documentation.
           6. Be in good standing with the Governor’s Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
              Prevention Committee and the New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission.
           7. Be in compliance with the terms and conditions of any current JJDP/JJC grant.
           8. Provide a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number. Please see
              instructions located at http://www.dnb.com/us.
           9. Provide a current and active status Central Contractor Registration (CCR).
              CCR is the federal government=s database for standard information about
              federal financial assistance applicants, recipients, and sub-recipients. For
              further information visit on-line at http://www.ccr.gov.
           10.Have the capacity to uphold all administrative, operating and staffing
              standards outlined in its agency’s policies and procedures.


    ELIGIBLE PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

    Eligible program activities may include but are not limited to the following:

           •      Mentoring programs
           •      Tutoring and basic skills instruction
           •      Conflict resolution and violence prevention curricula
           •      Life skills training
           •      Parent training and effective parenting programs
           •      Family therapy and family preservation programs
           •      Peer counseling and mediation programs
           •      Child and adolescent mental health services
           •      Before-school and after-school educational and development opportunities
                  programs
           •      Youth leadership development activities
           •      Vocational and job skills training
           •      Truancy prevention
           •      Exposure to and participation in the fine arts


IV. Restrictions in the Use of Funds

    Funds awarded under this initiative cannot be used for the following:

                                                                                          3
A.        Supplanting: Title V funds can be used to supplement existing funds for program
          activities but cannot replace those funds which have been appropriated for the
          same purpose.

B.        Construction, expansion or building renovation.

C.        Purchasing or acquiring land

D.        Vehicle acquisition

E.        Lobbying

F.        Bonuses, commissions or honorariums


INSTRUCTIONS FOR APPLICANTS

Adherence to the following elements is required.

         Applications must be limited to 12 pages or less, (not including the Face Page,
          Budget and the appendices).
         All pages must be numbered.
         All sections of the applications MUST be typed.
         Use twelve- (12) point; Times New Roman font.
         A copy of the proposal is to be submitted to the Youth Services Commission
          Administrator of the county for which your organization/agency is based.
         Fax and e-mail copies will not be accepted.
         Submit six copies of the application, including the original.

Deadline and Instructions for Submission:

The original application and six copies are to be submitted to the Juvenile Justice
Commission’s, Office of Local Programs and Services, Program Development and
Prevention Services Unit, by Monday, April 26, 2010 at 5:00 pm. Applications
delivered after 5:00 pm on Monday, April 26, 2010 will be administratively rejected
and will not be considered for funding.

Applications should be mailed to the attention of Okesha Harrison:

          US Postal Service Delivery                Fed Ex, UPS, and Hand Delivery
          Juvenile Justice Commission                   Juvenile Justice Commission
     Office of Local Programs and Services        Office of Local Programs and Services
     Program Development and Prevention           Program Development and Prevention
                  Services Unit                                 Services Unit
                  PO Box 107                           1001 Spruce Street, Suite 202
               Trenton, NJ 08625                             Ewing, NJ 08638

                                                                                          4
                STATE OF NEW JERSEY

                    GOVERNOR’S
   JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION
                     COMMITTEE




          NOTICE OF AVAILIBILITY OF FUNDS




                      TITLE V
INCENTIVE GRANTS FOR LOCAL DELINQUENCY PREVENTION




         APPLICATION SUBMISSION DEADLINE:
                   April 26, 2010
                      5:00 pm


               Juvenile Justice Commission
     Program Development and Prevention Services Unit
              1001 Spruce Street, Suite 202
                        PO Box 107
                 Trenton, NJ 08625-0107
                      (609) 292-1400




                                                        5
                            TABLE OF CONTENTS
Sections                                                                 Page

 I. Background……………………………………………………………………………………7

 II. Overview of JJDP Committee……………………………………………………………….7

 III. Introduction to Title V…………………………………………………………………………8

IV. Purpose, Goals, Objectives………………………………………………………………….9

 V. Successful Prevention Activities………….………………………………………………..10

VI. Priority Considerations………………………………………………………………………10

VII. Proposal Format ………………………………………...…………………………………..11
         Executive Summary…………………………………………………………………...11
         Elements of a 3-Year Delinquency Prevention Plan……………………………….12

VIII. Performance Measurement Reporting…………………………………………………….16
           Program Areas…………………………………………………………………………16

IX. Title V Grant Timeline………………………………………………..………………..…….19

 X. Checklist of Application Requirements…………………………………………………….20

XI. Application Review Criteria…………………………………………………………………21

Appendices

Appendix A: Risk Factors and Indicators by Sphere of Influence…………………………...23
Appendix B: Protective Factors and Indicators by Sphere of Influence…………………….25
Appendix C: Title V Community Readiness Assessment Tool…………………..…..………27

Attachments

Title V Application Face Page……………………………………………………………………29
Application Authorization Form……………………………………………………………...…...30
Prevention Policy Board Information Form……………………..…………………..…….…….31
Detailed Budget Description……………………………………………………………………...32
Attachment II Budget Detail Form ………………………………………………………….……36
Logic Model Table…………………………………………………………………………………39
Directions to Prospective Applicants’ Conference……………………………………………..40




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I. Background

  OVERVIEW AND HISTORY OF THE JJDP COMMITTEE
  The New Jersey Governor’s JJDP Committee is the state advisory group appointed by
  the Governor, as required by federal law (the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
  Prevention Act of 1974, as reauthorized in 2002), to administer federal juvenile justice
  funds awarded to New Jersey and to advise the Governor and the Legislature on
  juvenile justice issues.

  The JJDP Committee’s mission is to prevent and reduce delinquency by improving
  systems, mobilizing resources and engaging in advocacy to improve the lives of youth
  and families in the State. The JJDP Committee recommends funding for state and
  community level evidence-based programs, and systems reform efforts, and monitors
  compliance with Federal requirements for the treatment of juvenile offenders in facilities.
  It reviews all applications and provides the final recommendation for approval for
  funding.

  Both the JJDP Committee and the JJC are committed to reducing the
  overrepresentation of youth of color in the juvenile justice system. Therefore, the
  proposals that are sought should be culturally appropriate and reflect cultural
  competence and gender equity.

  Disproportionate Minority Contact

  The JJDP Act requires states to address the overrepresentation of minority youth in the
  juvenile justice system. This is defined as the presence of minority youth in the juvenile
  justice system at higher rates than should be expected based on their presence in the
  general population. The reduction of minority youth is the goal. Both the Juvenile
  Justice Commission and the JJDP Committee are committed to addressing this problem
  by improving services to minority youth in the community and throughout the juvenile
  justice system. Therefore, the proposals that are sought should reflect both cultural
  competence and cultural appropriateness. In addition, the staff hired should include
  members of the primary populations to be served.

  Cultural Competence: A set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and practices that come
  together in a system, agency, or among professionals and enables that system, agency,
  or those professionals to work effectively in cross-cultural situations. (Cross. Et al.,
  1989; Issacs & Benjamin, 1991).

  Cultural Appropriateness: Sensitivity to cultural differences and similarities and
  effectiveness in communicating within and across cultures. This also includes language
  differences, especially in working with families where adult members may not be
  bilingual. It is critical that staff hired to work with families, not only understand the
  language, but also the culture.

  Gender Equity: Although females represent a smaller portion of the total population
  arrested, detained and confined due to criminal charges, their development and needs
  are different from boys. Therefore, their treatment must be different. The JJDP
                                                                                     7
Committee has identified gender specific services for juvenile females as a priority for
JJDP Act funds.

A.    Introduction

      In 1992, Title V of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act of
      1974, as amended (42 U.S.C. 5601 et seq.) and reauthorized in 2002,
      established the Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs.
      Based on a need identified by States to have dedicated funds devoted to
      prevention efforts, Title V of the JJDP Act was designed to provide just such a
      dedicated source of monies to award grants for delinquency prevention within
      local communities. The Title V Grants program is founded on a research-based
      framework that focuses on reducing risks and enhancing protective factors to
      prevent youth from entering the juvenile justice system. It offers a funding
      incentive to encourage community leaders to engage in multi-disciplinary
      assessments of risks and resources specific to their communities and to develop
      comprehensive, collaborative plans to prevent delinquency (OJJDP Fact Sheet,
      December, 1998, #89). The federal funds awarded subsequent to this Notice of
      Availability of Funds (NOAF) come to the State of New Jersey from the Office of
      Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP).

      The Governor’s State Advisory Group, the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
      Prevention (JJDP) Committee, is the supervisory authority established under the
      JJDP Act and appointed by the Governor to oversee the development and
      implementation of the State Juvenile Justice Plan and delinquency prevention
      programming. Members of the JJDP Committee have training, experience or
      special knowledge in preventing and treating juvenile delinquency and/or the
      administration of juvenile justice. They advise the Governor and Legislature on
      juvenile justice issues and provide the final approval of funding for all Title V
      programs.

      The New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission (JJC) is the State agency
      designated by the Governor and approved by the Federal Administrator of the
      Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to administer
      Title V funds in the State. The purpose of this document is to announce the
      availability of these funds and to outline the requirements for applying for and
      receiving awards under the Title V-Incentive Grants Program.

      Over the last fifteen years there has been a government-wide move toward
      accountability.     Therefore subgrantees are required to report on their
      performance using specific performance measurements, as indicated by output
      and outcome measures (See Section VIII on page 14). Justification for funding
      and evidence of program impact are common requests from most funding
      sources. OJJDP, like all Federal agencies, must meet the following requirements
      of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (P.L. 103-62, or
      “GPRA”). The law requires agencies to link their performance to their budgets,
      evaluate their programs regularly and to use results of these evaluations to
      adjust their strategic plans accordingly. To meet these and other requirements,
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     all funded entities must collect performance data from programs receiving
     delinquency prevention funds. Successful applicants will be required to collect
     data and information to report quarterly, on performance measures and other
     information specific to the type of program funded.

B.   Purpose, Goals and Objectives

     The goal of New Jersey’s Title V-Incentive Grants Program is to reduce
     delinquency by supporting community collaboration that allows communities to
     provide their children, families, and institutions with the knowledge, skills, and
     opportunities necessary to foster a healthy and nurturing environment, which in
     turn leads to the development of a productive and responsible citizenry.

     The objectives of this program are:

     •     To aid communities in fostering collaborations that will direct delinquency
           prevention planning and efforts using Federal, State, local, and private
           resources to achieve positive community and youth development;

     •     To provide communities with the resources necessary to identify risk
           factors within their community as well as protective factors which would
           counteract the identified risk factors. These resources include the
           assessment of existing programs and activities in place within the
           community, as well as gaps in services;

     •     To aid communities in developing local comprehensive delinquency
           prevention plans that strengthen existing protective factors, fill in gaps
           where protective factors are lacking, and help communities identify assets
           in youth;

     •     To provide assistance to communities in forming coalitions which
           implement delinquency prevention strategies, monitor their progress, and
           make necessary modifications through collaborative community-wide
           planning efforts; and

     •     To develop and implement local comprehensive, delinquency prevention
           strategies which use and coordinate Federal, State, local and private
           resources for establishing a continuum of services for at-risk children and
           their families.

     The applicant communities for the Title V Grants Program are encouraged to
     take advantage of community needs assessments currently underway or
     completed by other existing and relevant multi-agency, community-wide planning
     groups. Communities are encouraged to form their Prevention Policy Boards for
     the Title V grant from existing groups which meet, or could be enhanced to meet,
     the eligibility requirements.


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V. Successful Prevention Activities

    All proposed prevention strategies must be based on the results of a thorough analysis
    of community risk and protective factors, an assessment of service gaps, and
    successful juvenile programming. Subgrantees are required to implement programs
    that are evidence-based. There are several databases and sources available to assist
    subgrantees in identifying appropriate programs and strategies that address identified
    risks. OJJDP’s Model Programs Guide (MPG) was developed specifically for Title V
    and includes more than 100 research-based and scientifically proven prevention
    programs from a variety of sources.                   The MPG is available at
    http://www.dsgonline.com/mpg2.5/mpg_index.htm. See Section VIII on page 14 for a
    complete list of Title V program areas under which proposed activities must fit.

    The following are common characteristics of successful prevention activities:

    •     Intervene Early in Life and/or Early in the Risk Trajectory: Activities that target
          young children or youth before they display risky behaviors, and include their
          families.

    •     Strengthen Families: Examples would be parent training, family counseling and
          family skills training.

    •     Include Social Skills Training: Activities that teach specific pro-social, problem-
          solving and conflict-resolution skills and also decision-making and assertiveness
          skills.

    •     Have an Integrated Approach if Being Instituted in Schools: School-based
          programs need to incorporate activities with the overall school culture and regular
          classroom curriculum.

    •     Provide Intensive Adult Attention: Mentors, counselors, teachers, etc. must
          engage youth both with intensity and for a sufficient period of time.

    •     Use Competent, Qualified Staff Who Have Specific Training to Implement the
          Chosen Activity: Adequate training for staff is essential for those who will be
          implementing any activity.

    •     All Activities Should: be accessible, be flexible; respect confidentiality; whenever
          possible, be comprehensive rather than fragmented; and involve youth in
          meaningful decision making roles.

VI. Priority Consideration

    Priority consideration will be given to programs and strategies which:

    •     Intervene at the earliest possible and/or most developmentally appropriate stage
          as identified through the risk and protective factor assessment and which serve
                                                                                            10
           to incorporate the entire family into the program or strategy, increase
           opportunities for bonding with caring adults, focus on the attainment of age
           appropriate social skills and employ an integrated approach which targets more
           than one sphere of influence in a child’s life.

     •     Increase protective factors that reduce the likelihood for minority youth to
           become involved in the juvenile justice system.


VII. Proposal Format
     A.    Executive Summary (5 Points)

     The Executive Summary should summarize the proposed project in two pages using the
     following format:

     1.    Briefly describe the implementing agency and its existing programs.
     2.    List the priority risk factors and corresponding data for your jurisdiction.
     3.    Describe the community and the target population to be served.
     4.    Briefly summarize the identified model program and the program area.
     5.    Briefly describe why the proposed program is the best choice for the target
           population and how youth will be identified and referred to your program.
     6.    Briefly describe your program by clearly illustrating the logical relationships
           between the problems (priority risk factors) to be addressed, the goal and
           objectives, planned activities and anticipated outputs and outcomes. Also
           include the project duration, hours of operation, frequency of service, number
           and age of youth to be served, number of families to be served, etc..

B.   Agency Capacity (5 Points)

     Introduce the implementing/lead agency that will provide services to the identified
     population using the following format:

     1.    Describe the implementing agency, its mission and services.
     2.    Describe current staffing, roles and their experience and training (attach a table
           of organization to this application).
     3.    Discuss any required staff training and training materials that are used.
     4.    Include a description of exiting youth programs, numbers served and any
           available evaluation/outcome data.
     5.    Describe extent that current programming involves work with families.
     6.    Discuss government and community partnerships that support current work and
           note past instances of interagency collaboration and their outcomes.
     7.    List current funding streams supporting the agency.




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C. Elements of the Three (3) Year Delinquency Prevention Plan
The local three-year community delinquency prevention plan must contain the following
elements and the indicated points will be used to score applications during the review
process:

1.    Problem Statement (20 Points)

      Detailed Assessment of Community Readiness

      Clearly define the geographic boundaries of the program's neighborhood or
      community to be served and include a map of the area. Provide a detailed
      assessment of the community’s readiness to adopt a comprehensive delinquency
      prevention strategy. Please use the Title V Community Readiness Index or a
      research-based readiness tool (See Appendix C on page 26).

      Risk Factor Assessment

      Provide an assessment of the prevalence of specific, identified delinquency risk
      factors, by sphere of influence (e.g. community, school, family, peer, individual),
      including the establishment of baseline data for the risk factors. Applicants must
      select at least two risk factors for each sphere of influence. Data should be
      collected for a minimum of two indicators for each risk factor showing a three to
      four year trend (See Appendix A on page 23). Risk factors data should not be
      older than 2006 and should reflect that of the applicant’s local jurisdiction within
      the state of New Jersey. National data is irrelevant for this application. In
      addition to percentages, the corresponding raw data must be provided.

      The overall assessment of risk factors should be submitted as an attachment to
      the application. The assessment of risk factors must result in a list of priority risk
      factors to be addressed, across spheres of influence, as determined and
      approved        by     the        PPB.            Applicants      should          visit
      http://dsgonline.com/projects_titlev_training.html to obtain a copy of the Risk
      Factor Indicator Inventory Form and the Risk Factor Indicator Action Planning
      Form; the password to access this site is “bethesda”.

      Prioritization of Risk Factors

      Provide a list of the top three to five (3-5) risk factors that the PPB has identified
      to be addressed in this three year plan. A narrative of the process used for
      prioritizing risk factors and the reasons why these risk factors were prioritized
      over other risk factors should be included in this section of the application.

2.    Identification of Available Resources and Gaps in Services (10 Points)

      After prioritizing the top three to five (3-5) risk factors to be addressed by the
      community, the applicant must conduct a resource assessment to identify which

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     programs exist in the community to address each of the risk factors. This should
     include any and existing programs addressing these risk factors, highlighting
     those Promising Approaches and/or Best Practices which specifically address
     priority risk factors. The Community Resource Assessment Inventory Form
     should be completed as an attachment to the application. Applicants should
     visit http://dsgonline.com/projects_titlev_training.html to obtain a copy of this
     form; the password for this site is “bethesda”.

     The resource assessment is to be followed by discussion of gaps in protective
     factors, assets and resources in the affected areas. (See Appendix B on page
     25) Describe the identified gaps in services, the risk factor(s) that are being
     inadequately addressed, and how they will be addressed by adapting the
     promising program that is being recommended through this application.


3.   Goal & Objectives (5 Points)

     Provide the goal and objectives of the proposed program and clearly illustrate the
     logical relationships between the problems (priority risk factors) to be addressed,
     planned activities and anticipated outcomes.

     Program objectives must be specific, measurable and must identify the outcomes
     to be achieved.

     Note: Performance measurement is a system of tracking progress in
     accomplishing goals, objectives, and outcomes.   Please see Section VIII
     on page 14 for information on performance measurement.


4.   Detailed Program Description (15 Points)

     Discuss the selected Model/Promising/Effective/Exemplary Program that the
     applicant has selected to implement and the risk factor(s) it will address. Using
     the logic model, develop a strategy, including goals, objectives, and a timetable,
     for obtaining and coordinating identified resources that will implement the
     promising approaches that address the priority risk factors. This strategy must
     include a plan for the coordination of services for at-risk youth and their families
     (see Section VIII). Also, develop a timetable, for mobilizing the community to
     assume responsibility for delinquency prevention. This should include ways of
     involving the private, nonprofit and business sectors in delinquency prevention
     activities.

     Based on the capacity of the lead agency and any collaborators in this process,
     describe the following:
           Number of youth to be served at any given time
           Number of youth to be served over the fifteen month grant period
           Age of youth to be served

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           Number of families to be served at any given time
           Number of families to be served over the fifteen month grant period
           Referral sources. Please include Letters of Commitment/Memorandums
            of Understanding
           Referral process
           The services/activities to be undertaken by the implementing agency and
            its collaborators. Include how the programs/services will be coordinated
            with existing resources. Please include in Letters of Commitment/MOU’s
           Program location
           Hours of service operation
           Eligibility criteria
           Those who will be excluded from service and the reasons.
           Positive and negative termination criteria
           Type of staff training that will be required
           Number and percent of program staff to be trained.


5.   Evaluation (5 Points)
           Data to be collected on each participant must include, age, race/ethnicity
            and gender
           Clearly restate the objectives and outcome performance measures that
            will be reported by the project as a measure of the work that is done with
            youth and families
           Indicate what methods/tools will be used to measure any change in
            behavior, attitude, skill or knowledge.
           Indicate time-lines for administering (methods), analyzing the results and
            preparing the report.


6.   Personnel/Management & Cultural/Ethnic Competency Analysis (10 points)

     Applicants must analyze the racial/ethnic ratio of juvenile clients to staff for the
     previous twelve-month period. In addition, applicants must address
     cultural/ethnic sensitivity and competency training needs and necessary
     strategies for improving the current juvenile client-staff racial/ethnic ratio, such as
     advertising in minority media and utilizing community organizations that have
     liaisons with the minority community.

     For each position provided with JJDP Act funds provide a detailed job description
     and job specifications, indicating the level of education and experience required.

        Describe recruitment methods for attracting bilingual or other minority staff, if
         needed.
        Describe any positions that will be provided through in-kind or other funding
         sources.

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        Describe the duties and responsibilities of the project director and to whom
         the director will report as well as who will be responsible for the programmatic
         and fiscal operation of the project.
        Submit resumes for any identified staff. Any existing agency staff hired to
         work on this project must have their previous position back filled in order to
         avoid supplanting of funds.


7.   Collaboration (5 Points)

     Prevention Policy Board

     The Prevention Policy Board (PPB) is to consist of no fewer than 15 and no more
     than 21 members from the community, representing a balance of public
     agencies, private nonprofit organizations serving children, youth, and families,
     and business and industry. Such agencies and organizations may include
     education, health and mental health, juvenile justice, child welfare, employment,
     parent, family, and youth associations, law enforcement, religion, recreation,
     child protective services, public defenders, prosecutors, and private
     manufacturing and service sectors. The applicant should also assure that the
     PPB, to the extent possible, contains one or more members under the age of 21,
     one or more parents or guardians with children who have had contact or are at
     risk of having contact with the juvenile justice system, and an overall membership
     that generally reflects the racial, ethnic, and cultural composition of the
     community's youth population.

     This section of the application should identify the unit of local government, as
     well as, the local agency or entity that will be responsible for supporting the PPB.
     Provide a description of how the PPB was constituted and how it provided
     general oversight for developing and approving the plan prior to its submission as
     well as how the PPB will make recommendations to the responsible local agency
     for the distribution of funds and the evaluation of funded activities.

     The PPB Membership Form (page 31) must be completed and submitted as an
     attachment to the application along with a letter of endorsement from the PPB
     and a schedule of meeting dates.

     Evidence of coordination with local comprehensive plans developed by Municipal
     Alliances, Child Abuse Commissions and/or County/Municipal Youth Services
     Commissions should be included in the application. Also in this section, identify
     the role and responsibility of each collaborating agency.

     Letters of commitment from key leaders and a letter of support from the County
     Youth Services Commission must be submitted as attachments to the
     application.



                                                                                       15
     Key leaders may include public and private individuals in key leadership and
     policy positions who are instrumental in effecting policy changes, controlling
     resources, and mobilizing the community.

8.   Logic Model (5 Points)

     Please complete the attached logic model form which will reflect the goals,
     objectives, activities and anticipated outcomes in a one-page format.


9.   Budget (10 Points)

     Provide a comprehensive budget and budget narrative describing how awarded
     funds and matching resources will be used to accomplish the stated goals and
     objectives. This must include a detailed description of the source(s) of the match
     contributions, both dollar and in-kind. A detailed budget explanation is provided
     on page 32.

VIII. Performance Measurement Reporting
     Performance measurement is a system of tracking progress in accomplishing
     goals, objectives, and outcomes. It monitors a few vital signs related to program
     performance and is less rigorous than program evaluation.

     All Title V subgrantees are required to select performance measures from
     OJJDP’s performance measurement system and develop a data collection plan
     that specifies which measures will be collected and how they will be measured.
     Performance measures must be selected from those presented on OJJDP’s Web
     site http://dsgonline.com/Program_Logic_Model/titlev_pm.htm and reported to
     OJJDP at required intervals. Funded programs are required to report on two
     mandatory and two non-mandatory measures as indicated on the logic model
     charts.


     Program Areas

     Funds for Title V programs must be for at-risk juveniles to "prevent" them from
     entering the juvenile justice system or "early intervention" programs for juveniles
     with first-time and non-serious offenses to keep them out of the juvenile justice
     system. Title V subgrantees should select from the listed program areas for their
     proposed interventions based on the prioritization of risk factors and indicator
     data.

           Title V Program Areas

            03    Child Abuse and Neglect
            04    Children of Incarcerated Parents

                                                                                      16
       09        Delinquency Prevention
       10        Disproportionate Minority Contact
       11        Diversion
       12        Gangs
       13        Gender-Specific Services
       15        Gun Programs
       16        Hate Crimes
       18        Job Training
       20        Mental Health Services
       21        Mentoring
       22        Native American Programs
       25        Restitution/Community Services
       26        Rural Area Juvenile Programs
       27        School Programs
       32        Substance Abuse
       34        Youth Courts

To facilitate selecting the performance measures most appropriate for the
program, it is recommended that the applicant first develop a logic model that
lays out the logical relationships between the problem to be addressed and the
program’s activities, outputs, and outcomes. The applicant should compare the
logic model for the program with the logic model that corresponds to the program
area as indicated on the OJJDP Performance Measurement Web site.

Within each program area, there are performance measures for both outputs and
outcomes. Outputs measure the products or changes for individuals, the juvenile
justice system, or county that result from the program. Outcomes are benefits or
changes as a result of the program. There are two types of outcomes:

            1.        Short-term – those that occur during the program or by the
                      completion of the program.
            2.        Long-term – those that occur 6 months to 1 year after program
                      completion.

The OJJDP performance measurement system designates some measures as
mandatory, that is, they are required to be selected, and some as non-
mandatory, or optional.

Subgrantees are required to report on:

                 1.      All mandatory and two optional output measures, and
                 2.      All mandatory and two optional outcome measures.

Subgrantees should develop a data collection plan that specifies each mandatory
and optional performance measure selected, the source of data (such as the
name of the specific survey to be used or arrest data), and a timetable for
collecting     the       data.               Applicants        should      visit

                                                                                 17
http://dsgonline.com/projects_titlev_training.html to obtain a copy of the Data
Collection Plan Form; the password to access this site is bethesda. Applications
should include Memorandum of Understanding or Inter-agency Agreements that
show how outcome-level data will be obtained from agencies when appropriate,
such as the police, schools, courts, or mental health agencies.

Successful applicants will be required to collect data and information to report
quarterly, or at other frequencies, on these measures and others specific to the
type of program funded.




                                                                              18
XI.   Time Line for FFY 07 & 08 Title V Grant Process

      March 15, 2010            Mail to interested parties and
                                Post on JJC Website

      March 15, 2010            Publish in New Jersey Register

      March 29, 2010            Mandatory Bidders Workshop

      April 26, 2010            APPLICATIONS DUE at 5:00 P.M.

      May 26, 2010              JJDP Committee Meeting for Funding
                                Consideration

      June 16, 2010             Applicants notified of final decision

      July 1, 2010              Project Implementation Begins

      October 15, 2010          First Quarter Fiscal Report due

      October 30, 2010          First Quarter Program Report due

      January 15, 2011          Second Quarter Fiscal Report due

      January 30, 2011          Second Quarter Program Report due




                                                                        19
XII.   Checklist of Application Requirements

       The following information constitutes a complete Application and must be
       submitted before the deadline in the order listed:

                     Subgrant Application Face Sheet
                     Application Authorization Form with original signatures
                     JJDP Core Requirements Compliance Certification from State
                     Prevention Policy Board (PPB) Membership Form
                     Schedule of PPB meetings
                     Letter of Endorsement from PPB
                     Letter of acknowledgement from the respective County Youth
                      Services Commission
                     Letters of Commitment from Key Leaders
                     Certification of Match Page (as indicated in Section III)
                     Completed Attachment II Budget Detail Form
                     Budget Narrative explaining the use of both Federal funding and
                      the source and use of the local match
                     Completed Risk Factor Indicator Inventory Form
                     Completed Resource Assessment Inventory Form
                     Detailed Assessment of Risk and Protective Factors to include
                      baseline data for each risk factor assessed
                     Executive Summary of Logic Model Comprehensive Three Year
                      Delinquency Prevention Plan
                     Memorandums of Understanding




                                                                                   20
XIII.   Application Review Criteria
        Applications will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet the following
        criteria:

                               SAMPLE REVIEW CRITERIA                                           Points

 1.     Executive Summary/Logic Model: Briefly described community, target                       10
        population, implementing agency and existing programs; Listed priority risk factors
        and corresponding data; Summarized model program and identified program area;
        Provided goal and objectives; Described why program is best choice for target
        population and how youth will be identified and referred; Clearly illustrated the
        logical relationships between the problems (priority risk factors) to be addressed,
        the goals and objectives, planned activities (strategies), and anticipated outputs
        and outcomes. Submitted a properly completed Logic Model Table.
 b.     Agency Capacity: Provided a description of the implementing agency, its mission           5
        and services; it’s currents staffing, roles and their experience and training and
        attached a table of organization. Discussed required staff training and training
        materials used. Include a description of programs provided, numbers served and
        any available evaluation/outcome data. Described extent that current
        programming involves work with families. Discuss government and community
        partnerships that support current work and noted past instances of interagency
        collaboration and their outcomes. List current funding streams supporting the
        agency.

 c.     Problem Statement: Clearly defined boundaries of program’s neighborhood or               15
        community to be served and provided a map of the area; Provided a realistic
        assessment, including evidence of the readiness of the community or
        neighborhood to adopt a comprehensive delinquency prevention strategy;
        Described community’s readiness at the time of application submission. Attached
        a detailed assessment of 16 delinquency risk factors (at least one for each sphere
        of influence) to serve as the baseline for determining project objectives and
        activities. Discussed the process used for prioritizing risk factors and applying
        proven and effective program strategies designed to address the risk factors. Risk
        factor data in not older than year 2002, it provides a 3 to 4 year trend and reflects
        that of the applicants local jurisdiction.
 d.     Identification of Available Resources and Promising Approaches: Identified               10
        available Promising Approaches and Best Practices which specifically address
        identified risk factors and assess gaps in protective factors. Provided an
        assessment of gaps In protective factors and described how gaps will be
        addressed through this application. Attached Community Resource Assessment
        Inventory Form.
 e.     Goal and Objectives: Goal and objectives clearly illustrate the logical relationships    10
        between the problems (priority risk factors) to be addressed, planned activities and
        anticipated outcomes. Objectives are specific, measurable and identify the
        outcomes to be achieved




                                                                                                         21
     Detailed Program Description: Provided a timetable, for obtaining and
f.                                                                                             15
     coordinating identified resources that will implement the promising approaches that
     address the priority risk factors and a timetable to mobilize the community to
     assume responsibility for delinquency prevention. Details number of youth to be
     served at any given time and over the eight month grant period; age of youth to be
     served; number of families to be served at any given time and over the eight month
     grant period; referral sources and process; services/activities to be undertaken by
     the implementing agency and its collaborators. Include how the programs/services
     will be coordinated with existing resources; program location; hours of operation;
     eligibility and exclusionary criteria; positive and negative termination criteria;
     required staff training; number and percent of program staff to be trained.
     Includes all necessary Memorandums of Understanding
g.   Evaluation: Indicated the methods that will be used to measure any change in              5
     behavior, attitude, skill or knowledge.
     Indicate time-lines for administering (methods), analyzing the results and preparing
     the report.


h.   Personnel/Management & Cultural/Ethnic Competency Analysis: Provided                      10
     analysis of racial/ethnic ratio of juvenile clients to staff for the previous six-month
     period and strategies for improving the current juvenile client-staff racial/ethnic
     ratio. Provided detailed job description, job specifications, education and
     experience requirements for each position provided with JJDP Act funds and
     through in-kind or other funding sources. Described the duties and responsibilities
     of the project director and to whom the director will report as well as who will be
     responsible for the programmatic and fiscal operation of the project. Attached
     resumes for any identified staff.

i.   Collaboration: Identified local agency that will be supporting the PPB and                10
     described how the PPB provided general oversight for developing and approving
     the plan prior to its submission; how the PPB will make recommendations to the
     responsible local agency for the distribution of funds and evaluation of funded
     activities. Described the roles of key community leaders in the comprehensive
     delinquency prevention strategy and attach their letters of commitment. Attached a
     schedule of PPB meetings, the PPB Information Form consisting of no fewer than
     15 members, letters of commitment from each member, key and the CYS
     Commission.

j.   Budget: Request not to exceed $47,500. Provide a comprehensive budget                     10
     outlining the planned expenditures of grant funds and matching resources, include
     a budget narrative justifying these expenditures. Provide written statements of
     commitment from State or local public agencies to match in cash or kind, at least
     50% of the funds awarded. Attachment II Budget Detail Form properly completed.

     TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS                                                                     100




                                                                                                     22
                                                                           Appendix A

         RISK FACTORS AND INDICATORS BY SPHERE OF INFLUENCE*
SPHERE OF
INFLUENCE                  RISK FACTORS                                     INDICATORS
COMMUNITY Availability of Alcohol and Drugs       Total Alcoholic Beverage Sales by
                                                  Location, Trends in Exposure to Drug Use,
                                                  Perceived Availability Drugs
               Availability of Firearms           Firearms in the Home, Firearms Sales
               Community Crime                    Weapons-related Charges, Violent Crime
                                                  Rate, Arrests fro Driving Under the
                                                  Influence, Adult Drug-related Arrests,
                                                  Adult Alcohol-related Arrests, Adult
                                                  Property-crime Arrests, Alcohol-related
                                                  Traffic Fatalities, Murders by Weapon,
                                                  Murder Rate, Gang-Related Activity
                                                  Reported by Law Enforcement Agencies
               Social And Physical Disorder       Hate Crimes, Poor External Housing
                                                  Conditions, Broken Light Fixtures in Public
                                                  Halls, Neighborhood Watch Organizations,
                                                  Non-Enforcement of Building Code
                                                  Violations/Condemned Buildings,
                                                  Homeless Projections, Vandalism and
                                                  Graffiti, Public Drunkenness
               Community Instability              Net Migration Rate, Children Moving, New
                                                  Home Construction, Home Ownership
                                                  Rates, Rental Occupied Housing, Property
                                                  Vacancy
               Low Community Attachment           Population Voting in Congressional or
                                                  Presidential Elections
               Economic Deprivation               Aid to Families with Dependent Children
                                                  (AFDC/TANF), Children Living Below
                                                  Poverty Level, Children in Working Poor
                                                  Families, Families Living Below Poverty
                                                  Level, Persons Living Below Poverty
                                                  Level, Female Family Householder with
                                                  No Spouse Present, Food Stamp Program
                                                  Recipients, Free and Reduced Lunch
                                                  Program, Unemployment, Individuals
                                                  without Health Insurance, Children Without
                                                  Health Insurance
SCHOOL         Academic Failure                   Average Student Reading Proficiency,
                                                  Average Student Math Proficiency,
                                                  Average Student Science Proficiency
               Negative Attitudes Toward School   GED Diplomas, Completion of Four Years
                                                  of High School, Chronic Absenteeism,
                                                  Truancy, Suspensions/Expulsions
               Inadequate School Climate          Exposure to Teacher Abuse by Students,
                                                  Violence/Crime in Schools, Teacher
                                                  Attitudes/Job Satisfaction, Physical Decay
                                                  of School
               School Dropout                     Even Dropout, Status Dropout




                                                                                          23
FAMILY               Family History of Problem Behavior                Clients in Alcohol or Other Drug Treatment
                                                                       Programs, Educational Attainment (Less
                                                                       Than 12 years of School), Low Adult
                                                                       Literacy, Pregnant Mothers Using Alcohol,
                                                                       Babies Born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
                     Family Management Problems                        Children Living Outside of the Family,
                                                                       Parental Involvement in Child’s School
                     Child Victimization and Maltreatment              Reported Child Abuse and Neglect Cases,
                                                                       Unpaid Child Support, Requests for Social
                                                                       Service Intervention
                     Family Conflict                                   Divorce, Domestic Violence Arrests,
                                                                       Intimate Murders, 911 Calls for Domestic
                                                                       Violence
PEER                 Gang Involvement                                  Gang Activity Participation, Police Reports
                                                                       of Youth Gang Activity, Perceived Peer
                                                                       Gang Involvement
                     Peer Alcohol, Drug Use, and                       Reported Use of Alcohol and Drugs by
                     Delinquency                                       Friends, Violent Friends,
INDIVIDUAL           Anti-Social Behavior & Alienation                 Suicides, Juvenile Arrests for Vandalism,
                                                                       Juvenile Arrests for Drug Abuse, Juvenile
                                                                       Alcohol or Drug-Related Arrests
                     Gun Possession                                    Self-report of Gun Carrying on School
                                                                       Property, Juvenile Arrest for Weapons
                                                                       Possession, Arrest for Gun Possession,
                                                                       Gun Confiscations at School
                     Teen Parenthood and Sexual Activity               Adolescent Pregnancies, Sexual Activity
                                                                       Among High School Students
                     Favorable Attitudes Toward Drug Use               Positive Attitudes Toward Alcohol Abuse
                                                                       or Drug Use
                     Early Onset of Violence                           Juvenile Arrests for Violent Crime and
                                                                       Serious Violent Crime
                     Early Onset of Alcohol and Drug Use               Juvenile Self Report of First Drug or
                                                                       Alcohol Experiences and/or Regular
                                                                       Usage
                     Cognitive and Neurological Deficits               Learning Disabilities, Emotional
                                                                       Disturbance, Traumatic Brain Injury,
                                                                       Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder,
                                                                       Special Education Enrollment


* The order that the risk factors are shown in this chart may differ from that shown in your manual.




                                                                                                               24
                                                                                            Appendix B

      PROTECTIVE FACTORS AND INDICATORS BY SHPERE OF INFLUENCE
SPHERE OF
INFLUENCE                         PROTECTIVE FACTORS                        SUGGESTED INDICATORS*
COMMUNITY Presence of Caring, Supporting Adults                   Availability of Caring Supportive Adults in
                                                                  Community, Availability of Supportive
                                                                  Neighbors in Community, Positive
                                                                  Relationships with Adults Outside Family,
                                                                  Neighborhood Associations
                    Opportunities for Participation               Community Service Opportunities and
                                                                  Volunteerism, Meaningful Ways for Youth
                                                                  to Participate in Community Activities,
                                                                  Availability of Prosocial Activities
                    High Expectations of Youth                    Scholarships, Incentive Programs for
                                                                  Graduating High School, High School
                                                                  Graduation Rates, Public Education
                                                                  Campaigns
                    Safe Environment                              Community Safety
SCHOOL              Caring and Support                            Low Teacher Turnover Rate, High
                                                                  Teacher Morale, Active PTA in School
                                                                  District, Parental Support for School, Safe
                                                                  and Caring School Environment
                    High Expectations                             School Achievement, Youth Who go to
                                                                  College, Scholarships Available
                    Clear Standards and Rules for                 Adherence to School Policies and Rules,
                    Appropriate Behavior                          Drug Free Schools Policy, No Violence or
                                                                  Guns Policy, Safe and Drug Free Schools
                                                                  Zones
                    Youth Participation, Involvement, and         Student Involvement in Class Activities
                    Responsibility in School Tasks and            and Policies, Youth Involvement in Extra
                    Decisions                                     Curricular Activities, School Clubs and
                                                                  Organizations.
FAMILY              Effective Parenting                           Prenatal Care and Delivery, Youth
                                                                  Reports of Family Love and Support,
                                                                  Parents’ Clear Rules and Consequences,
                                                                  Necessary Immunizations Received
                    Positive Bonding                              Attachment and Commitment to Parents
                                                                  and Family
PEER                Involvement with Positive Peer Group          Participation in Prosocial Activities
                    Activities and Norms
INDIVIDUAL          Social Competencies                           Self Efficacy, Youth With Driver’s
                                                                  Licenses and Incident Rates, Youth
                                                                  Employment, Conflict Resolution Skills,
                                                                  Life Skills
                    Positive Temperament                          Prosocial Orientation
                    Commitment to Community and                   Religious Involvement, Planning to go to
                    School                                        College
                    Self Esteem                                   Feelings of Self-worth


* The order that the risk factors are shown in this chart may differ from that shown in your manual.




                                                                                                           25
                               Stages of Community Readiness                                              Appendix C

Nine Stages
(Note: the higher the stage, the greater the degree of readiness)

Stage 1 - Community Tolerance / No Knowledge
Community norms actively tolerate or unintentionally encourage the problem behavior.
Those who do not have the behavior or do not participate may be viewed as deviant.

Stage 2 - Denial
The community recognizes that the behavior could be a problem, but nothing can or
should be done about it.

Stage 3 - Vague Awareness
The community reaches the awareness that something ought to be done. There is no
motivation or leadership to do so.

Stage 4 - Pre-Planning
There is recognition of the problem and that something ought to be done. There are
identifiable leaders, but no plan exists.

Stage 5 - Preparation
Practical, community-level planning is going on. Analysis of pros and cons of
strategies, approaches and programs has begun. Leadership is active and energetic.
Some level of funding may have been committed.

Stage 6 - Initiation
Program or community-wide initiative gets started. There is euphoria upon
implementation and initial successes.

Stage 7 - Institutionalization / Stabilization
Several programs may be up and running; prevention “status quo” is established.
Program limitations are evidenced, some resistance to change may be experienced,
and some rudimentary data tracking systems are in place. A programmatic action plan
is implemented; funding is steady, though not yet long-term.

Stage 8 - Confirmation / Expansion
Prevention programs are viewed as valuable, there is support for expansion,
broadening effort, and standardization of data collection.

Stage 9 - Professionalization
Detailed and sophisticated data collection and monitoring methods are in place.
Programs are better targeted and focused; community involvement is high. Effective
evaluation is used to test participant outcomes and to appropriately modify programs.
Source: Oetting, E.R.; Donnermeyer, J.J.; Plested, B.A.; Edwards, R.W.; Kelly, K.; and Beauvais, R. Assessing community
readiness for prevention. International Journal of Addictions, 30(6):659-683, 1995.

                                                                                                                          26
            Assessing Stages of Community Readiness
Stage 1 - Community Tolerance / No Knowledge

Questions to assess readiness.

      Do community members openly support alcohol and drug usage by youth and
       adults?
      Do community members support teen pregnancy?
      Is there a high level of adult and youth violence in the community?

Stage 2 - Denial

Questions to assess readiness

   •   Do neighbors ignore the violence or drug use?
   •   Are drug use paraphernalia readily visible throughout the community?


Stage 3 - Vague Awareness

Questions to assess readiness

   • Have community members met to discuss the problems caused by drug use and
      violence?
   • Is there a local community organization or leader who has spear-headed this
     effort?

Stage 4 - Pre-Planning

Questions to assess readiness

   • Have there been community meetings on substance abuse and violence?
   • Is there an identified community leader who has expressed interest in solving the
     problems?
   • Have there been meetings to help plan for community mobilization?


Stage 5 - Preparation

Questions to assess readiness

   •   Is there a community assessment in place?
   •   Have prevention programs been funded?
   •   Are the prevention programs being monitored?
       Have the prevention programs been evaluated?


                                                                                     27
Stage 6 - Initiation

Questions to assess readiness

   •   Has a community-wide strategic plan been implemented?

Stage 7 - Institutionalization / Stabilization

Questions to assess readiness

   •   Have multiple funding streams been used to fund prevention plan?
   •   Has an action plan been developed to combat known barriers to community
       change?


Stage 8 - Confirmation / Expansion

Questions to assess readiness

   •   Are prevention programs viewed as effective and valuable?
   •   Are data collection and tracking systems in place to monitor the impact of
       prevention efforts?
   •   Is the community assessment updated at least biennially?

Stage 9 - Professionalization

Questions to assess readiness

   •   Is there an outside evaluator for the prevention programs?
   •   Are promising approaches used as models for prevention programming?
   •   Are there multiple years of prevention data for results tracking?




                                                                                    28
STATE OF NEW JERSEY
DEPARTMENT OF LAW & PUBLIC SAFETY
JUVENILE JUSTICE COMMISSION
JJDP SUBGRANT APPLICATION                                                          For JJC Use Only
                                                                    PROJECT NO.           DATE RECEIVED


(Under Public Laws 93-415                                                          SUBGRANT PERIOD
and 102-586 as amended)
                                                                    GRANT NUMBER           DATE APPROVED



                                   TITLE V LOCAL INCENTIVE GRANT
                            JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION

    1.   Short Descriptive Title
    2.   Applicant Unit of Government
    3.   Implementing Agency and Address (if applicable)


    4.   Project Address
    5. Project Duration From                                                  To
         (Requested Starting and Concluding Dates )
    6.   Project Director
         Name                                                              Title
         Address                                                           Telephone
         E-mail Address                                                    Fax #
    7.   Contact Person (Person directly responsible for project)
         Name                                                              Title
         Address                                                           Telephone
         E-mail Address                                                    Fax #
    8.   Financial Officer (of Unit of Government, if applicable)
         Name                                                              Title
         Address                                                           Telephone
         E-mail Address                                                    Fax #
    9.   Total Amount of JJDP Funds Requested:

         $

         For JJC Use Only

         JJC/JJDP Budget Approval/Project Officer Signature

         Program Area                                 Funding Year                      State         Local



                                                                                                              29
                                                    APPLICATION AUTHORIZATION

Authorization to submit application to the Juvenile Justice Commission for a project entitled:

at an estimated total project cost of $                             .

The undersigned agrees upon approval of this project on behalf of the unit of government or State Agency to comply with the
AConditions Applicable to Grants Awarded@ (Section B of this Application). Further, the undersigned makes the assurances
called for in Section B concerning non-supplanting of State or local funds with federal funds; that this project will not have a
negative impact on the environment and that the State Review Process has been complied with where and if applicable.

The undersigned also certifies that the following procedures covering ACivil Rights Compliance,@ where required, have been
undertaken and completed.

Civil Rights Compliance

          1. An Equal Employment Opportunity Program (Affirmative Action Plan) covering the employment practices of the
          implementing agency has been executed and is available for review.
                                                                    Yes                      No
           G

          2. The required certificate indicating existence of a written Equal Opportunity Program has been filed with the
          Juvenile Justice Commission either with this application or with a previously approved application involving the same
          implementing agency.

                                                                         Yes                            No
                                                                         G



                                                                              Date certificate filed
Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and Voluntary Exclusion Lower Tier Covered Transactions:

This certification is required by the regulations implementing Executive Order 12549, Debarment and Suspension, 34 CFR Part
85, Section 85.510, Participant=s responsibilities. The regulations were published as Part VII of the May 26, 1988 Federal
Register (pages 19160-19211).

1. The prospective lower tier participant (subgrantee) certifies that neither it nor its principals are presently debarred, suspended,
proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this transaction by any Federal
department or agency.

2. Where the prospective lower tier participant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this certification, such prospective
participant shall attach an explanation to this proposal.

3. It is further agreed that this certification shall be obtained from any other supplier of goods or services using federal funds in
the amount of $25,000 or more under this project.

Drug-Free Workplace

This applicant assures that it will comply with Title V of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 and regulations promulgated by the
Federal government to maintain a drug-free workplace.

This application consists of the following attachments in addition to this form:

          Section A
                      Attachment 1: Description of Project
                      Attachment 2: Project Budget

          Section B
                      Conditions Applicable to Grants Awarded

Signature:

Name:

Title:
          Mayor, Freeholder Director, Chief Executive Officer, State Department Head

Unit of Government:



                                                                                                                                    30
                                PREVENTION POLICY BOARD
                                   MEMBERSHIP FORM
                                       (Please Type)

                                                                                        RACE/
   NAME                            ORGANIZATION                                TYPE     ETHNICITY




Under the Type category indicate what type of organizations this person represents from the following:
A -Public Agency               N - Private Non Profit           B - Business/Industry
C - Private Citizen            P - Parent                       Y - Youth under age 21

Under Race indicate the following letters: A - Asian/Pacific Islander     B - Black       H- Hispanic
                                           W – White          N – Native American         O- Other




                                                                                                         31
                          DETAILED BUDGET DESCRIPTION

Provide a comprehensive budget and budget narrative describing how awarded funds
and matching resources will be used to accomplish the stated goals and objectives.
This must include a detailed description of the source(s) of the match contributions, both
dollar and in-kind.


                          MATCHING FUNDING GUIDELINES

The applicant unit of local government must be willing and able to provide a 50 percent
match of the amount of the Federal award. (Example: If the award amount is $75,000,
the required match amount is $37,500). The match can be either cash or in-kind
contributions. A written statement of commitment from government or local private
agencies to match in cash or kind, at least 50% of the funds awarded must be submitted
as an attachment.

Cash match includes cash spent for project-related costs. In-kind match is determined
by the value of goods and the value of project-related donated (volunteered) services.
The value of these services should be calculated at the average market value of that
service at the time that the service was provided (see page 6).

It should be noted that the Title V provision prohibits States and units of local
government from requiring a cash or in-kind match from private nonprofit agencies
designated by recipient units of local government as Title V implementing agencies.
However, policy has allowed for cash or in-kind contributions to be volunteered by
private nonprofit agencies and corporations. While this policy allows third party
contributions in order to enable more communities to participate in the program, State
and local cash and/or in-kind match is critically important to the sustainability of Title V
projects after Federal funding ceases.

Applicants must submit a completed Attachment II Budget form with this application
detailing the total project budget.


                    BUDGET/DETAILED BUDGET EXPLANATION:

Estimated cost details of the project's budget should be itemized on an Attachment II
Budget Form. Costs should be broken down as indicated within the column headings.
Any cash or in-kind contributions should be cited in the total operating budget.

No requests for federal funds that would replace or supplant efforts that would have
been made in the absence of the federal grant will be approved. Thus, the federal
grants must expand the level of service if incorporated into an existing initiative. No
reimbursement of funds spent by an applicant prior to the award can be charged to this
grant.


                                                                                          32
Allowable Costs

The allowability of charges made to funds granted under federal legislation is
determined in accordance with the general principles of allowability and standards for
selected cost items set forth in General Services Administration, Federal Management
Circulars and the U.S. Department of Justice Financial Guide.

Unallowable Costs

9. Supplanting
10. Construction
11. Land Acquisition
12. Vehicle Acquisition
13. Bonuses, Commissions or Honorariums
14. Compensation of Federal Employees - Salary payments, consulting fees, and travel
    costs (including subsistence and lodging) of full-time federal employees.

The costs of all items will be reviewed by JJDP to determine acceptability. Costs
generally allowable may be rejected if in JJDP's determination such costs are deemed
excessive or not integral to the success of the project.

Budget Categories

Budget categories are listed and explained below. Note that applicants should use only
whole dollars when itemizing costs. A detailed budget narrative should be attached
explaining each budget item. Where applicable, provide rates for mileage, subsistence,
printing costs per 1,000 copies, etc.

A. Salaries and Wages

   List each position for which funds are requested, indicating the percentage of time to
   be spent on the project and the total annual salary of each. Employees' benefits,
   such as retirement, FICA and health insurance should be shown separately and
   itemized as fringe benefits.

   It is essential that subgrantees adequately forecast salary requirements (including
   base salaries and anticipated increments) when submitting applications to JJDP. All
   requests for salary increases, not provided within the approved project budget, will
   be reviewed on a case by case basis but in no case will the total amount of the grant
   be increased. Approval of such requests will be based upon reasonableness,
   consistency with local policy and availability of funds within the project budget.

B. Purchase of Services

   For all purchases of services, include in the application resumes of individuals or
   qualifications or organizations performing the duties. As a general rule, a maximum
   of $450 for an eight-hour day may be charged. If less than an eight-hour day is
   being provided, an hourly rate of $56.25 should be requested. JJDP reserves the
                                                                                     33
   right to approve or disapprove consultant services prior to commitment for such
   services.

   1. Contracting/Service Organizations and Associations. With respect to such
   services, the arrangement must be formal and consistent with federal, state and
   local procurement regulations. Selection of contractors should involve securing
   competitive bids or proposals from a group of qualified organizations. On all sole
   source contracts over $7,500, justification for use of this method must be included in
   the application.

   A detailed cost estimate should be provided in the Budget Explanation, including the
   scope of services to be performed, professional qualifications, and the basis for
   calculating fees including the estimated number of days required, travel rate,
   overhead, etc. Prior to obtaining the services of any organization, a copy of the
   proposed contract must be submitted to the JJDP for review and approval. The
   proposed contract will not be reviewed for legal sufficiency, but rather to insure that
   the scope of services to be provided is consistent with overall project goals and
   objectives.

   2. Instructional Costs for Training Seminars, Workshops, etc.

   Travel costs incurred for outside professionals for staff training including costs for
   travel, transportation and subsistence for these professionals will be included under
   Instructional Costs. Provide details that show the basis for the amount requested.


   3. Other Costs for Professional Services

   Other costs that could be included for purchase of services is emergency medical
   services or examinations, psychological/social services and contracting agreements
   for child care, payroll service, audits, accounting, laboratory analysis, etc.

C. Travel, Transportation, Subsistence

   Show travel costs by estimating the number of trips, multiplied by the estimated cost
   per trip. Where possible, show the proposed destination and purpose of the trip(s).
   In the absence of a locally approved rate, costs for travel and subsistence should be
   budgeted in accordance with current State regulations. Travel rates cannot be
   charged in excess of the State maximum of $0.31 per mile.

   Purchase of vehicles is not allowable under this grant. However, vehicle rentals and
   leasing are allowable, where vital to program functioning.

   Also to be included under this category are expenses to be incurred for lunches and
   refreshments for participants in training programs funded by this Agency. Amounts
   for lunches and refreshments should be itemized at per person costs. Meals for
   clients should also be listed in this budget category.

                                                                                        34
D. Consumable Supplies

   Estimate the cost of materials directly required by the project, such as office
   supplies, postage, printing and other expendable materials needed during the
   course of normal operation of the project. Each item must be individually itemized.
   Also include equipment items with a unit cost of $25 or less.

E. Facilities, Office Space, Utilities, Equipment Rental

   Estimate the cost of office space rental, furniture or equipment rental, maintenance
   costs, equipment maintenance contracts, utilities, telephone, etc. Show the cost per
   square foot for office space. Note that rent may not be charged for the use of public
   buildings, however, actual costs that can be accounted for may be used.

   Rental space, including space for file, conference, mail, supply, reproduction, and
   storage rooms should not exceed 150 square feet per employee. Costs should be
   consistent with prevailing rates in the area and documentation should be maintained
   in the file of the grant.

F. Equipment

   JJDP may approve the purchase of equipment deemed appropriate and essential to
   the successful operation of projects under the approved program. Requests for
   equipment should contain adequate cost specifications, including equipment type,
   quantity and estimated cost. An inventory of all equipment purchased with grant
   funds or through the federal excess property program must be submitted to JJDP
   within 90 days upon termination of each grant.

   A detailed explanation of equipment utilization should be included in the application.
   If training in the use of equipment is necessary, a schedule of training, including
   length of training, trainees and instructors should be presented.

   Applicants should become familiar with Office of Management and Budget (OMB)
   Circular A102, Appendix N, Property Management Standards. This guideline
   outlines subgrantee responsibilities in developing and maintaining adequate property
   records, internal control systems and periodic physical inventory checks.

G. Indirect Costs

Indirect costs are chargeable to federal funds, however every effort should be made to
maximize the grant funds for direct project services. Consistent with this aim, indirect
costs charged to the federal portion of a grant will be limited to 5% of the total direct
project costs. These are the maximum flat rates allowed by U.S. Department of Justice
in lieu of a negotiated rate. Subgrantees may not also charge expenses normally
included as indirect costs, e.g. accounting services, legal service, building occupancy
and maintenance, etc. as direct costs.


                                                                                        35
                                                                                            Attachment II Budget Detail Form

                                          SECTION A- ITEM 14. BUDGET DETAIL (Estimate)
                                                    WHOLE DOLLARS ONLY
                                 COST ELEMENT                     FEDERAL SHARE LOCAL MATCH                   PROJECT TOTAL

                              A. Salaries and Wages
                                                          Current
        Position                    % of time         Annual Salary

                                                                           $_____________    $_____________   $_____________


                                                                           $_____________    $_____________   $_____________


                                                                           $_____________    $_____________   $_____________




                                                      Sub-Total Salaries


                                                      Fringe Benefits
        (Detail in Budget Explanation)

                                                       Total Salaries

101 3




                                                                                              36
                                                                 _________________________
                                                                 Applicant Unit of Government


                                                SECTION A- ITEM 14. BUDGET DETAIL (Estimate)
                                                                  WHOLE DOLLARS ONLY
                                  COST ELEMENT                                FEDERAL SHARE          LOCAL MATCH      PROJECT TOTAL
        B. Purchase of Services

           1. Contracting or Service Organizations and Associations (list
              each by type with fee basis and amount of time devoted).

           2. Instructional costs for training seminars, etc.

           3. Other costs for professional services, i.e. psychological/ social
              services.

                                                  Total Purchase of Services        $_____________   $_____________   $_____________

        C. Travel, Transportation, Subsistence (itemize)


                                                                                    $_____________   $_____________   $_____________


                                                                Total Travel

101 4




                                                                                                      37
                                  COST ELEMENT                                   FEDERAL SHARE    LOCAL MATCH      PROJECT TOTAL

           D. Consumable Supplies, Postage, Printing, Etc. (Itemize)




                                                                                 $_____________   $_____________   $_____________
                                                    Total Consumable Supplies

        E. Facilities, Office Space, Utilities, Equipment Rental (Itemize)


                                                                                 $_____________   $_____________   $_____________
                                                              Total Facilities

        F. Equipment (Itemize)


                                                                                 $_____________   $_____________   $_____________
                                                              Total Equipment

        G. Indirect Costs
                                                                                 $_____________   $_____________   $_____________
                                                              Total Indirect
                                                                                 $_____________   $_____________   $_____________
        Total Project Costs
101 5




                                                                                                   38
Program                                                                                                   Date

Program Area


                                                                  LOGIC MODEL

The logic model should lay out the logical relationship between the program’s objectives, activities, outputs, and outcomes. It is a description of how
the program will work to achieve benefits for participants, staff and the community.
        Objectives                     Activities                        Outputs               Short-term Outcomes            Long-term Outcomes
                                                              Mandatory      Optional         Mandatory        Optional      Mandatory       Optional
                                                              Measures       Measures         Measures         Measures      Measures        Measures




                                                                                                          39
                             Middlesex Fire Academy
                                                1001 Fire Academy Drive
                                                  Sayreville, NJ 08872


Via Route 9 / Route 35 Northbound:
Come up through South Amboy into Sayreville. Do not go over the bridge. Take the exit on to the Route 9/Route 35 circle. The sign for
the exit reads North 35. The ramp is just after a large sign marked Coliseum (sic). At the bottom of the ramp merge right into the circle,
then move quickly to the left lane to go around the circle. Bear left going around the circle, passing the Amboy Cinemas. After going
under Route 9, merge to the right and take the first right turn-off, on to Chevalier Drive, just past the Sayreville Motor Lodge (Note:
Chevalier Drive street sign may be missing, look for signs for Garden State Parkway "South"). After 1/4 mile (just past the Parkway
entrance) turn left on to Main Street (large church at corner). After 3/4 mile take the exit for Kennedy Drive. At the bottom of the ramp
turn right into the Academy.
Traveling from Perth Amboy on Route 35 Southbound:
Take Route 35 south, crossing the Victory Bridge, and passing the back of Amboy Cinemas. Follow the Route 9/Route 35 circle under
Route 9. After going under Route 9, merge to the right and take the first right turn-off, on to Chevalier Drive, just past the Sayreville
Motor Lodge (Note: Chevalier Drive street sign may be missing, look for signs for Garden State Parkway "South"). After 1/4 mile (just
past the Parkway entrance) turn left on to Main Street (large church at corner). After 3/4 mile take the exit for Kennedy Drive. At the
bottom of the ramp turn right into the Academy.
Via East Brunswick / South River via Route 535:
Route 535 is Cranbury Road in East Brunswick. It becomes Main Street in South River. Travel North on Route 535 through South River
and over the Veterans' Memorial Bridge, stay in left lane. At the light after the bridge go straight on to Washington Road. At the next
light, (this will be the second traffic light after crossing the bridge) turn left on to Main Street. Proceed to the fourth traffic light (approx. 5
miles) and make a left into the Fire Academy.




                                                                                                        40
Via the Garden State Parkway Northbound:
Take Exit 125 (just after the Raritan tolls and before the bridge). At the bottom of the ramp turn left on to Chevalier Drive, and then make
the first on to Main Street (large church at corner). After 3/4 mile take the exit for Kennedy Drive. At the bottom of the ramp turn right into
the Academy.

Via the Garden State Parkway Southbound:
Take Exit 124 (just after the Raritan tolls). At the bottom of the ramp turn right on to Main Street and after a few hundred feet make the
first right on to Kennedy Drive. Stay on Kennedy Drive for 3/4 of a mile, through the traffic light, and straight into the Fire Academy.
Via Route 9 Southbound:
Take Route 9 south from Woodbridge over the Raritan River. Take the first exit (marked South Amboy Business Center). At the bottom
of the ramp take the first right turn on to Chevalier Drive just past the Sayreville Motor Lodge (Note: Chevalier Drive street sign may be
missing, look for signs for Garden State Parkway "South"). After 1/4 mile (just past the Parkway entrance) turn left on to Main Street
(large church at corner). After 3/4 mile take the exit for Kennedy Drive. At the bottom of the ramp turn right into the Academy.
From the New Jersey Turnpike North or South:
Take Turnpike Exit 11 for the Garden State Parkway (GSP). After the tolls, bear left and on to the Garden State Parkway (GSP)
traveling south. From the GSP take Exit 124 (just after the Raritan tolls). At the bottom of the ramp turn right on to Main Street and after
a few hundred feet make the first right on to Kennedy Drive. Stay on Kennedy Drive for 3/4 of a mile, through the traffic light, and
straight into the Fire Academy.




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