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					Proceedings of
Transforming the American Workplace
A 21st Century Vision

                                      A Summit on
                             Disability Employment Policy
                                 June 3 and 4, 2008

                                                 Hosted by

                       The Office of Disability Employment Policy
                           United States Department of Labor

Commemorative Piece and Desk Reference

The U.S. Department of Labor‘s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) encourages use of this
publication as:

• A commemorative piece documenting ODEP‘s progress since its inception as presented at Transforming
  the American Workplace: A 21st Century Vision, A Summit on Disability Employment Policy, in June
  2008; and
• A desk reference to assist individuals and organizations in developing and advancing promising
  practices related to disability employment.

On request, this publication is available in alternative formats, such as Braille, large print, CD-ROM, or
computer diskette. For more information, contact the Office of Disability Employment Policy by calling (202)
693-7880 (voice) or (202) 693-7881 (TTY), or e- mailing odep@dol.gov.

This report was produced by the U.S. Department of Labor‘s Office of Disability Employment Policy.
The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent the position or policy of the U.S. Department of
Labor, nor does mention of tradenames, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S.
Department of Labor.

Summit Proceedings Editorial Committee: Susan Parker, Chair; Rhonda Basha, Jennifer Kemp, Carol Boyer,
and Mario Damiani.

Summit Proceedings Note Takers: Beth Bienvenu, Carol Boyer, Patrick Cokley, Mario Damiani, Nadia
Ibrahim, Betsy Kravitz, Michael Reardon, Charles Sabatier, and Janet Voight-Miro.

This report is in the public domain. Authorization to reproduce it in whole or in part is granted. While
permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be: U.S. Department of Labor, Office
of Disability Employment Policy, Transforming the American Workplace: A 21st Century Vision,
A Summit on Disability Employment Policy, Washington, D.C.

This report is available on the Office of Disability Employment Policy Web site at http://www.dol.gov/odep.
Acknowledgments ..................................................................................................... i

Executive Summary ................................................................................................ 1

Introduction ................................................................................................................ 7
     Summit Overview ................................................................................................ 9
     Evening Reception and Educational Program ................................................ 10

Opening Plenary Session (June 3) .................................................................. 13
    Welcoming Remarks from Dr. Robert Davila,
    President, Gallaudet University ........................................................................ 13
    Remarks from the Assistant Secretary
    for Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor ................... 14
    Keynote Remarks from the U.S. Secretary of Labor ..................................... 18
    Plenary Remarks from Mark Bertolini, President, Aetna, Inc. .................... 23

Luncheon .................................................................................................................. 27
    Remarks from Captain (Ret.) Dawn Halfaker,
    Chief Executive Officer, Halfaker and Associates......................................... 27

Afternoon Plenary Session (June 3) ............................................................... 30
     Ensuring Employment Success for Returning Injured
     and Wounded Service Members........................................................................ 30

Breakfast Plenary (June 4) .................................................................................. 35
    Randy Lewis, Senior Vice President of Distribution and Logistics,
    Walgreen Company ............................................................................................ 35
    John Kemp, Principal, Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville PC
    and President, U.S. Business Leadership Network ........................................ 38

Workshops (June 3) ............................................................................................... 42
    Theme 1: The New Workplace: Flexibility ................................................... 42
    Theme 2: Transforming the Workplace with New Technologies ................ 52
    Theme 3: The Intergenerational Workplace .................................................. 59
    Theme 4: Universal Design/Accessibility ...................................................... 72
    Theme 5: Self-Employment and Entrepreneurship ....................................... 81
    Theme 6: Mental Health: Workplace Supports and Solutions .................... 87
    Theme 7: Organizational Culture: Driving Results .................................... 97

Future Directions: Stakeholder Workshops (June 4) ............................105
    Employers ......................................................................................................... 107
    Federal and State Partners ............................................................................... 109
                                                                                                                                  2
            Interest Groups .................................................................................................. 110
            Academics ......................................................................................................... 114

    Summit Closing Session (June 4): Conversation with America ......... 117

    Appendices
    Appendix A: Agenda ................................................................................................ 119
    Appendix B: Speaker Bios ....................................................................................... 128
    Appendix C: Participants ........................................................................................ 142




Transforming the American Workplace: A 21st Century Vision, A Summit on
Disability Employment Policy, was planned and executed by the U.S. Department
of Labor‘s (DOL) Office of Disability Employment Policy and was the culmination
of the hard work and collaboration of many dedicated people both within and
outside DOL.

First and foremost, ODEP thanks Dr. Robert R. Davila, President, Gallaudet University, for his warm
welcome to ODEP, DOL, and Summit participants. The support of the leadership of the Veter ans‘
Employment and Training Service in organizing and moderating the plenary Ensuring Employment
Success for Returning Injured and Wounded Service Members is also much appreciated. The plenary
panelists Alex Belous, Sergeant (Ret.) Gary Boggs, and John L awson are also recognized for their
valuable contributions.

ODEP is also grateful to the four other plenary speakers – Mark Bertolini, Captain (Ret.) Dawn
Halfaker, John Kemp, and Randy Lewis – as well as all workshop presenters: Jane Anderson, Joyce
Bender, Peter Blanck, Larry Cohen, Shirley Davis, Malcolm Foo, Keith Gall, Lori Golden, Barbara
Haight, Mike Haynie, Richard Luecking, Susan Mazrui, Tammie McNaughton, Clare Miller, Debra
Ruh, Deb Russell, Lisa Cuozzo Stern, Dr. Hyong Un, Frances West, Stephen Wing, Thomas
Wlodkowski, James M. (Jamey) Young, and Leslie Young. Susanne Bruyère, John Kemp, David
Mank, and Michael Morris are also recognized for facilitating the Future Directions workshops. The
contributions of Larry V. Norton, Sr., Karen Stang, the Armed Forces Color Guard, and the Old Guard
Fife and Drum Corps are also greatly appreciated.

The Summit was designed, developed, and implemented by the staff of ODEP and the Secretary‘s 21st
Century Workforce Office at DOL. Among the ODEP staff who played key roles were: Christopher
Button, Summit Coordinator; Rhonda Basha, Beth Bienvenu, Carol Boyer, Patrick Cokley, Charles
Conaty, Kevin Connors, Randy Cooper, Mario Damiani, Rachel Dorman, Carol Dunlap, Gary
Goosman, Jennifer Horan, Richard Horne, Nadia Ibrahim, Jennifer Kemp, Betsy Kravitz, Lisa
Lahrman, Susan Parker, Susan Picerno, Michael Reardon, Maggie Roffee, Charles Sabatier, Sheldon

                                                                                                                                      3
Serkin, Adrienne Thal, Janet Voight-Miro, and Andrea Vrchota.




On June 3 and 4, 2008, the U.S. Department of Labor‘s (DOL) Office of Disability
Employment Policy (ODEP) convened Transforming the American Workplace: A
21st Century Vision, A Summit on Disability Employment Policy, at the Kellogg
Conference Center on the campus of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. The
Summit‘s theme was chosen to reflect the fact that many of the trends transforming
the American workplace today – the slowing growth rate of the labor force, rapid
technological changes, globalization, and the increased availability of non-
traditional work environments, among others – hold enormous potential for
increasing the employment of individuals with disabilities.

Since its inception in 2001, ODEP has advanced policies and practices focused on opening doors to
employment for people with disabilities. In addition,ODEP has promoted the inherent value people
with disabilities bring to the American workplace and economy. ODEP is succeeding in shaping a
collaborative and comprehensive national policy that looks at the issue of disability employment
holistically, through: public/private partnerships with employers; technical assistance; the identification
and dissemination of effective practices to promote systems change; and the development of new
resources to support the hiring, retention, and advancement of employees with disabilities.

The Summit brought together for the first time more than 250 stakeholders, representing employers;
government officials at the Federal, State, and local levels; researchers and academics ; health care
providers; disability organizations; and individual disability advocates. A primary goal was to
highlight the research and effective practices resulting from seven years of ODEP‘s policy initiatives,
as well as DOL‘s overall accomplishments related to the employment of people with disabilities.

It was precisely these accomplishments and their impact that a distinguished group of plenary speakers
addressed in their remarks to Summit participants. In addition to DOL and ODEP leadership, the se
speakers included: Mark Bertolini, President of Aetna, Inc.; Captain (Ret.) Dawn M. Halfaker,
decorated combat veteran from Operation Iraqi Freedom and CEO of Halfaker and Associates; Randy
Lewis, Senior Vice President of Distribution and Logistics for Walgreens Company; and John Kemp,
Principal at Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville PC and President of the U.S. Business Leadership
Network.

The Summit also featured a plenary panel, moderated by DOL‘s Veterans‘ Employment and Training
Service, during which private-industry panelists shared what their companies are doing to enhance the
employment outcomes of returning service members.


                                                                                                          4
Seven workshops highlighted key workforce trends creating increased employment opportunities for
people with disabilities:

1. The New Workplace: Flexibility provided examples of employers‘ increasing incorporation of
flexibility policies and practices into the workplace to enable employees to customize various facets of
their jobs. This customization can take the form of everything from flexible schedules and
telecommuting options to individualized job duties and career trajectories that vary in pace and level of
advancement.

2. Transforming the Workplace with New Technologies spoke to the ways in which technology is
enhancing the development of the global business community and how corporations at the cutting edge
of these advancements are incorporating elements of accessibility and universal design into their work.

3. The Intergenerational Workplace explored the modern-day workplace, which for the very first time
includes representatives from four different generations: World War II-era veterans and their
contemporaries, Baby Boomers, and members of both Generation X and Generation Y. Employers
who adjust their workplaces to be more attractive to today‘s multigenerational workforce are finding
that many of these same strategies also make their businesses more attractive to the largely untapped
labor pool of people with disabilities.

4. Universal Design/Accessibility reviewed the concept of universal design, which promotes the design
of all products, the built environment, and workforce systems to be aesthetic and usable by all people to
the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design . Universal design,
therefore, implicitly includes accessibility because it circumvents the limitations imposed by various
types of disabilities.

5. Self-Employment and Entrepreneurship addressed how self-employment and entrepreneurship are
becoming increasingly popular employment options for individuals with disabilities striving to fulfill
their career aspirations and financial goals.

6. Mental Health: Workplace Supports and Solutions examined the deleterious effects that untreated
mental health ailments can have on workplace productivity and individual workers. Fortunately, many
employers understand that a workplace that is ―friendly‖ to disability, particularly mental health
disabilities, allows for greater success for both the employer and the employee.

7. Organizational Culture: Driving Results focused on the development of inclusive corporate cultures,
in particular those that foster acceptance of employees with disabilities, as essential elements of
corporate success. Maximizing an organization‘s ability to attract employees in the 21st century
requires creating a workplace that supports and includes an infinite variety of cultural and age
differences, and which effectively leverages untapped talent pools, including people with disabilities.

Workshop speakers‘ handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site. In the Proceedings
Report, at the end of each workshop summary, links to Web sites of speakers‘ organizations and
relevant ODEP resources are listed.
                                                                                                         5
Four concurrent Future Directions workshops facilitated discussions among the Summit‘s four key
stakeholder groups: employers, Federal and State partners, interest and advocacy groups, and
academics. Each audience was asked to reflect on current barriers to the employment of people with
disabilities, the changes needed in policy and practice to overcome those barriers, and specific ways to
work with the Federal government to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities.

At the Summit‘s closing session, workshop facilitators shared the thoughts of their respective
stakeholder group with all attendees. Participants‘ responses to the questions revealed their vision of
effective policies and practices, as well as gaps still needing to be addressed.

Summit participants had the opportunity to forge new cross-stakeholder partnerships and strengthen
existing ones. They were also able to explore how changes currently underway in today‘s workplace
can best be leveraged to promote employment opportunities for people with disabilities , and to discuss
the best ways to increase employers‘ access to this talented and largely untapped labor pool. The
Summit also provided a forum for employers to learn from one another and to provide insight into the
utility of ODEP‘s policies from a business perspective, bringing them to life in a real-world context.

The Summit‘s presentations and workshops were complemented by a June 3 evening reception and
educational program at the Smithsonian Institution‘s Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and
Portraiture. This event featured remarks from disability leaders and a first-of-its-kind photography
exhibit of milestones in disability history as it relates to employment.

Transforming the American Workplace: A 21st Century Vision , A Summit on Disability Employment
Policy, elucidated an important message for America‘s businesses: today more than ever, individuals
with disabilities have the requisite knowledge and skills to succeed in the workplace. The Summit
marked not an end point but rather the beginning of an important new ―Conversation with America‖ –
one in which all of the necessary players collaborate to discuss, recognize, and promote the value that
individuals with disabilities bring to the marketplace and to our society.




                                                                                                           6
On June 3 and 4, 2008, the U.S. Department of Labor‘s (DOL) Office of Disability
Employment Policy (ODEP) convened Transforming the American Workplace: A
21st Century Vision, A Summit on Disability Employment Policy, at the Kellogg
Conference Center on the campus of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. The
Summit‘s theme grew out of the fact that the many transformations shaping the
American workforce–the slowing growth rate of the labor force, rapid
technological changes, globalization, and the increased availability of non-
traditional work environments, among others–hold enormous potential for
increasing the employment of individuals with disabilities.

Since its inception in 2001, ODEP has advanced policies and practices focused on opening doors to
employment for people with disabilities and promoting their inherent value in the American workplace
and economy. As a result, it has begun to shape a collaborative and comprehensive national policy that
looks at the issue of disability employment holistically through: public/private partnerships with
employers; technical assistance; the identification and dissemination of effective practices to promote
systems change; and the development of new resources to support the hiring, retention, and
advancement of employees with disabilities.

The Summit brought together for the first time more than 250 stakeholders representing employers;
government officials at the Federal, State, and local levels; researchers and academics; health care
providers; disability organizations; and individual disability advocates. A primary goal was to
highlight the research and effective practices resulting from seven years of ODEP‘s policy
initiatives, as well as DOL‘s overall accomplishments related to the employment of people with
disabilities.

Participants also had the opportunity to strengthen existing and develop new cross -stakeholder
partnerships, and to explore how changes currently underway in today‘s workplace can best be
leveraged to promote employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increase employer
access to this talented and largely untapped labor pool.

Perhaps most importantly, the Summit provided a forum for employers to provide insight into the
utility of ODEP‘s policies from a business perspective. This employer insight was essential to the
Summit‘s success because research shows that employers‘ attitudes, organizational practices, and
innovative approaches to diversity have a significant effect on the employment of people with
disabilities. Also, the employment of people with disabilities produces exponentially positive
                                                                                                       7
outcomes by benefiting not only individual businesses but also others that seek to emulate their
success. For non-business participants, hearing from employers currently utilizing ODEP‘s strategies
brought those strategies to life and gave them a real-world context.

During and after the Summit, participants expressed appreciation for the opportunity to hear from so
many businesses, and enthusiasm for a fresh approac h to promoting policies intended to improve
employment opportunities for people with disabilities. The Summit gave employers a platform to talk
to other employers and share ideas and lessons with other stakeholders. Summit participants saw how
ODEP‘s policies foster the creation of the disability-friendly workplace and make good business sense
– and ultimately result in increased recruitment, hiring, retention, and advancement of employees with
disabilities.


SUMMIT OVERVIEW
After the Presentation and Retirement of Colors by the Armed Forces Color Guard, accompanied by
the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps, Larry V. Norton, Sr., sang the ―Star-Spangled Banner‖ and
Mistress of Ceremonies Adrienne Thal, ODEP Policy Advisor, led the Pledge of Allegiance. Summit
participants were then formally welcomed to Gallaudet University by University President Dr. Robert
Davila.

The opening plenary session featured speeches by DOL and ODEP leadership, as well as Mark
Bertolini, President of Aetna, Inc. Primary concepts conveyed were that America is currently at the
precipice of transformative change in recognizing the inherent and economic value people with
disabilities bring to the workplace, a movement that is being reinforced and further fueled by DOL‘s
and ODEP‘s groundbreaking efforts to eliminate barriers to employment for Americans with
disabilities. Bertolini in particular put this progress into real-world context by discussing how Aetna‘s
corporate culture supports diversity and the development of talent in all of its employees and promotes
the inclusion of people with disabilities.

After the opening plenary, four concurrent workshops were held: The New Workplace: Flexibility;
Transforming the Workplace with New Technologies; The Intergenerational Workplace; a nd Universal
Design/Accessibility. These workshops preceded a luncheon that featured poignant remarks and video
from Captain (Ret.) Dawn Halfaker, a West Point graduate and combat veteran who lost her right arm
and shoulder in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Following the luncheon, three concurrent workshops took
place: Self-Employment and Entrepreneurship; Mental Health: Workplace Supports and Solutions;
and Organizational Culture: Driving Results.

The final plenary on June 3, titled Ensuring Employment Success for Returning Injured and Wounded
Service Members and moderated by the Veterans‘ Employment and Training Service, centered on
improving the employment outcomes for returning injured and wounded service members and
showcased exemplary corporate efforts in this area.

On June 4, Mistress of Ceremonies Rachel Dorman, ODEP Policy Advisor, presided over a breakfast

                                                                                                         8
plenary featuring Randy Lewis, Senior Vice President of Distribution and Logistics at Walgreens, and
John Kemp, Principal at Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville PC and President of the U.S. Business
Leadership Network. Lewis described the transformation of Walgreens‘ facilities to be fully inclusive
of people with disabilities. Kemp offered humorous insight on disability awareness based on his
personal experiences.

Following the breakfast plenary, four concurrent Future Directions workshops facilitated discussions
among the Summit‘s four key stakeholder groups: employers, Federal and State partners, interest and
advocacy groups, and academics. Each audience was asked to reflect on current barriers to the
employment of people with disabilities, the changes needed in policy and practice to overcome those
barriers, and specific ways to work with the Federal government to increase the employment of
individuals with disabilities.

The closing session featured summaries by workshop facilitators about the challenges facing people
with disabilities as they strive to enter and remain in the workforce, a recap of the Summit‘s
accomplishments, and plans for continuing the dialogue among participants.

EVENING RECEPTION AND EDUCATIONAL P ROGRAM
The Summit‘s evening reception at the Smithsonian Institution‘s Donald W. Reynolds Center for
American Art and Portraiture, Robert and Arlene Kogod Courtyard, featured an educational program
consisting of remarks from disability leaders and the unveiling of a unique photographic exhibit
entitled History, Progress, Transformation: Vision of the Future. The Reynolds Center occupies the
Old Patent Office Building, a National Historic Landmark originally completed in 1867, and combines
in one structure two museums – the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait
Gallery – that ―tell America‘s stories through art, history and biography,‖ according to the Reyno lds
Center. Thus, the venue was a most fitting setting to tell the modern story of disability in America.

Approximately 400 guests, including many government and business leaders and members of the
disability advocacy community, heard remarks from several distinguished speakers, among them
Kenneth Stein, a featured exhibit photographer and Program Administrator at the San Francisco
Mayor‘s Office on Disability, and Andrew J. Imparato, President and Chief Executive Officer of the
American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD). ODEP is grateful to its guest speakers for
participating in the program and recognizes Mario Damiani, ODEP Policy Advisor, for serving as the
program‘s Master of Ceremonies.

The first-of-its-kind exhibit included photographs from a variety of sources, including museum
collections, personal photo albums, professional photographers, state programs and agencies, and
advocacy organizations. The images, some of which had never been publicly displayed,
were carefully selected to highlight key events in disability history, both the iconic events known to all
and the lesser-known events characteristic of broader aspects of the disability movement.

As its name suggests, the exhibit‘s chief aim was to portray the tribulations, tr ansitions, and triumphs

                                                                                                             9
experienced by Americans with disabilities since the beginning of the 20th Century, ranging from
large-scale marginalization and institutionalization to the fight for civil rights to the signing of the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and subsequent successes. The exhibit also included images
indicative of the current environment of equal opportunity in many aspects of American society,
including employment.

ODEP appreciates and recognizes the extraordinary value reception participants received from viewing
the photographs contributed by the following individuals and entities: The Bancroft Library at The
University of California, Berkeley; The George Bush Presidential Library and Museum; Dr. William
Bronstom; Michael Callahan; Yoshiko Dart; Marc Gold and Associates/Employment for All; Rebecca
Hare; Little People of America Archive; Mary Ellen Mark; Minnesota Governor‘s Council for
Developmental Disabilities; Museum of DisABILITY History; People, Inc.; Douglas Platt; Neal
Presant; Ken Stein; Colleen Wieck; and Jonathan Young.

ODEP also extends thanks to the Burton Blatt Institute, Nancy Brooks-Lane, Florida High School/High
Tech, Barry Garrison, the Georgia Governor‘s Council for Developmental Disabilities, Valerie
Meadows-Suber, Donna Mundy, Tom Olin, Curtis Petersen, Jr., Ron Rucker, Corey Smith, The
Smithsonian Institution, and Via of Lehigh Valley.

OPENING PLENARY SESSION — June 3, 2008
The Summit opened with welcoming remarks from Mistress of Ceremonies Adrienne
Thal, Policy Advisor at the U.S. Department of Labor‘s Office of Disability
Employment Policy (ODEP). After the Presentation and Retirement of Colors by
the Armed Forces Color Guard, accompanied by the Old Guard Fife and Drum
Corps, Larry V. Norton, Sr., sang the national anthem. Ms. Thal then led
participants in the Pledge of Allegiance. The subsequent opening plenary session
featured welcoming remarks from Dr. Robert R. Davila, President of Gallaudet
University, followed by remarks from ODEP and DOL leadership and Aetna, Inc.
President Mark Bertolini.

Welcome from Dr. Robert R. Davila, President of Gallaudet University
Dr. Robert R. Davila became President of Gallaudet University in 2007, bringing with him a wealth of
experience both as a teacher and administrator.

Dr. Davila stressed the importance of the conference and stated that the outcomes sought by Summit
attendees are outcomes that Gallaudet University has been seeking for many years. He discussed
Gallaudet as a special place and a great American story. He noted that Gallaudet wants each of its
graduates and students to develop not only a broad base of knowledge, but also the specific knowledge,
skills, and abilities to enable them to find employment and, in turn, become independent. Through
education and support, Gallaudet empowers and opens doors to employment for people who are deaf
                                                                                                           10
and hard of hearing, he said.

Citing a New York Times article about how women are entering the workforce in professions previously
dominated by men, Davila said that America‘s goal should be to have similar success in the integration
of people with disabilities into the workforce. For example, women account for 50 percent of medical
students today, when in 1970 the ratio was only one in 10. He believes that future articles will insert
―person with a disability‖ where the word ―woman‖ now appears.

―The key and pathway to all of this,‖ he said, ―is education.‖ Davila stressed the importance of support
services and noted that hundreds of people who are deaf have doctorates (including 30 percent of
Gallaudet‘s faculty), made possible by legislation that prohibits discrimination, opens the doors of
opportunity, and mandates access to support services. He noted that the American model of success in
the education and employment of people who are deaf and hard of hearing is being exported around the
globe, and that Gallaudet is working closely with other countries, people with disabilities, and
organizations worldwide to make this happen. He stated, ―We are making progress. We will still
overcome,‖ and stressed that he wants Gallaudet to continue to support the work of Summit attendees.
He closed by wishing ODEP a successful event.

Following Davila‘s speech, DOL and ODEP leadership further set the stage for the Summi t by asking
participants to consider it not an isolated event, but rather the beginning of an important new
―Conversation with America,‖ the eventual outcome of which will be significant, lasting change that
betters all sectors of society. Key concepts expressed were how workplaces inclusive of people with
disabilities strengthen not only America‘s promise of equal opportunity, but also its economy, by
leading to innovative products and services that in turn create opportunities for American businesses.
Also discussed was the important notion of work as fundamental to one‘s identity because it offers
purpose and the opportunity to lead an independent, self-directed life – key ideals upon which America
was founded and built.

Participants also learned about milestones achieved by DOL and ODEP in recent years and the
successes of many concrete, action-oriented initiatives and programs such as the Job Accommodation
Network (JAN), Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP), the Employer Assistance and Resource
Network (EARN), Customized Employment, Disability.gov and strategic partnerships with key
disability and business organizations. A number of DOL efforts to ensure successful employment
outcomes for returning wounded and injured service members were also shared, along with the news
that the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) would start collecting employment data on people with
disabilities as part of its monthly Current Population Survey.

Mark Bertolini,
President, Aetna, Inc.
Mark Bertolini became President of Aetna, Inc. on July 24, 2007. Previously, he served as Aetna's
Executive Vice President and Head of Business Operations. As President, Bertolini oversees all
businesses and service operations across the corporation‘s broad range of health care products.
                                                                                                      11
In his remarks, he provided an overview of Aetna, Inc. and his personal experiences with
disability, having sustained a spinal cord injury several years ago and having a son who is a
cancer and stroke survivor. Aetna is the 82nd largest company in America, employing more than
35,500 employees in the United States and abroad.

Bertolini stated that he has grown as a person and learned more every day by virtue of his spinal cord
injury. He believes he would not be where he is today and could not ably lead an organization of
Aetna‘s size and complexity were it not for his spinal cord injury and support from others in
his life.

Bertolini started by defining Aetna‘s corporate culture, explaining that ―The Aetna Way‖ has four prongs:
(1) integrity, (2) employee engagement, (3) excellence, and (4) quality of service and value.

He added that every year, 93 percent of Aetna‘s employees engage in an online survey on how the
company is serving its customers and employees. The company considers employees as a product,
since they carry out the company‘s focus to serve the customer. A large part of Bertolini‘s
compensation is tied to improving the four lowest scores on this survey.


     To succeed as a company, Aetna needs to attract top
     talent and cannot overlook any segment of the labor
          market, including people with disabilities.
                                   − Mark Bertolini, President, Aetna, Inc.

Bertolini said that he is proud that Aetna is one of the most admired companies in the health care
industry. Key to this success is engaging in a transformation of corporate culture aimed at complete
diversity, especially in terms of the types of people involved in the company‘s decisions. According to
Bertolini, Aetna is also one of Fortune 500‘s most admired companies because of how it treats its
employees and because of its empathy for the people it serves.

AETNA AS AN EMPLOYER
Aetna was a founding member of the National Business and Disability Council and has been an active
participant since 1997. In recognition of its dedication in the area of disability employment, Aetna was
named an employer of the year by the National Center for Disability Services. Furthermore, in 2006
the company was honored by the U.S. Department of Labor for exemplary policies and practices
related to disability employment.

To succeed as a company, Bertolini said, Aetna needs to attract top talent and cannot overlook any
segment of the labor market, including people with disabilities. Aetna has a meaningful employee
development process that includes online development and performance plans for every employee,

                                                                                                         12
which are reviewed on a biannual basis. Bertolini feels that good managers review these plans on a
daily basis. Aetna also has a Workplace Accommodations Unit, staffed by experts in workplace health,
which Bertolini himself used when he broke his neck in five places due to a skiing accident in 2004.
Within two weeks of being released from the hospital, he was back at work; today, Bertolini‘s office
environment continues to accommodate his disability, which involves a loss of full functioning on the
upper left side of his body.

Furthermore, the company has 9,000 employees who work at home. The company offers this option as
an incentive to adhering to high productivity standards and intends to have half its workforce
telecommuting over the next decade, Bertolini said.

Aetna also has an online diversity educational program, with Bertolini as its executive sponsor. In this
role, he has met with each employee resource group and asked how Aetna can bette r serve them.

AETNA AS AN INSURER
Aetna has 37 million customers and is a top-five group disability player in the United States The company
focuses on getting people with disabilities back to work through its Integrated Health and Disability
program. Utilizing coordinated medical and disability case management, this program gets people back to
work 5.7 days sooner than previous programs.

Bertolini believes the Integrated Health and Disability Program focuses on the mind-body connection,
which recognizes the link between how an employee is mentally prepared for work and his/her
productivity. Aetna has found a strong correlation between depression and the prevalence of physical
health conditions. Therefore, the company pays physicians 15 dollars more per office visit to screen
each member for depression and provides treatment with group therapy or medication for any
employee who has depression.

AETNA AS A CORPORATE CITIZEN
Bertolini went on to share that Aetna has one of the oldest corporate charity and philanthropy programs
in America, donating $25 million a year. Also, Aetna employees give 1.3 million volunteer hours to
such entities as Habitat for Humanity. Aetna‘s Foundation is also a long-time supporter of the
American School for the Deaf, the oldest special education school in America, and the United States
Amputee Hockey Team.

Aetna also operates a program, ―To Your Health,‖ to help the uninsured. The company is trying to
break down the barriers to insurance for college students, legal aliens, and the self-employed. To Your
Health offers a 10-point plan on the Aetna Web site, with policy papers supporting each of the points,
one of which is mandated student health insurance.


       ―That which does not kill me makes me stronger.‖
                                           − Friedrich Nietzsche
                                                                                                        13
 Bertolini feels that all of his adversity has made him who
      he is now and better prepared him for his role.
        He stated he wouldn‘t trade a minute of it.
Bertolini shared a personal story about his teenaged son, who was diagnosed with a rare and lethal
form of lymphoma a few years ago. Bertolini researched the disease, moved in with his son at his
hospital room, and gave him direct care for a year and a half. The family and medical professionals
thought Bertolini‘s son was going to die, so they moved him to hospice care. Through his arduous
research, Bertolini found a drug used in Europe that helped his son live. However, complications from
the treatment caused his son to have a stroke that resulted in aphasia, other cognitive problems, and the
need for a kidney transplant for which Bertolini himself donated a kidney. His son is the only person
to ever survive this type of cancer. It was only through Bertolini‘s personal involvement and
perseverance that his son progressed to where he is today. Today, his son is in college.

He also relayed the story of the skiing accident that put him in a week-long coma, with lingering
physical limitations. Today, he wears a pocket spinal cord stimulator to keep the pain under control.
He said these experiences reminded him of Friedrich Nietzsche‘s quotation, ―That which does not kill
me makes me stronger.‖ Bertolini feels that all of his adversity has made him who he is now and better
prepared him for his role. He stated he wouldn‘t trade a minute of it.

For 30 minutes after his speech, Bertolini fielded a series of wide-ranging questions from participants,
dealing with such issues as diversity in the workplace, telecommuting, depression and mental health
screenings, autism, intellectual disability, and having a child with a disability. His answers were
insightful and provided a further glimpse into Aetna‘s corporate culture and how the company serves
the varying health care needs of its employees and the American public.

LUNCHEON PLENARY SESSION — June 3, 2008
Captain (Ret.) Dawn Halfaker, Chief Executive Officer,
Halfaker and Associates
Captain (Ret.) Dawn Halfaker, a 2001 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point
and decorated disabled veteran, was deployed to Iraq in February 2004. On June 19, 2004,
during her stint with the 293rd Military Police Company in Baqubah, Iraq, she lost her right
arm and shoulder while engaged in combat. Halfaker also sustained a number of other injuries
including lung damage and internal shrapnel. Today she is a successful entrepreneur as the
Chief Executive Officer of Halfaker and Associates, a national security consulting firm.

                                                                                                       14
Prior to her remarks, attendees saw a clip from the HBO documentary, ―Alive Day Memories:
Home from Iraq,‖ featuring Captain Halfaker (―Alive Day Memories: Home from Iraq.‖
Produced by HBO Documentary Films, in association with Attaboy Films, James Galdofini,
Executive Producer).

Halfaker began by saying that she felt an extreme amount of passion in the room. She also said that
because of the graphic nature of the HBO documentary, she tries not to watch it too often. Halfaker
went on to discuss her transition from the combat zone to civilian life and the importance of
meaningful employment for people with disabilities, including severely injured servicemen
and women.


   ―It‘s ok [that] I do things differently. It‘s still
     me. I live passionately. Life is not over.‖
                               − Cpt. (Ret.) Dawn Halfaker, Halfaker and Associates



After the explosion that injured her, Halfaker was unconscious until she woke up at Walter Reed Army
Medical Center. In her mind, she went, in what seemed like an instant, from being a platoon leader on
a mission and engaged in combat to getting hurt ―out of nowhere‖ and being air lifted to Walter Reed.
She had no idea of the extent of her injuries until she regained consciousness in the hospital.

Once Halfaker woke up and saw her parents, she thought she was still in Iraq. She said that after
learning that she had lost her arm, she thought, ―My life is over.‖ She harkened back to a time before
her deployment to Iraq when she and a friend joked with one another, ―If I lose a finger, just kill me . . .
let me die.‖ For Halfaker, that statement, made in jest, compared with thinking about her present
situation, illustrates her own change in attitude about disability.

Halfaker said she felt depressed for some time but didn‘t dwell on it due to the medical treatment,
rehabilitation, and family support she received. At first, she felt sorry for herself for not being able to
do some simple things like typing e-mails quickly with two hands – until she met a man who had
written a book with one finger. She said she now understands that he is just one of many people out
there who have disabilities and are ―doing amazing things.‖ Due to this experience and some others,
Halfaker sees the need to ―continue to work together‖ to ensure all people have the opportunity to put
their abilities to work.

It wasn‘t long before she accepted what happened and started on what she calls ―a journey, a challenge.‖
Halfaker explained that the hardest thing for her was learning how to do so many things differently.
However, she welcomed the opportunity to tell her story because she feels it will help others. She now
understands that ―It‘s okay [that] I do things differently. It‘s still me. I still live passionately. Life is not
over.‖

                                                                                                              15
After leaving the military, Halfaker looked for employment and although she participated in a number
of interviews, she felt that ―people looked at me and saw my injury.‖ She decided to start her own
business. She said she knows she is a natural leader and likes being the boss.

Having gained new perspective, Halfaker now ponders, ―How can we get [other] people with
disabilities opportunities in the workforce?‖ She enjoys the fact that she is now able to provide
wounded service members with ―a sense of purpose, not just a job.‖ In her desire to give something
back, Halfaker works closely with the Wounded Warrior Project, a nonprofit organization that helps
soldiers injured in the line of duty find work in the civilian workforce after being discharged.

As a person who acquired a disability, Halfaker feels she has experienced a great deal of personal
growth in a short period of time. She believes that by going through all the pain, loss, and
rehabilitation, her attitude has changed. In describing her injuries, Halfaker stated, ―You just don‘t
prepare for it; it doesn‘t enter into the psyche of a young person.‖

In answering questions from Summit participants, Halfaker told a number of stories related to how she
formed her own business and how it has prospered in a short period of time. After being asked about
her experiences at Walter Reed, Halfaker said that she thought the employment piece was important,
and that the Department of Defense‘s Operation Warfighter, which helps wounded warriors get
internships at Federal agencies while on medical hold, is a great program. Of all the programs at
Walter Reed, none are more important than those that focus on employment, she said. She also feels
the opportunities for the wounded warriors to participate in sports programs outside the hospital
grounds are helpful.

While overseeing her company, Halfaker also continues to work on her Master‘s degree in order to
position herself to maximize her full potential. In doing so, she is building her reputation in the civilian
world as a leader, displaying the same leadership qualities she showed by graduating from West Point
and placing herself in a danger zone to protect American service members and Iraqi civilians. Halfaker
ended by saying that the thoughts she expressed in the documentary about whether or not she will be
able to be a good parent, wondering how she would be able to pick up her son or daughter without two
arms, are no longer of concern.



AFTERNOON PLENARY SESSION — June 3, 2008
ENSURING EMPLOYMENT SUCCESS FOR RETURNING INJURED
AND WOUNDED SERVICE M EMBERS

The session began with an introduction of the panel members by the U.S. Department of
Labor‘s (DOL) Office of Disability Employment Policy Senior Policy Advisor Charles Sabatier.
The leadership of DOL‘s Veterans‘ Employment and Training Service (VETS) then presented
remarks about the value and skills military personnel offer America‘s businesses upon
                                                                                                          16
transition to civilian employment and how DOL and VETS are working in concert with other
agencies to address their needs, particularly the employment needs of those who return with
service-related disabilities. Specific programs highlighted included REALifelines, the
Transition Training Academy, and the America‘s Heroes at Work initiative, which supports
employment success for returning service members with post-traumatic stress disorder and/or
traumatic brain injury. The session then included the perspective of former military members
focused on what business and government are doing to improve the employment opportunities
for wounded soldiers returning to civilian life.

Gary Boggs, Northrop Grumman
Boggs started by sharing that he served seven years in the Army and three years in the National Guard
as an infantry soldier, and that his job while on duty in Iraq was to ―kick down doors and go after the
bad guys.‖ On September 26, 2003, his platoon was ambushed and the Humvee he was traveling in
was hit by an improvised explosive device (IED). As a result, Boggs lost his left eye, ruptured both
eardrums, and sustained significant damage to his left side. Recently he discovered that he had
suffered a minor traumatic brain injury as well.

Boggs had the opportunity to stay in the military, but losing his eye precluded him from being an
officer and being deployed in combat. He said that there was no way he ―could ride a desk in the
Army. No offense to the desk riders present,‖ - it just wasn‘t for him. He added that before he left for
Iraq, he was fortunate to work for a large retailer, and unlike a lot of soldiers, he believed his trans ition
back to civilian work would be seamless. But as soon as he returned to his previous employer, he
found otherwise. His job duties changed from being in charge of 26 soldiers and interpreters, with a lot
of responsibility, to stocking shelves. He was depressed and he didn‘t want to go to work. He tried
and trained for other positions, including car sales, military recruiting, and financial advising. None fit
him.

Boggs eventually connected with an organization called the Coalition of American Her oes. After being
out of the service for a year and a half, he found himself in a room with 350 other wounded soldiers
sharing similar experiences. He was excited about the opportunities discussed and signed on with
Operation IMPACT, a program of Northrop Grumman. He said Operation IMPACT staff did not look
at his resume only; they also looked at him as a person. In the past he had either been over -qualified or
under-qualified for positions. Northrop Grumman created a position for him based on his unique skills:
a quality assurance engineer.

In addition, Boggs now spends time helping other wounded returning service members, many of whom
are going through the same difficulties he faced, and has gained new perspective as a result. ―I didn‘t
want to admit I had something wrong with my head,‖ he said. ―Through talking to these soldiers, I
finally swallowed my pride and admitted I had a problem. I was diagnosed with a minor traumatic
brain issue.‖ Now that he knows he has a disability, he has learned how to effectively manage it and is
experiencing a whole new career and life.


                                                                                                            17
Alex Belous, Cisco Systems
Belous started by saying that the Transition Training Academy derived from a moment four years ago
when the Senior Vice President for Human Services at Cisco came to him and said, ―Why aren‘t we
hiring many disabled vets?‖ Because Belous had started related programs in the past, the Senior Vice
President felt he should have some concept of how they could do this. Belous took the challenge and
came to Washington, assuming it had all the answers. He discovered he was wrong.

Cisco then looked within its own organization for a solution – and found one. Through a program
called the Cisco Networking Academy, the company has trained about three million high school and
technical students across the world in the last ten years. Every day, 620,000 students in 150 countries
take online courses in 13 languages that Cisco developed and distributes for free. Cisco decided it
would proactively offer these courses to wounded returning service members in military medical hold
facilities, where they could remain for upwards of 18 months during their recovery and rehabilitation.

Working with VETS and ODEP, Cisco set up a partnership with the Naval Medical Center San Diego,
hired staff, and built the curriculum. The building process lasted two years, cost Cisco about $500,000,
and required ―the commitment of some of Cisco‘s best instructors. And it‘s been more than worth it,‖
Belous said. Cisco has had 57 graduates thus far, with a 95 percent completion rate. Of those who
wished to be placed, Cisco has a 90 percent placement rate.

Cisco is now establishing a similar partnership with the Brooke Army Medical Center in Texas.
Currently, 91 students are enrolled, and 57 are on the waiting list. Belous said Cisco will build and
grow the program until everybody who wants to participate can do so. The processes, the model, the
placement, and the e-learning have been placed into open source public domain. Thus, any entity can
use Cisco‘s program. It‘s not copyrighted and the processes are not hidden. Cisco‘s intent is that it be
replicated.

John Lawson, Home Depot
In 2003, Home Depot and DOL formed a partnership to reach out to veterans and their spouses.
Currently, Home Depot has about 13,500 associates who are veterans. Lawson said the company
knows that candidates hired from the military are a more diverse group than the traditional candidate
pool and that when he looks at how they perform, the group averages higher than the general employee
population. In terms of attrition, a key concern for Home Depot and other employers is that veterans
are about 13 percent less likely to leave than the general population. So, from both an economic and
employer perspective, hiring military veterans makes sense. ―By and large, veterans have the
leadership and core values that align with getting work done in a company,‖ Lawson said.


―By and large, veterans have the leadership and core
values that align with getting work done in a company.‖
                                                                                                       18
                                         − John Lawson, Home Depot

Furthermore, Home Depot currently has more than 1,800 deployed associates, approximately 1,100 in
the active reserve, and another 1,200 in the inactive reserve. To support these individuals, the company
has donated several million volunteer hours for service members and their families in a program called
Project Homefront. As part of this, Home Depot employees perform needed repairs and other jobs in
the homes of family members whose spouses are deployed.

Lawson said Home Depot also provides supplemental pay to cover the difference between military pay
and current corporate pay to soldiers for up to five years if they are deployed. During the deployment
period, Home Depot associates also accrue vacation time and sick time, so when they return to their
homes and families, they have those benefits available to them. And every year, just as if they were on
the job, they receive a pay increase and a similar rating, or the actual rating, they received when they
were in the store performing their jobs.




BREAKFAST PLENARY SESSION — June 4, 2008
Randy Lewis, Will History and Hope Rhyme?
J. Randolph (Randy) Lewis is Senior Vice President, Distribution and Logistics
for Walgreens Company, where he oversees the flow of merchandise from suppliers to stores
and the operation of 12 major distribution centers nationwide. Lewis began his presentation
with an ABC-TV World News Tonight video clip about Walgreens‘ transformation of corporate
culture to fully include people with both cognitive and physical disabilities. The video
showcased some of Walgreens‘ employees at its center in Anderson, South Carolina, where 40
percent of the employees have disabilities. Lewis shared that his dedication to this issue stems,
in part, from his 20-year-old son, Austin, who has autism.

Lewis said that Walgreens has responded to the changing demographics of the American workforce by
employing a large percentage of people with disabilities. It did this, not because it was the good thing
to do or the right thing to do, but because it was the better thing to do. ―The environment at the new
distribution center building featured in the video embraces all abilities,‖ he said. As a result, a sense of
being and purpose, along with a spirit of teamwork, exists at the facility.


                ―Disabilities play no favorites,
              whether a person is single, married,
                 rich, poor, black, or white.‖
                                                                                                          19
                                      - Randy Lewis, Walgreens Company

He shared that Walgreens had some start-up problems instituting the new distribution center, just as any
company would. Equipment didn‘t work. Computers didn‘t work. But, in most facilities when equipment
malfunctions, most of the workers simply stop working. At this facility, the employees carried out other
duties that didn‘t depend on electronic equipment, such as picking up a broom and sweeping and other
tasks.

According to Lewis, ―Diversity is tolerance, and if you embrace it, it will transform you.‖ Walgreens‘
corporate management believes something special developed around the Anderson building that
positively impacted the company‘s typically able-bodied workers, and contributed to making them
better workers, better parents, and better citizens.

The goal of Walgreens‘ distribution facilities is to provide the right merchandise at the right cost and
deliver it on time to the company‘s retail stores. Most of the new facilities‘ employees worked every
Saturday from July through November to get the operation up to speed. When Lewis visited the center
a few months after it opened he expected usual employee questions along the lines of ―When will we
be able to stop working overtime and on Saturdays?‖ Instead he heard, ―How are we doing?‖ and
―What can we do to make things better?‖ Lewis said he had never heard these questions from
distribution center workers before.

Walgreens, which currently has 10,000 employees, has set a goal to hire 1,000 individuals with
disabilities by 2010. In preparation for this, the company has changed its training methods. It began
by working with staff from Goodwill Industries, who provided employees to do ancillary work for
Walgreens. Then Walgreens realized that if it had a completely integrated environment, it could do
this on its own. Once that environment was in place, Walgreens conducted an informal ―technical
study‖ among its employees. The results showed that their employees come to work in a good mood,
foster positive personal relationships with one another, complete their work, and go home with a smile.
Lewis said that through these experiences, Walgreens has learned that each person is unique and
valuable, like Lewis‘s son Austin. Austin, who is 20 years old, speaks and reads on a third- or fourth-
grade level. He never holds a grudge and loves Michael J. Fox, American Airlines, and Beverly Hills.
He will tell people about these things over and over again. Lewis said Austin has taught him to look
past this and see him as a valuable person, and to practice and celebrate little victories. Austin had his
first Individual Education Plan (IEP) at three years old and, as of May 2008, started his 34th. Lewis
said that when he and his wife attended this latest IEP meeting with Austin‘s teachers, they observed
the other parents as they waited. They were from all different backgrounds, economic status, races and
religions. ―Disabilities play no favorites, whether a person is single, married, rich, poor, black, or
white,‖ he said.

According to Lewis, ―When you have a child with a disability, you realize that your time is limited. And
that at age 21, children with IEPs will be booted out of the school system.‖ Therefore, transition planning
for employment needs to be seriously considered. He said studies show that 40 or 50 and even 70 percent
of children with disabilities are never offered a job. And for those with autism, the unemployment rate
may be as high as 95 percent. Many do not drive and many have limited access to transportation, an
                                                                                                         20
essential support for employment. Some have limits on the number of hours they can work, whether self -
imposed or imposed by service providers. Many do not learn in the way that others are accustomed to
learning. And according to Lewis, further complicating the situation is a misconception among many who
provide services and supports to people with disabilities that people with disabilities cannot truly succeed
in a job.

Lewis continued by sharing the employment success stories of several Walgreens‘ employees with
disabilities. Daryl, who has a significant cognitive disability, is number one in both productivity and
performance at Walgreens‘ Anderson distribution facility. Harrison, who has autism, proudly notes
that he can receive ten cases in one minute. When asked how many cases that would be in one hour,
Harrison was not able to compute the mathematical multiplication to provide the answer; yet he
performs at a rate of 150 percent more than an average center worker. Edwin, who is deaf, works in
Walgreens‘ Puerto Rico distribution plant. Even though some managers thought his deafness might be
a safety issue, Edwin is number one in safety and number three in productivity at the plant.

Lewis said he feels he came to understand many of these issues too late in life. He admitted that he‘s
made many mistakes. He attributed these mistakes to fear and ego making him blind to possibilities.
To illustrate this, he quoted contemporary author Marianne Williamson:

―Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate; our deepest fear is that we are more powerful beyond
our measure. It is not our light that frightens us, it is our darkness.‖

―It‘s a fear that we may end up doing something so big that we don‘t think we can do it,‖ Lewis said.
He then asked attendees to ponder the question, ―Will hope and history rhyme?‖ by quoting a stanza
from Seamus Heaney‘s poem The Cure at Troy. If not, ―people with disabilities will remain on the
margins of society.‖ But hope tells us that ―we will reach out and . . . welcome them as
our own.‖

John Kemp, So, What Happened to You?
John Kemp is a principal at the law firm of Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, P.C. In his
practice, he serves as CEO of the American Congress of Community Supports and Employment
Services, the HalfthePlanet Foundation, and the One Percent Coalition, as well as the
Executive Director and General Counsel of the U.S. Business Leadership Network. Kemp also
serves on the State Department‘s Advisory Committee on Persons with Disabilities.

Kemp‘s noteworthy humor punctuated his presentation from his first remarks. He responded to Randy
Lewis‘s presentation with: ―Randy, did you have to be that good? ‗Will history and hope rhyme?‘
I‘ve got nothing like that – just me and a computer typing and cranking out a few thoughts.‖ He
thanked ODEP for its vision in planning the Summit and pointed out many of his friends and associates
in the audience, including Frances West, with IBM, noting that IBM was recently named the number
one place to work for people with disabilities by Disability, Inc. Kemp also acknowledged several
other disability leaders in the room. In particular, he asserted to Andy Imparato, CEO and President of

                                                                                                          21
the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), ―The disability community is with
you.‖

Kemp shared his personal story about his dad who at the time was almost 90 and living with end-stage
Parkinson‘s. Kemp‘s mom died when he was very young and his dad raised three children as a single
parent. From the start, his dad infused in him the knowledge that he would have to work. As a young
child, he had a paper route, and during his teenaged years he worked summer jobs in Washington, D.C.
Kemp‘s personal story demonstrates that society should not expect anything less for people with
disabilities. Like all employees, if they don‘t do a good job, they should be fired, he said. [Editor‘s
Note: On June 5, 2008, Kemp‘s father passed away.]

Kemp said that enlightened employers seek the advice of wise people with disabilities, and, as a result,
people with disabilities have seen advanced accessibility in the physical environment and Web sites .
This is because businesses see the universal design application for all people, he said. People with
disabilities are a distinct market, and the disability policy community needs to show this to businesses.

Work and self-sufficiency are values that everyone seeks; work is at once a pride, a tonic, a suffering for
some, Kemp said. Everyone has the right to work, the privilege to work, and the disability community
needs to market what it can do. With the power of technology, people with disabilities can empower
their lives.

The Declaration of Independence states that all men are created equal and have the right to life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happiness, he added.

Do people with disabilities have a ―disability identity?" Kemp then asked the audi ence, adding that
many cultures avoid disability. In the school system, one needs to blend in to be accepted, he said.
Also important to note is that less than one half of the U.S. population of people with disabilities
identify themselves as such. This identity issue is a big problem and affects how people with
disabilities are marketed to by companies. Many people with disabilities have a fear about identifying
themselves as members of this community, as about 83 percent acquired their disability late r in life.


                    ―Work and self-sufficiency
                 are values that everyone seeks.‖
                                 -   John Kemp, U.S. Business Leadership Network

Disability makes us different, and more people need to realize that it‘s okay to be disabled, Kemp said.
Disability makes us proud, with the whole emergence of the disability culture movement. It‘s new, and
people with disabilities need to understand this movement and to look at its many role models.
Disability culture is not simply the shared experience of oppression. Just as Randy Lewis shared and in
Kemp‘s visit to the Anderson, South Carolina, Walgreens‘ distribution facility, Kemp noted that he

                                                                                                          22
―could see other people with disabilities moving and functioning perfectly comfortably; it‘s a great way
to look at universal design in the broadest sense.‖ Kemp emphasized that ―The most compelling
evidence of a disability culture is the vitality of these principles despite generations of poverty,
isolation, lack of education, and sometimes, even imposed immobility.‖ A heightened acceptance of
human differences is needed.

Kemp, an arm-and-leg prostheses user, went on to offer many humorous examples of his own personal
brand of disability awareness experiences. He stated that when asked, ―So, what happened to you?‖ he
often responds with ―What happened to you?‖ However, he believes that all people need to realize that
interdependence is part of the lives of people with disabilities.

Disability humor is an avenue with a sophisticated future orientation. Most fellow travelers ask two basi c
questions when riding on planes: ―Where are you going?‖ and ―Where are you from?‖ Kemp tends to get
asked additional questions: ―What happened to you? Are you married? Does your wife have a disability?
Can you have kids?‖ To the latter he often answers, ―Can you have kids?‖ Another question he is often
asked is ―How do you go to the bathroom?‖ He replies, ―Very carefully.‖

Kemp provided another example from an experience he had at Chicago‘s O‘Hare Airport. While
driving around in his scooter, a five-year-old remarked to his dad, ―Oh, daddy, that‘s bad.‖ The father
replied to his son, ―That‘s not bad . . . it‘s just different.‖

Another traveling experience Kemp relayed was one where he had to sit in the very back of a plane with a
family with two children in front of him. The children turned around and started asking him questions
about his prosthetics. ―What‘s that?‖ they asked. Kemp thought this inquiry would be a great opportunity
for Disability Awareness 101 training. He began by telling the children that he can use his prosthetic hand
hooks to go fishing by just dropping them into the water. He continued his joking by providing more
examples–how he can cook steaks without using tongs and put marshmallows on his hooks and cook
them, too.

On a different flight, Kemp was seated in the first class cabin and noticed a young boy helping the flight
attendant pick up trash. When the boy saw Kemp‘s prostheses, he asked, ―What are those things?‖ Kemp
responded, ―The big guy up there just didn‘t give me any hands.‖ Without pause, the boy asked, ―The
pilot?‖

What all these examples point out is that people are not intentionally rude, Kemp said. And many
employers try to get disability etiquette right or assume they get it right without asking people with
disabilities. Most people with disabilities know their disabilities are not a major problem in their lives.
All they want is respect.

When mentoring youth, including youth with disabilities, Kemp provides the following words of wisdom
about what they should try to accomplish in life:




                                                                                                              23
WORDS OF WISDOM

1. Own your own business
2. Run for elected office
3. Serve on a board of a disability organization
4. Serve as a volunteer
5. Travel, and come back and kiss the ground when you return to the United States
6. Write a book
7. Own your own home
8. Participate in, and with, a world-class group of performers
9. Put yourself in the presence of excellence (like Randy Lewis, he said)
10. Exceed your parents‘ educational level and expect your kids to do the same


Kemp closed his remarks by reciting Welsh Poet Sheenagh Pugh‘s poem Sometimes, which conveys the
message that sometimes in life people fulfill their dreams and ends with the simple statement ―May it
happen for you.‖


WORKSHOPS — June 3, 2008
Following the Opening Plenary Session and Luncheon, Summit attendees broke into
hour-long workshops facilitated or moderated by ODEP‘s staff and featuring
ODEP‘s partners in the private sector, advocacy, and research fields. The seven
themes for the workshops were specifically chosen to highlight key areas in which
ODEP has been involved since its inception in 2001.




                                                                                                        24
THEME 1: THE NEW WORKPLACE: F LEXIBILITY
Moderator: Christopher (Chris) Button, Supervisory Policy Advisor, Workforce System Policy Team,
ODEP

Speakers: Malcolm Foo, Senior Manager and Talent Strategies Lead, Federal Human Capital Practice,
Deloitte Consulting LLP

Jane Anderson, Project Director, Midwest Institute for Telecommuting Education (MITE)

Richard Luecking, President, TransCen, Inc.

Themes: (1) recruitment, (2) retention, (3) telework, and (4) customized employment.

(Speaker handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site at http://www.odepsummit.org/agenda.html.)



Chris Button
Since originally scheduled speaker Karen Stang was not able to attend the Summit, ODEP‘s Chris
Button spoke on her behalf about Northrop Grumman‘s (NG) Operation IMPACT program, which
targets returning service members and veterans with disabilities and helps them secure employme nt.
To implement and initiate Operation IMPACT, NG created something similar to the Federal
government‘s Schedule A program, whereby a returning service member or veteran with a disability
could be placed in a job through a priority hiring method. However, the difference between the Federal
government‘s Schedule A program and NG is that NG also creates customized job positions based on
the skills and abilities of the person with a disability rather than only filling positions already open to
the general public.

Button referenced a meeting of Deloitte‘s managers with ODEP‘s senior managers during which the
latter shared information about the agency‘s funded research on Customized Employment (CE). Both
sides agreed that ODEP‘s CE has similar aspects to Deloitte‘s Mass Career CustomizationT M (MCC).
ODEP‘s research has shown that CE assists both employers and employees in understanding how jobs
and tasks are organized and how individuals with complex life challenges, both with and without
disabilities, can succeed in the workplace.

Malcolm Foo
                                                                                                         25
Malcolm Foo then shared that Deloitte implemented and launched its MCC policy in 2007 to provide
more flexibility to its employees. The program was instituted because Deloitte was experiencing
problems retaining women executives once they started having families. In addition, Deloitte
recognized the following six major trends affecting its workforce:


SIX MAJOR WORKFORCE TRENDS

1. Shrinking pool of skilled labor
2. Changing family structures
3. Increasing number of women in the workforce
4. Changing expectations of men
5. Emerging expectations of Generations X and Y
6. Increasing impact of technology

                ―The workforce has really changed,
          but the workplace has not. The solution to this
                disconnect is workplace flexibility.‖
                                    − Malcolm Foo, Deloitte Consulting

Deloitte also understood that women in the workforce represented the indicators of general workforce
issues, Foo added. In 2007, women made up 56 percent of college graduates, 51 percent of new
entrants to the workforce, and 48 percent currently in the workforce. In addition, 63 percent came from
―non-traditional‖ households (with both spouses in the workforce), and only 17 percent from
―traditional‖ households‖ (with one spouse not in the workforce).

Foo reinforced the statistic of the shrinking skilled labor pool with a projected six million employee
shortfall by 2010. In addition, the workforce needs to deal with the changing expectations of members
of Generations X and Y and of younger men in the Baby Boomer demographic, who tend to be more
family-oriented. The workforce has really changed, but the workplace has not, he said. The solution to
this disconnect is workplace flexibility, part-time work, telecommuting, job sharing, sabbaticals, and
alternative work schedules–tools the Federal government uses. However, flexible work arrangements
are not really scalable and often come with the stigma that certain workers are getting special favors.
Therefore, a shift in the paradigm was needed.

To address executive women‘s retention issues and current workforce trends, Deloitte instituted the
corporate lattice (as opposed to a corporate ladder), a single path along which an employee can rise
through the ranks of the company – or slow down – based on his or her unique needs and priorities.

Foo said the MCC profile assumes a definite, not infinite, set of options along four career dimensions:

                                                                                                       26
FOUR CAREER DIMENSIONS

1. Pace (options related to the speed of career progression)
2. Workload (the quantity of output)
3. Location/Schedule (extended travel, telework, etc.)
4. Role (choices in position and responsibilities)

 ―If one can customize his/her cell phone ring tones, type
of voice on a car‘s GPS, and M&Ms, why can‘t employees
          customize their working environment?‖
                                      − Malcolm Foo, Deloitte Consulting

The MCC provides structure to manage these options as commonplace events. Employees customize
their careers by periodically selecting, in counsel with their managers, the option that best fits their
career objectives and life circumstances at the time (e.g., wanting to start a family, pursue educational
opportunities, or attain a professional goal more swiftly than normal). An MCC profile provides a
snapshot of an employee‘s career by clarifying expectations for contributio ns, evaluations, and
rewards, and can be adjusted over time to reflect changing circumstances.

The MCC profile allows an employee to dial up or dial down his/her career choices. For example, an
employee may choose to take calls only during a certain time, to travel or not at various time periods, or
may opt to not work weekends. Foo commented on the word ―accommodation,‖ as used in ODEP‘s
former Assistant Secretary‘s opening Summit speech. Although ―reasonable accommodation‖ is a legal
term, Deloitte does not want to treat their employees with ―special‖ favors, he said. Because every
employee at Deloitte has an MCC profile, any risk of stigma is eliminated.

To determine the return on investment (ROI) of MCC, Deloitte looks at retention rates, financial s (cost
savings of their talent acquisitions), and employee commitment. Deloitte also conducts employee
satisfaction surveys. Findings show that MCC has had no negative impact on client service. At first,
Deloitte was fearful that all employees would choose to dial down their profile. However, about 90
percent opted for the middle career profile, dialing neither up nor down, but 10 percent opted to dial
up–two times higher than before MCC was initiated. Deloitte also found improved employee
satisfaction and a positive correlation between MCC and increased retention rates. The company has
also seen an increase in employee referrals. Overall, Deloitte‘s experience indicates that customizing
one‘s career path brings a psychological comfort to employees.

In response to Foo‘s presentation, Button commented that Deloitte‘s MCC is quite similar to the
concept of universal design (UD). She said universal design applies not just to the physical
environment but to programs and services as well, and the adaptability it affords to those both with and
without disabilities is useful. Button added that MCC gives Deloitte the ability to incorporate people
                                                                                                             27
with disabilities into their workforce.



Jane Anderson
Jane Anderson explained that telework is no longer a definable term. Rather, today it applies to having
a more agile workforce in a more mobile world with greater freedom to customize where and when
work is being done. She posed the question, ―What‘s the difference between working in your cubicle
where you may not see your boss all day and working the same tasks from an office in your home?‖

Anderson described a project she started in Minnesota where employees telework during rush hours in
the morning and evening. She added that through ODEP, MITE conducte d a research study with
15,000 employers, 463 of which reported experience with telework and/or the hiring of persons with
disabilities. Of these, 232 were targeted for a more in-depth survey focused on productivity and
retention.

For the past 12 years, Anderson herself has had a home-based secretary who lives 45 miles away and
happens to have a disability. In the beginning people questioned what would happen if Anderson
needed her secretary in person? Anderson responded that, contrary to what some supervisors think,
walking around and seeing if someone is working is becoming a less and less common management
style. She added that it was more important to focus on measuring productivity regardless of whether
the person was teleworking or not, and that this was requiring managers to think about performance
measurement differently.


   ―What‘s the difference between working in your cubicle
   where you may not see your boss all day and working the
          same tasks from an office in your home?‖
                        − Jane Anderson, Midwest Institute for Telecommuting Education

Anderson then related her experience in working with a disability agency using telework. She noted
that initially placement rates dropped due to a decline in communication about job leads amo ng the
teleworking staff. When a plan to provide better communication among teleworkers was subsequently
implemented and communication with team members became 25 percent of their performance
evaluation, placement rates increased by 20 percent. Anderson stated that managers need to review the
processes and determine how to make them work, such as communicating via writing, texting, phone,
etc. The ability of employees to reach each other is an operational process that needs to be addressed.


             ―Telework is ultimately a good thing
        because it causes businesses to look more closely
                                                                                                       28
                    at what they should be measuring.‖
                        − Jane Anderson, Midwest Institute for Telecommuting Education

Another example Anderson related was MITE‘s work with a medical transcription c ompany with many
transcriptionists working off site. Upon implementation of the arrangement, productivity increased by
16 percent, and the 38 percent of the workforce working off site contributed 46 percent of the
company‘s production. Another company, CMT, used technical contractors that normally took two to
three days to finalize contracts. When this company approved these staff to work at home, the average
contract completion time decreased to about five hours. In both instances, the increased produc tivity
appeared to be related to reducing interruptions in the workplace.

Anderson cited four basic tenets of measuring productivity that cut across jobs:


MEASURING PRODUCTIVITY

1. Be quantifiable
2. Meet deadlines
3. Show how employees manage priorities (the decision-making process)
4. Be able to measure the quality of the work


Telework can be scary to many managers, Anderson added, because it can uncover deficits in how they
manage and measure productivity. ―Telework is ultimately a good thing,‖ ac cording to Anderson,
because it causes businesses to look more closely at what they should be measuring. She further
believes that trust of the employee and the perception that the employee is really doing the work are
issues that can be addressed through proactive management strategies.

As an example, Chris Button highlighted the Federal government‘s telework initiative. She described
telework as another universal strategy that can benefit a lot of people and open doors to opportunity for
people with disabilities.



Richard Luecking
Richard Luecking noted that the disability community and employers use certain words regarding disability
employment that are often not the same and mentioned examples such as ―mass career customization‖ and
―flexible work arrangements‖ (FWA). Thus, it is important to note that it is not the disability community
using these terms to describe workforce retention and recruitment strategies, but the employer community.
Because of this trend, disability and employer communities have a wonderful opportunity to meld these two
worlds.
                                                                                                       29
Luecking explained that CE was adopted to clarify an operational need within a business and is a
creative and effective employment path for people with significant disabilities. For employers, CE can
be an avenue to workplace flexibility.

CE has four basic steps:

CREATIVE & EFFECTIVE EMPLOYMENT PATH

1. Through the discovery and exploration process, identify a person‘s traits, talents,
   interests, and needs for support and any particular skills.
2. Develop a job search plan to enable the individual to identify places for potential
   employment.
3. Negotiate with employers how these sets of tasks will benefit them. The negotiating process can be
   fairly sophisticated. Often a job coach acts as an intermediary on behalf of the individual with a
   disability with the employer.
4. Identify any employment support that may be needed for both the employee and the
   employer, such as transportation, assistive technology, schedules, etc.



               ―What really sells an employer
     is more what persons can do and how they can bring
                    value to a company.‖
                                     − Richard Luecking, TransCen, Inc.

In terms of the ―carrot and stick‖ approach, CE offers employers more of a ―carrot‖ (e.g., on-the-job
training, increased productivity) rather than the ―stick‖ of enforcement represented by legislation, such
as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Thus, ―these employers hired people with disabilities
not because of the ADA but for employers‘ three business reasons—to make money, to save money, or
to improve operations,‖ according to Luecking. What really sells an employer is more what persons
can do and how they can bring value to a company, Luecking said.


   ―. . . these employers hired people with disabilities not
    because of the ADA but for three business reasons—
         to make money, to save money, or to improve
                         operations.‖
                                     − Richard Luecking, TransCen, Inc.
                                                                                                       30
Luecking‘s organization, TransCen, Inc., one of ODEP‘s partners, has developed significant data about
CE by conducting intensive interviews with employers who used the strategy to employ individuals
who were seen in the past by many in the workforce development system as ―too disabled to work.‖
The research showed that the three reasons companies hire people are to: (1) make money, (2) save
money, and/or (3) improve operations. Because the hiring of a qualified person with a disability
utilizing CE freed more seasoned employees to help more customers, employers were encouraged to
hire people with disabilities—not because of the ADA—but because doing so benefited their
businesses.

Chris Button
Button noted that the notion of Flexible Work Arrangements (FWA) appeared to be taking hold in
multiple venues and was included in the interagency Report of the Taskforce on the Aging of the
American Workforce headed by DOL. Button also shared that ODEP has been working with DOL‘s
Apprenticeship program to look at ways in which apprenticeship programs could be customized to be
more flexible and thereby more inclusive of people with disabilities.

Questions & Answers

Button then asked the speakers to further consider how these various flexibilities could be used to increase
opportunities for people with disabilities. Malcolm Foo said it was important to get managers and
supervisors to see that this was just another way to get people in and to address bottlenecks and
operational glitches that may exist. Foo said it is imperative to view the impending talent crisis from the
50,000-foot level, and that it is this vantage point that is ultimately motivating a lot of companies like his
to begin to think more creatively.

Jane Anderson added that using business-focused language is very important. She said that with the
teleworking pilot project, it wasn‘t until her employment specialist started talking to prospective
businesses about reducing turnover and improving customer service that they really began to listen.
She used MITE's client Precision Tune as an example. At Precision Tune, customer service was poor.
MITE addressed this by instituting customer service representatives working from home on a part -time
basis. After a year and a half, Precision Tune hired the teleworkers as full-time employees with
benefits.

An audience participant commented that companies will listen to the business case for bottom-line
results, adding that her company worked with MITE and saw that companies can improve productivity
and increase retention rates with flexible work arrangements.

Susan Goodman from the National Down Syndrome Congress stated that the jobs some of the panelists
were talking about are not entry-level jobs and wanted to know more about whether anyone could
address how they work with people with intellectual disabilities. Foo replied that Deloitte‘s MCC does

                                                                                                            31
not apply to entry-level hires. At Deloitte, they are piloting this new program with Deloitte‘s existing
employees first.

Luecking pointed out that CE strategies can be applied to a broad range of people. Because CE is
based on what the company needs and what a particular job seeker offers, it is a win-win outcome for
both.

WEB SITES OF SPEAKERS’ ORGANIZATIONS

Deloitte
http://www.deloitte.com/dtt/section_node/0,1042,sid%253D2270,00.html
http://deloitte.com/dtt/section_node/0,1042,sid%253D26554,00.html

Midwest Institute for Telecommuting Education
http://www.mite.org/
http://www.mite.org/telecommutdisabilities/telecommutdisabilities.html

TransCen, Inc.
http://www.transcen.org/
http://www.transcen.org/projects.html

Northrop Grumman’s Operation IMPACT
http://operationimpact.ms.northropgrumman.com/03_news/03_03_martin_news.htm

ODEP Resources
Web site on Telework Resources and Funded Research
http://www.dol.gov/odep/categories/research/telework.htm

Web site on Customized Employment Resources and Funded Research
http://www.dol.gov/odep/categories/workforce/cust_emp.htm



THEME 2: TRANSFORMING THE WORKPLACE WITH NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Moderator: Randy Cooper, Senior Policy Advisor, ODEP

Speakers: Debra Ruh, President and Founder, TecAccess LLC

Frances West, Director, Human Ability and Accessibility Center, IBM

Thomas Wlodkowski, Director of Accessibility, AOL

                                                                                                           32
Themes: Assistive technology (AT) and the interoperability of AT and information technology (IT) for
successful employment.

(Speaker handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site at http://www.odepsummit.org/agenda.html.)


    ―AT is what makes it possible for employees with very
      significant disabilities to work in the first place.‖
                                          − Debra Ruh, TecAccess



Randy Cooper
Randy Cooper described how social and demographic changes support investing in accessible and
interoperable technology and how industry is building solutions to new challenges, achieving
accessibility, expanding markets, and reducing barriers to employment for people with disabilities. He
referenced ODEP‘s Technology Initiative, noting ODEP‘s collaboration with the Assistive Technology
Industry Association and the U.S. Business Leadership Network.

Debra Ruh
Debra Ruh opened by asserting that her company, TecAccess, employs more than 75 brilliant
individuals, who happen to have a variety of disabilities. TecAccess enjoys a 90 percent employee
retention rate and prides itself on a workforce based on diversity.

The majority of TecAccess‘ employees telework, and Ruh finds that those who do so are highly
productive. She attributes the use of assistive technology (AT) as being partly responsible for this
outcome. In terms of recruitment, she has found that she can often attract better candidates because
TecAccess offers teleworking as an option.

TecAccess‘ services focus on ensuring clients‘ services, products, Web sites, telecommunications, e -
learning tools, and technology are accessible to the clients, their staff, and their customers.

Ruh noted that AT does not have to be the newest, most high-tech device or equipment on the market
to be accessible. Sometimes making the appropriate accommodation requires being creative with the
technology that one already has available or using readily available technology for general use and
adapting it for use by individuals with disabilities. For example, employees with speech or hearing
difficulties might use widely available services such as online chat, e-mail, or instant messaging to
communicate, eliminating the need for AT or other potentially costly accommodations. In other
instances, ―AT is what makes it possible for employees with very significant disabilities to work in the
first place,‖ she said.
                                                                                                         33
TecAccess also works with technology manufacturers, such as IBM, to evaluate the accessibility of
new tools coming on the market.



Frances West
Frances West explained that her chief responsibility is to ensure that all IBM products and services are
accessible to individuals with disabilities and compliant with accessibility laws and regulations. Her
division has a corporate function, but is situated inside IBM‘s research arm. Overall, IBM employs
380,000 individuals around the world and is growing rapidly, with 80,000 new employees recently
added in India alone. Because the company is expanding not only in the U.S., but also in
emerging/developing nations, it has a global view, especially in thinking about disability
accommodations in the workplace, she said.

West said that IBM is at the forefront of trying to figure out what the company can do to enhance
accessibility. Many times a ready solution or product does not exist. As one of the only remaining
private technology companies with a research arm, IBM spends $5-6 billion per year in research and
employs more than 4,000 scientists and researchers around the world. It is actively trying to expand its
research laboratory base into emerging countries.

West also said that other nations, like Brazil, are doing much more than the U.S. to increase the
employment rates of people with disabilities. In Brazil, each employer is required to employ
individuals with disabilities as at least five percent of its workforce, and those that do not meet the
threshold face sanctions. Similar government employment policies exist in France and China, she
added.

West‘s division works on a daily basis with IBM‘s Human Resources department. She said
accessibility is a real challenge, even for tools that are seeing greater and greater use, such as Webcasts
and podcasts. Because technology is constantly changing, IBM is constantly ―moving‖ to adapt to the
changes. The company is doubling its research into accessibility, especially with speech recognition
software and the concept of independent speaker recognition, which ensures that the software has a
broad enough vocabulary and the ability to recognize a variety of tonal qualities and accents.

Other emerging tools that present accessibility challenges are Facebook, wikis, blogs, and Skype a nd
other Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) tools, West said. But certain IBM products/programs are
fairly successful on the accessibility front, such as LotusNotes, SameTime, and Project JUMBO.
Project JUMBO is a VOIP system that provides real-time captioning that is 97 percent accurate, which
is considered sufficient for chatting proficiency.

IBM has a multinational research collaboration working on instant, real-time, spoken translation that is
capable of translating not only across languages, but also across accents. IBM also offers the
Technology Adoption Program that allows people a quick way to try the technology to verify its

                                                                                                          34
accessibility before purchasing it.

West said research regarding accessibility should not be only a private endeavor. P ublic/government
help is needed and can be expedited through public-private collaborations, and such collaborations
would reflect the spirit of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

West believes that government funds s hould not only go to universities but also the private sector. She
said that within the private sector, something can be actively done and products can be commercialized,
as opposed to simply conducting research with the incentive of increased funding to allow for, in
essence, continuous or prolonged research.

West added that the next generation of technology is the 3D Internet, which presents the Internet in a
visual manner akin to video games. 3D Internet has the potential to be a tremendous vehicle fo r
learning, particularly in science and technology. However, IBM and other companies will have to
examine how this technology can be made accessible. According to West, solving the accessibility
issue in the years ahead will be an exciting challenge. West said that ―disability demands innovation‖
and noted that America was built on innovation.


 ―Individuals with disabilities need to avoid segmentation
 (often on the basis of disability) and develop a collective
    voice that speaks to their requirements and asks the
        questions that need to be asked. They need
   to create an ‗ecosystem‘ where they all collaborate.‖
                                             − Frances West, IBM

West then commented that ―it is really . . . a shame‖ that IBM, TecAccess, and AOL are being
recognized for doing the bare minimum on the accessibility issue. She believes that individuals with
disabilities need to avoid segmentation (often on the basis of disability) and develop a collective voice
that speaks to their requirements and asks the questions that need to be asked. They need to create an
―ecosystem‖ where they all collaborate, she said, because this is a societal issue like health care. Also,
in terms of funding, the disability community needs to be brought together as one and needs to decide
where funding needs to go. Funding, for research particularly, should not be split up by disability type.
Instead, the community needs to decide, ―… this year our research priority will be accessibility for
individuals who are deaf, and next year it will be for people who are blind/low-vision.‖



Tom Wlodkowski
Wlodkowski‘s AOL Accessibility Division is a worldwide operation, functioning in all of the various
                                                                                                         35
subsidiaries of AOL (e.g., MapQuest, TMZ.com, and a host of consumer sites). The division is based in AOL‘s
legal department (Consumer and Regulatory Affairs Division), not in the research department as with IBM.
The mission of his team is to ensure that consumer- facing Web sites and all products are accessible and usable
by the disability audience, which results in better products for everyone, he said. All AOL products/sites go
through Wlodkowski‘s team and an accessibility review prior to going public. With new products, his team
gets involved early in the process to ensure that accessibility is covered. Sometimes the company already has
existing accessibility solutions in other products that can work with a new product. Sometimes his team also
works with HR regarding the accessibility of programs used by AOL employees, such as captioning software
and screen readers.

Wlodkowski said the industry is on the precipice of a paradigm shift, with the prospective advent of Web 2.0,
which will allow users to control how they get content and what content they get. AOL also just spent $850
million to acquire Bebo.com, a social networking site based in the United Kingdom, with a view toward making
it accessible. Other new technologies driven by Web 2.0 include office wikis, blogs, and other social
networking sites. Accessibility support needs to be embedded in these new technologies for people with
disabilities. In the past, making pure text in programs and keyboards accessible was easy. Over time, faster
Internet connections, graphics, and animation were used increasingly. Soon the only aspects of sites that were
accessible were parallel text-only pages. Assistive technology and browsers followed with improved user
support and easier navigation via page-header tags and keystrokes.

Today, the dynamic Web has a software- like look and feel in its materials, Wlodkowski said. Tools like Ajax
and JavaScript are used for this purpose, and it is becoming more and more cost effective for
businesses/employers to deliver content over the dynamic Web (even HR-related content like expense reports
and performance reviews). The challenge is to make this content and other content with rich Internet
applications accessible and to align the behavior of the software user with the behavior of the Web user. Some
available tools are AXS, which is a free, open-source JavaScript library, and DOJO, which is an open source
toolkit for anyone developing a Web application.


      Companies ―need to find ways of marketing
what we do to the mainstream, so . . . we can find ways to
       bolster our needs or the solutions that all
          of us . . . advocate [for] every day.‖
                                            − Tom Wlodkowski, AOL

Increased work is being done on personalizing tools so users who are blind who want more text content than
graphic content can get text content that is appropriately tagged. Also, AOL is developing products that address
the needs of users who are deaf, particularly with captioning video and providing scalable video on Web sites
with captions. This video-captioning development is a collaborative effort of AOL with Google, Yahoo, and
Microsoft as part of the Internet Caption Forum.


                                                                                                             36
In the future, accessibility will be ―baked in‖ to these different tools, Wlodkowski said. Increased personalization
and different content will be tagged in different ways for individuals with different kinds of disabilities.

Wlodkowski commented that even successful projects such as the National Institute on Disability and
Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) at the Department of Education should encourage more corporate
involvement in their grant-related activities. Also, private companies like his are here to help and to provide
access to their technology. For those who need the technology, it is not necessary ―to reinvent the wheel.‖

Wlodkowski emphasized that companies like AOL ―need to find ways of marketing what we do to the
mainstream, so . . . we can find ways to bolster our needs or the solutions that all of us . . . advocate [for] every
day.‖

Questions & Answers
One of the workshop participants, Matilda Evans from Computer Sciences Corporation, commented that a
toolbox or other resource for the many new technologies is needed. Also, since many companies are being
asked to provide global solutions, they need to keep this perspective in mind.

Another workshop participant, Steve Mendelsohn from the National Disability Institute, stated that the business
case for these new technologies is complex. With competing priorities, people do not fully understand
accessibility or are unwilling to spend time or money on accessibility. The communication and IT accessibility
issues are much more complex than physical accessibility, he said.

Conclusion
A closing thought applicable to all employers is that they need to be nimble, think outside the box, and know
their options.

WEB SITES OF SPEAKERS’ ORGANIZATIONS

TecAccess LLC
http://www.tecaccess.net/index.shtml
http://www.tecaccess.net/content/accessibility.shtml
http://www.tecaccess.net/content/employment.shtml

IBM
http://www.ibm.com/us/en/
http://www-03.ibm.com/employment/us/diverse/
http://www-03.ibm.com/able/

AOL
http://corp.aol.com/
http://corp.aol.com/corporate-citizenship/accessibility
                                                                                                                    37
http://corp.aol.com/corporate-citizenship/diversity-and- inclusion

ODEP Resources

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
http://www.jan.wvu.edu/

JAN is a toll- free information and referral service on job accommodations for people with disabilities; on the
employment provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act; and on resources for technical assistance,
funding, education, and services related to the employment of people with disabilities. In addition, JAN
analyzes trends and statistical data related to the technical assistance it provides.

Roadmaps for Enhancing Employment of Persons with Disabilities through Accessible Technology, Executive
Summary
http://www.usbln.org/pdf-docs/Roadmap_Enhancing_Employment_of_PWD_Exec_Summ.pdf

On September 24, 2007, a Business Dialogue on Accessible Technology and Disability Employment was held
in Orlando, Florida. The Business Dialogue was sponsored by the Assistive Technology Industry Association
(ATIA) and the U.S. Business Leadership Network (USBLN) with the participation of ODEP, DOL and the
U.S. Department of Education‘s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. The purpose of the
event was to provide cutting-edge business leaders and decision- makers with the opportunity to develop
consensus roadmaps to enhance the hiring, retention, and advancement of persons with disabilities and others
through accessible technology.

Roadmaps Full Report
http://www.usbln.org/pdf-docs/Roadmap_Enhancing_Employment_of_PWD_Full_Report.pdf



THEME 3: THE INTERGENERATIONAL WORKPLACE




                                                                                                                  38
Moderator: Rhonda Basha, Team Leader, Workforce Systems Policy, ODEP

Speakers: Barbara Haight, Senior Manager, Community Relations, Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.

Stephen M. Wing, Director, Government Programs, CVS/Caremark

Larry Cohen, Manager, Workforce Issues, American Association of Retired Persons

Keith Gall, Vice President, Capstone Programs, Junior Achievement Worldwide

Theme: The Intergenerational Workplace

(Speaker handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site at http://www.odepsummit.org/agenda.html.)


   ―Employers who adjust their workplaces to be more
    attractive to today‘s multigenerational workforce
 are finding that many of these same strategies also make
       their businesses more attractive to the largely
     untapped labor pool of people with disabilities.‖
                            − Rhonda Basha, Office of Disability Employment Policy


Rhonda Basha
Basha started out by saying that because of the slowing of labor-force growth for the foreseeable
future, the ―War for Talent‖ is changing: the challenge will no longer be having the knowledge on how
to attract and retain the best and the brightest but rather competing for enough qualified people to get
the job done. Maximizing an organization‘s ability to attract employees in the 21st Century requires
                                                                                                         39
creating a workplace that supports and includes an infinite variety of cultural and age differences.
Accounting for the varying norms and styles embodied in today‘s multigenerational workplace is the
new face of such diversity efforts. Employers who adjust their workplaces to be more attractive to
today‘s multigenerational workforce are finding that many of these same strategies also make their
businesses more attractive to the largely untapped labor pool of people with disabilities.

For the first time in recent history, the workforce includes four generations of employees – Veterans,
Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. Each generation has been shaped by the political,
social, and economic experiences of their youth. While these generations share many common values
and beliefs, they also exhibit differences that can strongly influence behavior on the job and lead to
missed opportunities that could impact a company‘s bottom line.

Basha shared that ODEP‘s work on the intergenerational workforce thus far has focused on:

• Identifying how workforce flexibilities currently being used to recruit, hire, and retain mature
  workers can be utilized to effectively include workers with disabilities.
• Determining how reverse mentoring and other forms of mentoring are being used by
  employers to increase skills development and as a hiring, recruitment, and retention strategy
  with younger workers.

After taking five minutes each to talk about who they are and what their organization does, an
interactive conversation with the panelists and the audience focused on the following questions:

• What do the speakers‘ organizations see as the greatest challenges and opportunities of having
  four generations in the workplace?

• What types of strategies are the speakers‘ organizations utilizing to maximize potential in this
  environment?

• Can any of these strategies be generalized to include people with disabilities (e.g., older
  workers, multi-sensory training, etc.)?

• How is mentoring being used as a strategy to: (a) hire, retain, and recruit, (b) accomplish
  knowledge transfer, and (c) facilitate skills development? Are people with disabilities included
  in these mentoring activities?

• What advice would the speakers‘ organizations give other businesses and organizations about
  navigating the uncharted territory of the intergenerational workforce, and making people with
  disabilities part of this mix?

        WHO’S W HO IN TODAY’S INTERGERATIONAL WORKPLACE

       THE GENERATIONS                      BIRTH YEARS

                                                                                                       40
       VETERANS or WWII                    BEFORE 1946

       BABY BOOMERS                        1946-1964

       GENERATION X                        1965-1980

       GENERATION Y                        1980-2000
        or MILLENNIAL


Barbara Haight
According to Barbara Haight, Booz Allen tends to have a highly educated workforce, with 70 percent
or more of its employees having advanced degrees. The company hires a lot of people retiring out of
the military or government service, or more highly educated younger staff. The company also employs
the ―old-timers,‖ who sometimes came out of very structured systems, bumping up against young
people not many years out of college, with a lot of qualifications and very different viewpoints of what
the workplace should look like. At Booz Allen, Haight indicated the opportunity for tension comes up
at the higher end of management in trying to understand how to motivate and work across the different
communication styles these different generations have.

One way that this issue has been addressed, Haight stated, is through affinity groups, which Booz Allen
has for just about everything, the most innovative perhaps being the armed services forum. These
affinity groups bubble up from employees themselves, when they feel a need and see a reason to align
together.

The company tends to address intergenerational conflict head on when it becomes a conflict that needs
intervention, such as when a person is not succeeding or a manager and an employee are not getting
along. The next step is to move from being reactive to proactive.

Haight recently took a course on the intergenerational workforce with a mix of participants from all
four generations and it helped dispel a lot of myths for her. She learned why ―Gen Xers‖ and ―Ys‖
would rather e-mail her than walk next door to her office and have a conversation. She also knows
why they don‘t want to be overwhelmed with paper. By the same token, Haight doesn‘t want to be
overwhelmed with technology or have others telling her how she should be doing thi ngs.

There really can be a huge difference between older workers who like to have a structured
communication style and those of the younger generation who like to do twelve things at once.
Haight‘s company is finding that delivering information organizationally in a manner that satisfies all
these different preferences can be very challenging.

Haight cited an April 2007 Wall Street Journal article that portrayed Generation Y as a generation in which
                                                                                                          41
everyone was being praised all the time as a child. As a result, these people sometimes have a hard time
and feel like a failure when praise is not lavished upon them for doing their job when they enter the
workplace. To address this issue, one company has gone as far as hiring a ―celebration assistant‖ who
throws out candy around the office telling people what a wonderful job they are doing.


   Every employer is encouraged to stop stereotyping—
  ―Let‘s not say ‗you‘ or ‗we‘ or ‗me‘ or ‗you are all this
          way.‘ Everyone is a unique individual.‖
                                    − Barbara Haight, Booz Allen Hamilton

In Haight‘s opinion, the greatest opportunity in the intergenerational workforce is the wealth of
collaboration that can occur and the different thinking that is brought to problem solving. The
problem-solving opportunity is a huge benefit and is recognized as one of the strengths of having a
diversified workforce generally. Maximizing the opportunities and figuring out how to get everything
done that needs to get done within an organization is key. Haight thinks it‘s a matter of talking with
people to show them where the opportunities are, although she admits she hasn‘t seen anything written
and has been searching. As with many large businesses, Booz Allen's mentoring program is very
formalized. Mentoring, however, comes in a lot of different shapes and forms. There are skills-based
mentors that employees may seek out to get better at a specific aspect of their jobs. Other mentors may
play a more situational role, such as talking with an employee about what it‘s like to do something or
about particular problems or concerns.

Haight stated that Booz Allen actually includes 360-degree assessments to provide performance
feedback annually for every employee. Mentors are encouraged to give feedback and to talk about
their mentee‘s progress over the year.

Haight wants to explore whether Booz Allen can incorporate reverse mentoring. She indicated that she
can‘t think of a better thing to do than to have a young person mentor her about things of which she
would not intuitively be aware. Haight encourages every employer to stop stereotyping – ―Let‘s not
say ‗you‘ or ‗we‘ or ‗me‘ or ‗you are all this way.‘ Everyone is a unique individual.‖

Steve Wing
CVS/Caremark has more than 200,000 employees, and this past year filled more than one billion
prescriptions worldwide. With that huge statistic, CVS has a responsibility to hire people who are
accurate and capable of doing a good job.


      ―Because older people and people with disabilities
      sometimes have the same needs, CVS looks at these
                                                                                                           42
                needs as an opportunity to tap into both
                         of these labor pools.‖

                                       − Steve Wing, CVS/Caremark

CVS wants its stores to look like the communities in which they are located. CVS started its mature -
worker program back in the early 1990s, when they found that less than seven percent of their
workforce was over 50, a number that didn‘t match up demographically in the areas they were
reviewing. That‘s when CVS developed partnerships with AARP, the National Council on Aging, and
a number of other organizations. Today, more than 18 percent of CVS‘s workforce is over 50,
including some people in their 90s. Because older people and people with disabilities sometimes have
the same needs, CVS looks at these needs as an opportunity to tap into both of these labor pools. The
company also conducted a study with the University of Vermont that focused on mentoring as a
retention tool for its senior pharmacists and managers.

The University of Kentucky and Boston College have also conducted recent research on the
intergenerational workforce. One interesting finding is that even people in their 60s and 70s want to
get promoted. Therefore, CVS has a program for all of its managers about managing the various
generations to maximize potential and opportunities.

CVS has a youth-targeted program, Pathways to Pharmacy, in which more than 2,000 inner-city and
rural youth are participating nationwide this summer. Ninety-nine percent are minority students; many
also have disabilities. When CVS first went to schools to talk about what they wanted in a diverse
workforce, CVS said they wanted to include people with disabilities.

In the year since CVS was honored by the U.S. Department of Labor for its disability employment
policies and practices, the company met wit h the American Association for the Advancement of
Science (AAAS), among many other organizations. AAAS runs a program for college sophomores and
juniors with disabilities who are majoring in chemistry, biology, math, and science, but are not sure
about career plans. CVS started its first program this summer with AAAS identifying eight students
with disabilities that matched up with CVS‘s criteria. Through this effort, CVS currently has three
students in their stores that are doing great things.

Wing said that flexibility is an important hiring and retention strategy. CVS attracts older workers by
tapping into senior centers to recruit staff. One example is CVS‘s ―snowbird‖ program, which is open
to anybody in the company. This program accommodates employees who have time-shares and second
homes in warmer climates during colder-climate-area months. CVS started its snowbird program in
2004, which is particularly attractive to older employees who want to spend the winter in Florida and
the rest of the year in places like Cincinnati.

Wing thinks that people want an employer to hear what they have to say regardless of their age. They

                                                                                                        43
want to know whether they are doing a good job and about the possibilities of promotion, even if, as is
often the case with older workers, they don‘t ask the question directly.


Larry Cohen
AARP is the nation‘s largest member organization for people aged 50 and older. Its publication, AARP
The Magazine is the world‘s largest circulation magazine. It is distributed primarily in hard copy
because its membership prefers print media. In terms of employment, AARP‘s goals are to: 1)
increase opportunities for workers 50 and older in an equitable labor market; 2) improve workplace
options; and 3) empower workers 50 and older.

With so many different generations in the workplace, miscommunication may occur, particularly when
a company has a younger manager supervising an older employee. One of the people Cohen works
with has four working generations in her family. Her dad, who is still working in the civil service, is a
Veteran, she‘s a Boomer, and she has two daughters, one a ―Gen Y‖ and one a ―Gen Xer.‖ The ―Gen
Xer‖ doesn‘t understand why when she finishes a project she doesn‘t get a raise. Each generation has
different expectations, perspectives, and needs, making managing multiple generations a challenge.

AARP recently held a conference in Japan, where cultural differences bring additional challenges to
this concept. In Japan, age is respected – workforce management is turned upside down where respect
for elders is a key value. The challenges the U.S. has in this area are magnified across
the globe.

AARP has a publication on this topic called Leading a Multigenerational Workforce, available at
http://assets.aarp.org/www.aarp.org_/articles/money/employers/leading_multigenerational_workforce.p
df .

Knowing and understanding what strategies exist and how they can be used with the different
generations is critical. For example, with a ―Gen Yer,‖ a company needs to of fer more mentoring and
coaching. Every company will need to understand the different communication methods each
generation prefers.


 ―AARP believes that many of the strategies and polices
and practices that facilitate employment for older workers
  are good for everyone . . . What‘s good for one age is
                really good for everyone.‖
                                           − Larry Cohen, AARP


                                                                                                       44
Another important thing to consider is the benefit of flexibility and the workforce environment. For
example, for a Boomer, who is part of the so- called ―sandwich generation,‖ simultaneously caring for
their kids and parents, getting elder care or help with taking care of their own family issues may be
preferred benefits, while a younger employee just getting ready to start a family may want more time off
or a more flexible schedule. Cohen also added that volunteerism is a huge consideration for companies.
He believes that the future work environment may require a new strategy through which the benefits
package is more of a café kind of plan.

AARP believes that many of the strategies, policies and practices that facilitate employment for older
workers are good for everyone. For example, AARP offers a sabbatical program through which
employees can take an extra month off after seven years of employment. When a company institutes
programs with these types of benefits, it creates tremendous opportunities for people at lower career
levels to act in management positions. What‘s good for one age is really good for everyone.

AARP also offers a mentoring program through which employees are paired up with agreed-upon
mentors. In addition, new employees are assigned a ―buddy‖ among their peers. Statistics have shown
the organization that this practice is very important for their experience for the first six months.




Keith Gall
Junior Achievement (JA) is a nonprofit organization based in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Its goal is
to provide economic education for students in workplace development, economic education through
entrepreneurship, and financial literacy. In operation since 1919, JA currently reaches about 8.3
million children a year through its various programs and is the world's largest nonprofit organization
teaching economic education. The goal of JA‘s programs is to prepare students for the workplace.

JA has programs from kindergarten all the way through 12th grade. In JA‘s elementary program, which
Gall started and conducted in Florida for nearly two decades, students actually apply and are assigned a
job and spend the day at ―JA Business Town‖ working. This program is open to all kids.


   ―When kids with disabilities have an opportunity to get
         involved in performing a job, being part
        of a team, and taking on responsibilities,
              they learn they can succeed.‖
                                      − Keith Gall, Junior Achievement

Gall referenced materials he prepared for the Summit, which contained quotatio ns from children with
disabilities and their parents. In particular, he shared a story about a child who uses a wheelchair who
                                                                                                         45
said that before he participated in the JA program, he didn‘t think he would ever be able to work.
These are the stories, Gall says, that demonstrate how these programs can make a real difference.
When kids with disabilities have an opportunity to get involved in performing a job, being part of a
team, and taking on responsibilities, they learn they can succeed.

In its middle school program, ―JA Finance Park,‖ students have to plan a budget. The organization
gives them a life situation and tells them they are between 25 and 35, which they think is "terribly old,"
Gall notes. They also find out whether they are married or not, whether they have any children, and
their gross annual income. For the day, they have to plan a budget for themselves and their family. For
the youth involved it‘s an exciting opportunity to learn about managing their personal finances. By the
end of the day, they come away saying, ―Gosh! I think I know why it‘s difficult at home when it‘s bill
paying time,‖ or ―I‘m not going to have kids when I get older because they are too expensive,‖ Gall
shared.

JA‘s high school program is a curriculum through which students have the opportunity to visit
businesses and job shadow someone in the workplace. Gall believes the program provides a great
opportunity for students to actually see what it‘s like to be in different workplaces.

Gall commented on the recent news and research regarding the changing workplace. Students are
graduating from high school and college and going into the work world, expecting a ―different‖ work
world. Gall shared his personal experience with his 24-year-old son who lives at home, who he said
started working for Verizon last year and thinks he should be CEO by now. Gall believes that
everyone has a responsibility to teach children what the workplace is really like and how they fit into it.

Most of JA‘s programs are taught by the business community. Business leaders go into the schools and
teach the curriculum that‘s been developed, but, most importantly, they provide opportunities for real
world learning experiences. As with anything in education, if children are taught early, t hey perform
better later on. So, if they are taught to understand generational differences while in elementary or
middle school, it will be easier for them later on. With many business people coming into the
classrooms or serving as volunteers, the young people in JA‘s programs get a chance to experience the
multi-generational workplace by actually interacting with people of different generations before they
enter the workplace.




But it‘s actually a two-way learning experience, Gall said. Not only do the children have experiences
and opportunities that help them understand what it‘s like to be part of the workplace, but many of the
volunteers return to work having learned from the students. This experience is especially true with
JA‘s high school job shadowing program. Gall hears many stories from people who were ―shadowed‖
and found that they benefited from the opportunity themselves.

JA‘s programs don‘t really focus on whether students have disabilities or not. JA arranges for
whatever circumstances the students present when they join the program. When someone tries to tell
Gall whether a student has a disability or not, he doesn‘t want to know these details. JA just lets the
                                                                                                          46
student do the job he or she is supposed to do as part of the whole gro up. Gall finds it works better this
way.

Questions & Answers
With regard to the question as to what were seen as the greatest challenges and opportunities of having
four generations in the workplace, a ―Gen Xer‖ in the audience responded ―If 50 is the new 30, what
does that make 30, 10? I find that to be the most insulting thing professionally. The other thing is the
stereotype that we are all capitalist monsters. The National Association of Workforce Development
Professionals did a survey two years ago which found that ―Gen Xers‖ and ―Ys‖ would rather receive
mentoring on the job or professional development than get more money or an annual promotion.‖

 ―One of the worst things we can do is to develop strategies based
         on a specific generation, in the same way that a
  company should not develop strategies based on a disability.‖
                                           − Workshop Participant

A Generation Y participant agreed that the stereotypes were problematic, noting that although it was
presumed that they wanted to work at a fast pace, that wasn‘t necessarily always the case. A Baby
Boomer participant indicated that from her perspective, the pressure to get up to that speed was also
challenging.

Another participant, a self-identified Baby Boomer, noted that one of the things she realized early on in
supervising ―Gen Xers‖ and ―Ys‖ is the level of debate. She indic ated that she had become very
appreciative of the debate because it was creative and useful.

One participant stated that ―one of the worst things we can do is to develop strategies based on a
specific generation, in the same way that a company should not develop strategies based on a
disability.‖ Rather, the structure needs to be in place to allow people coming through the door to
indicate what they need and their preferred methods of communication.

An audience participant asked the panel the following question: ―What should the take-away from this
conference be regarding what ODEP or the government in general can and should be doing to promote
expansion of individuals with disabilities participating in these programs?‖ Haight replied that the
government needs to ―walk the walk‖ itself regarding what it is expecting business to do, and to
support positive imaging of people with disabilities through best practices rather than focusing on
punitive measures. She also said that the government needs to work with business leaders who are
better able to communicate with other businesses.

Gall noted that, from an education standpoint, educators need to be fully committed to inclusive
mainstream education and that general education teachers should be required to learn more about
                                                                                                         47
special education while they are in school.

Cohen noted that a lot of general barriers exist in obtaining employment with the Federal government,
citing the burdensome hiring practice of requiring lengthy Knowledge, Skills, and Abiliti es (KSAs) as
an example. He also identified The Partnership for Public Service, which helps older workers obtain
work with the Department of the Treasury, as a good model for addressing these types of issues.

A member of the audience who represented a national bank responded to the panel‘s comments by
stating she thought that rather than looking at ―what‘s next,‖ it is important that businesses and the
disability community go back and look at the policies, programs, and procedures already in place. She
indicated that it was important to understand what barriers exist within those policies and programs that
prohibit access of any individuals of ―different‖ backgrounds from taking advantage of a mentoring
program, a career development program, a staffing initiative, etc.

Basha summed up the discussion by saying that participants had discussed myths that need to be
debunked, and that different generations need to respect each other for the strengths each brings to the
workplace. She further stressed that it is important not to fall into stereotypical thinking, that more
education is needed, and that policies already in place need to be examined to determine whether they
block minorities, including people with disabilities, from achieving employment success. Mentoring
was also identified as an important recruitment and retention strategy, as well as an effective way to
transfer and augment workplace knowledge and skills.




WEB SITES OF SPEAKERS’ ORGANIZATIONS

AARP
http://www.aarp.org/
http://www.aarp.org/research/work/employment/
http://www.aarp.org/research/work/issues/
http://assets.aarp.org/www.aarp.org_/articles/money/employers/leading_multigenerational_workforce.pdf

Junior Achievement Worldwide
http://www.ja.org/
http://www.ja.org/programs/capstone/index.shtml


                                                                                                        48
Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.
http://www.boozallen.com/home
http://www.boozallen.com/careers/a_great_place_to_work/diversity

CVS/Caremark
http://www.cvscaremark.com/
http://www.cvscaremark.com/our-company/our-culture/diversity

ODEP Resources
Recruitment and Retention of Older Workers: Considerations for Employers
http://www.communityinclusion.org/article.php?article_id=231&type=topic&id=18

The National Center on Workforce Development/Adult (NCWD/A), funded by the Office of Disability
Employment Policy, undertook a one-year project that examined practices and strategies implemented by U.S.
companies seeking to recruit and retain older workers. This brief presents themes that emerged from phone
conversations with employees at 18 companies in 13 states.

Recruitment and Retention of Older Workers: Application to People with Disabilities
http://www.onestops.info/article.php?article_id=473

This brief, based on NCWD/A‘s one-year project described above, identifies strategies that can benefit both
older workers and workers with disabilities

Report of the Taskforce on the Aging of the American Workforce
http://www.doleta.gov/reports/FINAL_Taskforce_Report_2-11-08.pdf

This report was cleared by the Office of Management and Budget and provided to the U.S. Senate Special
Committee on Aging on February 11, 2008 by the lead Taskforce agency, DOL‘s Employment and Training
Administration. ODEP played an essential role on this Taskforce.

THEME 4: UNIVERSAL DESIGN/ACCESSIBILITY




                                                                                                              49
Moderator: Michael Reardon, Team Leader, Employment-Related Supports Team, ODEP

Speakers: Leslie C. Young, Ronald L. Mace Universal Design Institute

Susan K. Mazrui, Director, Federal Regulatory Affairs, AT&T

Deb Russell, Career Outreach Manager, Walgreens

Theme: Universal design for both physical and programmatic access.

(Speaker handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site at http://www.odepsummit.org/agenda.html.)


            ―. . . effective UD would have all people,
         with and without disabilities, using UD features
         without even knowing they are UD features . . .
          the features are blended into the environment
                     and readily usable by all.‖
                          - Leslie C. Young, Ronald L. Mace Universal Design Institute




Michael Reardon

                                                                                                         50
Reardon addressed the importance of Universal Design (UD), noting that the employment rate of
individuals with disabilities has not seen a dramatic increase since the passage of the ADA. He
attributed this to too much emphasis on training and too little on ensuring job sites, and ways to get to
job sites, are accessible. He said ODEP‘s emphasis is more on the environment, so it is working with
the U.S. Departments of Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Health and Human
Services on a number of issues related to UD.

Leslie C. Young
Leslie Young showed a series of images of very active people of all shapes and sizes doing the same
things. To emphasize the importance of UD, she read a personal statement from someone with a
significant disability that said ―I‘m tired of being told I can be independent while being denied the
chance of being interdependent.‖ Based on these images and statement, Young reflected that UD helps
everyone do what they want to do when they want to do it. She emphasized that with America‘s
changing demographics and the aging of the Baby Boomer population, a new workforce is emerging.
This workforce includes, among other groups, older workers, recent immigrants, and people with
disabilities. Young noted that the human condition does not equ al perfection, and that we all get things
done in different ways; people with disabilities have jobs, support families, and maintain and pay for
homes, but they may go about doing these things differently than those without disabilities. Everyone
has different learning and processing modes as well as sensory and physical aptitudes.


         ―UD strives to be a broad-spectrum solution
    that helps everyone, not just people with disabilities.‖
                          − Leslie C. Young, Ronald L. Mace Universal Design Institute

Young explained that UD is a relatively new paradigm that emerged from the civil rights movements
for racial and gender equality and from the lack of services and supports for wounded service me mbers
returning from foreign conflicts. These events led to new building codes that included accessible
design and barrier-free features. While these codes are clearly needed, Young indicated that it is
important to remember that they focus only on the bare minimum needed to comply with the law and
might not truly ensure usability by someone with a disability.

Young went on to say that barrier-free design provides a level of accessibility for people with
disabilities but often results in separate and stigmatizing solutions, such as a ramp at a different
building entry rather than at a main entrance with stairs. Moreover, UD recognizes the importance of
how things look.

UD pioneer and visionary, Ron Mace, a nationally and internationally recognized archi tect, product
designer, and educator, coined the term ―Universal Design‖ to describe the concept of designing all
products and the built environment to be aesthetic and usable by all people to the greatest extent

                                                                                                        51
possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. A more philosophical view of UD is
that it is generally democratic and affirms the value of ordinary people rather than upholding the fiction
of an ideal person. UD makes it impossible for society to ignore differences in individual ability and is
democratic in that it respects those differences. In essence, UD strives to be a broad-spectrum solution
that helps everyone, not just people with disabilities, Young said. It is applicable not only to the built
environment, but also to the way information is communicated and how services are provided.

Because people were having trouble understanding the universal design philosophy beyond having
codes and minimum standards, many architects, product designers, engineers, and environmental
design researchers collaborated to establish the following principles to guide the wide range of design
disciplines including products, environments, interiors, housing, architecture, urban planning, and
communications.

SEVEN PRINCIPLES
OF UNIVERSAL DESIGN

• Equitable use
• Flexibility in use
• Simple and intuitive
• Perceptible information
• Tolerance for error
• Low physical effort
• Size and space for approach and use

Young sees ―equitable use‖ as the ultimate UD goal and the other six principles as strategies to achieve
that goal. Ideally, UD incorporates all of these elements in a way that is seamless, invisible and has no
negative impact on the environment or the person‘s self-perspective. In terms of usability, effective
UD would have all people, with and without disabilities, using UD features without even knowing they
are UD features. Whether it is the delivery man pushing a hand truck across the access ramp to enter
an office building more easily, the grocery shopper passing quickly through the automatic entrance
doors, or the traveler using a tactile map with raised lines and bright colors, the features are blended
into the environment and readily usable by all. To illustrate an example of each UD principle, Young
showed several slides.

Young reinforced that UD principles make the workplace more efficient for everyone, including a
growing number of older workers and workers with disabilities, including those with cognitive issues.
UD helps people accomplish everyday tasks such as receiving message alerts without disturbing others,
and makes new things possible for people with disabilities, giving them the ability to travel around a
city or accomplish grocery shopping with a sense of control, and the security of having a phone they
can use.

Many industries, such as those producing telephone, retail, transportation, education, and computer
products, as well as architecture are implementing UD to have a strong market penetration. People
who should recognize the importance of utilizing UD principles are businesses, employers, researchers,
                                                                                                          52
and government officials. Young believes that if universal work environments are built, the use of the
term ―accommodations‖ may not be necessary.

Susan Mazrui
Susan Mazrui explained that a company such as AT&T, an innovator and developer of high-tech
products, with more than 300,000 employees around the world, is interested in UD because it provides
a competitive advantage. In terms of government procurement, for example, UD can be a tipping point
in signing a $20 billion contract. Another reason is that UD addresses the business case that supports
the recruitment and retention of talented employees, including workers with disabilities and older
workers. But the benefits to people without disabilities are also significant. For example, captioning
not only benefits employees who are deaf, but also those with limited English proficiency. Low-
glare/high-contrast features benefit anyone using a visual interface, while talking caller ID benefits
people who cannot get to the phone because they have their hands full.


         ―UD can allow a basic compliance requirement
         to be met while simultaneously opening the door
            to innovation, creativity, and excitement.‖
                                          − Susan Mazrui, AT&T

Furthermore, providing services to people with disabilities enhances the company‘s brand because it
demonstrates that the company cares about its community and customers coming from a range of
backgrounds, abilities, and ages. Finally, legal obligations require adherence to accessible design, and
UD can allow a basic compliance requirement to be met while simultaneously opening the door to
innovation, creativity, and excitement, Mazrui said. AT&T focuses on accessible design not becau se it
is mandated to do so, but because it makes good business sense.

Instead of viewing UD as a constraint on design, AT&T uses it as fodder for innovation. AT&T
recognizes UD necessitates looking at what the user needs from a disability perspective. This
translates into providing choices to address a variety of needs.

One of the issues AT&T has been examining with regard to accessibility is removing barriers to
research and product testing that might inadvertently exclude people with disabilities. For example, in
conducting research, AT&T needs to ask if accessible public transportation is available to the testing
facility, if the testing facility is wheelchair accessible, and whether alternative methods of gathering
information other than a phone survey should be utilized to gauge the views and opinions of those who
are deaf or hard of hearing. Another AT&T imperative is to invite the input and opinions of experts in
disability, including people in the community, parents of children with disabilitie s, and people with
some technical background, for example.


                                                                                                      53
Mazrui said that it is important from the company‘s perspective that such input be obtained for
everything from network engineering to public relations to HR to product development. Given that
many people within the company grew up prior to mainstreaming, many don‘t have a lot of friends
with disabilities or might equate disability with their grandparents. Having personal interaction with
people with disabilities expands employees‘ understanding of their personal needs and choices and
ultimately makes a difference in the products they decide to market.

According to Mazrui, AT&T is also committed to UD and accessibility because they drive down prices
for people with disabilities. And because AT&T has shown commitment to disability issues in the
development of its products, the disability community has been very supportive of the company. Also
helpful is the company‘s internal dialogue about disability. At AT&T, an internal employee group
called IDEAL (Individuals with Disabilities Enabling Advocacy Link) provides excitement and insight
around disability issues and helps employees overcome their own barriers, attitudes, or ignorance about
disability.

Referring to the concept of competitive advantage, Mazrui spoke about AT&T‘s new ―Breeze‖ flip
phone, an easy-to-use phone with helpful features that looks ―cool.‖ The phone retains the simplicity
of dialing a phone number in an uncomplicated fashion, but adds features that are both simple and
intuitive, such as large print, a list of menu items as opposed to icons, voice dialing, and other voice -
activated options. These features are also included in more advanced telephones with additional
options, such as a calendar, music, e-mail, and other productivity tools that other companies have, but
they are both accessible and usable.

Mazrui showed a few slides with additional AT&T products designed with UD principles, such as
captioning on the iPhone, the LG phone, and the 3GLG phones, the latter of which will have the ability
to read aloud or have voice input from the other functions. When AT&T designs for accessibility, the
company looks at empowering its business customers with features that benefit all.

When high-tech products and services such as these are developed and the company wants to be on the
cutting edge, it needs to provide choices. An important part of UD is for a company to stand back from
the idea of developing a specialized product or service and instead look at how the product wil l benefit
a huge number of people. And for people who need more than what would be covered by UD, such as
screen readers, a company needs to consider how it can provide choices so consumers can have a basic
product or one with all the ―bells and whistles.‖

AT&T also offers a national wireless call center for customers with disabilities. It is staffed with
numerous customer-care representatives to assist customers with screen-reading or enlarging
functionality, free 411, and voice-dialing services.

Mazrui said that even though AT&T has a long way to go, the company realizes that working together
with disability organizations and individuals with disabilities is the way to provide UD and
accessibility. This sort of dialogue changes how you look at your co mpany or how you look at
employees and opportunities provided. It provides the tools for a no -lose situation. For companies
ahead of the game, it also provides a competitive advantage.
                                                                                                         54
Deb Russell
Deb Russell shared Walgreens‘ version of UD as implemented in its Anderson, South Carolina
distribution center. Walgreens has made its jobs more accessible to more people, especially those with
cognitive disabilities or autism, as well as those with physical disabilities. In making work stations
accessible and usable, Walgreens uses UD principles.

For example, for shorter workers who may have difficulty seeing items in bins too high for their line of
sight, mirrors are set up above the bins so they can see where the product is when they are reaching for
it. In addition, they can choose to stand on raised platforms.

For other employees, screens provide job aids with words or graphics to remind them about or clarify
tasks related to their job duties, or display graphic cues to tell them the pace of their own productivity
or give them repetitive instructions in real time as they complete different steps for a specific duty.
Men‘s and women‘s restroom doors are distinguished from one another with symbols, tactile clues,
Braille, and text, and locations of emergency evacuation points and purposes of different work stations
are described or set apart with a variety of similar cues.

Walgreens has also used UD principles in developing accessible product-scanning systems. When data
needs to be entered, it can be done via keyboard or mouse. The systems provide four different ways for
product scanning, including fixed scanners in front of or next to employees or handheld scanners.
Also, picture cues supplement the text on the screen. Walgreens also motivates its e mployees with a
system that encourages them to make fewer errors or rewards them for meeting goals.


 ―Walgreens does not use the word ‗accommodation,‘ but
   rather ‗enhancers,‘ because everyone is entitled to
               ‗workplace enhancers.‘‖
                                      − Deb Russell, Walgreen Company

Russell showed a variety of slides showcasing Walgreens‘ use of UD principles at workstations and
throughout the facility. She also showed slides depicting what some of the previous work stations
looked like without UD pri nciples in place. According to Russell, ―Walgreens does not use the word
‗accommodation,‘ but rather ‗enhancers,‘ because everyone is entitled to ‗workplace enhancers.‘‖

Walgreens has worked hard to overcome the perceived stereotypes of what people with disabilities
need. Instead, Walgreens welcomes input from employees with disabilities or disability experts on
what is needed. As a broad example, many stereotypes indicate that people with intellectual disabilities
are childlike. Russell emphasized that Walgreens treats all employees as adults.


                                                                                                        55
Productivity is emphasized at Walgreens. That the workforce accomplishes what it needs to – nothing
more and nothing less – is an important goal. To Walgreens, it doesn't matter who tests well, but rather
who can get the products into the trucks and onto shelves.

WEB SITES OF SPEAKERS’ ORGANIZATIONS

AT&T
http://www.att.com/gen/landing-pages?pid=3309
http://www.att.com/gen/corporate-citizenship?pid=7738
http://www.attideal.org/ideal.asp

IDEAL is an Employee Resource Group that partners with AT&T in raising sensitivity and awareness.

Walgreens
http://www.walgreens.com/about/default.jsp?foot=company_info
http://diversity.walgreens.com/default.html?foot=diversity_site
http://www.walgreensoutreach.com/?foot=outreach

Ronald L. Mace Universal Design Institute
http://www.udinstitute.org

ODEP Resources
Universal Design Fact Sheet: What is universal design, and how can it benefit a business?
http://www.dol.gov/odep/alliances/universal.htm

Good customer service means providing a welcoming environment, respectful treatment, and needed
information. Universal Design provides an important toolset for companies seeking to provide these advantages
for their customers and for their employees, who also want to feel we lcome and respected, and who require
adequate and timely information to do their jobs.

Universal Design for the Workforce Development System Toolkit
http://www.onestops.info/website.php?page=ud_index

This toolkit, developed by the National Center on Workforce and Disability, is a collection of tools, online
training modules, and best-practice findings from the field, all of which are designed to promote a workforce-
development system that is both responsive to local needs and realities, and able to meet the needs of its diverse
businesses and career seeker customers. Taken together, these tools form a comprehensive system evaluation
and change curriculum which users can customize to best meet their state and local needs.



THEME 5: SELF-EMPLOYMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

                                                                                                                56
Moderator: Jennifer Kemp, Senior Policy Advisor, ODEP

Speakers: Joyce Bender, CEO/President, Bender Consulting Services, Inc.

James M. (Jamey) Young, Vice-President and Senior Relationship Manager, Juneau Business Banking
Group, Wells Fargo Bank

Mike Haynie, Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, Whitman School of Management, Syracuse
University

Theme: Self-employment and entrepreneurship as employment options for people with disabilities and
the advantages and challenges of this option.

(Speaker handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site at http://www.odepsummit.org/agenda.html.)


Jennifer Kemp
Kemp set the stage for the speakers‘ discussion by noting that an increasing number of Americans with

                                                                                                         57
and without disabilities see entrepreneurship as an attractive employment option. The self -employment
option offers an alternate avenue for economic self-sufficiency for people with disabilities. She
provided the following statistics about self-employment:

• People with disabilities are twice as likely to be entrepreneurs as people without disabilities
  (U.S. Census Bureau).
• A recent survey by Junior Achievement found that 68 percent of youth – not just youth in Junior
  Achievement – have an interest in becoming entrepreneurs even though it is perceived as hard
  work.
• Retirees are interested in entrepreneurship.

Joyce Bender
Joyce Bender is an entrepreneur who began her company, Bender Consulting Services, 13 years ago.
When she began her venture, people told her it was a foolish idea and would not work. The company
focuses on promoting the movement of people with disabilities into full-time, competitive careers, and
Bender has proved the naysayers wrong.

Bender Consulting Services staffs client companies with qualified applicants with disabilities. After
client companies review and accept a candidate, that person is hired by Bender Consulting and serves in
a consultant capacity to the client. In addition to a salary, all Bender employees receive health care. Six
to nine months later, if the consultant performs well for the client, he or she becomes an employee of the
client.

At the heart of Bender‘s company is a determined entrepreneurial spirit. Bender believes that ―for
many Americans with disabilities, finding employment can be a difficult process, and entrepreneurship
provides an attractive alternative to the job search.‖

According to Bender, key elements of entrepreneurship include:

1. Vision–Entrepreneurs need to believe in their vision and have the courage to see it through
   despite any adversity they may face.
2. Education–Entrepreneurship involves all facets of business, from marketing to banking. To
   make informed decisions and ensure that a startup company runs smoothly, entrepreneurs must
   be well educated. Sometimes that education means knowing that someone needs to be hired to
   perform a task.
3. Perseverance –The business world is filled with ups and downs, but to be a successful
   entrepreneur one must work hard and never give up on a goal.
4. Integrity–Without integrity, an entrepreneur is destined for failure. Success stems from an
   unrelenting dedication to both the goal and authenticity.

Jamey Young

                                                                                                         58
Jamey Young approached the topic from t he perspective of a banker with Wells Fargo. He recently
began assisting people with disabilities in entrepreneurial ventures when he was recruited by an ODEP
grantee, Self-Employment Technical Assistance, Resources, & Training (START-UP/USA) Alaska.

Young stated that he strongly believes that people gain value and self-worth when they feel like they
are productive members of society. Prior to advising START-UP/USA, Young did not realize how
significant self-employment could be to the well-being of people with disabilities.

He offered the following guidance to both entrepreneurs and service providers:

1. Be Direct–Entrepreneurs must tell private-sector staff what they can do to be of assistance.
2. Watch Credit Scores –As the credit culture becomes more refined and driven toward a credit-
scoring model, entrepreneurs need to understand their credit scores. According to Young, credit
reports have the ability to determine the fate of an entrepreneur. Banks looking at past credit reports
may deem candidates as high risk and deny their request for start-up capital. Recent legislation enables
consumers to request a free annual credit report. Ensuring the accuracy of these reports will prevent
problems from arising in the future.
3. Learn about Resources – Entrepreneurs have a variety of resources available to them. The Small
Business Administration (SBA) is an invaluable resource that provides capital, programs, and a wealth
of information. This information can be used to develop general business plans, strengthen areas of
difficulty, and promote networking and the building of partnerships.



Mike Haynie
Mike Haynie is a veteran who served for 14 years before retiring in 2006. At the time of his
retirement, the number of disabled veterans leaving the armed forces staggered him. To date, it is
estimated that since 2001, more than one million soldiers have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of
these, 300,000 now have disabilities.


  ―Entrepreneurship enables people with disabilities to
        provide for themselves and their families.
Entrepreneurship also provides flexible accommodations
     for people with disabilities. And perhaps most
importantly, it allows former service members to create a
                 bridge to a new identity.‖
                                    − Mike Haynie, Syracuse University

                                                                                                        59
Looking at the academic research available, Haynie remarked that ―Entrepreneurship enables people
with disabilities to provide for themselves and their families. Entrepreneurship also provides flexible
accommodations for people with disabilities. And perhaps most importantly, it allows former service
members to create a bridge to a new identity.‖ Yet this information was not reaching recently disabled
veterans in a practical way. So Haynie and his colleagues created the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for
Veterans with Disabilities (EBV).

EBV is a 15-month process. Phase I is an online course. Phase II gathers the veterans at university
business schools for eight to 10 days. Over the course of this ―boot camp,‖ the vetera ns are exposed to
accomplished entrepreneurs and learn about marketing, banking, and other strategies for success.
Phase III involves 12 months of ongoing faculty support and mentoring.

The first EBV had 20 veterans. Since that initial program, nine businesses have been successfully
started. The program itself is run at no cost to the participants, with funding derived from private
investors and participating business schools.

Part of the reason it was so successful, according to Haynie, is business sc hools are teaching what they
know best. Competency is a key issue, as those who develop similar programs must understand the
nature of entrepreneurship to ensure that subsequent programs are as rigorous and successful. In 2008,
the program is being replicated at UCLA‘s Anderson School of Management, Florida State
University‘s College of Business, and Texas A&M‘s Mays Business School.

The ensuing discussion centered on the following points:

• In rural areas, self-employment is often the only employment option.
• Through Griffin-Hammis Associates, a partner with ODEP‘s funded START-UP/USA initiative,
  ODEP is promoting self-employment as a viable option for people with disabilities.
• Government contracts should provide opportunities to service-disabled veteran-owned
  businesses. It was noted that the three percent of procurement targets are missed annually
  because companies cannot find veteran-owned businesses with which to subcontract. EBV is
  working to create small businesses to meet this need.

WEB SITES OF SPEAKERS’ ORGANIZATIONS

Self-Employment Technical Assistance, Resources, & Training
(START-UP/USA)
http://www.start- up-usa.biz/

Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV)
http://whitman.syr.edu/ebv/

Bender Consulting Services, Inc.
http://www.benderconsult.com/index2.html
                                                                                                       60
ODEP Resources

Self-Employment Technical Assistance, Resources, & Training (START-UP/USA)
http://www.start- up-usa.biz/about/index.cfm

START-UP/USA is a partnership between Virginia Commonwealth University and
Griffin-Hammis and Associates, LLC that is funded by a cooperative agreement from ODEP. The project
provides technical assistance and disseminates resources nationally to individuals interested in pursuing self-
employment.

Job Accommodation Network‘s Entrepreneurship Web Site
http://www.jan.wvu.edu/entre/

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) provides information, counseling, and referrals
about self-employment and small business ownership opportunities for people with disab ilities. The Web site
provides numerous entrepreneurship resources.

Road to Self-Sufficiency: A Guide to Entrepreneurship for Youth with Disabilities
http://www.ncwd-youth.info/resources_&_Publications/entrepreneurship_guide.html

This guide from the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD/Youth) addresses
how entrepreneurship education can be implemented in programs and offers suggestions on how to introduce
self-employment as an option for all youth, including youth with disabilities.




THEME 6: M ENTAL HEALTH: WORKPLACE SUPPORTS AND SOLUTIONS




                                                                                                                  61
Facilitator: Susan Parker, Director, Division of Policy Development, ODEP

Moderator: Shirley Davis, Director of Diversity Initiatives, Society for Human Resource Management
(SHRM)

Speakers: Hyong Un, M.D., National Medical Director, Behavioral Health, Aetna, Inc.

Clare Miller, Director, Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, American Psychiatric Association

Lisa Cuozzo Stern, Director of Operations, MontgomeryWorks!

(Speaker handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site at http://www.odepsummit.org/agenda.html.)

Susan Parker
Susan Parker provided introductory remarks, stating that in 2003, ODEP defined mental health in the
workplace as a topic worthy of policy development activity based on published data documenting the
lowered productivity in America‘s workplaces due to mental health issues. These data were reinforced
by data drawn from developed countries and published by the International L abour Organization and
World Health Organization in Geneva. ODEP has improved employment opportunities for people with
mental health needs through its Customized Employment and Youth Transition demonstration projects,
as well as its leadership of the Employment Work Group of the Federal Partners in Mental Health
Transformation, and DOL‘s Mental Health Work Group.

Parker indicated that ODEP cannot do the job alone. She further indicated that the most effective
solutions to mental health issues in today‘s public- and private-sector workplaces necessitate the use of
partnerships, and that such a premise stimulated the design of the current panel and presentations.



Shirley Davis
                                                                                                         62
Shirley Davis explained that her role as Director of Diversity Initiatives at SHRM is to ensure that
resources are provided to human resources and diversity practitioners who work full -time to ensure
they are building diverse and inclusive cultures within their organizations. She stated that diversity is
viewed in its broadest sense and includes people with different religious backgrounds, ethnicities,
sexual orientations, and people with disabilities. It is her opinion that the things that make each
individual unique are good for business. And perhaps even more importantly, Da vis said that investing
in mentally healthy workforces is also good for business because it lowers medical costs and
absenteeism and increases productivity.


           ―The SHRM philosophy stresses that diversity
            is good business. Employee health includes
                     mental health wellness.‖
                       − Shirley Davis, Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)



Dr. Hyong Un
Dr. Un explained that mental illnesses are very common in the U.S, affecting 20 -28 percent of the
population. About 10 percent have very serious mental illnesses such as major depression, bipolar
disorder, and schizophrenia. In 2003, about 9.2 percent of all individuals aged 18 and older in the U.S.
(19.6 million) experienced a serious mental illness (Center for Mental Health Services, 2004). The rate
of mental illness in the U.S. workforce for those aged 18–54 is 23 percent, or 27.9 million employees
(Hertz & Baker, 2000).




                                                                                                       63
Dr. Un further indicated that treatment rates are low for adults. In any given year, only 13.2 percent receive
treatment (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2004). The treatment rate of
privately-insured populations is an even lower 5.5 percent (National Committee for Quality Assurance,
2002).

For those with chronic medical illnesses such as chronic pain or diabetes, the incidence of depression is
almost double the expected rate in the general population. Of those with chronic pain, 52 percent have
depression (Pincus HA. J Clin Psychiatry. 2001; 62 Suppl 6:5-9; Schatzberg AF. J Clin Psychiatry.
2004; 65 Suppl 12:3-4).

Dr. Un explained that when factors contributing to work impairment are examined, depression usually
ranks number one or two, with substance abuse and panic disorders following depression. Dr. Un
indicated that employers ultimately pay for the poor treatment of depression, whether or not they
acknowledge it, because people with depression utilize the medical system in a different way than
those without depression. Depression has an impact not only on productivity, but also health care
costs, because those who have chronic medical conditions and depression do not do as well medically
and account for 80 percent of health care costs.

Dr. Un explained that Aetna‘s Depression Initiative employs a Behavioral Health Strategy model to
address these issues. Aetna focuses on the person holistically, looking not only at the employee‘s
behavioral health diagnosis, but also at their other life-related issues such as financial problems.
Aetna‘s Depression Initiative has three major components: 1) Depression disease management; 2)
Depression in primary care; and 3) Medical/Psychological Case Management.

Aetna uses standardized depression screening tools because effective treatment depends on effective
                                                                                                           64
screening, and it is difficult to gauge how severely depressed people are. Aetna screens every member
who reaches them through other medical disease management pathways, and about 20 percent of those
individuals have depression. Aetna also encourages collaboration between medical and behavioral
health providers, conducts outreach, and provides its employees with decision support tools.

A case-managed control study of 1,756 members with depression conducted by Aetna
yielded the following information:

1) Under-treating depression significantly affects health care and work;
2) Higher behavioral health care costs are offset by lowered medical care costs;
3) Members are much more apt to stay on antidepressant medications;
4) Total medical costs did not change significantly;
5) 43 percent of members with major depression achieve full remission as defined by Aetna‘s scoring.


     ―The workplace...pays for the poor treatment of
   depression. Aetna recognizes that effectively helping
  employees means that ... situations in their lives and the
         work environment must be addressed.‖
                                         − Dr. Hyong Un, Aetna, Inc.

Dr. Un stressed the important role that primary care physicians play in Aetna‘s program. He indicated
that Aetna pays primary care doctors to screen for depression because many people with even more
serious levels of depression do not go to a psychiatrist for a number of reasons. Dr. Un stressed ―The
workplace . . . pays for the poor treatment of depression. Aetna recognizes that effectively helping
employees means that . . . situations in their lives and the work environment must be addressed.‖

An audience member asked how Aetna reassures its employees with mental health issues that this
information will not be shared or affect their potential future employment. Dr Un indicated that in
addition to stressing adherence to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
and other privacy rules, Aetna creates an environment without stigma that utilizes champions that
advocate for depression screening in the workplace, and by conducting screening and openly talking
about mental health related issues.

Clare Miller
Clare Miller discussed the American Psychiatric Foundation‘s Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, an
educational program executed in collaboration with employers and the American Psychiatric Association
(APA). The Partnership‘s mission is to advance effective employer approaches to mental health. Its
membership includes well-known corporate names drawn from several industrial sectors, private nonprofit
organizations (health and mental health), and trade organizations.
                                                                                                           65
The Partnership focuses on the business case for addressing mental health and shares ideas about how
employers can take action. Accordingly, educational materials are delivered to employers and employees on a
broad range of mental health topics. For example, Mental Health Works is a free quarterly newsletter that
describes corporate approaches to mental health and contains concise summaries of research.

In addition, the Partnership has developed two electronic tools for employers that talk about the cost impact of
depression and alcoholism in the workplace. These tools allow companies to input information related to their
company, industry type, size, and location. They then receive a detailed report that lets them know the costs
they are expending in terms of absenteeism and what the return on investment would be if the employees
received the treatment they needed. There is also a tool that can help employers choose health care plans based
on quality and not just costs.

The Partnership also provides a forum for businesses to explore mental health issues and share innovative
solutions. ―Employer Innovations Online‖ is a Web-based, searchable database that profiles employers‘
innovative programs and practices for addressing mental health at the workplace. The database is used to
identify and manage mental health-related areas that impact work performance, and connects decision makers
with research on outcomes of such approaches as told from the employer‘s perspective.

Included among the mental health practices highlighted in the Employer Innovations Online database are:



MENTAL HEALTH PRACTICES

1. Employee assistance programs;
2. Disability/case management;
3. Integration/partnerships;
4. Mental health plans/benefit designs; and
5. Pharmacy benefits.


The Partnership also develops resources for employees. For example, the Healthy Minds.org Web site provides
information for consumers about effective treatments. The Partnership has also developed tip sheets on going
back to school and dealing with Winter Blues and a large number of Let‘s Talk Facts brochures.

Employers within the Partnership are taking action to effect organizational changes that promote the hiring and
retention of workers recovering from mental illness in the following ways:

1. Using their purchasing power to leverage the system and demand quality treatment from their vendors;
2. Ensuring that their employees are aware of how to access their benefits to get the care they need;
3. Demonstrating that employees with mental health difficulties make highly productive employees;
4. Actively campaigning to lift the stigma of mental illness by directly facing the workplace issues;
5. Working with sponsors of conferences and forums to describe what policies and practices work best to
   insure greatest employee productivity;
                                                                                                              66
6. Initiating education programs about employees and mental health recovery from such reliable
   information sources as SHRM and APA;
7. Designing health plans with parity between mental health benefits equal to those for physical health,
   complementing other diversity programs with the employee, in mind; and
8. Providing education to new employees at the worksite about mental illnesses, their impact on work,
   and the importance of seeking treatment.

Public awareness about the importance of mental health in the workplace has increased, Miller said. In
addition, due to advances in treatment, more people with mental illness are working. Spillover to management
practices and the costs to employers of doing nothing are evident. Miller summed up the current state of affairs
by stating, ―Finally we are moving beyond what the problem is to what we can do about it. An employer has to
strategically address this issue rather than just throw money at it.‖

When asked about whether Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) are still a viable model, Miller replied that it
was an open question because they vary greatly and that it really depends on how the program is structured.
Reinforcing Miller‘s comments, Dr. Un indicated that EAPs can offer a valuable set of services but they tend to
be underutilized, and are often not promoted effectively by either employers or the actual EAP providers.

Lisa Cuozzo Stern
DOL‘s more than 3,000 One-Stop Career Centers across the country provide employment and training
assistance to both job seekers and employers. Funding is provided through DOL to the states and then to state
Workforce Investment Boards for eventual distribution at the local level. Although every One-Stop across the
country has a series of services they are required to provide under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), they
all look and are called something different. ―The mission of the One-Stop is to help people find jobs and jobs
find people,‖ Stern stated.

Lisa Cuozzo Stern, from MontgomeryWorks!, the One-Stop in Montgomery County, Maryland, stressed that
One-Stops do not provide disability employment. Rather, they provide employment-related services to any job
seeker over the age of 16 and offer employers a variety of traditional and nontraditional business solutions. For
example, employers can post job listings for free and the One-Stop can conduct outreach and liaison activities to
better connect the employer with the community. In addition, the One-Stop can perform job matching, provide
labor market and tax incentive information, and assist employers in evaluating their training and other
employment-related needs.

Other traditional One-Stop services available to employers include (1) coordinating rapid response
outplacement services during employer lay-offs or downsizing and (2) conducting on-the-spot interviews with
interested candidates and working with a professional team to tailor recruiting events to meet a company‘s
current and future workforce needs.


  ―The mission of the One-Stop is to help people find jobs
                  and jobs find people.‖
                                                                                                              67
                                     − Lisa Cuozzo Stern, MontgomeryWorks!

Other less traditional recruitment assistance available includes employer forums, where information about a
company‘s mission, career pathways, training and benefits are presented on behalf of an employer to potential
employees. In addition, WIA funding can be used to subsidize trial work experiences so that both the job
seeker and the employer can determine if the match is a good fit. Employers may also be eligible to receive on-
the-job training reimbursement.

One-Stops provide coordinated outreach to assist employers in hiring a diverse and often untapped labor force,
including workers with all types of disabilities. As part of this, they frequently partner with mental health
providers to assist employers in making their workplaces mental- health friendly and can provide staff training.

Additional resources include the Disability Program Navigators, who deliver One-Stop information and
resources to employers and employees, which often include a link to mental health services. Other frequently
used resources include:

1. The Employer Assistance & Resource Network (EARN) (http://www.earnworks.com), a free, ODEP- funded
service connecting employers looking for quality employees with skilled job candidates
2. Disability and Business Technical Assistance Centers (DBTACs) (http://www.adata.org), ten regional
programs providing broad services for current information, referrals, resources, and training on the Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA).
3. Employment Incentives (http://www.employmentincentives.com), which offers information about the
financial incentives available to businesses to make their worksites and Web sites accessible and hire
individuals with disabilities.
4. Mental Health Services Locator (http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/databases/), which gives the user
comprehensive and geographically- specific information about available mental health services a nd resources
helpful to professionals, consumers and their families, and the public.

Conclusion
Investment by employers in positive mental health in the workplace improves productivity and the
bottom- line.


WEB SITES OF SPEAKERS’ ORGANIZATIONS

Self-Employment Technical Assistance, Resources, & Training (START-UP/USA)
http://www.start-up-usa.biz/

Society for Human Resource Management
http://shrm.org/
http://shrm.org/diversity/

                                                                                                               68
Partnership for Workplace Mental Health
http://www.workplacementalhealth.or g/index.aspx
http://www.workplacementalhealth.org/employer_resources/index.aspx

Aetna, Inc.
http://www.aetna.com/index.htm
http://www.aetna.com/about/index.html
http://www.aetna.com/about/aetna/
http://www.aetna.com/about/america/
http://www.aetna.com/a bout/aetna/diversity/
http://www.aetnabehavioralhealth.com/BH/

MontgomeryWorks!
http://www.montgomeryworks.com/

ODEP Resources

Entering the World of Work: What Youth with Mental Health Needs Should Know about
Accommodations
http://www.dol.gov/odep/pubs/fact/transitioning.htm
This fact sheet provides guidance to assist youth with mental health needs in making a successful
transition into the workforce by answering questions regarding disclosure, accommodations and
providing resources.

Tunnels and Cliffs: A Guide for Workforce Development Practitioners and Policymakers serving
Youth with Mental Health Needs
http://www.ncwd-youth.info/assets/guides/mental_health/Mental_Health_Guide_complete.pdf
This guide was developed for youth service practitioners and policy makers to help them improve
service and systems for youth with mental health needs.

Navigating Tunnels and Cliffs: Empowering Families and Caregivers to Assist Youth with Mental
Health Needs in Preparing for Work
http://www.ncwd-youth.info/assets/short_cuts/shortcut_005.pdf
This document summarizes the challenges facing families and caregivers of youth and young adults
with mental health needs and provides resources to assist them in helping the young person prepare for
a career and community life. It also offers an action plan for parents and caretakers to make
coordination and collaboration of mental health services and career preparation a priority.

Mental Health Case Study Report: Transitioning Youth with Mental Health Needs to Meaningful Employment
and Independent Living
http://www.ncwd-youth.info/assets/reports/mental_health_case_study_report.pdf
NCWD/Youth, with funding from ODEP, carried out case study research on successful strategies to help youth
with mental health needs transition to pos tsecondary education, employment, and independent lives. With a
                                                                                                         69
focus primarily on the role of skills development, work, and career exploration, five promising program sites
were examined and program design features and system -level policies that appear to help youth and young
adults with mental health conditions better transition into adulthood and life -long success were identified.




THEME 7: ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: DRIVING RESULTS
Moderator: Richard Horne, Director, Division of Policy, Planning, and Research, ODEP

Speakers: Lori Golden, AccessAbilities Leader, Ernst & Young

Tammie McNaughton, Director, Corporate Diversity and Work Life, Highmark

Peter Blanck, University Professor and Chairman, Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University

Themes: (1) demographics, (2) inclusiveness, (3) organizational structures.

(Speaker handouts are available on the ODEP Summit Web site at http://www.odepsummit.org/agenda.html.)

Richard Horne asked three theme-focused questions to the speakers.

DEMOGRAPHICS
Please describe your organization’s demographics and how your organization operates.

Lori Golden
Lori Golden explained that Ernst & Young is one of the largest, best-known accounting firms in the
world. Approximately two-thirds of the employees work in financial services, while the remaining
third are in ―infrastructure roles‖ (e.g., human resources, internal finance, administrative services, etc.)

Most employees at Ernst & Young are ―experienced hires,‖ with the exception of campus recruits.
Most employees tend to be fairly young with an average retirement age of 62. About 40 percent of the
workforce is ―Generation X‖ (which roughly includes those born between 1964 and 1980) and
―Generation Y‖ (which roughly includes those born after 1980). Within ap proximately six years, 60
percent of Ernst & Young staff will be members of ―Generation Y.‖

Ernst & Young follows a matrix structure, in which decisions are made through gaining the consensus
of many employees. This structure often makes the decision-making process time consuming, in turn
making changes in corporate culture slower to occur. Ultimately, though, this method results in a lot of
―buy-in‖ from employees and the changes that do ensue take root and last. Changes in culture impact
how Ernst & Young raises disability awareness.
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Ernst & Young is highly decentralized, with twelve geographic locations. Across locations, employees
from each service group are dispersed (e.g., auditing, taxes, and transaction advisory).

   Tammie McNaughton
Highmark, McNaughton explained, ―is one of the largest Blue Cross Blue Shield plans [in] the nation.‖
The company has 19,000 staff members, produces 12.6 billion dollars, and processes 128.8 million
claims each year. Highmark is in the process of a merger with a group in Philadelphia that will double
these numbers. Headquartered in Pittsburgh, Highmark has a $2.5 billion economic impact in
Pennsylvania.

People are Highmark‘s business. The company serves people of all abilities, backgrounds, races,
religions, and sexual orientations. The company takes these differences into consideration as an
organization.

In the western Pennsylvania region (Allegheny County), more people are dying than are being born.
The average age of Highmark employees is 47. The company has an employee population that has
stayed for several years.

At Highmark, the playing field is leveled for new hires with disabilities as well as ―long-termers‖ with
disabilities. When the merger is final, Highmark will have a workforce that is eve n older than the
average. Therefore, it needs to look at its disability employment options as it moves forward, since an
aging workforce will usually have more employees with disabling conditions.

INCLUSIVENESS
Why focus on inclusiveness?

Tammie McNaughton
Highmark is a place where respect, credibility, and fairness build trust. Highmark takes pride in its
employees‘ camaraderie, as it is important to create an environment where everyone feels engaged and
included. At Highmark, an employee doesn‘t forget the employee at the next desk. Employees are
included regardless of whether they have a different background, a disability, or a different set of skills.

Highmark holds quarterly disability awareness sessions to educate employees about how to work with
persons with disabilities. When they started these sessions, employees came forward to indicate how
helpful they found them.


         ―Highmark is a place where respect, credibility,
                  and fairness build trust.‖
                                                                                                         71
                                        - Tammie McNaughton, Highmark

Respect for diversity is embedded in everything the company does. Highmark also relies on referring
many of their resources to the Job Accommodation Network to help with diversity issues. When a
request for proposals (RFPs) comes along, Highmark reviews the disability perspective. The company
attracts business because of the work it does with diversity and disability.

Lori Golden
Ernst & Young believes that inclusiveness makes good business sense. First and foremost, the
company believes that talent is needed in whatever packages it comes. With a shortage of accountants,
the company is always looking for individuals with the proper skill set.

Ernst & Young doesn‘t simply hire people with disabilities; it provides opportunities for them to
advance within the company. Once Ernst & Young brings in a new employee, the company provides
all the appropriate tools, resources, information, and opportunities for advancement. The organization
creates a culture where persons with disabilities feel understood, respected, an d supported. This
attitude extends beyond employees with disabilities. Working in teams is a core value at Ernst &
Young, and the company wants to bring in the best and brightest. Even with the right tools, however,
the company understands that people need to work in a culture in which they feel understood.


    ―Ernst & Young . . . believes that inclusiveness makes
     good business sense . . . and that talent is needed in
           whatever packages the talent comes.‖
                                        − Lori Golden, Ernst & Young

Ernst & Young emphasizes creating a culture where people are aware of disability issues. Employees
are educated on the etiquette and language surrounding disabilities, as well as some of the day-to-day
concerns employees with disabilities might have. That way, not only do people with disabilities feel
comfortable, but so does everyone else within the organization. They believe that such education
empowers their teams.

Tammie McNaughton
At Highmark, management‘s perception is that intellectual disabilities are not the type of disabilities
people are comfortable disclosing. However, the company administers tests for customer service and
other administrative positions, so intellectual disabilities may be uncovered during this process. If an
individual has not disclosed an intellectual disability and the testing reveals that or she is not a good
                                                                                                            72
match for the position, Highmark addresses the issues. Highmark has experienced success with hiring
individuals with intellectual disabilities and currently employs some successful employees with Down
syndrome.

Lori Golden
Ernst & Young expects to pilot a program to address the hiring of persons with intellectual disabilities.
The program will partner with an agency to hire persons with intellectual disabilities for ―mail room‖
types of positions at the company‘s New York headquarters. For about 11 years, Ernst & Young has
staffed the mail room of their Hartford office exclusively with individuals from the local Arc. The
challenge for Ernst & Young is finding vacant positions, as the company has very little turnover.

Ernst & Young has received inquiries, however, from the human resources field about performance
issues that seem to be related to learning differences. To address this, the company will host an event
focused on learning disabilities in the workplace.

Also, Ernst & Young realizes that transitioning from college to the working world (i.e., transitioning to
a less-structured environment) can be difficult for young people with learning disabilities. While in
school, young people may be using accommodations and taking medication, but when they transition to
the world of work, employers don‘t always know how to support their success.

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

What structures, policies, and values support your efforts?

Lori Golden
At Ernst & Young, within the human resources function, the ―Centers for Expertise‖ have come
together to focus on inclusiveness. About a dozen employees are responsible for promoting flexibility
and inclusiveness around all kinds of differences, but they specifically focus on gender, ethnicity,
sexual orientation, and people with disabilities.

Leaders within the company champion efforts to promote inclusiveness and flexibility through
programs and education, with at least one of these leaders in each of Ernst & Young‘s 12 geographic
regions. The AccessAbilities™ network meets once per month by conference call to discuss ways in
which they can improve conditions for employees with disabilities. They vet different strategies, offer
advice on deliverables, and offer guidance. They also work across functional groups that get involved
when disability issues are relevant to their mission for example, working with the real estate group on
designing an accessible building.

Ernst & Young has also spearheaded larger training efforts that are implemented within their functional
areas, geographic locations, and/or their service lines. In addition, the company has produced
educational materials and ensured that they are leveraged in many different co ntexts throughout the
firm.
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Tammie McNaughton
At Highmark, the diversity group is housed within Human Resources (HR), which ensures facilities are
accessible, works with leadership, and partners with relevant groups. Within their facilities group, for
example, HR ensures that proper accommodations are made for employees.

For interested employees, Highmark has offered American Sign Language (ASL) training at lunch-
time and now has a lunch group that continues to meet and communicates only through ASL.

Highmark‘s budget for accommodations is maintained by its HR department. Therefore, managers
never need to think about the cost of accommodations.

Highmark is reviewing issues regarding accessible technology and making sure that all of its business
systems are fully accessible. To do this, Highmark is working with IBM and taking recommendations
from persons with disabilities.

Once a disability initiative was underway at Highmark, the number of interested individuals increased.
The company participates in programs such as National Disability Mentoring Day and has incorporated
diversity awareness into performance reviews. Through these and other activities, Highmark sends a
message of inclusiveness.

Peter Blanck
Peter Blanck explained that ODEP has funded a consortium of university researchers that is working to
develop a standardized protocol for setting benchmarks for the hiring of individuals with disabilities.
Using a variety of research methods, including nearly 700 surveys and interviews to date, the
researchers have contacted and obtained data from a number of model employers. The results of the
study will allow the researchers to examine commonalities and differences across organizations, and to
see how business outcomes are affected by the hiring of people with disabilities.

The results will also shed light on which employers go beyond minimal compliance and provide
employees with disabilities with promotions, advancement, and meaningful career opportunities.
Blanck said he hopes that the results will reach the 99.9 percent of employers who did not attend
ODEP‘s Summit, but can perhaps learn from them. Blanck commended the employers, many of whom
already conduct significant research themselves, for cooperating with the consortium.

Questions and Answers
In response to an audience question on how the study looks at organizational readiness, Blanck noted
that seven years ago, when the issue was couched in terms of a ―disability employment initiative,‖
people were fearful of this concept and by the prospect of entering unfamiliar territory in working with
a person with a disability. ―Now that the discussion has evolved and disability has become one of the
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many differences that employers include in diversity initiatives, the practice of hiring people with
disabilities successfully ‗gels‘ with employers,‖ Blanck posits. This trend is particularly true when
managers who are intimidated or fearful about hiring people with disabilities take the time to learn
about people with disabilities who work hard for the organization and, as such, are successful.

Blanck noted that it is also important to look at accountability concerning the hiring of people with
disabilities, and to include this issue in the performance evaluations of managers responsible for
promoting it. Managers who demonstrate commitment to the hiring of people with disabilities should
be rewarded at the time of their performance evaluations. Golden noted that Ernst & Young includes
such a diversity element as part of managers‘ performance evaluations. McNaughton noted that at
Highmark additional inclusiveness measures are the numbers of prospective employees with
disabilities that self-select Highmark as a potential employer and the numbers of employees that
disclose their disabilities and ask for accommodations.

        ―Now that the discussion has evolved and that disability has
       become one of the many differences that employers include in
          diversity initiatives, the practice of hiring people with
             disabilities successfully ‗gels‘ with employers.‖
                           − Peter Blanck, Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University

In response to another question, Blanck agreed with the hypothesis that, from a market -based approach,
there is a competitive advantage to being a model employer of people with disabilities. In support of
his point, Blanck cited a recent study he conducted with a colleague that looked at 30,000 employees
and found, after examining wages, productivity, and company outcomes, significant positive results
related to employees‘ job tenure and diversity.

WEB SITES OF SPEAKERS’ ORGANIZATIONS

Ernst and Young
http://www.ey.com/global/Content.nsf/US/About_Ernst_Young_-_Disabilities

Highmark
https://www.highmark.com/hmk2/index.shtml
https://www.highmark.com/hmk2/about/mission/diversityinitcommit.shtml

Burton Blatt Institute
http://bbi.syr.edu

ODEP Resources
Effective Interaction: Communicating With and About People
                                                                                                        75
with Disabilities in the Workplace
http://www.dol.gov/odep/pubs/fact/effectiveinteraction.htm

Preparing the Workplace for Everyone
http://www.dol.gov/odep/pubs/ep/preparing2.htm

This publication, written by the Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and
Individuals with Disabilities, Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness in the Workplace, is meant to
serve as a launching point for Federal agencies as they re-evaluate and strengthen their Occupant
Emergency Plans (OEPs).



FUTURE DIRECTIONS:
STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOPS – JUNE 4, 2008
Following the breakfast plenary on June 4, four concurrent Future Directions workshops featured
discussions among the Summit‘s four key stakeholder audiences: employers, Federal and state
partners, interest and advocacy groups, and academics. Each audience reflected on three central
questions related to what has been inhibiting and what needs to happen to increase the employment of
individuals with disabilities.

The questions were:

1. From your perspective, what do you see as the most significant barriers to employment
   of Americans with disabilities in the workplace of the 21st Century?

2. As the policy lead for the Federal government in disability employment, what changes
   in policy/practice does ODEP need to create to eliminate these barriers?

3. What should the role of this particular stakeholder group be to support the employment of
   people with disabilities? In what ways can we work with the Federal government to make it
   happen?

In each hour-long session, the facilitators, chosen for their affiliation with the particular stakeholder
group and their expertise in disability employment policy, guided the discussions. Each session had
20-40 attendees, mainly from the associated stakeholder group but also with representation from other
groups. At the Summit‘s closing session, workshop facilitators shared the thoughts of their respective
stakeholder group with all attendees. Participants‘ responses to the questions reveal their vision of
effective policies and practices, as well as noting the gaps they see that need to be bridged.




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F UTURE DIRECTIONS: EMPLOYERS
Facilitator: John Kemp, Principal, Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville PC, and President, U.S. Business
Leadership Network

From your perspective, what do you see as the most significant barriers to employment
of Americans with disabilities in the workplace of the 21st Century?

• Attitudinal barriers are a significant barrier, not only in HR but throughout the organization.
  Training helps, but it‘s still a barrier.
• A great divide exists between Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and employers.
• Researchers spend time researching and asking the same questions, particularly on what the
  barriers are to employment of people with disabilities.
• Fortune 500 companies in finance are looking to hire people with disabilities and they asked
  ―where are they?‖ They want to know how to tap into this population.
• Employers do not know the local resources, local people who can connect them to qualified
  applicants with disabilities.
• Upper senior level and middle management do not feel safe disclosing their disability – need to
  make a culture shift.
• Disincentives related to Social Security.
• Many Vocational Rehabilitation staff tell their clients not to disclose their disabilities to
  employers, which is a barrier. The VR relationship is an issue.
• The Federal government‘s various definitions of disability.
• Listening to the language of employers at the Summit, perhaps the best word isn‘t
  ―accommodations‖ but ―tools.‖
• Disabled vets aren‘t seeing themselves as being ―disabled‖ – they need to be pulled into the
  disability community.

As the policy lead for the Federal government in disability employment, what changes
in policy/practice does ODEP need to create to eliminate these barriers?

• Focus on telework for people who cannot work outside of the home, e.g., call centers. A barrier
  is the lack of education on telework resources and options.
• Policy changes need to start in education, start kids young and entice them where they feel
  their engagement and interests are.
• The next generation is forcing employers to be technologically savvy, but also to be aware of the
  accessibility issues involved. The younger workforce is tapping into systems like Second Life,
  where they‘re posting jobs and participating in job fairs.
• A need for the technology infrastructure and tech tools to empower (accommodate) potential
  applicants with disabilities. Technology will be the differentiator–the harmonizer or the
  divider. (For example, Facebook and MySpace are not accessible).
• Research is needed on the accessibility of emerging technologies where social
  collaboration/networking is happening.
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• State and Federal tax credits, incentives. Employers need to know what incentives are available.
• Reviews of companies‘ annual reports and at their disability affinity groups. Have they been
  effective? What investments made by companies have worked? Can they be replicated?
• Add people with disabilities to the contracting status of minority-owned businesses. Spread the
   wealth for subcontracting.
• The new BLS data point on people with disabilities presents a huge opportunity for
   awareness-raising, visibility, and advertising.
• Money should be spent on doing a survey of the skill sets that are needed in business, do a
   business-to-business survey.
• Spend money on letting business educate and train. Develop high-quality training. Develop a
   government-sponsored ―cookbook‖ on disability training.
• The Federal government needs to continue to pay health care costs of people with disabilities
   when they are employed – public/private partnerships, Medicaid Buy-ins, and other patchwork
  type solutions. How does America get to the point where adequate health care insurance is
   available for all people?
• Is detection and identification of disabilities done early enough to address return-to-work
  issues?

What should the role of employers be to support the employment of people
with disabilities? In what ways can we work with the Federal government to
make it happen?

• One suggestion would be for ODEP to have a partner program, highlighting programs that
  offer services. Tell businesses what is out there.
• Partnerships where employers can have a boutique approach to getting the resources they ne ed,
  e.g., how to start a program or where they can engage with the community to make people with
  disabilities aware of jobs, etc.
• Large employers can help small employers get on the bandwagon through their vendors or
  other corporate responsibility programs.
• Have an executive-on-loan program, sending employers out to share their best practices with
  others in the same industry. This loan program will help create culture change.

F UTURE DIRECTIONS: F EDERAL AND STATE P ARTNERS
Facilitator: Michael Morris, Chief Executive Officer, Burton Blatt Institute,
Syracuse University

From your perspective, what do you see as the most significant barriers to employment
of Americans with disabilities in the workplace of the 21st Century?

• Lack of a seamless, integrated, and individualized service-delivery system.
• Disconnect between evidence-based practice and research.
• Multiple definitions of the same words across systems (i.e., ―disability‖).
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• Siloed funding.
• Complexity of benefit structure and different legislative authorities.
• Performance measures under WIA and elsewhere.
• Anti-discrimination legislation presents both challenges and opportunities.
• Overcoming the belief that people with disabilities cannot do the job.
• Public sector is not a model employer in hiring more people with disabilities.
• Increase awareness of available evidence-based practices and solutions.

Michael Morris summed up the major themes of these barriers as misalignment, fragmentation,
performance measurement, complexity, and communication.

As the policy lead for the Federal government in disability employment, what changes
in policy/practice does ODEP need to create to eliminate these barriers?

• Include people with disabilities in developing any solutions ( ―We say we are doing this, but it is
   not really being done.‖).
• Provide individual budgets and self-directed services across systems.
• Centralize case management at the local level to promote information flow and with flexible
   dollars across systems (no need for consolidation of the agencies themselves).
• Need for legislative buy-in at the beginning of demonstrations.
• Need for increased knowledge translation of research into plain English.
• Researchers need to engage policymakers early.
• Require performance measurements for agencies on how they utilize information gained from
   demonstration projects to impact systems change and on their collaboration towards
   systems-change outcomes.
• Recognize work and self-sufficiency as preferred outcomes and strive to make everyone a
  taxpayer as overall national policies.
• Promote Federal tax incentives to state and local governments related to the hiring of people
  with disabilities.
• Increase use of the Ticket to Work program by assisting more governmental entities to become
  Employment Networks.
• Change the mindset that multiple solutions are needed to address multiple populations and
   interests.
• Standardize, simplify, and communicate hiring procedures in the Federal government,
   such as the Schedule A Hiring Authority.
• Make a Schedule A type of hiring authority available to state and local governments and
   disseminate related Federal best practices.

What should the role of Federal and state partners be to support the employment of
people with disabilities? In what ways can we work with the Federal government to
make it happen?

• Encourage and assist the Federal government to be a model employer.

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• Realign/restructure policy to better support implementation at the local level.
• Translate effective practices in research journals into plain English.
• Involve all stakeholders, including people with disabilities, from the beginning.
• Establish meaningful partnerships.
• Conduct a public awareness campaign.
• Adopt and promote policies that embrace work and self-sufficiency as preferred outcomes,
  striving to make everyone a taxpayer

F UTURE DIRECTIONS: INTEREST GROUPS
Facilitator: David Mank, Director, Institute on Disability and Community, Indiana University

From your perspective, what do you see as the most significant barriers to employment
of Americans with disabilities in the workplace of the 21st Century?

Mank summed up the major themes of many of the barriers submitted by the participants under two
main headings: People (Attitudinal) and Systems.

Attitudinal Barriers:     How     people   (employers,    parents,   and    people    with      disabilities)
think about work:

• Fear.
• Tradition (―It‘s always-been-done-this-way‖ attitude).
• Low expectations.
• Culture of welfare employment support for people with disabilities.
• Perception.
• Image.
• Family pressure on dependence on Social Security check.

Existing Systems Barriers:

• Transportation.
• Lack of work readiness and transition.
• Hard to address in a vacuum.
• Lack of talent and economic incentives to provide support.
• Disincentives of public policy (entitlements, Medicare, SSI/SSDI, etc.).
• Lack of flexibility in the workplace for people with complex needs
  (not just for people with disabilities).
• Trend from employers hiring more contractors rather than full-time or part-time
  employees receiving little or no benefits (e.g., health care).
• Employment readiness; lack of internships.
• Structures and systems that exist and that don‘t exist (no structure to promote what people
  bring to the workforce).

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• Deficit orientation vs. strengths.
• Choice of low-wage benefits vs. staying home on benefits (fear is very real).
• No one system in the U.S. that provides an interface between employers and job seekers.
• The disability community has no political clout; the community is great at starting programs
  but not sustaining them with a fear of whether they can really handle sustaining them.
• Consistent and sustained pressure from the top leaders at the Federal and corpo rate levels
  is lacking.
• Many people with disabilities have difficulties in networking, including mentoring
  opportunities.
• Career advancement opportunities are lacking due to workplace discrimination.

As the policy lead for the Federal government in disability employment, what changes
in policy/practice does ODEP need to create to eliminate these barriers?

• Initiate policy and practice changes as systemic problems that need to be addressed at the local
   and social capital levels.
• Promote and adopt the use of ODEP‘s Guideposts for Success as a successful systems-change
   policy document by all Federal and state education departments.
• Implement and promote a disability history curriculum to be adopted into schools, starting in
  the elementary grades (Note: Florida, Idaho, North Carolina, Washington, and West Virginia
   have already done so).
• Institute individualized cross-system school-to-work transition plans, as the existing systems
   are disconnected.
• Initiate school-to-work transition planning at the kindergarten level with the expectation of
  employment from parents, educators, and education administrators.
• Change the policies that prohibit Vocational Rehabilitation systems‘ involvement with
  transition planning.
• Develop more work-readiness programs geared to the economic development skills needed in
  local communities and build in retention skills training for both employers and workers.
• Promote within the Federal government its Schedule A Hiring Authority.
• Respect for work needs to be restored in the U.S.
• Understand that accessible transportation and affordable housing issues are those that need
  improvement for everyone, not just for people with disabilities; the disability community and
  local communities need to work collaboratively within this framework.
• Embrace the political will for the government to discontinue funding programs that do not
   produce positive outcomes.
• Fund valuable employment programs with a ―work-first‖ message for everyone from all
  funding streams: governments, employers, and workforce systems.
• Decrease the bureaucratic eligibility criteria for people with disabilities in seeking employment.
• Support people having control of their own lives. The problem is not an iss ue about whether
  enough money is available; it‘s how the money is spent.
• Change the Federal-state policy structure to a person-centered structure. Policies of such
   agencies as the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Social Security Administration, Centers for

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  Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and
  others penalize people with disabilities for working.
• Conduct a cross-Federal agency review of all policies that impact employment success with
   disincentives to work.
• Create and adopt policies that make employment supports as entitlements.
• Increase the integration of youth with disabilities into all youth programs
  (e.g., 4H, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, etc.).
• Expose youth to multiple disciplines and careers choices, especially in the STEM (Science,
   Technology, Engineering, and Math) curricula.
• Encourage more service providers and economic developers to be job developers.
• Fund the education and training of job developers.

Solutions should be universal — not special and separate — to address the employment needs of the
entire workforce.

What should the role of interest group representatives be to support the employment of
people with disabilities? In what ways can we work with the Federal government to
make it happen?

• Work with ODEP and state and local governments to show best practices for state and local
  governments to function without relying on Federal funding.
• Pursue more innovative and entrepreneurial investments.
• Work with individuals on an individualized, negotiated basis.

The Interest Group‘s members offered the following as ways to support the employment of Americans
with disabilities:

• Be vigilant on the public policy agenda.
• Involve the media with more positive messages on how individuals with disabilities are
   presented.
• Bring in community involvement and more community conversations to change policies at the
  local level.
• Form political coalitions (PACs) with other issues groups with the same interests (e.g., housing,
  transportation, health care).
• Collect and share personal stories, both good and bad, about employment successes and
  employment outrages with local and state representatives, other advocacy groups,
   Congressional representatives, and various media outlets.
• Develop a universal marketing strategy.
• Education is the long-term answer. Yet, this interest group needs to recognize the short-term
  issues, too.




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F UTURE DIRECTIONS: ACADEMICS
Facilitator: Susanne Bruyère, Director, Employment and Disability Institute at the School of Industrial
and Labor Relations, Associate Dean of Outreach, Cornell University

Moderator: Richard Horne, Director, Division of Policy, Planning, and Research, Office of Disability
Employment Policy (ODEP)

From your perspective, what do you see as the most significant barriers to the
employment of Americans with disabilities in the workplace of the 21st Century?

A member of this group pointed out that all the stakeholder groups have already identified barriers to
employment for persons with disabilities. She believes that a better use of time would be to identify the
barriers to addressing the barriers. The moderator agreed to proceed with this modified question.

Revised Question 1: What are the most significant barriers to addressing the barriers
to the employment of people with disabilities in the 21st Century?

• Evidence-based research is needed to identify best practices for state officials and community-
  based organizations. People need to know what does and does not work. That is the role of
  research.
• There is evidence-based research that needs to be disseminated. Dissemination of such
  research is an area of focus for academics.
• Evidence-based research needs to lay out how knowledge can be transferred. People in the
  field need ongoing development in this area. They need new forms of media, which needs to be a
  bottom-up, ―grass roots‖ process.
• At the Master‘s level, students may read articles, but once they are in the field, they don‘t have
  time because of heavy case loads. Instead of journal articles, they need listservs, fact sheets,
  1-800 numbers, resources like the Job Accommodation Network (JAN), and abbreviated forms
  of communication.
• Research findings can inform teacher-preparation courses. Personnel preparation must cover
  all topics, not just special education. As schools are becoming more inclusive, all teachers must
  know about special education.
• High schools need to be prepared to expose students to career opportunities before they
  graduate. The mainstream needs to include special education students in opportunities like job
  shadowing and community service.
• The funding stream for vocational education has provided a lot of options, but it needs to focus
  more on youth with disabilities.
• The majority of professionals who work in community-based programs have not been well
  informed of best practices for youth with disabilities. They also may not ha ve the best
  qualifications.
• The language used by researchers must not be too technical. ―Academic speak‖ must be
  translated for employers. Academics need to know from employers what format works for
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  employers.
• Pushback still occurs from corporations. They are still reluctant to hire people with disabilities.
  They need to know that persons with disabilities are critical to the talent pool.
• Academics need to hear about employment and persons with disabilities in the current political
  campaign.
• Research needs to be completed and disseminated in a timelier manner. Research findings have
  a short ―shelf-life.‖

As the policy lead for the Federal government in disability employment, what changes
in policy/practices does ODEP need to create to eliminate these barriers?

• Because of the rules and regulations pertaining to the way money is given out, it can be very
  difficult to form collaborations. Federal agencies work in silos.
• The findings from pilot projects and research do ne by agencies like ODEP need to be
  disseminated better.
• The private sector does a tremendous amount of research to inform their practices, but they
  also fail when it comes to effective dissemination. The difficulty seems to be in translating t he
  work that the businesses are doing.
• A helpful policy change would address joint university-private sector research with the transfer
  of training or transfer of knowledge. This information could inform Master‘s programs for
  teachers and practitioners.
• Community colleges are some of the biggest workforce preparation contributors and an
  important partner in this process. They are a good bridge between the practical community
  and needs of the employers and the academics.
• ODEP is setting up rehabilitation training centers across the country, and community colleges
  need to be included in the network of knowledge exchange.
• Government agencies need to change funding opportunities so that funding is leveraged.
• Multiple variables in research projects are needed because of many barriers.

What should the role of academics be to support the employment of people with
disabilities? In what ways can we work with the Federal government to make
it happen?

Academics:
• Are the experts. Academics need to articulate and disseminate the research findings.
• Need to mentor the next generation of researchers, reaching out to youth with disabilities.
• Need to complete more evaluations and figure out what works (particularly true of the
  workforce development system).
• Cannot be afraid to acknowledge what is not working.
• Need information to be disseminated in a timely fashion.
• Need information on clearance issues, because this is often what holds things up.
• Need to disseminate information about the OMB clearance process. Should maintain a
  database of surveys with OMB clearance.

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• Need to partner with stakeholders to facilitate the translation/transmission of research.
• Should partner with the private sector, with joint funding to promote this partnership.

Themes identified:
• Researchers need to identify what does and does not work.
• Best practices need to be disseminated to the field in a way that is practical, timely, and ―user
  friendly.‖
• Graduate programs for teachers and practitioners need to incorporate research on best
  practices.
• Youth with disabilities need to be exposed to the same career exploration opportunities prior to
graduation that are offered to mainstream students.
• Community colleges need to be included in the information exchange.
• The business case is needed for both corporations and researchers.
• Greater coordination and more partnerships between the private sector, academia, and the
  Federal government are needed.
• Dissemination practices used by Federal agencies need to be improved.
• Funding opportunities need to be better leveraged.


SUMMIT CLOSING SESSION - June 4, 2008
At the close of the Summit, ODEP leadership reiterated to participants that the intention of the event
was to serve as a starting point for an important new ―Conversation with America‖ about the value
people with disabilities add to the nation‘s employers and economy. Summit participants were also
reminded that ODEP welcomes comments and e-mails wherein individuals should feel free to say
things they may not have said previously. One chief area where input is particularly welcome is
suggestions on key pieces of information that should be included in the dialogue. ODEP is working
hard and fast to prepare what needs to be said and how, and input from partners – in Federal, state, and
local government and in academia, business, and various interest groups – is welcome.

As Summit participants and the organizations they represent look to the future and collaborate to craft
the messages that need to be conveyed to America and to the world, this group must "think big‖ and
think past the barriers, both real and perceived, that can hinder the notion of what is achievable.
Sometimes the barrier might be the thought that ―this is the way we have done it before and this is the
way we are going to continue it do it.‖ Sometimes it might be the way legislation is written, or the
dictates of corporate policy, or the reluctance to research new areas, ideas, and opportunities. These are
barriers we must break down.

The world is on the verge of a paradigm shift through which societal recognition of the inherent and
economic value people with disabilities bring to the workplace will emerge. As businesses of all sizes
and in all industries experience this widespread change, they will invest in people with disabilities –
and reap dividends as a result. They will make people with disabilities part of the workforce and
forever change the way business is done. In the coming decades, in communities across the nation,
people with disabilities will attain positions that will transform the American workplace.
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APPENDIX A
June 3 and 4, 2008
Hosted by the Office of Disability Employment Policy
United States Department of Labor


AGENDA                      DAY 1 – June 3, 2008
8:00 am – 9:00 am        REGISTRATION
                         CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (Ballroom)

9:00 am – 11:15 am       PLENARY SESSION (Ballroom)

9:00 am – 9:30 am        Opening Remarks

                         Master of Ceremonies
                         Adrienne Thal, Policy Advisor,
                         Office of Disability Employment Policy

                         Presentation and Retirement of Colors
                         Armed Forces Color Guard
                         The Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps

                         National Anthem
                         Larry V. Norton, Proposal Manager,
                         Federal Markets & Business Development, Deloitte Services LLP

                         Pledge of Allegiance
                         Adrienne Thal, Policy Advisor,
                         Office of Disability Employment Policy

9:30 am – 9:45 am        Welcome
                         Dr. Robert Davila, President, Gallaudet University

9:45 am – 10:00 am       Remarks from the Assistant Secretary for Disability
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                      Employment Policy, U.S. Departme nt of Labor

10:00 am –10:30 am    Keynote Remarks from the U.S. Secretary of Labor

10:30 am – 11:15 am   Defining the Next Generation Workforce
                      Mark Bertolini, President, Aetna Inc.

11:15 am – 11:30 am   BREAK

11:30 am – 12:30 pm   WORKSHOPS
                      Each workshop will focus on a current workforce trend and its
                      connection with ODEP‘s policy and research activities.

                      The New Workplace: Flexibility (Room 6)
                      Innovative and flexible employment strategies, including
                      customized employment and telecommuting, address the needs
                      of a varied and dynamic workforce. Participants will hear how
                      workplace flexibility contributes to work/life balance, and benefits
                      employee productivity and employer profitability.

                      Moderator: Christopher Button, Supervisory Policy Advisor,
                      Workforce Systems Policy Team, ODEP

                      Speakers:

                      Karen Stang, Human Resources Manager,
                      Operation IMPACT Program, Northrop Grumman Corporation
                      Malcolm Foo, Senior Manager and Talent Strategies Lead,
                      Federal Human Capital Practice, Deloitte Consulting LLP

                      Jane Anderson, Project Director,
                      Midwest Institute for Telecommuting Education

                      Richard Luecking, President, TransCen, Inc.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm   WORKSHOPS (continued)

                      Transforming the Workplace with New Technologies
                      (Room 5)
                      Demographic trends today support the business case for
                      investing in accessible and interoperable technology. Join us for a
                      glimpse into how industry is building solutions to new challenges
                      and, in the process, achieving accessibility, expanding markets,
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and reducing barriers to employment.

Moderator: Randy Cooper, Senior Policy Advisor,
Employment Supports Policy Team, ODEP

Speakers:

Debra Ruh, President and Founder, TecAccess LLC

Frances West, Director,
Human Ability & Accessibility Center, IBM

Thomas Wlodkowski, Director of Accessibility, AOL

The Intergenerational Workplace (Room 4)
To address and capitalize on intergenerational workplace
differences, employers utilize an increasing array of strategies to
keep all workers motivated, productive, and engaged. Leading
companies and organizations will share how they are responding
to four generations of employees and ho w those same strategies
can also facilitate the employment of youth and adults with
disabilities.

Moderator: Rhonda Basha, Team Leader,
Workforce Systems Policy Team, ODEP

Speakers:

Larry Cohen, Manager, Workforce Issues, AARP

Keith Gall, Vice President, Capstone Programs,
Junior Achievement Worldwide

Barbara Haight, Senior Manager,
Community Relations, Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.

Stephen M. Wing, Director,
Government Programs, CVS/Caremark

Universal Design/Accessibility (Auditorium)
Universal design enhances physical, programmatic, and virtual
environments, including the products, services and
communications used by people with disabilities, without the

                                                                      88
                     need for further adaptation or specialization. Speakers from the
                     Universal Design Institute and two corporations who have
                     implemented universal design will discuss the many ways
                     accessibility benefits businesses.

                     Moderator: Michael Reardon, Team Leader,
                     Employment Supports Policy Team, ODEP

                     Speakers:

                     Leslie C. Young, Housing Works-Universal Design Institute

                     Susan K. Mazrui, Director, Federal Regulatory Affairs, AT& T

                     Deb Russell, Career Outreach Manager, Walgreens

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm   LUNCH             (Ballroom)

                     Introduction: Assistant Secretary for Disability Employment Policy,
                      U.S. Department of Labor

                     Speaker: Captain (Ret.) Dawn Halfaker,
                     Chief Executive Officer, Halfaker and Associates

                     Entrepreneur and decorated disabled veteran Dawn Halfaker
                     will discuss her transition from the combat zone to civilian life,
                     and the importance of meaningful employment for people with
                     disabilities, including severely injured service men and women.
                     Captain Halfaker will show a clip from the documentary Alive
                     Day Memories and share her experiences as the CEO of a
                     small business.

2:00 pm – 2:15 pm    BREAK

2:15 pm – 3:30 pm    WORKSHOPS

                     Self-Employment and Entrepreneurship (Room 4)
                     Self-employment and entrepreneurship are increasingly popular
                     employment alternatives for individuals with disabilities striving
                     to fulfill their career aspirations and financial goals. Panelists will
                     discuss the advantages and challenges of self-employment and provide
                     information on two ODEP-funded self-employment projects.


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Moderator: Jennifer Kemp, Senior Policy Advisor,
Workforce Systems Policy Team, ODEP

Speakers:

Joyce Bender, President and Chief Executive Officer,
Bender Consulting Services, Inc.

Mike Haynie, Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship,
Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University

James M. Young, Vice-President and Senior Relationship
Manager, Juneau Business Banking Group, Wells Fargo Bank

Mental Health: Workplace Supports and Solutions
(Room 5)

Mental health in the workplace is a key concern for employers
today and our panel of experts will share field-tested strategies
that employers can use to ensure the productivity and retention
 of employees with mental health needs.

Moderator: Susan Parker, Director,
Division of Policy Development, ODEP

Speakers:

Shirley Davis, Director of Diversity Initiatives,
Society for Human Resource Management

Hyong Un, MD, National Medical Director, Behavioral Health,
Aetna Inc.

Clare Miller, Director, Partnership for Workplace Mental Health,
American Psychiatric Foundation

Lisa Cuozzo Stern, Director of Operations, MontgomeryWorks!


Organizational Culture: Driving Results (Room 6)
Learn about a groundbreaking ODEP-funded research study,
investigating how organizational structures, values, policies, and
day-to-day practices affect all aspects of the employment of

                                                                     90
                    people with disabilities. The panelists include the lead research
                    institution and some of the companies identified as having
                    exemplary practices.

                    Moderator: Richard Horne, Director,
                    Division of Policy Planni ng & Research, ODEP

                    Speakers:

                    Tammie McNaughton, Director,
                    Corporate Diversity & Work Life, Highmark

                    Lori Golden, AccessABILITIES Leader, Ernst and Young

                    Peter Blanck, University Professor and Chairman,
                    Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University

3:30 pm – 3:45 pm   BREAK

3:45 pm – 5:00 pm   PLENARY SESSION (Ballroom)

                    Ensuring Employment Success for Returning Injured
                    and Wounded Service Members
                    Employment plays a critical role in the road to recovery for
                    wounded and injured service members. Participants will
                    learn how ODEP and its partners equip employers and the
                    workforce system with valuable information on supports and
                    strategies for returning service members in their transition
                    to civilian life and employment, with a particular focus on those
                    returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

                    Introduction: Charles Sabatier, Senior Policy Advisor,
                    Employment Supports Policy Team, ODEP

                    Moderator: Assistant Secretary, Veterans‘ Employment & Training
|                   Service, U.S. Department of Labor

                    Speakers:

                    Alex Belous, Manager, Education & Health Strategy,
                    Cisco Foundation, Cisco Public Benefit Investment

                    Sergeant (Ret.) Gary Boggs, Quality Assurance Engineer,

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                      Northrop Grumman Corporation, and National Spokesperson
                      for Coalition to Salute America‘s Heroes

                      John Lawson, Executive Director & Manager of Leadership
                      Programs, The Home Depot

6:00 pm – 9:00 pm     RECEPTION

                      Featuring History, Progress, Transformation:
                      Vision of the Future,
                      A pictorial exhibit on disability history and employment,
                      with presentations by key disability leaders on disability
                      employment policy.

                      Smithsonian Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art
                      and Portraiture, Robert and Arlene Kogod Courtyard, Eighth and
                      F Streets NW, Washington, D.C. (Enter at the G Street entrance)


AGENDA                   DAY 2 – June 4, 2008
8:30 am – 10:00 am    BREAKFAST PLENARY (Ballroom)
                      Join us for breakfast and hear from two trailblazers in the
                      corporate and disability sectors: Randy Lewis will share ho w
                      he is transforming corporate culture, policies, programs,
                      and day-to-day employment practices to fully include employees
                      with cognitive and physical disabilities, and John Kemp will
                      share his enlightening personal experiences navigating the
                      business and media communities as an executive and advocate
                      with a significant disability.

                      Master of Ceremonies
                      Rachel Dorman, Policy Advisor,
                      Office of Disability Employment Policy
                      Will History and Hope Rhyme?
                      Randy Lewis, Senior Vice President of Distribution and
                      Logistics, Walgreens Company

                      So, What Happened to You?
                      John Kemp, Principal, Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville PC and
                      President, U.S. Business Leadership Network

10:00 am – 10:15 am   BREAK

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10:15 am – 11:15 am   FUTURE DIRECTIONS:
                      STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOPS
                      Employers, Federal partners, interest groups, and academics
                      will meet with others within their stakeholder group to discuss
                      what needs to happen to expand access to the talent pool of
                      workers with disabilities.

                      Employers (Room 4)

                      Facilitator: John Kemp, Principal, Powers Pyles Sutter &
                      Verville PC and President, U.S. Business Leadership Network

                      Federal and State Partners (Room 5)

                      Facilitator: David Mank, Director, Institute on Disability and
                      Community, Indiana University

                      Interest Groups (Room 6)

                      Facilitator: Michael Morris, Chief Executive Officer,
                      Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University

                      Academics (Auditorium)

                      Facilitator: Susanne Bruyère, Director of the Employment and
                      Disability Institute, School of Industrial and Labor Relations,
                      and Associate Dean of Outreach, Cornell University

11:15 am – 11:30 am   BREAK

11:30 am – 12:30 pm   WORKSHOP REPORTS AND CLOSING REMARKS
                      (Auditorium)

                      Reports on Day 1 and Day 2 Workshops

                      Closing Remarks
                      Assistant Secretary for Disability Employment Policy, U.S.
Department            of Labor




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APPENDIX B
SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES
Keynote and Plenary Speaker Biographies

Alex Belous
Alex Belous is the Manager for Education and Health Strategy for the Cisco Fo undation team, part of
the Cisco Corporate Affairs Depart-ment. Mr. Belous‘ responsibilities include the Transition Training
Academy, a collaborative effort between Cisco, DOL‘s Veterans‘ Employment and Training Service
(VETS), and the Wounded Warrior Project that offers training and hope to seriously injured veterans.
He also helped establish the Cisco Networking Academy program, a comprehensive technical training
initiative that has served, free of charge, more than three million students and teachers around the
globe. Before joining Cisco, Mr. Belous was the Innovative Technologies Director at the Arizona
Department of Education, where he forged partnerships to improve access to technology at the state‘s
most isolated and underserved schools. Mr. Belous also taught for 15 years and holds a Bachelor‘s
degree in Early Childhood Education and Master‘s degrees in both Education and Counseling
Psychology from Arizona State University.

Mark T. Bertolini
As President of Aetna, Inc., Mark T. Bertolini oversees all business and service operations across the
corporation‘s broad range of health care products. Prior to assuming the presidency of Aetna, he
served as Executive Vice President and head of Aetna Business Operations as well as head of Aetna
Regional Businesses and Aetna Specialty Products. Prior to joining Aetna, Mr. Bertolini worked for
Cigna HealthCare, NYLCare Health Plans, and SelectCare, Inc. Mr. Bertolini earned a Bachelor‘s
degree in Business Administration from Wayne State University and a Master of Business
Administration in Finance from Cornell University, where he currently serves on the Advisor Board for
the School of Human Ecology. He also serves on the Boards of Directors for University of
Connecticut Health Center and the Connecticut Business and Industry Association.

Gary Boggs
Gary Boggs works in quality assurance for Northrop Grumman‘s mine countermeasures program, a
position he obtained through Operation IMPACT, the global defense company‘s transition program for
severely injured service members. Five years ago, while he was on duty in Iraq, a roadside bomb
caused Boggs to suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI), loss of his left eye, damage to both arms and his
hearing, and shrapnel wounds to his left side. Following medical retirement, the sergeant returned to
his former employer for some time and then worked as a recruiter for an Army contractor. His next
job, with a financial firm, revealed his TBI. As a result, he took medical leave, and during this time
was hired by Northrop Grumman—where he now works to help other soldiers avoid incidents like the

                                                                                                      94
one that almost took his life. He also became a spokesman for the Coalition to Salute America‘s
Heroes.

Robert R. Davila
Robert R. Davila became president of Gallaudet University in 2007, bringing with him a wealth of
experience both as a teacher and administrator, as well as an inspiring, and quintessentially American,
life story. The son of poor, loving parents who worked the fields of Southern California, Dr. Davila
became deaf when he was eight years old. Determined for her son to have a fair shot in life, his mother
sent him to California School for the Deaf (CSD) in Berkeley, where he thrived. He then attended
Gallaudet University and went on to earn a Master‘s and Doctorate in Education from Hunter College
and Syracuse University, respectively. Before serving Gallaudet, Dr. Davila supervised schools for
deaf students and was CEO of Rochester Institute of Technology‘s National Technical Institute for the
Deaf. He has also served as former Assistant Secretary for the U.S. Department of Education‘s Office
of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.

Dawn Halfaker
Captain (Ret.) Dawn Halfaker is CEO of Halfaker and Associates, a service-disabled veteran-owned
business that provides national security services to the Federal government. She founded the company
following a distinguished career as a Military Police Officer in the U.S. Army. Wounded during a
combat patrol near Baghdad in 2004, she earned a Purple Heart and Bronze Star for her service.
Captain (Ret.) Halfaker also serves as Vice President of the Wounded Warrior Project Board of
Directors, where she focuses on the needs of severely injured service men and women. In addition, she
was appointed by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to serve on the Committee for Operation Iraqi
Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom Veterans and Families. Captain (Ret.) Halfaker earned a
Bachelor‘s degree from the United States Military Academy at West Point and is currently pursuing a
Master‘s degree in Security Studies from Georgetown University.

John Kemp
With personal disability experience using four prostheses, John D. Kemp inspires others
through knowledge, experience, vision, person-and persistence. Currently, he is a principal at the law
firm of Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, P.C. In his practice, he serves as CEO of American Congress
of Community Supports and Employment Services, the HalfthePlanet Foundation, and the One Percent
Coalition, as well as the Executi ve Director and General Counsel of the U.S. Business Leadership
Network. He also currently serves on the State Department‘s Advisory Committee on Persons with
Disabilities. Mr. Kemp is a graduate of Georgetown University and Washburn University School of
Law, where he was also awarded an Honorary Doctorate in 2003. In 2007 Mr. Kemp was honored by
the U.S. Department of Labor for his efforts to promote disability employment, and in 2006 he received
the Henry B. Betts Award, widely regarded as America‘s highest honor for disability leadership and
service.

                                                                                                     95
John Lawson
As Director of Executive Development and Leadership Programs on The Home Depot‘s Corporate
Talent Management team, John Lawson is responsible for leading executive development and
leadership development programs targeting more than 2,000 directors and other managers. He first
joined The Home Depot in 2004 as Director of Contact Center Operations in Home Services. Prior to
that, Mr. Lawson worked for American Century Investments, where he directed the company‘s contact
center, Internet, and face-to-face operations, and General Electric (GE), where he was a contact center
leader and program manager for the Global Business Management Course at GE Crotonville. Mr.
Lawson received a degree in ge neral engineering and math science from the U.S. Military Academy at
West Point and served as an Army Officer in the Field Artillery for nine years.

J. Randolph Lewis
J. Randolph (Randy) Lewis is Senior Vice President, Distribution and Logistics for Walgreens Company,
where he oversees the flow of merchandise from suppliers to stores and the operation of 12 major
distribution centers nationwide. He first joined the company in 1992 as Divisional Vice President,
Logistics and Planning. He was formerly a partner with Ernst & Young and had served as a consultant to
Walgreens‘ Strategic Inventory Management System project since 1987. Lewis received a Master of
Business Administration from the University of Texas and served in the Peace Corps in Peru. He has
served as Chairman of the Distribution/Logistics Committee for the National Association of Chain Drug
Stores and is currently on the Board of Directors of Wendy‘s International, Inc.

Workshop Speaker and Facilitator Biographies

Jane Anderson
Jane Anderson, Director of the Midwest Institute for Telecommuting Education (MITE), has worked in
vocational rehabilitation and disability employment for more than 25 years and has particular expertise
in the design and implementation of collaborative employer telework models. She provides customized
training and consultation to public, private, and non-profit organizations and has worked with
numerous employers to implement and benefit from innovative telework programs. From 2004 -2007,
she also led an ODEP-funded research and demonstration project to conduct a national telework
employer survey and facilitate telework opportunities for veterans and injured workers. Prior to joining
MITE, Ms. Anderson served as an employment specialist and director of FlexWork, one of the first
programs in the nation to offer telework to persons with disabilities. Ms. Anderson holds a Master‘s
degree in Vocational Education from the University of Minnesota.

Joyce A. Bender
Joyce A. Bender is the CEO/President of Bender Cons ulting Services, Inc., a national technology
consulting firm specializing in creating competitive employment opportunities for people with
disabilities in information technology, engineering, finance/accounting, human resources, and general
                                                                                                        96
business. In 1985, Ms. Bender survived a life-threatening accident caused by a misdiagnosis of
epilepsy. Due to her personal experience living with both epilepsy and a hearing disability, she
founded Bender Consulting Services in 1995 and Bender Consulting Services of Canada in 2001. Ms.
Bender serves in an advisory role for several local and national nonprofits and is currently Senior Vice
Chair of the national Epilepsy Foundation and Treasurer of the American Association of People with
Disabilities. A graduate of Geneva College, she has received numerous awards for her dedication to
improving opportunities for people with disabilities, and hosts her own weekly radio show on disability
issues.


Peter Blanck
Peter Blanck is University Professor at Syracuse University – the highest faculty rank at the institution,
granted upon only eight individuals in its history. He is also Chairman of the University‘s Burton Blatt
Institute, which strives to advance civic, economic, and social participation of persons with disabili ties.
Before joining Syracuse University, Dr. Blanck was Kierscht Professor of Law and Director of the
Law, Health Policy, and Disability Center at the University of Iowa. He is on the boards of several
national disability advocacy organizations and has authored numerous articles and books on disability
law. He has also led grants to study disability law and policy, argued Americans with Disabilities Act
cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, and testified before Congress. Dr. Blanck holds a Bachelor‘s
degree, Juris Doctor, and Ph.D. from the University of Rochester, Stanford University, and Harvard
University, respectively.

Susanne M. Bruyère
Susanne M. Bruyère is the Director of the Employment and Disability Institute and Associate Dean of
Outreach at Cornell Univer- sity‘s School of Industrial and Labor Relations Extension Division. In this
role, she directs numerous research efforts, including two federally funded Rehabilitation Research and
Training Centers (RRTCs), the RRTC for Economic Research on Employment Policy for Persons with
Disabilities and the RRTC on Disability Statistics and Demographics.
She has also directed several employment dis- ability nondiscrimination studies. Dr. Bruyère holds
Master‘s degrees in Rehabilitation
Counseling, Public Administration and Adult Education and a doctorate in Rehabilitation Counseling
Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is an American Psychological
Association fellow and has served in leadership roles for several other professi onal associations,
including the National Council on Rehabilitation Education and the American Rehabilitation
Counseling Association

Larry Cohen
Larry Cohen is Manager of Workforce Programs at the American Association of Retired Persons
(AARP). In this position, he builds relationships with the business community in order to raise
awareness about the value older workers add to the nation‘s workplaces and to promote positive
corporate action. He also leads the team that directs the day-to-day operations of AARP‘s Federal
                                                                                                          97
Workforce Roundtable, Aging Workforce Advisory Council, National Employer Team, and other
programs related to the employment of mature workers. Mr. Cohen has worked at AARP for 10 years,
having also served in membership, human resources, and state and national initiatives. In these roles,
he managed business intelligence integration, strategic planning and budgeting, and state -based
projects. Mr. Cohen holds a Master of Business Administration from Johns Hopkins University, where
he also taught business and technology for six years as a part-time faculty member.

Shirley Davis
As Director of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives for the Society for Human Resource Management
(SHRM), Shirley Davis acts as SHRM‘s ―thought leader‖ on global diversity issues. She has more
than 15 years of experience in human resources, organizational and leadership development, and
diversity management. Her past positions include Director of Diversity at Constellation Energy,
several leadership roles at Capital One, and Senior Human Resource Analyst and Management
Development Consultant at Circuit City Headquarters. Today, Dr. Davis travels nationally and
internationally, speaking to business and community leaders, corporate executives, and other
professionals about the importance of inclusive workplaces and other human resource management
issues. A former Ms. American United States, Miss District of Columbia, and Ms. Oklahoma, Dr.
Davis holds a Bachelor‘s degree in Pre-Law, a Master‘s degree in Human Resources Management, and
a Doctorate in Business and Organization Management.


Malcolm Foo
Malcolm Foo leads the Talent Strategies service line in Deloitte Consulting‘s Federal Human Capital
Practice and has extensive experience in organization and talent strategies, business process
improvement, and performance management. He also serves as the Diversity and Inclusion Program
lead for Deloitte‘s Federal Practice in the Washington, D.C. region. In this role, he has helped
establish several employee affinity groups, most recently the Ability First Business Resource Group,
representing the firm‘s professionals with disabilities. In his career, Mr. Foo has consulted for
government organizations both domestically and abroad. In the U.S., he has worked with the U. S.
House of Representatives, General Services Administration, Internal Revenue Service, U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In
the 1990s, as part of New Zealand‘s comprehensive public sector reform agenda, he worked with
various public agencies to devise and implement output-based performance measurement systems.


Keith Gall
Keith Gall is Vice President of Capstone Programs and Executive Director of the Job Shadow Coalition
at Junior Achievement (JA) Worldwide, a partnership between the business community, educators, and
volunteers working to inspire young people to dream big and reach their potential. Prior to joining JA
Worldwide, Mr. Gall was the Director of the Gus A. Stavros Institute in Largo, Florida, where he was
responsible for the development and implementation of the Enterprise Village and Finance Park
programs. Both of these economics curricula are now part of the JA program list and attract nearly
                                                                                                    98
300,000 students each year. Prior to his time with the Stavros Institute, Mr. Gall served as a principal,
assistant principal, and teacher in Pinellas County, Florida over the course of 32 years. He earned both a
Bachelor‘s degree and Master‘s degree from the University of South Florida.


Lori Golden
Lori Golden leads Ernst & Young AccessAbilities, the firm‘s initiative to build an enabling and
inclusive environment for people with disabilities. Launched three years ago, AccessAbilities now
features a network comprised of several hundred people from across the firm‘s geographies, ranks, and
functional groups. The program also promotes a Leaders Network of Abilities Champions who
advocate for disability inclusiveness within their respective sub-areas. As the initiative‘s leader, Ms.
Golden facilitates the networks and drives a variety of efforts aimed at enhancing accessibility in Ernst
& Young offices; making internal communications, meetings, training, and technology more
accessible; educating Ernst & Young employees on disability etiquette and inclusive work habits; and
raising awareness of ―invisible‖ disabilities. A graduate of Harvard University, Ms. Golden joined
Ernst & Young ten years ago following a career in marketing and sales strategy.


Barbara Haight
As a Senior Manager for Corporate Community Relations at Booz Allen Hamilton, Barbara Haight was
involved in all aspects of the firm‘s corporate citizenship, philanthropy, and community impact
programs. She played a key leadership role in the creation and implementation of Booz Allen‘s
Emerging Leaders initiative – an internship and leadership development program for college students
with disabilities that has been recognized by the Department of Labor‘s Office of Disability
Employment Policy as an exemplary corporate effort. Ms. Haight was a founding member of the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce‘s Business Education Network and the Department of Education Office of
Special Education and Rehabilitative Service‘s Youth to Work Advisory Council. She earned her
professional certification from the Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College‘s Carroll School
of Management. Ms. Haight left Booz Allen in July 2008 to accept the position of Director of the
Division of Policy, Communication, and Outreach at ODEP.


Mike Haynie
Mike Haynie is an Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship and Emerging Enterprises at Syracuse
University‘s Whitman School of Management. His academic research focuses on decision-making,
entrepreneurial thinking, and social cognition, and his work has been p ublished in leading
entrepreneurship and business journals. Before beginning his academic career, Dr. Haynie served for
14 years as an officer in the United States Air Force. In 2007, he founded the Entrepreneurship
Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities program at Syracuse University, an initiative designed to offer
world-class training in entrepreneurship to veterans disabled as a result of their military service. Dr.
Haynie holds a Bachelor‘s degree from the University of Delaware, a Master of Busine ss
Administration from the University of Oregon, and a Doctorate in Entrepreneurship and Business

                                                                                                        99
Strategy from the Leeds College of Business at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Richard G. Luecking
Richard G. Luecking, Ed.D. is President of TransCen, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving
educational and employment outcomes for people with disabilities. He assumed this position in 1987,
when the organization‘s Board of Directors charged him with strengthening linkages between schools,
service providers, government agencies, businesses, and families in order to improve post -school
employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. Dr. Luecking was an original consultant in the
development of the Bridges From School to Work program of the Marriott Foundation for People with
Disabilities, which has been replicated and established in several national locations with the help of
TransCen. Prior to joining TransCen, Dr. Luecking held several positions in rehabilitation, education,
and non-profit management. He is the author of numerous publications addressing the employment of
people with disabilities, business partnerships, school-to-work transition, and career development and
regularly contributes to publications targeting practitioners in workforce development and education.

David Mank
David Mank is the Director of the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community and a Professor of
Education at Indiana University. Throughout this career, he has worked to advance Supported
Employment, an integrated work environment that equips people with severe disabilities with the tools
and resources they need to enter competitive employment. Dr. Mank is a member of numerous
editorial boards and has authored more than 100 articles and book chapters. He serves on the council
of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (formerly the American Association of
University Affiliated Programs for Persons with Developmental Disabilities), an organization that
connects university-affiliated programs with major colleges and teaching hospitals in order to
strengthen their ability to serve individuals with disabilities. Dr. Mank‘s advocacy efforts have
spanned the globe, and in 2001, he was awarded the highest honor bestowed upon an individual by The
Arc of the United States, the Franklin Smith Award of National Distinguished Service.

Susan Mazrui
Susan Mazrui is Director of Regulatory Affairs for AT&T Services, Inc. (formerly Cingular Wireless).
In this role, she advocates for the development of accessible telecommunication services and products
and works to ensure inclusion of people with disabilities in the company‘s marketing as well as
employment practices. In support of these goals, she coordinates the company‘s Access Task Force,
which addresses a broad range of disability and other consumer-related initiatives. Ms. Mazrui also
lends her expertise to numerous disability-related advisory boards and regularly delivers presentations
and writes articles on topics related to technology and accessibility. Mazrui received her Master‘s
degree in Interdisciplinary Studies in Education from San Francisco State University. Prior to entering
the telecommunications field, she taught graduate and undergraduate courses in computing and
assistive technology at San Francisco State University and Special Education in San Jose, California.

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Tammie L. McNaughton
Tammie L. McNaughton is Director, Corporate Diversity and Work Life at Highmark. In this role, she
actively partners with a variety of professional organizations to support diversity, inclusion, and work
life with a special emphasis on upward mobility for women and minorities and the employment of
individuals with disabilities. Ms. McNaughton also chairs the Board of the Pittsburgh Disability
Employment Project for Freedom, the Pennsylvania Business Leadership Network, and the program
committee for the Business Advisory Council of Life‘s Work of Western Pennsylvania. Prior to
joining Highmark, she spent more than 16 years with a Fortune 500 company in advertising, training
and development, and sales. Ms. McNaughton graduated summa cum laude from the University of
Pittsburgh with a Bachelor‘s degree in Psychology with a minor in Management and Communications.

Clare Miller
Clare Miller is the Director of the Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, a program of the
American Psychiatric Foundation that advances effective employer approaches to mental health by
leveraging the knowledge and experience of the American Psychiatric Association and its employ er
partners. The Partnership delivers educational materials and provides a forum to explore mental health
issues and share innovative solutions. Prior to joining the Partnership, Ms. Miller was Manager of the
Center for Prevention and Health Services at the National Business Group on Health (formerly the
Washington Business Group on Health). Prior to that, she was Director for Public Policy at Mental
Health America (formerly the National Mental Health Association). Ms. Miller earned a Bachelor‘s
degree from Salisbury University in Maryland.


Michael Morris
Michael Morris is the Director of the National Disability Institute (NDI) and the CEO of the Burton
Blatt Institute at Syracuse University. He boasts more than 20 years of experience pioneering new
strategies to improve the lives of people with disabilities. In 1981, he was named the first Joseph P.
Kennedy Fellow in Public Policy and came to Washington, D.C. to work in the office of Connecticut
Senator Lowell Weicker as legal counsel to the Senate Subcommittee on the Handicapped. From
Capitol Hill, he went to work at United Cerebral Palsy Association and later helped establish the
National Disability Institute (NDI). Today, Mr. Morris serves as a policy expert to multiple Federal
agencies on policy and systems relationships at national, state, and local levels to advance asset
development for persons with disabilities. He earned an undergraduate degree in Political Science
from Case Western University and a law degree from Emory University.

Debra Ruh
Debra Ruh is Founder and President of TecAccess, a provider of accessibility and workforce solutions
for the world‘s largest and fastest growing minority groups – people with disabilities, ―baby boomers,‖
and veterans with disabilities. Since creating TecAccess in 2001, she has grown the organization into a
leading provider of professional accessibility and usability testing and training, workforce solutions,
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targeted marketing solutions, focus groups, and usability studies. Her past positions include Founder
and CEO of Strategic Performance Solutions, Vice President and Dean of Distance Learning with
Market Street Mortgage, and Vice President of Training and Development and Quality Control for
SunTrust Mortgage. An unwavering advocate for people with disabilities and disabled veterans, Ms.
Ruh has authored numerous articles and regularly speaks on accessibility, transition, disabilities, and
workforce initiatives to audiences around the country and overseas.

Deb Russell
Deb Russell is a Corporate Manager for Walgreens Company, the nation‘s largest drug store chain and
seventh largest retailer. In this role, she oversees the company‘s commitment to having one -third of
the workforce in its latest and all future distribution centers comprised of qualified individuals with
disabilities. Ms. Russell has worked in the field of disability employment for more than 15 years. Her
experience includes being a special education teacher and job developer, and addressing issues related
to the employment of people with disabilities within the workforce investment and Medicaid systems.
Ms. Russell has presented on topics related to the employment of people with disabilities to audiences
nationwide.

Lisa Cuozzo Stern
Lisa Cuozzo Stern is the Director of Operations for the MontgomeryWorks! One-Stop Workforce
Center in Montgomery County, Maryland. In this role, she provides operational support, oversees
programmatic activities for various projects, and advises One-Stop partners. She also coordinates the
organization‘s outreach efforts on behalf of both businesses and job seekers and directs the
Montgomery County Veterans Workforce Investment Program and the Montgomery County
Government‘s Customized Employment Public Internship Project. Ms. Stern has worked with youth
and adults with barriers to employment since 1985. In addition to workforce development, her
experience includes classroom teaching, vocational assessment and evaluation, and career counseling.
Ms. Stern holds a Master‘s degree in Education and Human Development from George Washington
University and is a seasoned trainer with expertise in customized employment, school -to-work
transition, job development, and business partnerships. She has also co -authored numerous workforce
development publications and train-the-trainer manuals.

Hyong Un, M.D.
Dr. Hyong Un is the National Medical Director for Aetna Behavioral Health, where he is responsible
for supporting the development of clinical strategic plans and quality management. He also overse es
the development of innovative behavioral health disease and care management programs as well as
initiatives that integrate behavioral health with medical management. Prior to joining Aetna in 2001,
Dr. Un served as Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Friends Hospital, the nation‘s first private psychiatric
hospital, and Executive Medical Director of the Counseling Program at Pennsylvania Hospital and
PennFriends Behavioral Health System. A member of the American Psychiatric Association, his
clinical interests are in neuropsychiatry and psychopharmacology. Dr. Un graduated from the
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University of Pennsylvania‘s School of Medicine and completed his residency at the Hospital of the
University of Pennsylvania.

Frances W. West
As Director of IBM‘s Human Ability & Accessibility Center, Frances W. West is charged with
promoting the company‘s advanced research technology, products, services, and solutions in the areas
of human ability and accessibility worldwide. In 2005, Ms. West was nominated to serve on the
Boards of Directors of the American Association of People with Disabilities and of the Assistive
Technology Industry Association. She was also invited to testify on behalf of the information
technology industry at a U.S. Senate hearing on the impact of accessibility open standards on the
European Union. In 2006, she spoke at the United Nations e-Accessibility Conference in New York.
Ms. West attended the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Washington & Lee University in
Virginia and graduated with a degree in marketing from the University of Kentucky.

Stephen M. Wing
Stephen M. Wing is Director of Workforce Initiatives for CVS Caremark. A veteran of the drug store
industry for 33 years, he has devoted the last 18 to working with government agencies, non-traditional
employment organizations, educational institutions, and others to recruit targeted groups for
employment. He has been instrumental in the development of cutting-edge programs such as CVS‘s
Regional Learning Centers, designed in partnership with One-Stop Career Centers. In addition, under
Mr. Wing‘s leadership, CVS‘s Government Programs division has taken an active role in Welfare -to-
Work and faith-based initiatives. As a result, since 1996, CVS has hired more than 60,000 people who
previously were on public assistance, with high retention rates. Mr. Wing serves on multiple advisory
councils, including the Boards of Directors for the Institute for Competitive Workforce and Corporate
Voices for Working Families. He holds a Bachelor‘s degree in Education from Winona State
University in Minnesota.

Thomas Wlodkowski
As Director of Accessibility at AOL, Thomas Wlodkowski is responsible for executing AOL‘s
corporate Accessibility Policy, the cornerstone of the company‘s commitment to ensuring its products
and services are accessible to customers with disabilities. Mr. Wlodkowski drives employee awareness
of issues that prevent full access to the Internet, develops value-added features for the disability
community, and implements technological solutions to enhance the accessibility of AOL products and
services. He also serves as AOL‘s liaison to the disability community, including the company‘s
Accessibility Advisory committee, a cross-disability group of advocacy leaders and accessible
technology experts who provide advice and strategic counsel on accessibility issues. Blind himself,
Mr. Wlodkowski is acutely aware of the positive impact accessible mainstream technology can have on
the lives of people with disabilities.



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James M. Young
A native of Juneau, Alaska, James M. (Jamey) Young is a financial services professional who
volunteers his time and expertise to assist entrepreneurs and people with disabilities seeking improved
employment opportunities. When Mr. Young was six, his father became disabled in a mill accident,
and that experience helped shape his commitment to disability employment issues. Today, he is a Vice
President/Senior Relationship Manager with Wells Fargo Bank and volunteers as a Small Business
Development Center presenter and a Junior Achievement classroom consultant on economic education.
For the past year, he has contributed his private industry and economic development perspective to the
advisory council of START-UP/USA Alaska, a multi-agency supported project promoting self
employment for people with disabilities. Mr. Young graduated from Pacific Lutheran University in
Tacoma, Washington with a Bachelor‘s degree in Economics.


Leslie C. Young
Leslie C. Young is a professional designer, technical writer, and specialist with 25 years of experience
in design for people with disabilities. Among other projects, she currently manages a universal design
audit for the National Children‘s Museum in Washington, D.C., and is developing an online
educational tool to assist architects and designers to avoid common errors in achieving compliance
with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Previously, Ms. Young served as Director of Universal
Design Services at North Carolina State University, where she conducted trainings and co -authored
numerous publications on universal design. Earlier in her career, she was a Lead Designer at Barrier
Free Environments, Inc. Ms. Young has provided testimony in many forums in an effort to promote
better understanding of disability rights and community integration through accessibility and attitudinal
change.




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