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					Teaching Math GLEs with the
  Newspaper is a BREEZE!
         February 21, 2008

        Dawn Kitchell
   Missouri Press Association

        Jennifer Hawkins
  Class 7 MAP Senior Leader
  Gifted Education, Grades 1-6
          St. Clair, MO


                                 1
Let’s get Acquainted Using
Numbers in the Newspaper

Create a nametag using the newspaper. First,
cut out letters to form your name and paste
them on your note card. Then, locate numbers
that describe you or your personality. Cut and
paste the numbers on your nametag. Be ready
to share your nametag with others.


                                                 2
What is Newspaper In
    Education?




                       3
―Much has been said and written on the utility
  of newspapers, but one principal advantage
  which might be derived from these
  publications has been neglected: we mean
  that of reading them in schools, and by the
  children in families.‖

                               June 8 Editorial


                                                  4
More than 200 years ago

     June 8, 1795


                          5
            The History
The New York Times initiated what was likely
  the first formal classroom program in 1932.

In 1956, leaders in education and the
   newspaper industry met in Chicago to
   discuss the need for a national initiative to
   encourage the use of newspapers in schools.
   A study was commissioned: ―Newspapers in
   the Classroom of a Free Society.‖
                                                   6
The name ―Newspapers In the Classroom‖ grew
  from the study and was the common name until
  the late 1970s, when Newspaper In Education
  was adopted following Canada’s lead.

In 1980, a school administrator in Indiana decided
   to try a week of using newspapers and no
   textbooks in reading classes. The project was a
   great success, and the following year the Indiana
   Reading Association promoted the week-long
   project statewide.                                7
The first national Newspaper In Education Week
  was celebrated in 1983, co-sponsored by the
  ANPA Foundation (now Newspaper
  Association of America) and the International
  Reading Association. Lesson plans were
  distributed to schools through local newspapers
  and reading councils.

The National Council for Social Studies joined the
  project in 1988 and curriculum was created to
  represent all three partners.                    8
Newspaper In Education Week is still celebrated
  the first full week in March. And NAA
  continues to provide teacher curriculum.


But Newspaper In Education has grown from a
  one week program into a daily/weekly
  classroom tool.

                                                  9
In 2000, 14.4 million students were served
  by Newspaper In Education programs in
  the U.S. That’s 1 in 3.


And recent research has proven its value
 in the No Child Left Behind Era.
                                             10
11
Newspaper In Education
  • Introduce the
    Newspaper
  • Show Value
  • Enhance Reading Skills
  • Real-Life Application
    Across the Curriculum
  • Improved Test Scores
  • Civic Literacy           12
  Why are classroom
newspapers important to
      educators?

                          13
Measuring Success (2002)
                       • Students who use newspapers
                       at all score 10 percent better on
                       standardized tests.
                       • Minority students who use the
                       newspaper frequently (at least
                       once a week) score 29 percent
                       better.
                       • The more often the newspaper
                       is used, the higher the test
                       scores!


Download this study at www.naafoundation.org
                                                           14
A 2005 study by Stephan Sargent, Ed.D. (College
  of Education, Northeastern State University,
  Broken Arrow, Oklahoma), examined
  differences in attitudes toward reading among
  3rd, 4th and 5th graders using the Elementary
  Reading Attitude Survey.

All students were tested on reading attitudes in
  the fall of 2004 and then tested again in April
  2005.
                                                    15
Sargent's findings were dramatic:

 Students who used newspapers regularly throughout the
  year with the Newspaper In Education program had a
  mean score that was 8 percent higher than the control
  group, while the control group's scores had a slight
  drop.

Sargent's conclusion:

  Regular use of the Newspaper In Education program
  positively impacts the reading attitudes of students in
  the third, fourth and fifth grades.
                                                            16
 Why are classroom
newspapers important
   to newspapers?

                       17
Growing Lifelong Readers

                     • NAA Foundation 2004
                     • Young adults ages 18 to
                         34: “Do you remember
                         using the newspaper in the
                         classroom?”
                     •   Yes – 62 percent are
                         current newspaper readers.
                     •   No – 38 percent are
                         current newspaper readers.
  Download this report at www.naafoundation.org
                                                      18
Growing Lifelong Readers




  Download this 2006 report at www.naafoundation.org
                                                       19
MORI Research interviewed 1,607 young adults, ages 18-24, in 2006 in
  seven metropolitan areas, including Kansas City, Mo.


Of the young adults who read their local
  newspaper and teen section as teens, nearly
  8 in 10 (78 percent) read their newspaper in
  the past week, and 50 percent read it
  yesterday.


                                                                       20
 5 Factors with Significant and Positive
   Relationship on Future Readership

• Read newspaper in an average week as
teens
• Ever read newspaper’s teen section
• Parents regularly read
• Parents regularly encouraged reading
newspaper
• Newspapers ever used in class discussions
                                              21
Higher student achievement.
  Readers now and later.
       Civic literacy.



                              22
23
                    Civic Literacy
• 1 in 3 high school students say the First Amendment
    goes “too far” in the rights in guarantees.
•   Only 50 percent of high school students say
    newspapers should be allowed to publish freely
    without government censorship.
•   Students lack knowledge and understanding of the
    key aspects of the First Amendment.

         “The Future of the First Amendment,” Knight Foundation, 2006



                                                                        24
The single best indicator of
 whether someone votes is
 whether he reads a paper,
 according to political scientist
 Martin P. Wattenberg in his
 book, "Where Have All the
 Voters Gone?"
            Chicago Tribune, 2006

                                    25
A democracy ceases to be a
 democracy if its citizens do
 not participate in its
 governance.

               Walter Cronkite

                                 26
In the Northwest Ordnance of
 1787, Thomas Jefferson slipped
 in a famous mandate of public
 schools for basically one reason:
 to turn kids into citizens able to
 govern themselves.

                                      27
When the press is free and every
 man able to read, all is safe.
       Thomas Jefferson, 1799



                                   28
     How do I Use the
 Newspaper to Meet GLEs?

1. Know how to read the Math Grade Level
   Expectations.
2. Know the types of questions used on the
   MAP test.
3. Use NIE ―Using the Newspaper to Meet
   Grade Level Expectations‖ booklet and
   MAP Moments.
                                             29
  Understanding the Math GLE
          Documents
•The GLEs for math are divided into five
major strands.
•Number and Operations
•Algebraic Relationships
•Geometric and Spatial Relationships
•Measurement
•Data and Probability
                                           30
             Understanding the GLE
                   Documents
The mathematics Grade-Level Expectations are
organized according to:

•Strand (number and operations, measurement,
etc.);
•Big Idea (e.g., 1. Understand numbers, ways of
representing numbers, relationships among numbers
and number systems);
•Concept (e.g., B. Represent and use rational
numbers); an
•Grade (e.g., 04)                                 31
      Three Types of
      MAP Questions
 • Multiple-choice Questions
 • Open-ended Constructed Response
   Questions
 • Performance Events

 Use the newspaper to assess
ALL three types of questions!
                                     32
  Example of Multiple Choice
 Question Using the Newspaper

Which section of the newspaper will use
   numbers to represent objects for sale?
a. Classifieds
b. People
c. Sports
d. Business
                                            33
      Characteristics of Top
         Quality OCRs
– require the use of higher order thinking.
– allow for more than just a right or wrong answer
  and/or process.
– when possible, allow for more than one way to
  arrive at the answer.
– when possible, ask students to support their answers
  with reasoning.
– when appropriate, ask students to justify their
  choice of answer.
– require the use of specific examples as a means of
  support.
– Usually 3-5 minutes to answer
                                                         34
Example of OCR Using the
      Newspaper
               Round Up!
Find the ads for cars in the newspaper. Pick
5 cars that are pictured with their prices.
Round each price to the nearest 100. In
most cases is the nearest 100 higher or
lower? Why do you think so? Now round
to the nearest 1,000.
                                               35
    A Performance Event

•An event is completed in one sitting or class
period.

• It requires students to apply their knowledge
to situations that they are likely to confront in
their own lives.

•It is scored using a scoring guide.

                                                    36
        A Performance Task
•A task requires more than one sitting to complete.

•Like an event, a task requires students to apply
knowledge to situations that they are likely to
confront in their own lives.

•The processes and/or products are scored through
the use of scoring guides.


                                                      37
 Example of Performance
Event Using the Newspaper
                  Prompt
It’s your 16th birthday. Your parents gave you
 $10,000 to spend on an automobile. In the For
  Sale Section of the newspaper, find 5 cars that
   you like in your price range. Create a chart
including the model/make of the car, year the car
  was built, price, and the amount of money you
 would have left from $10,000. Using this data,
determine which is the best deal for you. Explain
                    your answer.
                                                38
Using the Newspaper to Meet
 Grade Level Expectations
Two GLE newspaper feature have been created to assist
with student preparation for the MAP test. Activities and
assessments have been written for all Grade Level
Expectations in the the following areas:
• Reading
• Math—Numbers and Operations
Activities and assessments were written by Missouri
public educators.
                                                            39
             GLE Features
• The GLE features are written in a grid format
  similar to our familiar GLEs.
• Features were written for two strands: Reading
  and Math—Numbers and Operations.
• One Activity and assessment is included for each
  GLE
• MO Show-Me-Standards are also noted in the
  grids.

                                                     40
      Strand
                        Math—Numbers and Operations
  Big Idea
                3 COMPUTE FLUENTLY AND MAKE REASONALBE ESTIMATES
 Grade Level            GRADE K                GRADE 1             GRADE 2      GRADE 3
                A   Recognize              Describe or
                    numbers up to          represent the
                    31.                    mental strategy
                                           used to compute an
   Concept                                 addition problem.


Standards      ST   MS 1.6, 1.10         MA 1 3.4, 4.1          MA 1 3.4, 4.1
                    Sit in a circle with
                    a deck of playing
                    cards in the center.
                    Flip over the top
  Activities        card and race to
                    locate the same
                    number in the
                    newspaper….

                    Cut numbers 1-31
                    from the
Assessments         newspaper. Glue
                    them randomly to a
                    plain sheet of white
                    paper.                                                                41
     Why Should I Use the
   Newspaper to Teach GLEs?
• It’s different!       Students get bored with using classroom textbooks,
   and they will enjoy using another resource.
• It’s inexpensive!       Many communities have NIE sponsors who fund
   newspapers for classrooms. Other newspapers offer discounted rates for
   classrooms.
• It’s versatile! Newspaper can be used to teach ALL GLEs.
• It’s easy! Just use the GLE Math and Reading series templates.      The
   work has been done for you!
• It’s fun! Newspaper can be used for individual or cooperative group
  activities.
• It’s “A Living Textbook!” Using a newspaper is a good way
   to incorporate real-life lessons and current events.
                                                                             42
      Your Task

Complete the following
activities to see how easy
it is to use the newspaper
       to teach GLEs.

                             43
    Making a Connection with
    Numbers in the Newspaper
Strand: Math—Numbers and Operations
Big Idea: Understanding numbers, ways of presenting numbers, and
   relationships among numbers and number systems
GLE: N1A4

             Why do I have to Learn this Junk?
  Turn to the front page of the newspaper. In 60
   seconds, circle as many numbers (numerals or
   word numbers) as you can find. Count your
   numbers. Discuss the types of numbers you
   found and how these numbers relate to the
   concepts you learn in math class.
                                                                   44
              Lining Up Cars

Strand: Math—Numbers and Operations
Big Idea: Understanding numbers, ways of presenting
numbers, and relationships among numbers and number
systems
GLE: N1A4

In the Classified Section of the newspaper, locate 8
cars for sale. Cut and paste the ads in order from
least (cheapest) to greatest (most expensive) price.


                                                       45
     Lining Up Cars—Part 2

Strand: Math—Data and Probability
Big Idea: Select and use appropriate statistical methods to analyze
data
GLE: D2A6

Using the 8 car ads from the prior activity,
calculate the mean, median, mode and range of
the car prices.



                                                                      46
                      Shape Zoo
Strand: Math—Geometry and Spatial Relationships
Big Idea: Analyze characteristics and properties of two- and three-
   dimensional geometric shapes and develop mathematical arguments
   about geometric relationships
GLEs: G1A1, G1A2, G1A3, G1A4 and G1C 3


  Locate and cut out at least three shapes from the
  newspaper. Arrange the shapes on a separate piece of
  paper to create an original zoo animal. You may draw
  extra details on your drawing. Make sure you label the
  shapes that create your animal and give your animal a
  name.

                                                                      47
             Picture Perimeters
Strand: Math—Measurement
Big Idea: Apply appropriate techniques, tools and formulas to
determine measurements
GLE: M2C3, M2C4, M2C5, M2C6


Select 2 pictures from the newspaper. Measure the
perimeter of each picture in centimeters. Calculate and
compare the area of the two pictures.

Extension: Find the perimeter and area of 3 more pictures.
Using the area of each picture, arrange them in order from
least to greatest.
                                                                48
              GeomeTREE

Strand: Math—Geometry and Spatial Relationships
Big Idea: Analyze characteristics and properties of two- and
three-dimensional geometric shapes and develop mathematical
arguments about geometric relationships
GLEs: G1A 1, G1A2

Look through the newspaper and cut out
different shapes. Label the shapes and glue
them to the paper tree to create a
―Geometree.‖

                                                               49
How Does Your Newspaper
     Measure Up?
Strand: Math—Measurement
Big Idea: Understand measurable attributes of objects and the
units, systems and processes of measurement
GLE: M1A1, M1A2, M1A3



Create a 3-column chart labeled linear, time,
and weight. Skim through the newspaper to
locate numbers that fit in each category. Cut
and paste them in the appropriate categories.
                                                                50
         Obituary Averages
Strand: Math—Data and Probability
Big Idea: Select and use appropriate statistical methods to analyze
data
GLE: D2A6

Locate the obituaries in the newspaper. Find
the average age of the people in the obituaries.
Extension: You can also find the average birth
weight of newborn babies.

                                                                      51
       What’s Your Angle?
Strand: Math—Measurement
Big Idea: Understand measurable attributes of objects and the
units, systems and processes of measurement
GLE: M1A6

Draw a Venn Diagram with three interlocking
circles. Label one circle obtuse angle, one acute
angle, and the other one right angle. Cut and paste
letters from headlines in the appropriate spots of the
Venn Diagram. Some letters may have more than
one type of angle therefore will need to be placed in
an interlocking section.
                                                                52
                Sports Scores
Strand: Math—Numbers and Operations
Big Idea:Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates
GLE: N3C2, N3C3

Look in the Sports Section for scores to complete the
chart. In the first column write the name of the sport. In
the second column write the name of each team and the
score each earned. In the third column compute the point
differential between the two scores, and in the fourth
column put the total points scored by both teams. Find
the scores for at least five games.
                                                             53
      Can You Fill These Up?
Strand: Math—Numbers and Operations
Big Idea:Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers,
relationships among numbers and number systems
GLE: N1D3, N1D4

Instead of groceries, you will fill the carts with numbers.
Cut numbers from the newspaper and paste them on the
carts. Fill the first cart with EVEN numbers and the
second cart with ODD numbers.
Extension: You can do this same activity with multiples,
greater than/less than, etc.
                                                              54
                     Dollar Words
Strand: Math—Measurement
Big Idea:Understand measurable attributes of objects and the units,
systems and processes of measurement
GLE: M1D2

Give each letter of the alphabet monetary value. ―A‖ is
worth one cent, ―B‖ is worth two cents, and so on. Try
to find as many words that are worth exactly $1.00.
Extension: Find the shortest word that is worth the most
money or the longest word worth the least money.

                                                                      55
        Choose Your Own!

Find a partner who teaches the same
  grade level as you. Look through the
  activities and assessments in the
  ―Using the Newspaper to Meet Grade
  Level Expectations.‖ Choose an
  activity and assessment from your
  grade level to complete with your
  partner.
                                         56
         How Can I Use My Extra
Newspaper to Promote Critical Thinking Skills?

Here are a few challenges for your students:
1. Using 5 newspapers, 1 foot of tape, and 1 sleeve of
   staples, create a structure for 2 students to sit in. It must
   have a roof and you cannot tape it to the floor. You
   have 30 minutes to build your structure. The sturdiest
   design wins.
2. Create a Bridge (same supplies)
3. Create a Wall (same supplies)
4. Create an original hat
5. Make a basket                                               57
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                 Contact Information


Jennifer Hawkins: jhawkins@stclair.k12.mo.us
Dawn Kitchell: kitchelld@emissourian.com
Missouri Press Association: http://www.mopress.com/
Missourian in Education: www.emissourian.com
NIE Post Dispatch: http://nie.post-dispatch.com/


                                                      62

				
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