Sports Management and Marketing Test Bank Questions by rke15301

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									Date Received


                         Fall 2006 Semester Assessment Report Form


Directions: Please complete a form for each of the programs within your department. This
form was designed to provide a format for assessment reporting and should not be used to limit
the amount of information provided. Each box that is attached to each of the sections is designed
to adjust to varying lengths. If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Bea Babbit t at x51506
or via email at: bea.babbitt@unlv.edu.


1. Program Information:
       Program Marketing
    Department Marketing
        College College of Business
       Program •Dr. James Cross
    Assessment •Dr. Michael LaTour, Department Chair
    Coordinator
 Semester Data Fall, 2006
      Collected
         Report •Dr. James Cross
   Submitted by •Dr. Michael LaTour
                 •Ms. Ceri Nishihara, J.D. (Graduate Assistant)
   Phone/email (702) 895-3364
Date Submitted April 30, 2007



2. According to the Assessment Plan for this program, what were the planned
assessments to be conducted during the 2006-2007 Academic Year? You may want to
copy and paste from this program’s assessment plan.

Program Objective 1: Students be able to synthesize topic-related basic and
applied research in Marketing.

Program Objective 2: Students be able to incorporate research based Consumer
Psychology knowledge into Marketing problem analysis and strategy.

Program Objective 3: Students be able to produce, assess and modify marketing
plans.
Outcome 1: Conduct an internal Marketing organizational assessment.
Outcome 2: Identify and prioritize opportunities and threats in the market.
Outcome 3: Evaluate and select target opportunities.
Outcome 4: Assess market research needs.
Outcome 5: Develop marketing strategy.
Outcome 6: Assess the performance of a marketing plan against objectives and modify
the plan accordingly.

Program Objective 4: By the end of the program, students be able to describe,
evaluate and apply a market orientation.
Outcome 1: Describe the societal purpose of marketing.
Outcome 2: Describe marketing's role within the organization.
Outcome 3: Evaluate, and be able to apply the core values that should drive marketing
decision-making.
       Describe the importance of the marketing concept.
       Describe the importance of a long-term orientation.
       Explain the importance of a global perspective.
       Describe the importance of customer loyalty.
       Explain the importance of competitive advantage.
       Describe the application of ethical philosophies to the cultivation of customer
        relationships.

Curriculum Alignment of Student Learning Objectives. Where is the information
introduced, enriched, and/or reinforced in the courses required in the program?

                Required
                Courses
Program         MKT 301     MKT 312    MKT 400     MKT 495
Outcome
Goals

1               I           I          I           E


2               I           E          E           R


3               I           E          E           R


4               I           E          E           R


               I = Introduced E = Enhanced R = Reinforced


Evidence/Artifacts used to assess Student Learning Outcomes over the 5 year
period of this Plan. What instruments will be used in each of the five years? When
and where will they be administered in each of the five years? Which Student Learning
Outcomes will be assessed during each of the 5 years? How will results be reported
(e.g. percentages, ranks, state or national comparisons) for each of the 5 years?

Generally: Because the Marketing curriculum is a less quantitative undertaking than
other concentrations offered at the University, placing numerical values on achievement
of each Objective is effectively superfluous. Therefore, results and progress will be
assessed by the Department Chair and the Assessment Committee to determine the
adequacy of the curriculum in achieving each Program Objective. Despite the lack of
quantitative data for comparison with similar programs, the pursuit of a degree in
Marketing at UNLV is competitive and rigorous; each required class elicits significant
input of thought and effort from the Marketing majors.


Student        Methods/Instruments Expected Measures     When and where will
Learning       (Direct and Indirect) from the            the
Outcomes       to be used            Methods/Instruments Methods/Instruments
for the                                                  be administered and
Program                                                  data collected?
               Random sample of      Grades and          At the end of the
1              tests, writing        comments.           Spring semester. The
               assignments from                          departmental
               MKT 312, MKT 400,                         assessment
               MKT 495.                                  committee will select
                                                         random samples from
                                                         appropriate classes.
2              Random sample of      Grades and          At the end of the
               tests, writing        comments.           Spring semester. The
               assignments from                          departmental
               required courses.                         assessment
                                                         committee will select
                                                         random samples from
                                                         appropriate classes.
3              Random sample of      Grades and          At the end of the
               tests, writing        comments.           Spring semester. The
               assignments from                          departmental
               MKT 495.                                  assessment
                                                         committee will select
                                                         random samples from
                                                         appropriate classes.
4.             Random sample of      Grades and          At the end of the
               tests, writing        comments.           Spring semester. The
               assignments from                          departmental
               MKT 495.                                  assessment
                                                         committee will select
                                                         random samples from
                                                         appropriate classes.
3. Results, conclusions, and discoveries. What are the results of the planned
assessments listed above? What conclusions or discoveries were made from these
results? Describe below or attach to the form.

Results, conclusions, and discoveries
Program Objective 1: Students be able to synthesize topic-related basic
and applied research in Marketing.

      Marketing 312: Consumer Behavior
      In section one, students are expected to conduct primary and
      secondary research into a consumer-behavior related topic on which
      they have proposed a hypothesis. This requires that each student draft
      a questionnaire and conduct the survey to gather information on their
      chosen subject. Once the raw data is gathered, the students must then
      perform applicable quantitative analysis and draw a conclusion from the
      results as related to the class subjects covered during the semester.
      The final course project requires that the students report their findings
      based on a combination literature review and primary data with a view
      to the ethical practices of marketers. Topics ranged from marketing
      cigarettes to minors, alcohol to the homeless and false advertising
      about the mistreatment of animals with regard to the “Happy Cows”
      advertisements from the “Real California Cheese” campaign. In section
      two students are expected to conduct in-depth research into a
      consumer behavior topic area and synthesize a large amount of
      academic as well as practitioner research. In so doing they are
      thoroughly exposed to the research and analysis processes. In addition,
      they must organize the results of these efforts in a substa ntial term
      paper.

      The Marketing 312 approach clearly satisfies Objective 1 by exposing
      students to the requirements of creating a study, performing the
      research and coming to a conclusion with primary and secondary data.
      The collected samples of students indicate that they have successfully
      mastered the assimilation of theory and applied research, with overall
      project grades being quite high: samples reflect that students scored
      between 83% and 100% for their efforts during the term, as assessed
      by faculty with substantial experience in the field. The Marketing
      Department Assessment Committee is quite proud of this result, as the
      basis for Marketing excellence lies not only in the ability to learn from
      other’s research, but also in the ability to take current knowledge one
      step further by designing and executing a cogent and informative
      research project.
     Marketing 400: Marketing Research
     This required course fulfills Objective 1 in two distinct ways: first, it
     requires the students to perform a large research project on a specific
     topic (during the surveyed semester, the topic was the viability of a
     professional sports team locating in Las Vegas). Each group designed
     a questionnaire based on techniques learned in the classroom setting,
     surveyed approximately 200 subjects, and performed in-depth analysis
     of the responses. The students then analyzed the results and made
     recommendations on whether or not a professional sports team should
     locate in the Las Vegas area.

     Second, each student was required to submit two Research Paper
     Summaries wherein they were expected to find a relevant professional
     journal article and evaluate it from both a theoretical and practical
     perspective.

     Marketing 400 greatly enhances Objective 1 by requiring a larger
     research project and critiques of peer-reviewed articles as well.
     Students were very deliberate in their execution of the requirements in
     this course, indicating that they understood the emphasis on the
     process of market research. Each sampled project had a solid
     infrastructure, the variance in grades typically arose from the choice of
     statistical evaluation and the succeeding analysis. Grades ranged from
     80-105 out of a possible 110, indicating that, for the most part, students
     have a firm grasp on the importance and value of combining first- and
     secondhand research.

     Marketing 495: Advanced Marketing Management
     Objective 1 is further enhanced and refined in the “Capstone” of the
     undergraduate Marketing curriculum, as students are expected to
     complete a comprehensive case study analysis. This permits a “closed
     universe,” allowing the professor to focus more on student
     comprehension and mastery of the subject matter rather than on the
     form of the study or research project. Furthermore, the real-life applied
     research of primary data only improves students’ grasp of performing
     actual surveys involving real subjects. The expectation in this course is
     that students demonstrate skills acquired from prerequisite courses and
     synthesize them with the requirements of an actual business situation.
     In addition, instructors of MKT 495 contribute comprehensive questions
     for assessment as part of the business capstone course.

Program Objective 2: Students be able to incorporate research based
Consumer Psychology knowledge into Marketing problem analysis and
strategy.

     Marketing 301: Marketing Management
This course introduces students to the basics of Marketing and forms
the basis of the later required concentration courses. This course is
based primarily on classroom learning with some independent
research, and is geared towards exposing students to the Marketing
thought process. Essential to this process is the understanding of
consumer psychology as it relates to conception, pricing, promotion and
distribution of goods, ideas and services with the final objective of
meeting organizational strategic needs.

Marketing 301 provides an excellent introduction to the following
courses and is assessed by exams and article reports. As with all
introductory courses, Marketing 301 functions as a filter of sorts the
result being a wider spectrum of awarded class marks for the students
taking the course.

Marketing 312: Consumer Behavior
Through exams, discussions and the required project, students
examine consumer behavior and organizational buying behavior issues
from an organizational perspective. Discussion sections focus on
various consumer behavior issues and how understanding the issues
can (or should) guide strategy. Because students are performing
analysis from a firm’s viewpoint, they gain insight into various ways
consumer psychology can affect a company’s bottom line.

Students preparing for the exam portion of the course will be well-
versed and assessed on their grasp of how psychology plays into
different aspects of the Marketing mix and application of resulting
components of strategy. In doing so, Marketing 312 effectively
enhances Objective 2 as determined by the subject matter of the final
exams. Students scored a raw average of 75% on the exams from both
sections, without a significant difference in grades between the two.
The problem areas were equally divided between applied theory of
consumer psychology and simple memory retention questions. The
results of this sample are not surprising, as the field of consumer
behavior is riddled with elaborate theories and methods that can be
greatly detail-oriented while also being vague. As students progress in
the Marketing program, we anticipate that they will refine their
knowledge on these topics as they are permitted to delve deeper into
the issue of consumer psychology and will emerge with an overall
appreciation as to the nuance of behavior with regards to any marketing
effort.

Marketing 400: Marketing Research
By allowing students the opportunity to conduct primary research and
turn their findings into insight about the consumer mind, this class
further enhances the goal outlined by Objective 2. Students internalize
      the subject matter of the course, make their observations of survey
      subjects and apply the two to come up with a recommendation based
      upon their conceptualization of the consumer psychology. This, in
      effect, solidifies the very important concept that the customer mind
      drives success in marketing endeavors and gaining perspective on
      customer tendencies could be the difference in the success or failure of
      a commercial endeavor.

      Marketing 495: Advanced Marketing Management
      Perhaps more subtly than the preceding courses, Marketing 495
      reinforces the idea that consumer psychology forms the basis for
      understanding markets and targeting marketing effort. At this point in
      the students’ curricular experience, the issue of the consumer mind is
      omnipresent and students convey this implicit understanding in their
      projects and responses. In reviewing the students’ projects and exams,
      the understanding of the importance of consumer psychology is
      present, though not explicitly mentioned. In this way, Objective 2 is
      solidly addressed.


Program Objective 3: Students be able to produce, assess and modify
marketing plans.

      Marketing 301: Marketing Management
      By providing basic Marketing opportunity skills and knowledge through
      exams and research projects, Marketing 301 supplies the foundation
      upon which following courses will build.

      Marketing 400: Marketing Research
      This course directly addresses Outcome 3 and Outcome 4 of Objective
      3. By performing primary research, students gain perspective on the
      initial processes required to assemble a marketing plan. They evaluate
      target opportunities by determining the demand for a particular firm
      undertaking while making note of areas where future research is
      needed.

      Marketing 495: Advanced Marketing Management
      The final exam in this course featured a case study wherein students
      were tested on their ability to conduct a long -term assessment for a
      proposed marketing program change. Specifically, it required students
      to identify different ways to segment a market and assess market
      segment size, evaluate the prospects of a product line extension with
      regard to a brand extension, and perform financial and profitability
      analysis related to a decision arising from those prospects. The case
      analysis project allowed students to use all relevant data when faced
      with amending a marketing strategy and further developed the desired
      Outcomes in Objective 3 by taking the students through an entire
      marketing plan, from initiation to development of strategy. Based on
      the samples collected from this course, students exhibited mastery in
      the areas of market segmentation, extrapolation of data required to plan
      strategy and reasonable methods for implementation of that strategy.
      The average grade of the sample was 86 out of a possible 100,
      indicating that the theories and goals of the curriculum were fully
      realized.


      Note: One Outcome that needs addressing is number 6: that students
      be able to assess the performance of a marketing plan against
      objectives and be able to modify the plan accordingly. Students have
      managed quite well in changing a marketing plan, but have shown little
      foresight into possible outcomes or metrics for assessing the success of
      proposed changes. Setting benchmarks to determine the viability of a
      plan would be most beneficial in preparing students for realistic
      performance requirements in firm undertakings. Perhaps more focus
      should be placed on the results of the plan, and not simply the initial
      ideas for change.


Program Objective 4: By the end of the program, students should be
able to describe, evaluate and apply a market orientation.

      Marketing 495: Advanced Marketing Management
      By going through the process of a case study and requisite analysis,
      the goals embodied by Objective 4 are implicitly included in the project.
      Sample grades reflect an average of 91%, indicating a very firm grasp
      on the underlying Marketi ng concepts. It seems that certain of the
      Outcomes are not directly addressed, but are necessary components to
      a satisfactory performance in the class.

Note: Because the Outcomes listed under Objective 4 are fairly broad and
can be subjective, more effort could be paid to highlighting the core values of
Outcome 3. This could be done as a short essay at the beginning of the
Advanced Marketing Management course, thus allowing the Assessment
Committee to ensure that the values of the industry are being effectively
communicated to the students. Should this process yield unsatisfactory
results with regards to achievement of Objective 4, the Assessment
Committee will work with each professor to amend the course content to better
target the aspirations of this Objective during the Capstone class while not
upsetting the curriculum already in place.


General Assessment of Objectives: Administration of Assessment Exam
to graduating Marketing majors.

Description of Assessment Instrument
The instrument was a 50-question multiple-choice exam that focuses on topic
areas in the marketing that correspond to the Department’s program
objectives. The questions were randomly selected from appropriate sections of
the test bank for a renowned introductory marketing textbook. The selected
questions were also designed to test student knowledge, comprehension, and
application of important course concepts.

The questions were grouped into three sections on the instrument. Each
section focused on subject areas of course modules typically covered in most
courses and by most textbooks.

       The first group was made up of 20 questions that centered on
        processes involved in the formulation of marketing strategies such
        as segmentation, opportunity identification, SWOT analysis, etc.

       The second group consisted of 20 questions, which were focused
        on relevant issues marketing managers confront when making
        decisions about the different elements of the marketing mix, i.e.,
        price, product, place, and promotion.

       The last section, consisting of 10 questions, was quantitative in
        nature. It required students to demonstrate comprehension and
        application of pricing concepts and formulas.

This instrument was the first one produced by the department.


Administration of the Assessment Instrument
The instrument was administered during class periods at the end of the Fall
2006 semester for the Capstone business course, BUS 495, which all seniors
in the College of Business are required to complete. Instructors for the
capstone course provided marketing majors in their classes with the
instrument and instructions for completing the exam. Students were told that
the exam would have no impact on their grade for the capstone or any other
course they were currently taking or had completed. They were given the full
period of class in which to complete the assessment test. Students reported
their answers to the test questions on a Scantron form. They were also
instructed that they did not have to write their names on the Scantron form
they completed nor the exam copy they received.


Assessment Test Results:
Test Group Performance
A total of 16 marketing majors completed the assessment test.

The average number of correct responses across the class was 28.8.
The standard deviation of correct responses was 5.7

The maximum number of correct response by an individual student was 39.
The least number of correct responses by an individual student was 16.

A comparison of the summary statistics for test group performance on the
assessment exam for Spring and Fall 2006 appears in the following table.

                                                         Spring       Fall
                                                         2006         2006
 Average number of correct responses across the          27.8         28.8
 class
 Standard deviation of correct responses across the      12.1         5.7
 class
 Maximum number of correct response by an                37           39
 individual student
 Least number of correct responses by an individual      11           16
 student

These statistics indicate that overall group performance improved slightly.
Perhaps more importantly, the standard deviation of performance across the
group fell dramatically. This could be due in part to the redesign of the
instrument although the degree of rigor for the questions in both the Spring
and Fall 2006 instruments did not vary.

Item Analysis

An item analysis of the completed Scantron forms revealed the following
statistics for the questions as a whole and the three individual groups of
questions.

                                 Mean Number of          Standard Deviation of
                                Students Scoring          Number of Students
                               Correct Responses              Scoring Correct
                                                                  Responses
 Group 1 (Questions 1-                         9.0                        3.7
 20)
 Group 2 (Questions 21-                        9.3                           4.5
 50)

The findings above suggest that marketing majors who completed the
assessment test equally well on the two sets of questions contained in the
assessment instrument.

This stands in contrast to the Spring 2006 results shown below, which
indicated that marketing majors performed better on the set of questions
centered around marketing mix decisions than those focused on strategy
formulation.

                                Mean Number of         Standard Deviation of
                               Students Scoring         Number of Students
                              Correct Responses             Scoring Correct
                                                                Responses
 Group 1 (Questions 1-                       25.2                      14.3
 20)
 Group 2 (Questions 21-                      30.8                           8.1
 40)
 Group 3 (Questions 41-                      28.4                          13.7
 50)


A closer look at student performance on individual items revealed that there
were 19 questions for which 8 or more of the 16 students taking the test gave
an incorrect response. A further breakdown of these items showed 11
questions for which more than 10 of the 16 students gave an incorrect
response.


Conclusions

This is the second time the Department has administered its program
assessment test.

Compared to the test results from the Spring 2006 semester when the first
assessment was performed, the results for the Fall 2006 suggest slight
improvement in the performance of marketing majors across all two areas of
marketing topics addressed by the exam. In contrast to the Spring 2006
results, the Fall 2006 results indicate a marked improvement in marketing
majors’ performance on the questions about marketing strategy formulation.

Spring 2006 Test Results

A total of 50 marketing majors completed the assessment test.

The average number of correct responses across the class was 27.8.
The standard deviation of correct responses was 12.1

The maximum number of correct response by an individual student was 37.
The least number of correct responses by an individual student was 11.

An item analysis of the completed Scantron forms revealed the following
statistics for the questions as a whole and the three individual groups of
questions.

                                 Mean Number of          Standard Deviation of
                                Students Scoring          Number of Students
                               Correct Responses              Scoring Correct
                                                                  Responses
 Group 1:Questions 1-20                       25.2                       14.3
 Group 2: Questions 21-                       30.8                        8.1
 40
 Group 3: Questions 41-                       28.4                           13.7
 50

These findings suggest that marketing majors who completed the assessment
test performed more strongly on the questions that dealt with decisions and
issues about the marketing mix elements of a marketing strategy.

A closer look at student performance on individual items revealed that there
were 21 questions for which 25 or more of the 50 students taking the test gave
an incorrect response. A further breakdown of these items showed

       4 questions for which more than 40 of the 50 students gave an
        incorrect responses.

       14 questions for which 30 or more students gave an incorrect
        responses.

       21 questions for which 25 or more students gave an incorrect
        responses.


Conclusions

This is the first time the Department has administered an assessment test of
this nature. At the least, the results from this first test provide benchmarks
against which future assessment and progress of the marketing program can
be measured.

As for the test results, they suggest that there is room for improvement in the
performance of marketing majors across all three general areas of marketing
topics addressed by the exam and especially in the areas dealing with strategy
formulation and application of quantitative-oriented pricing concepts.
        The results reported here do not account for any specific effects on
        student performance that might derive from the test bank from which
        the questions were drawn and specific treatment of topics unique to the
        textbook for that test bank.



4. Use of Results. What program changes are indicated? How will they be
implemented? If none, describe why changes were not needed.

The Assessment Instrument administered in the Marketing 495 (Capstone) class
indicates that significant improvement can be achieved with greater in-class
focus on the Objectives. The Marketing Department Assessment Committee is
considering taking the following steps to further highlight the necessity of
accomplishing the program goals. The Committee fully understands the
implications of the results of the test, and is dedicated to improving the
performance on future Assessment Tests/Instruments in future. To assist in this
effort, the following approaches will be undertaken:

As mentioned in the Discoveries and Results portion of this report, there are two
key concepts that should be highlighted in the Marketing curriculum:
benchmarking for assessment of a successful program and ensuring that the
students understand and embrace Marketing’s core values. Recommendations
on each of these were contained within the discussion of the Objectives, but the
recommendations could be supplemented with faculty i nsight on the Assessment
Plan Objectives as a whole. Faculty should be told which Objectives their
courses should address and should include in their coursework activities which
directly highlight those Objectives.

The Assessment Committee could gain further insight into the success of these
Objectives by surveying the students in the Marketing 495 class (with a follow-up
survey several years later as they are engaged in their careers) . These are
students preparing to graduate who have completed a majority of the
requirements for a major in Marketing and can provide the best feedback on the
Department’s efforts. A proposed questionnaire is below.

Program Assessment Questionnaire:

Dear Marketing Students,

Congratulations on almost completing the Marketing curriculum! To improve our program even
further, please tell us how we performed on the following objectives, whether the Marketing
faculty and administration has succeeded in presenting and reinforcing the following concepts.
Check the appropriate box on how well we met our objectives. Thank you for giving us feedback
and best of luck in your future endeavors !
 After your           5             4            3              2               1
 Marketing required   Absolutely!   Yes.         Maybe.         Not really.     No idea w hat
 classes, can you…                                                              that is.
 1. Conduct an
 internal marketing
 organizational
 assessment?
 2. Identify and
 prioritize
 opportunities and
 threats in the
 market?
 3. Evaluate and
 select target
 opportunities?
 4. Assess market
 research needs?
 5. Develop
 marketing
 strategy?
 6. Assess the
 performance of a
 marketing plan
 against objectives
 and modify the plan
 accordingly?
 7. Describe the
 societal purpose of
 marketing?
 8. Describe
 marketing’s role
 within an
 organization?
 9. Evaluate and be
 able to describe
 marketing’s core
 values:
 a) Marketing
 Concept?
 b) Importance of
 Long-term
 Orientation?
 c) Importance of
 Global
 Perspective?
 d) Importance of
 Customer Loyalty?
 e) Importance of
 Competitive
 Advantage?
 f) Importance of
 ethical philosophy
 in cultivating
 customer
 relationships?


Additionally, in order to orient new and returning faculty with the Marketing
Department objectives outlined above, the Assessment Committee will distribute
a department memo at the beginning of each school year detailing the goals of
the program and requesting feedback from the professors about how each
required class curriculum addresses the objectives, or what changes will be
made to fulfill the desired goals. Surveying the faculty serves two purposes: first,
it allows faculty an opportunity to further assimilate program objectives into their
class curriculum. Second, it allows the Assessment Committee to see the
initiative at the beginning of the school year and have a metric by which to judge
the success of that initiative at the conclusion of Spring (or Fall) semester.
Marketing Department Faculty Assessment Document:

Dear Marketing Faculty,

As you know, the Marketing Department Assessment Committee has been actively analyzing the
performance of Marketing majors to determine overall student success in mastering certain
objectives deemed important to being a successful marketer. Please review the list of objectives
and outcomes and report back to the Committee by answering the following questions regarding
each of Objectives 1-4:

1. How does your planned course curriculum address Objective 1 (2,3,4)? Understand that there
are certain objectives that are irrelevant to, or are not intended to be addressed by, specific
courses.
2. If you believe your cours e could better address one of the Objectives, how will you change the
course structure to accommodate?
•Syllabus?
•Lectures?
•Short research papers?
•Term papers?
•Special projects?
•Presentations?
•Quizzes?
•Exam questions?
3. If you feel change is warranted, how will the changes outlined above reflect greater focus on
achieving the Department Objectives?

Note on Faculty Response:

We are still receiving little faculty responses to the questionnaire, but believe,
based on student improvement on the assessment instrument, that the faculty is
responding to the stated departmental objectives by making the objectives focal
points in their curricula. However, the Assessment Committee will be expecting
a more energetic response from the faculty on this questionnaire in the future.


5. Dissemination of results, conclusions, and discoveries. How and with whom were
the results shared?


Dissemination of Information over the 5 year period of this Plan. When,
where, and how will results be disseminated to stakeholders?

 Student Learning                Who will analyze the             When, where, and how
 Outcomes for the                data?                            will the results be
 Program                                                          disseminated to
                                                                  stakeholders?
 1                               The Department C hair            Results from previous
                                 and Assessment                   academic year will be
                                 Committee.                       disseminated to
                           department faculty, the
                           Dean’s office and the
                           Departmental Advisory
                           Board.
    The Department Chair   Results from previous
2   and Assessment         academic year will be
    Committee.             disseminated to
                           department faculty, the
                           Dean’s office and the
                           Departmental Advisory
                           Board.
    The Department Chair   Results from previous
3   and Assessment         academic year will be
    Committee.             disseminated to
                           department faculty, the
                           Dean’s office and the
                           Departmental Advisory
                           Board.
    The Department Chair   Results from previous
4   and Assessment         academic year will be
    Committee.             disseminated to
                           department faculty, the
                           Dean’s office and the
                           Departmental Advisory
                           Board.

								
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