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                                       C o l l ec t ed / A r ch iv ed f o r Th ur sd ay , Feb ru ar y 5 , 200 9 -- Page 1 of 32



Sen. Scott Rupp standing in the way of
Martinez nomination
By Tony Messenger
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Gov. Jay Nixon’s nominee to head the economic development department ran into rough waters in the Senate
today, even after Sen. Brad Lager, R-Savannah, said he‘d support her.
Lager was holding up the nomination of Linda Martinez, a lawyer from the St. Louis firm Bryan Cave, because
he said he wanted to make sure she didn‘t have any conflicts of interest regarding clients who might be seeking
state tax credits. This morning, Lager said he was satisfied that Martinez was ―competent and capable.‖
But Sen. Scott Rupp, R-Wentzville, wasn‘t ready to accept that pronouncement, mostly, because he said he
was appalled that Martinez hadn‘t sought his support.
Martinez is opposed by some conservatives because of her views on illegal immigration. Rupp sponsored the
legislation last year that strengthened Missouri‘s laws regarding illegal immigration. Rupp said that it made no
sense to him that Martinez wouldn‘t have come to see him to discuss her nomination.
He pointed out over and over again that his office was ―17 steps‖ from Lager‘s office. Lager said he had met with
Martinez 5 times in recent days.
―Maybe if I were to draw a map of the 4th floor on how to get to my office,‖ it would help, Rupp said while holding
up her nomination. Rupp said he hadn‘t received any calls or notes of support for Martinez. ―All I‘m getting is
hundreds of e-mails opposing her.‖
At one point, Majority Floor Leader Kevin Engler tried to broker a meeting between Martinez and Rupp for later
today, but Rupp wouldn‘t bite.
―If she wants to call my office and make an appointment like any other constituent, I will meet with her, but not
today,‖ Rupp said.
Engler then arranged a meeting at 9:45 tomorrow morning, and Rupp stopped his filibuster, but only after
Martinez‘ sponsor in the Senate, Sen. Robin Wright-Jones, D-St. Louis, temporarily withdrew her motion of
nomination. In doing so, Wright-Jones suggested that Rupp, and others, might be opposing Martinez because
she‘s a woman.
Rupp took offense to that allegation. ―That‘s just a freshman senator not understanding the decorum of the
Senate. To make that accusation is irresponsible.‖
Both Engler and Sen. Charlie Shields, the Senate president pro tem, said they were surprised by Rupp‘s
filibuster. After taking his stand, Rupp told reporters that he wanted to make sure Martinez‘ views on illegal
immigration won‘t ―interfere with how she would conduct her duties‖ as director of economic development.
Rupp appeared to have enough support for his filibuster that Martinez might want to schedule a few more
meetings with senators while she‘s in the building.
He indicated to Wright-Jones that he thought a meeting with Martinez would satisfy his concerns.




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Director of Economic Development's
Appointment Filibustered
KBIA-Maureen McCollum

COLUMBIA, MO (2009-02-04) Some Republican state senators have questions for the next director of the
Department of Economic Development before they confirm her. KBIA's Maureen McCollum has more:
Senator Scott Rupp filibustered the appointment of Linda Martinez as the next director of the Department of
Economic Development yesterday. The republican says he's concerned Governor Jay Nixon's pick to lead the
DED is too soft on illegal immigration. Martinez worked pro bono with a group of St. Louis workers in 2007 to sue
the town of Valley Park. The St. Louis suburb passed ordinances fining employers who hired undocumented
immigrants and landlords who rented to them. Rupp sponsored a law last year penalizing employers who hire
undocumented workers.
Senator Jim Lembke says he's concerned about Martinez upholding Missouri's current immigration laws based
on statements she made regarding the Valley Park case. Martinez appeared on CNN's Lou Dobbs' Show while
working on the case, saying immigration is a federal issue and shouldn't be administered by cities and states.
Lembke, a Republican, sent Martinez questions last week regarding immigration and he says, from her
responses, it seems she'll follow state laws.
"The senate in its role as an advise and consent is supposed to ask hard questions at times. I mean, this is the
first time that I've asked any questions and we've approved a lot of the governor's appointees at this point."
When Lembke was a state representative, he cosponsored a few bills that cracked down on illegal immigration.
Senator Brad Lager says Martinez could be one of the most knowledgeable DED directors to date. But, the
republican has asked for a list of her past clients to make sure there's no conflict of interest when it comes to
granting state money.
"As their projects come before DED, there's a process in place to make sure that she recuses herself from it and
someone else actually handles those programs."
Lager says it's important that everyone has a fair shot when it comes to applying for economic developm ent
funds.
Nixon spokesperson Jack Cardetti says Martinez has an extensive background in economic development and
she's the most qualified person to become the DED director.
"We need to start turning this economy around, we need to start doing it today. You know 219,000 Missourians
woke up this morning and didn't have a job to go to. That's the biggest problem in the state."
Cardetti says he hopes the Senate gets all questions answered and vote to confirm her soon.




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Wednesday, February 04, 2009

Sen. Champion: Martinez Will Be
Confirmed
Springfield's State Senator Norma Champion tells The Notebook that Linda Martinez has alleviated her
concerns surrounding the illegal immigration issue and says she could be confirmed as the new head of
Economic Development by week's end.
***
Martinez's nomination was held up Wednesday by Sen. Scott Rupp.
In an interview, Champion said she would vote to confirm Martinez. She made her decision after a meeting with
Martinez and the nominee explained why she participated in a St. Louis area lawsuit that challenged an
ordinance that fined businesses and landlords for hiring and renting to illegal immigrants.
"She said the city was going beyond what they were allowed to do. It was a question of legality. She also saw
that it put a lot of burdens on businesses and that they didn't really have a fair hearing in the matter. I'm strong
on the regulation of illegal immigrants, but it satisfied me," Champion said.
ON WHY SHE'LL CONFIRM: "Several of the Governor's appointments are way too liberal for me, but it's about
understanding the job. As to the question of her being qualified and being good at the job at hand, I don't think
anyone questions that. Democrats and Republicans think she's outstanding."
ON THE HOLD UP: "She'll be confirmed. I wouldn't be surprised to see it this week. I don't get the impression
the Senators are blocking her to stop her, but rather to express their opinion."
ALSO:
SEN. JIM LEMBKE, who was the first Senator to raise public concerns about Martinez's comments on illegal
immigration, sent a letter to the nominee this week, asking her to "be clearer" in her answers.
An excerpt from Lembke's letter:
"In your response last week you wrote that the State of Missouri has not ruled on the issue of illegal immigration.
However, don‘t you recognize the precedence set within the lawsuit against the City of Valley Park of which you
were a part? My understanding is that the Eastern District Court specifically rejected the preemption arguments
that you and the ACLU made when that Court upheld the Valley Park ordinance. As I feel certain you know,
several provisions of that Valley Park Ordinance were copied into state law in 2008 by the General Assembly
and Governor. Do you now acknowledge that, as a matter of law, you were wrong when you represented the
plaintiffs against Valley Park? And do you intend to fully support those provisions that are now part of Missouri
state law, even though you sued to stop them in 2007?"
Posted by David Catanese –KY3-TV




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Missouri House backs emergency jobs
legislation
By Virginia Young
POST- DISPATCHJEFFERSON CITY BUREA U CHIEF
02/05/2009

JEFFERSON CITY — Emergency jobs legislation won initial House approval on Wednesday after legislators
sweetened subsidies for businesses that maintain stable employment.
Gov. Jay Nixon called the vote "a major step toward achieving my goal of signing a bold, comprehensive jobs bill
before the Legislature's March break."
The bill would expand the state's Quality Jobs program, which rewards companies for creating jobs that pay at
least the average wage in the county.
The state could issue an unlimited amount of tax credits to growing businesses. Currently, the credits are
capped at $60 million a year. In another change, $30 million could go to firms that simply retain jobs, up from $3
million now. Those subsidies would no longer be limited to companies with at least 1,000 employees.
In most counties, businesses would be eligible if they employed at least 1 percent of the workers in that county.
In urban areas, the threshold would be 750 employees.
Rep. Ellen Brandom, R-Sikeston, proposed the amendment. She said it would help communities keep
companies such as Norando Aluminum Inc. in New Madrid, which is struggling.
"Their jobs are great union jobs with outstanding benefits," Brandom said. "We don't want to lose companies like
that."
The bill's sponsor, Rep. Tim Flook, R-Liberty, said it would be hard to get senators to raise the job-retention
subsidy to $30 million but he would try.
"We will have to be doing some pretty good dance steps over in the Senate to work out a compromise," Flook
said.
The bill also provides incentives for data storage businesses in underground mines, investors in high-tech firms,
companies that perform research and cities that partner with universities to create science-oriented business
districts.
Another House vote is needed to send the measure to the Senate. If passed by both chambers and signed by
Nixon, it will take effect immediately.
The bill is HB191.




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House gives initial OK to business tax incentives
Bill seeks to expand Quality Jobs plan to spur hiring growth.
Chris Blank The Associated Press

Jefferson City -- The Missouri House gave first-round approval Wednesday to an array of business tax incentives
that lawmakers hope will spur job creation.
Facing a recession, Republican leaders in the House and Senate and Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon all cited
pocketbook and economic development issues as their top priority. The economic development measure that
received initial approval Wednesday was the first bill to be debated on the House floor.
The legislation, which needs another vote before moving to the Senate, includes an expansion of a popular tax
incentive program for employers who add well-paying jobs with health insurance benefits. It also promises tax
breaks for investors in early stage technology-based companies and sales tax exemptions for companies
operating underground data storage centers.
Sponsoring Rep. Tim Flook said the bill contained "targeted" tax incentives that would help sustain jobs. He
contrasted it with stimulus legislation being debated in Congress.
"This is about spurring investment and spurring competition and not just spending money and bailing people
out," said Flook, R-Liberty.
One of the bill's main provisions is to expand Missouri's Quality Jobs program, which was created in 2005 and
awards tax credits to companies creating jobs with health benefits and salaries that equal the wage in that
county. The state Department of Economic Development estimates the program has created 22,000 jobs.
The legislation would remove a $60 million cap on how many tax breaks can be awarded and makes it easier for
large employers to get a tax credit for sustaining their work forces.
Currently, a business can get up to a $1 million tax break if it has kept at least 1,000 workers for two years and
meets certain benchmarks, such as being likely to invest at least $70 million within two years . That entire tax
credit program is capped at $3 million.
So far only one company -- Express Scripts Inc. in St. Louis -- has received money, and two others have been
approved.
The House voted 149-13 to expand those available tax breaks by tenfold to $30 million, to lower the qualification
standards and to give until 2015 for the Economic Development Department to approve new projects.
To qualify, a company would need to employ 1 percent of all those working in the county where it is located, or
750 workers in seven heavily populated counties and St. Louis city.
Lawmakers in recent years have touted the Quality Jobs program and regularly increase the amount of tax
breaks that can be awarded through it. Last year, the legislature bumped up the program's cap by $20 million.
In his State of the State speech last month, Nixon drew applause from Republicans and Democrats when he
urged the legislature to expand employer tax incentives to help spur the economy. He praised House members
Wednesday for voting to expand the Quality Jobs program.
"Today's vote is a major step toward achieving my goal of signing a bold, comprehensive jobs bill before the
legislature's March break," Nixon said in a written statement.




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The House economic development bill also creates a tax incentive similar to the Quality Jobs program but
targeted at small businesses. Among the requirements for qualifying starting in 2010, employers would need to
expand their payroll by 20 percent and pay a salary at least equal to the county's average wage.
It's unclear exactly how much the entire bill will cost. An estimate prepared by legislative staff puts the tax
breaks' annual cost to the state at a minimum of $312,000. But that analysis notes the measure could cost the
state more.
The House debated the legislation for about five hours before approving it by voice vote.




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Missouri Senate moves to tighten rules on prepaid
funerals
By RICK ALM
The Kans as City Star
Missouri and Texas companies caught in a prepaid funeral scam last year piled up $1.9 billion in liabilities, but
authorities have found only $312.9 million in cash, insurance and other assets.
Funeral consumers, funeral homes and insurance guaranty associations in at least 19 states are on the hook for
the difference, including an estimated $202 million owed to 45,000 customers in Missouri and Kansas.
The Missouri Senate this week gave first-round approval to a bill aimed at tightening prepaid funeral rules to
prevent the financial abuses that led to the collapse last spring of St. Louis-based National Prearranged
Services Inc. and two Texas insurance affiliates.
The FBI and other agencies are investigating, while state insurance guaranty associations have stepped in to
cover the companies‘ continuing financial obligation to pay for policyholders‘ funerals.
The industry-funded guaranty associations are receiving customers‘ payments and also will be first in line to be
reimbursed from any settlements and other assets after the legal dust settles.
And there might be substantial assets still out there to be discovered that are controlled by company principals,
said Donna J. Garrett, the Texas Department of Insurance receiver overseeing liquidation of the companies
while paying hundreds of claims weekly to the estates of policyholders.
Seizing company executives‘ private wealth to cover the companies‘ obligations is being considered. ―We could
and we‘re certainly looking at all options, as are the FBI and several other federal agencies,‖ said Garrett.
National Prearranged was founded in 1979 by James Douglas Cassity, a disbarred Springfield lawyer who in the
early 1980s served a six-month stretch in federal prison for fraud in a tax-shelter scheme.
By last spring, sons Brent and Tyler Cassity controlled the company and other family enterprises including
insurance companies, funeral homes and cemeteries, among them Mount Washington Forever Cemetery and
Funeral Home in Independence.
Last year, Texas insurance regulators began raising questions about the Cassitys‘ financial practices and in
April, in cooperation with Missouri and other states, placed the three companies in state receivership.
Pending civil lawsuits and regulatory actions in several states now allege improper financial actions that drained
the company‘s invested reserves while underwriting prepaid funeral customers‘ accounts with non-interest-
bearing term life insurance that could not cover the full costs of prepaid funerals.
Since the guaranty associations have agreed to pay off policies at face value only, funeral home operators have
been left to absorb inflationary increases in the cost of funeral services they contracted to provide.
Last year a panel of Missouri lawmakers, regulators and funeral industry representatives agreed to a package of
―desperately needed‖ changes in the law, including stricter investment standards and a requirement that 100
percent of customers‘ payments be invested, up from the current 80 percent and one of the lowest investment
trust thresholds in the country.
Rep. Jay Wasson, a Nixa Republican who headed that study panel, said the Senate bill didn‘t go that far. It
bumps the minimum to around 85 percent.
For more information call toll-free, 1-800-334-3851, or go to www.LincolnMemorialLife.com.




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Buckle-up: MoDOT chief pushes for
tougher seat belt law
AP-Wed Feb 04, 2009, 09:25 PM CST
Jefferson City, Mo. - It‘s failed repeatedly in the past, but state Transportation Director Pete Rahn is optimistic
that a bill stepping up Missouri‘s seat belt enforcement may pass this year.
Rahn wants lawmakers to allow police to pull over motorists for not wearing seat belts.
Under current Missouri law, police can issue tickets for seat belt violations only if motorists are first stopped for
some other violation.
Twenty-six states and the District of Columbia already have laws allowing seat belt violations to be a prim ary
reason motorists are pulled over, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association.
Rahn said passage of a primary seat belt law in Missouri is the top legislative priority of the Missouri Department
of Transportation. Other states that adopted such laws have seen an average 11 percent increase in their rate of
seat belt use, he said.
From January 2005 through Wednesday, 2,195 people who were not wearing seat belts died in Missouri traffic
accidents, Rahn said. If Missouri had a primary seat belt law, and its usage rate increased according to national
averages, Rahn estimated 360 of those lives could have been saved.
‗‗There is a growing understanding that we have this senseless carnage occurring on our roads,‘‘ Rahn said.
Whether that translates to votes at the Missouri Capitol remains to be seen.
Similar bills have failed in the House in previous years. Some lawmakers believe a primary seat belt
enforcement law would be an unnecessary government intrusion on personal freedom; others fear it could
provide an excuse for racial profiling by police.
Supporters of strong seat belt enforcement struck an usual alliance in 2005 by combining their bill with a
provision repealing Missouri‘s mandatory motorcycle helmet law for adults. But the House voted 91-69 that year
to strip out seat belt provision.
In 2007, the seat belt legislation was set aside without a vote after running into stiff opposition in the House.
Rep. Steve Hobbs, R-Mexico, said a primary seat belt law polls poorly among his rural constituents, adding that
he remains opposed to it and doubts there will be much action on it this year.
It takes 82 votes to pass a bill in the House.
Rep. Bill Deeken, R-Jefferson City, said 55 colleagues have agreed to co-sponsor his bill this year allowing
police to pull over motorists for failing to wear seat belts. Deeken said an additional 15 have said they would
support the bill. But to pass it, he needs to gain the support of at least 12 more House members.
Deeken is a former opponent of a stronger seat belt law who said he switched his position after his daughter‘s
family survived a traffic accident with a train three years because they were wearing their seat belts.
‗‗People need to realize the government tells us to do a lot of things, and we don‘t always like it, but there might
be some things about it that maybe the government really cares,‘‘ he said.
States can receive federal money for adopting primary seat belt laws. But those measures must be signed into
law by June 30, and states must begin issuing citations by Sept. 30 to qualify for federal funds, according to the
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
The federal money attached to seat-belt enforcement can only be spent for highway-related projects.




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Maximizing Federal Stimulus Money
JEFFERSON CITY - Gov. Jay Nixon organized a council to compliment the executive branch in determining how
to use federal stimulus money.
Gov. Nixon is relying on his Economic Stimulus Coordination Council to come up with spending priorities, in
conjunction with the executive branch of Missouri's government, for the proposed federal stimulus money.
The council will help maximize the funds from the federal stimulus package by finding what areas it can either
make budget cuts, or re-allocate money. Once the federal government releases the package, the state of
Missouri will then allocate those funds to certain areas.
The areas of concentration include: energy and the environment, science and technology, health care and
Medicaid, education, and transportation. The money that would potentially be used for transportation would
mostly be used by MoDOT.
"We have a couple of projects that are very important to economic development and bringing jobs to Missouri.
So it means we're gonna be able to do more of our job than we could without these monies," explains Pete
Rahn, director of MoDOT.
While MoDOT and other state organizations have one idea of what to do with a majority of the stimulus money,
two Missouri residents braved the cold elements and shared their priorities.
"Probably education. If we don't educate our schools, or our students, we're gonna miss the boat," said Missouri
resident Linda Spence.
"My daughter-in-law is a fifth-grade teacher, and I know that in our part of the state, we do struggle with funding,"
said Missouri resident Brenda Lovelace.
The funding mentioned will come to Missouri, as long as lawmakers in Washington pass President Obama's
proposal for the stimulus package.
KOMU-TV -Reported by: Michael Solakian
Written by: Michael Solakian




               On the Web :        www.senate.mo.gov/senco m – Telephone : (573) 751- 3824
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Gracia Backer to oversee jobless
benefits again
By Virginia Young
Post-Dispatch Jefferson City Bureau
JEFFERSON CITY — With the state‘s job losses mounting, Gov. Jay Nixon has turned to an experienced hand
to run the employment security division.
Democrat Gracia Backer, who ran the agency under former Gov. Bob Holden, was nominated yesterday to
return as the jobless benefits chief. The appointment is subject to confirmation by the Senate.
Backer represented Callaway County in the Missouri House from 1983 to 2000, including a stint as majority
leader. She lost a primary race for lieutenant governor in 2000.
The unemployment fund is nearly broke and is preparing to ask the federal government for a loan. Backer knows
the drill; she ran the fund when it sought a loan to cover a shortfall in 2003.




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Legislators Buckling Down
JEFFERSON CITY- MoDOT Director Pete Rahn addressed two issues in Wednesday's news conference:
creating primary seat belt law, and the economic recovery act.
Rahn stressed the importance of passing a primary seat belt law.
"It is absolutely critical that 2009 be the year that Missouri legislature passes a primary belt law. And that is the
number one priority for MoDOT, it exceeds all other priorities that we have," he said.
Currently Missouri has only a secondary seat belt law, meaning that a police officer cannot stop a driver for not
having his seat belt on. The officer must find the driver committing another offense, such as speeding.
Rahn wants to make failing to wear a seatable a stoppable offense. In other words, police would be able to cite a
driver, simply for not buckling up.
Twenty-six states have passed primary seat belt laws. Missouri legislators says that this is the last year Missouri
can pass the law and still get an incentive grant from the federal government.
"We can get $16.2 million, and if we can pass it and have it signed by the governor by June 2, we can get an
extra $3.8 million," says Representative Bill Deeken.
That adds up to a total of $20 million the state could get from the federal government.
Eight out of the ten people KOMU interviewed supported the passing of a primary seat belt law.
Andrew Jayamane, a Columbia resident, has a different view. " I've had family that have been in accidents, and I
lost a friend that actually died, so I always wear my seat belt. But I just still really think that it's people's choice, to
wear their seat belt or not. You know it's a safety precaution, not a law."
Also addressed in agenda, was the economic recovery act. Rahn says that should it pass, MoDOT has 34
potential projects lined up. The estimated cost of the projects is $510 million. Rahn says the projects would
create up to 14,000 jobs, and could have as much as a $2.4 billion impact on Missouri's economy.
KOMU-TV
Reported by: Nicole Niziolek
Edited by: Trinity Nelson




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MoDOT chief pushes for tougher seat
belt law
Wednesday, February 04, 2009
By DAVID A. LIEB-Associated Press Writer
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) It's failed repeatedly in the past, but state Transportation Director Pete Rahn is
optimistic that a bill stepping up Missouri's seat belt enforcement may pass this year.
Rahn wants lawmakers to allow police to pull over motorists for not wearing seat belts.
Under current Missouri law, police can issue tickets for seat belt violations only if motorists are first stopped for
some other violation.
Twenty-six states and the District of Columbia already have laws allowing seat belt violations to be a prim ary
reason motorists are pulled over, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association.
Rahn said passage of a primary seat belt law in Missouri is the top legislative priority of the Missouri Department
of Transportation. Other states that adopted such laws have seen an average 11 percent inc rease in their rate of
seat belt use, he said.
From January 2005 through Wednesday, 2,195 people who were not wearing seat belts died in Missouri traffic
accidents, Rahn said. If Missouri had a primary seat belt law, and its usage rate increased according to national
averages, Rahn estimated 360 of those lives could have been saved.
''There is a growing understanding that we have this senseless carnage occurring on our roads,'' Rahn said.
Whether that translates to votes at the Missouri Capitol remains to be seen.
Similar bills have failed in the House in previous years. Some lawmakers believe a primary seat belt
enforcement law would be an unnecessary government intrusion on personal freedom; others fear it could
provide an excuse for racial profiling by police.
Supporters of strong seat belt enforcement struck an usual alliance in 2005 by combining their bill with a
provision repealing Missouri's mandatory motorcycle helmet law for adults. But the House voted 91-69 that year
to strip out seat belt provision.
In 2007, the seat belt legislation was set aside without a vote after running into stiff opposition in the House.
Rep. Steve Hobbs, R-Mexico, said a primary seat belt law polls poorly among his rural constituents, adding that
he remains opposed to it and doubts there will be much action on it this year.
It takes 82 votes to pass a bill in the House.
Rep. Bill Deeken, R-Jefferson City, said 55 colleagues have agreed to co-sponsor his bill this year allowing
police to pull over motorists for failing to wear seat belts. Deeken said an additional 15 have said they would
support the bill. But to pass it, he needs to gain the support of at least 12 more House members.
Deeken is a former opponent of a stronger seat belt law who said he switched his position after his daughter's
family survived a traffic accident with a train three years because they were wearing their seat belts.
''People need to realize the government tells us to do a lot of things, and we don't always like it, but there might
be some things about it that maybe the government really cares,'' he said.
States can receive federal money for adopting primary seat belt laws. But those measures must be signed into
law by June 30, and states must begin issuing citations by Sept. 30 to qualify for federal funds, according to the
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The federal money attached to seat-belt enforcement can only
be spent for highway-related projects.




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Mo. senators, Gov.'s council debate
stimulus money
Eds: UPDATES wi th more details, senate talks. ADDS byline.
By LEE LOGAN
Associated Press Writer
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- With billions of dollars on the line, Missouri officials are trying to figure out how to
get the most money possible from a federal economic stimulus plan, and how to best use it.
In separate meetings Wednesday, a panel convened by Gov. Jay Nixon focused on how the state can quickly
use the federal money, while a Senate committee discussed where the funds would fit into the state budget, both
in the short and long term.
The governor's council consists of business and government leaders from across the state.
"The ongoing national economic crisis has hit Missouri really hard," Nixon told the group at its initial meeting. But
if the state best uses its share, he said, "we've got a real shot to rebound our economy much more quickly than
others."
Nixon policy director Jeff Harris said the group should not focus on individual projects but on ensuring measures
are in place to use the money quickly.
Co-chairman Steve Stogel, a St. Louis real estate developer, said the group hopes to finish recommendations by
Feb. 27. Stogel said he expects President Barack Obama to sign the stimulus bill around President's Day.
Later Wednesday, a group of senators debated how best to use the funds to plug budget holes.
Sen. Jason Crowell is worried about using one-time federal money to pay for ongoing state programs, such as
aid to school districts.
"When we get off the federal juice, somebody's going to have to pay these people," said Crowell, R-Cape
Girardeau.
Linda Luebbring, Nixon's budget director, said the proposed state budget only uses stimulus money to maintain
current spending levels, with slight increases in some areas such as Medicaid.
"The idea is to try to make up for the lack of money at the state level because of the economy," she said.
Under estimates by the National Conference of State Legislatures, Missouri is slated to receive about $800
million in extra Medicaid funding that can be used as states see fit. Missouri also could receive $1.2 billion in
overall budget help, about $700 million of which must be spent on education.
Under a bill introduced Wednesday by Senate Appropriations Chairman Gary Nodler and Sen. Joan Bray, the
ranking Democrat on the budget committee, stimulus money would be put in two new funds in the state budget.
The increase in Medicaid funding would go in a separate pot, while all other money from the federal bill would be
placed in a general stimulus fund.
Nodler, R-Joplin, and Bray, D-St. Louis, said the special funds would make it easier to track how the stimulus
money is spent and could identify particular projects to garner more funding.
According to figures released Wednesday by the White House, the stimulus package could create or save about
73,000 jobs in Missouri and provide tax refunds up to $1,000 to more than 2 million workers. The package also
would extend unemployment benefits, create a new tax credit to offset college costs and modernize up to 163
schools in Missouri, according to White House figures.



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Missouri is slated to receive about $600 million for roads and bridges. Some U.S. senators have said they want
to add more infrastructure spending.
State Transportation Director Pete Rahn said the amount doesn't live up to the bill's hype and that the
department still faces a looming shortfall of funds in future years.
During the governor's economic council meeting, Stogel said he would recommend changing the state income
tax code so that federal tax cuts would not trigger similar tax cuts at the state level. He said that would keep the
state from losing tax revenue.
Stogel asked the group to come up with recommendations about other areas in the package, including rural
broadband service and transportation funding.




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Stogel to co-chair Mo. economic
stimulus council
St. Louis Busine ss Journal - by Angela Mueller


Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has named 26 indiv iduals to serve on the state’s Economic Stimulus
Coordination Council, including nine members from the St. Louis region.

Steve Stogel, principal of DFC Group, will serve as co-chair of the council, which was created to ensure
that Missouri maximizes the amount of money it receives from the federal stimulus program.

Other local executives serving on the council include:

• Steve Ehlmann, St. Charles County executive

• Charles Burson, of counsel with Bryan Cave LLP

• Tom Irwin, Civic Progress executive director

• Maxine Clark, CEO of Build-a-Bear Workshop

• Dave Nichols, president of AT&T Missouri

• Linda Martinez, director of the Missouri Department of Economic Development

• David Steward, chairman of World Wide Technology

• Donald Suggs, publisher of the St. Louis American

The council will submit recommendations to the governor for coordinating job creation activities with state
and federal legislators and for optimizing all opportunities with the federal government.

The members of the council will serve without com pensation.

The council’s creation was one of the first orders signed by Nixon when he took office earlier this month .




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KBIA Local

Mexico MU Project at Standstill Due to
Funding Loss
James Steward
COLUMBIA, MO (2009-02-04) The University of Missouri stands to lose more than 50 million dollars in funding
for construction projects. MU was supposed to receive the funding from the Missouri Higher Education Loan
Authority, or MOHELA. The funds have been suspended indefinitely while Governor Jay Nixon reviews
MOHELA's finances.
The money was designated to be used for several new buildings, including the new MU Plant Science Center in
Mexico.The center was supposed to receive 5 million dollars. Those involved with the project now wonder where
that money will come from.
Mexico State Representative Steve Hobbs is disappointed with the setback but he says he is determined to
forge ahead with the project.
"Quite frankly, at the point we're at in the project, it doesn't matter where the money comes from as long as it
comes."
Hobbs is actively working to replace the lost funds. He is still hopeful that the project can begin without a lengthy
delay.




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Feb. 13 is new deadline for Blunt e-mail
investigators' report
JEFFERSON CITY | A Cole County judge will allow investigators looking into former Gov. Matt Blunt's e-mail
retention practices to file a report on Feb. 13.
The investigators, appointed in 2007 by then-attorney general, now-Gov. Jay Nixon, were initially supposed to
present the report last month, according to the terms of a legal settlement.
Under the order entered by Judge Richard Callahan, the investigators must present their report to Blunt's
lawyers by next Friday. The attorneys will then have until March 2 to prepare a response to the report.
The order also says the report cannot be shared publicly until after the response is ready.
Submitted by Jas on N oble KC STAR P RIME BUZZ BLOG




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Senate holds hearing on bill to repeal
ethanol blend requirements
RICHMOND DAILY NEWS - Dennis Sharkey, News Editor
02-04-2009
A Missouri senator thinks corn grown in our state belongs in feed troughs, not in our gas tanks.
Sen. Matt Bartle, R-Lee‘s Summit, has filed a bill that would repeal the 10 blend requirement for Missouri gas
station owners. Under current law, gas stations are required to use a 10 percent blend in fuel if the price of
ethanol is at or below the cost of gasoline.
The bill is scheduled for a hearing tomorrow in front of the Senate Agriculture Committee. Bartle said in his
weekly column on Friday that he plans on being at the hearing for support.
Bartle said the mandate forces farmers to grow corn for fuel instead of food, driving up grocery store and animal
feed prices. He said during these hard economic times Missourians do not need more costs.
―I cannot think of a worse time to make things any more financially difficult for Missourians, all of whom are
affected by food prices and are struggling more than ever to make ends meet,‖ Bartle said in his column.
Ray County Grain Growers General Manager Mike Nordwald was not available for comment for this story, but in
the past has discounted Bartle‘s claims. Nordwald said in December that grain prices and fuel prices were lower
but consumers were not seeing the trickle down at the store.
Bartle said the mandate simply props up certain industries and prohibits the development of other fuel sources.
―By getting in the business of picking ‗winners‘ and ‗losers,‘ state government is hindering innovation and the
development of other technologies,‖ Bartle said.
Another bill being heard by the Agriculture Committee tomorrow would make the same requirement for diesel
fuel sold in the state.
Senate Bill 29 would require retailers to sell a five percent bio-diesel blend fuel. Like the ethanol statute, retailers
would not be liable to purchase the blend unless the bio-diesel could be purchased for less or equal to regular
diesel.




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Lawmakers debate worth of alternative-
fuel mandates
ST. JOSEPH NEWS- PRESS -by Alyson E. Raletz
Thursday, February 5, 2009
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Lawmakers considered tossing out the state‘s ethanol standard and enacting a
biodiesel requirement in almost the same breath Wednesday.
The debate among Republicans underlined the polar views that still exist on government mandates involving
alternative fuels after the first full year a 10 percent ethanol blend hit all gas pumps in the state.
A St. Joseph Democrat who helped craft the ethanol legislation that went into effect Jan. 1, 2008, watched Sen.
Matt Bartle, R-Lee‘s Summit, try to repeal it during a Senate agriculture committee meeting with SB 11.
Mr. Bartle said 70 percent of Missouri gas stations voluntarily offered ethanol before 2008, citing high corn prices
and lack of production efficiency as reasons to scratch the standard.
―Ethanol mandates require government interference,‖ Mr. Bartle said. ―We‘re coming in and saying government
knows better.‖
But Rep. Martin Rucker, D-St. Joseph, said the ethanol rule helped keep Missouri‘s gas prices the lowest in the
country for most of 2008, and the change gave Lifeline Foods an incentive to go online with its St. Joseph
ethanol plant in October 2007.
Ethanol plants also exist in Macon, Mo., and Craig, Mo.
―To our reluctance, sometimes you do have to have the government step in and make good choices,‖ said Mr.
Rucker, who helped author the standard (HB 1026) with a Kirksville Republican in 2006.
Sen. Bill Stouffer, R-Napton, defended the ethanol standard to the agriculture committee Wednesday and asked
senators to go the next step and support the same mechanism for biodiesel fuel in the state. Similar efforts from
him have failed the last two years.
In SB 29, Mr. Stouffer calls for a 5 percent biodiesel blend requirement that includes a price trigger similar to
what‘s in place now for ethanol, meaning that the standard would be lifted at any time biodiesel is more
expensive than regular diesel.
―I understand why there is resistance ... but the only way to expose the market to biodiesel is to impose
standards,‖ he said.
While the Missouri Farm Bureau and the Missouri Corn Growers Association supported the bill, members of the
American Petroleum Institute and the Magellan Pipeline Co., which has an office in Wathena, Kan., opposed it.
Bruce Heine of Magellan argued that the company is attempting a $4 billion project to build a biodiesel pipeline
from Missouri to New York, but the bill‘s price trigger could eliminate it. Since fuel terminals will have to invest $2
million in infrastructure to keep both regular diesel and biodiesel on hand at all times, Mr. Heine said it would be
difficult to justify additional investment.
―We view this as a step backwards,‖ Mr. Heine said.
The committee didn‘t vote on the proposals.
Despite the controversy and prior unsuccessful attempts, Mr. Rucker said he believed the biodiesel standard had
higher chances of passage this year, now that Missourians have seen the ethanol standard for a full year.
―This is another opportunity to cut down our dependence on foreign oil,‖ the St. Joseph Democrat said.
In St. Joseph, Ag Processing‘s biodiesel plant has a capacity of 28 million gallons per year. The plant has
produced biodiesel since September 2007, exclusively from the soybean oil produced at AGP‘s crush facility
next door. Northwest Biodiesel also began production in St. Joseph in 2007. Terra Bioenergy is building another
biodiesel plant on the Stockyards Expressway.



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Possible New Radio System
JEFFERSON CITY- Police and fire fighters in Jefferson City are upset with budget tightening.
The Nixon budget calls for cancelling the $81 million dollars needed to install a state-wide radio communication
system.
A Columbia fire department member experienced the down side of the old system.
"When we were deployed to Clarksville, for the Mississippi River flooding, there were definitely communications
issues with being able to talk between agencies," Terry Cassil said.
The current system does not allow for reliable state-wide communication.
"Now all departments have seperate radio systems, they don't talk to each other, so any interdepartmental
communication has to occur either face to face or through telephone calls," Jefferson Police Department
member Doug Keeney said.
This means resucers have no way of contacting far away emergency centers for help.
KOMU-TV -: Christine Gerli




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Reactor opponents object to change in law
By Janese Heavin
Wednesday, February 4, 2009

A bill that would allow utility companies to charge for construction projects in progress is simply a way for giants
such as AmerenUE to pass on its risks to consumers, opponents said.
And members of Missourians for Fair Electric Rates — a coalition of consumer protection and environmental
groups — vow to fight the proposed legislation this session by bombarding their state representatives with phone
calls and e-mails.
―I‘ve seen some bad ideas, but this one takes the cake,‖ said John Coffman, an attorney who represents the
Consumers Council of Missouri. ―It‘s a huge rip-off,‖ he told about 60 people who attended a forum last night at
the Boone County Government Center.
The General Assembly this session will consider legislation that repeals the no-CWIP law voters approved in
1976. If approved, Construction Work in Progress would allow AmerenUE to increase rates to finance a new
reactor at the Callaway Nuclear Plant. AmerenUE has said it cannot build the plant — expected to cost at least
$6 billion — without a repeal of CWIP. It would be the largest construction project in Missouri history.
The utility company and supporters tout the project as a way to boost the local economy: At its peak,
construction is expected to create roughly 2,500 new jobs with an annual payroll of $400 million, AmerenUE
spokesman Mike Cleary said.
Work isn‘t expected to begin until after 2011. Opponents question whether creating jobs later would be worth the
jobs they suspect will be lost if rates increase. If CWIP were approved and AmerenUE increased rates, large
industrial companies might have to lay off workers to offset those operating expenses, said Peter Bradford, a
utility adviser and former member of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
Bradford also challenged claims that forcing AmerenUE to wait until the end of the project to pay for financing
would cost customers more than if the utility were allowed to collect smaller hikes over the course of
construction. He argued that it wouldn‘t be cheaper for low-income residents who might be forced to rack up
credit card debt if utility rates were to increase during a tight economy. If choosing between buying food and
medicine, ―their first choice would not be to invest in a nuclear plant that won‘t come online for another seven to
eight years,‖ Bradford said.
Plus, he said, it‘s not fair to charge senior citizens for a service they might not ever use.
A few attendees dubbed the forum an attack on AmerenUE. ―It seemed really one-sided,‖ said Eben Allen, a
Columbia resident. ―What I didn‘t see was any clear ideas on where the future of Missouri power is going to
come from.‖




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Travel club loophole would be closed under legislation
Chad Livengood
News-Leader

Jefferson City -- Consumers who get gifts for buying a membership from travel clubs in Branson would have
three days to return the gift and cancel the contract under proposed legislation .
House Bill 83 would close a loophole in the law that allows travel clubs to deny a request to rescind the
membership contract if the consumer already used the free gift.
Rep. Dennis Wood, R-Kimberling City, is sponsoring the bill. His 62nd District covers parts of Stone and Taney
counties and includes Branson, the state's entertainment capital .
"They're basically taking back that right of rescindment," Wood told the House Small Business Committee
Wednesday. "I think that's wrong for them not to be able to rescind just because they used a free t icket."
Wood said consumers would have to pay back the travel club for the gift if they already used it.
The Branson Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce and Convention & Visitors Bureau frequently gets complaints
from visitors about not being able to rescind their travel club contract after giving the deal a second thought, said
President and CEO Ross Summers.
"This is by far the No. 1 complaint that we receive," Summers said. "The vacation club companies are taking
advantage of a loophole in the current state."
Summers said travel clubs use the contract clause to force people to remain in the club, even if the free show
tickets aren't used.
"If they return (the gift) the next day and they have been unused, the travel company will say you have taken
advantage of a membership benefit," Summers said.
No travel clubs from Branson testified against the bill, which could be voted on in committee as early as next
week.
Trent Ford, a lobbyist for Vacation Services of America in Branson, said his company supports the legislation
because it targets the "bad players" in their industry.
"It gives us a bad name as a business," Ford said.
In an interview after the hearing, Summers said Branson shows typically steer clear of brokering tickets to travel
clubs because the memberships are viewed as "a very suspect product." Memberships may cost $2,500 to
$7,000, he said.
"It's seen as a scam by a lot of people," he said.




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Vehicle offices to waive fees for some communities impacted by ice storms
News-Leader Staff

The Missouri Department of Revenue is waiving fees for residents in Mountain View, Thayer and West Plains
who couldn't conduct transactions at their local motor vehicle fee office during recent ice storms.
The waiver applies to people who were unable to use the Mountain Grove and West Plains office from Jan. 26 to
Friday because power outages and storm damage have taken precedent in the past week.
Other offices where the Department of Revenue is waiving fines includes: Alton Caruthersville, Chafee,
Charleston, Dexter, Doniphan, Gainesville, Kennett, Malden, New Madrid, Poplar Bluff, Sikeston, Van Buren and
Willow Springs.
Citizens who were already late with their vehicle tag and driver's license renewals at these offices before Jan. 26
will not get their penalties waived.
"I'm focused on helping these Missourians recover and get back to work, and the last thing they need to worry
about is paying a penalty for not being able to get to their local license offices," Gov. Jay Nixon said in a
statement.




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Governor Waives Penalities
JEFFERSON CITY - Governor Jay Nixon and the Director of Revenue announced license office fees will be
waived for residents affected by the ice storm.
Governor Jay Nixon and Director of Revenue Karen King Mitchell announced Tuesday that penalities normally
assessed for late transactions at local license offices will be waived for customers affected by the recent ice
storms.
Offices in Alton, Caruthersville, Chaffee, Charleston, Dexter, Doniphan, Gainesville, Kennett, Malden, Mountain
View, New Madrid, Popular Bluff, Sikeston, Thayer, Van Buren, West Plains and Willow Springs are all waived
of late transaction fees.
The waiver only applies to people who were unable to get to one of these offices from January 26 to February 4,
or can't get to an office between today and February 6. The types of fees the Department of Revenue is waiving
are pentalities for not renewing a vehicle's license plate and not obtaining a vehicle's title within 30 days of the
vehicle's purchase.
Mitchell says, because of the ongoing consequences of the storm local office managers can apply for penalty
waivers through next week if there is still a need.
KOMU-TV -Written by: Jennifer Kovaleski




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Officials get conflicting Sunshine Law
info
Thursday, February 5, 2009
By Peg McNichol
Southeast Missourian
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Cape Girardeau County Commissioner Gerald Jones led a voluntary Sunshine Law
training session Wednesday for new commissioners in Jefferson City. At another session, they got conflicting
information about the law.
Jones, a former president of the Missouri Association of Counties, a member of the organization's board of
directors and owner of the Cash-Book Journal, said he was asked to lead the class because "I am a newspaper
man and the attorney general's office was too busy."
He handed out the newest version of Sunshine Law books, produced while Gov. Jay Nixon was attorney
general.
Greg Donley, an Ozark County commissioner, said it seemed OK to make a decision "out in the field" as long as
commissioners later voted on the issue in an open meeting.
First-term Warren County Commissioner Dan Hampson said he felt at ease after learning commissioners could
discuss county business without declaring a meeting "as long as you don't make a definite decisions ... as long
as you make the decision in the county commission chambers, with a formal quorum."
Hubie Kluesner, another first-term Warren County commissioner, said the Sunshine law is about common sense.
"You don't make a decision in a pickup truck," he said.
But Ivan L. Schraeder, attorney for the Missouri Association of Counties and the County Commissioners
Association of Missouri, said official talk — even in a field near a bridge — should be posted as an open
meeting, unless an emergency was underway.
Schraeder did not attend Jones' training session. He did discuss the law after referring to it in an afternoon
session on pending legislation.
During a question-and-answer session, some commissioners asked Schraeder for guidance on whether it was
OK for two or three commissioners — a quorum of a three-member commission — to visit a damaged bridge,
take notes and discuss options.
"That's an open meeting," Schraeder said. "That needs to be posted."
Even as a posted meeting, he said, a technical violation could be the lack of public access. He asked if any of
the nearly 200 commissioners present had shared rides to Jefferson City for Wednesday's training. Many
nodded.
"Where's the room for the public [during a car ride]? I hope you drove a pickup truck," he said.
"There's nothing wrong with commissioners traveling together," he said, and "in fact, from the taxpayers
perspective, it's a reasonably good practice" because it's more efficient.
A year ago this week, the relationship between Jones and 2nd District Commissioner Jay Purcell began to
unravel, with the secret digital recording of a private conversation between the two as they shared a car ride to
training in Jefferson City.




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That secret recording and others made by Purcell were made public last May and led to a Sunshine Law lawsuit
Purcell filed against the county commission, including himself, currently under appeal at the state court level.
This year, Jones, Purcell and new 1st District Commissioner Paul Koeper said they drove separately to the
annual state training sessions. An estimated 300 commissioners arrived for the classes, though several stayed
behind to deal with weather-related disasters in their counties.
In 2008, the Southeast Missourian recorded nearly a dozen potential Sunshine Law violations among several
local public agencies, including a number of boards that report to the county commission. In one a case, a
county park board member told a newspaper reporter a meeting notice wasn't posted bec ause they didn't want
the media there; other cases appeared to result from a lack of Sunshine Law knowledge or understanding.




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EDITORIALS … & Letters to the Editor
Tour of Missouri bike race coming to
Cape
Thursday, February 5, 2009
Entering its third year, the Tour of Missouri bicycle race will make its way to Cape Girardeau in September, a
goal local cycling enthusiasts and city officials have been seeking for some time. The official announcement
came late last month as Tour of Missouri organizers announced the 11 cities on the 2009 tour, which will start on
the east side of the state this year. The first two races started on the west side of the state and ended in St.
Louis.
This year's race will start in St. Louis and head for Ste. Genevieve. Cape Girardeau will be the host city at the
end of the second stage. Local supporters who have worked diligently to get on the race schedule now have the
task of raising $50,000 to $75,000 and up to 100 volunteers.
The race, which counts among its most ardent supporters Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder of Cape Girardeau, has grown in
stature in its first two years. The rating given by the International Cycling Union to the 2009 race is expected to
draw considerable interest from well-known cyclists whose names frequently appear atop the list of leaders in
other international events.
Tour of Missouri backers say the race has a major economic impact on the state. The first race in 2007 involved
368,000 spectators along the route, and that number increased in 2008 to 434,000. In dollars, this represented
an economic impact of more than $25 million the first year and nearly $30 million last year.
Congratulations to everyone who has worked so diligently to make Cape Girardeau part of the Tour of Missouri.




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Budget solution should help families
Guest Column
By Blaine Luetkemeyer

Hannibal Courier-Post
Posted Feb 04, 2009 @ 08:19 PM
Washington, DC — I appreciate President Obama‘s desire to see a bipartisan stimulus package to help all the
American families who are hurting. Unfortunately, Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid are using the so called stimulus
package to give new meaning to big government spending.
We cannot spend our way out of the economic troubles that we are in. First, we need to stop racking up huge
sums of debt on the nation‘s credit card and passing the debt off for our children and grandchildren to pay off. As
the president said during the campaign, we need to go through the budget line by line and eliminate programs
that are not working. Now is not the time to be creating new government spending programs.
I cannot say this enough - we cannot borrow and spend our way back to prosperity. We should be planting the
seeds of real prosperity for people by providing real and meaningful tax relief, supporting our small businesses
and ending the practice of placing more debt on our children and grandchildren. The package that Pelosi and her
friends passed like week does little to help hard-working Americans like those in the 9th District who are
struggling every day to provide for their families. In fact, this spending spree will have minimal immediate impact
on improving our struggling economy.
The cold hard facts are that the Pelosi spending proposal will cost every resident in our district more than
$2,700, for a total cost to all district taxpayers of $1.8 billion. And what do you get for your money? How about
$600 million to help to buy new cars for government workers; $150 million for repairs to the Smithsonian
Institution, the same institution that spent $4,000 for a heater for the lap pool of the most recent director, $31,000
on designer upholstery and $2,535 to clean a chandelier; and $50 million for the National Endowment for the
Arts, which spent $190,000 for various artistic endeavors in Nancy Pelosi‘s district of San Francisco.
The Republican alternative that I support would provide an immediate boost to our economy. In fact, according
to estimates based on modeling created by the president‘s own chief economic adviser, the Republican plan
would create more than six million new jobs in the next two years. When compared to the Democratic proposal,
the Republican plan provides twice the jobs at half the cost.
The Republican plan is bipartisan, simple and responsible. It provides real tax cuts for working families. Under
the Republican plan, a married couple filing jointly could save up to $3,200 a year in taxes. Allowing taxpayers
to keep more of their hard-earned money is the best way to stimulate our economy.
The Republican plan also suspends the tax taken from unemployment benefits, provides a tax deduction for
purchasing health care and says that today‘s tax cuts will not lead to future tax increases. These are reasonable
proposals that will provide a significant and immediate boost to our economy.
These are good ideas, and in the spirit of President Obama‘s bipartisan outreach, they should be considered. To
see the entire plan, I encourage you to visit: http://republicanwhip.house.gov/jobs
I remain committed to working with the president and Congress to support a true stimulus bill that will help spur
job growth and allow American families to keep more of their hard-earned tax dollars.
Blaine Luetkemeyer
U.S. Rep. 9th District




               On the Web :        www.senate.mo.gov/senco m – Telephone : (573) 751- 3824
               M I S S O U R I S EN A T E C O M M U N I C A T I O N S

                   DAILY N EWS C LIPS
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Missourinet
Missouri House moves quickly on jobs creation plan
Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 6:39 PM
By Brent Martin
Members of the Missouri House have moved quickly on this legislative session's top priority: creating jobs.
It's highly unusual for the House to move major legislation this early in the session. Preliminary approval has
been given to an enhancement of the Quality Jobs program, the state's primary economic development tool.
Sponsor Tim Flook of Liberty brings the bill to the floor with a sense of urgency, telling members that the failing
national and state economies must be addressed. He says HB191 provides tax incentives for the private sector
to create jobs, not a bailout.
Quality Jobs provides tax breaks to businesses that pay high wages and provide health benefits. Businesses
receive the tax breaks after the jobs are created. The bill removes the annual $60 million dollar cap on the
program. It also creates a small business growth act, provides incentives for underground data storage in
Missouri cave warehouses and promotes the creation of business science industrial parks located near the
state's research universities.
Flook notes the bill doesn't just seek to lure new business to the state, but also to help existing businesses
expand.
 "We're going to focus on aggressive activity to create and maintain jobs," Flook tells colleagues during floor
debate.
One more vote sends the bill to the Senate with plenty of time for the legislature to fulfill Governor Nixon's
request to have a jobs creation plan on his desk by Spring break.


Seeking quality in pre-school education
Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 9:12 PM
By Bob Priddy
The effort to rate early childhood education and before-and-after school programs the same way hotels are rated
has been renewed at the Capitol.
Senator Charlie Shields of St. Joseph says the state spends three-billion dollars on K-through-12 education. But
it spends little on getting children ready for their school years. He proposes a Quality Rating System that he
hopes will encourage more early-childhood education programs to be better. He says the system also will tell
parents where the better education opportunities are for their children.
The University of Missouri's Center for Family Policy and Research has been operating pilot projects for a few
years, and center director Kathy Thornburg says those programs are working. "Only about 13 percent of our
programs are accredited by the six approved accrediting bodies of the state. The majority of the others...do not
and most of them will not meet the standards of accreditation, which is the top level of quality," she says.




               On the Web :        www.senate.mo.gov/senco m – Telephone : (573) 751- 3824
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                                   C o l l ec t ed / A r ch iv ed f o r Th ur sd ay , Feb ru ar y 5 , 200 9 -- Page 30 of 32


The state licenses child care facilities, but does not base the licensing on the quality of education available in
them. Shields bill requires the Departments of Social Services, Health, and Elementary and Secondary
Education to come up with a system to grade facilities with one to five stars.
A senate committee is expected to quickly send the bill to the floor for debate.


Missouri gets a failing grade from the American Lung
Association
Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 7:13 PM
By Jessica Machetta
A report by the American Lung Association gives Missouri straight Fs for the third year in a row on the State of
Tobacco Control Report Card.
And it's not just because Missourians smoke more than other Americans.
Victoria Warren is the Program Coordinator for comprehensive tobacco control program for the Department of
Health and Senior Services.
She says several factors contribute to Missouri's failing grade, but that a lot of it comes down to funding.
She says aside from health coverage, Missouri lacks enough funding for youth programs, smoking cessation
programs, hotlines and more.
Also, communities that have gone smoke-free are seeing fewer kids start smoking, leading to a decrease in adult
smokers in the future.
That means they won't be having health issues related to smoking later on in life.
Warren says it takes a lot of effort to get communities to go smoke-free because businesses fear it will have a
negative economic impact, but that studies show it does not.
The Tobacco Control Report card shows Missouri has the lowest state excise tax in the nation at 17 cents per
pack -- the national average is $1.19.
Within the state, Nodaway county has lowest smoking rate in Missouri -- about 14 percent. Taney County tops
the list. More than 40 percent of the population smokes there.
Click here to see how your county ranks on smoking and health care coverage.


PSC Chair wants dialogue on CWIP law changes
Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 6:42 PM
By Steve Walsh
One of the key bills before the Legislature this session is a bill that would allow electric utitilities to charge
ratepayers for projects while those projects are still under construction. While a decision in the General Asembly
is still a long way off, the man at the helm of the Public Service Commission thinks it would be a good idea for
the PSC to discuss the matter.
PSC Chairman Robert Clayton says an inquiry and a workshop with all the stakeholders in the same room would
allow for the exchange of ideas. And he acknowledges the PSC would not be involved in policy.



               On the Web :        www.senate.mo.gov/senco m – Telephone : (573) 751- 3824
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                   DAILY N EWS C LIPS
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Clayton says it would be wrong to heed the advice of some members of the Commission who think it would be
wise to wait until the legislation becomes law - if it gets that far. He says putting off discussion until August would
delay bringing about a collaborative effort that will be needed.


Gov. Nixon visits Poplar Bluff to survey recovery efforts
Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 6:13 PM
By Jessica Machetta
Gov. Nixon visited Southeast Missouri again today to survey the recovery efforts after last Monday's ice storm
left more than 163,000 homes and businesses without power.
He says a lot of progress has been made in the past week, but much
remains to be done.
The State Emergency Management Agency reports a total of eight
fatalities now. Six people died on icy roads last week ... two more people
died in New Madrid County from carbon monoxide poisoning while running
a generator in their garage.
Officials report power is still out on about 22,000 meters across south and
southeast Missouri Dept of Social Services report 18 shelters are serving
about 636 people with heat, warm meals and a place to sleep if needed.
Click here to visit the Emergency Management Agency's latest situation
report.




               On the Web :        www.senate.mo.gov/senco m – Telephone : (573) 751- 3824
               M I S S O U R I S EN A T E C O M M U N I C A T I O N S

                   DAILY N EWS C LIPS
                                   C o l l ec t ed / A r ch iv ed f o r Th ur sd ay , Feb ru ar y 5 , 200 9 -- Page 32 of 32




USA TODAY MISSOURI NEWS
Thursday, February 5
Kirkwood - A memorial walkway with six benches is planned for the victims of a City Hall shooting last year.
Charles "Cookie" Thornton killed three city officials and two police officers on Feb. 7; wounded Mayor Mike
Swoboda died seven months later from medical complications.

Wednesday, February 4
Jefferson City - Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan announced her candidacy for U.S. Senate on her
campaign website Tuesday. Carnahan, a Democrat, is the first candidate of either party to officially enter the
race after Republican Sen. Kit Bond announced last month that he will not seek re-election in 2010.

Tuesday, February 3
Jefferson City - Gov. Nixon selected DeKalb Associate Circuit Judge R. Brent Elliot as a circuit judge for the 43rd
judicial circuit, which covers Caldwell, Clinton, Daviess, DeKalb and Livingston counties. The position became
vacant when Stephen Griffin announced his retirement.

Monday, February 2
St. Louis - The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Farmington High School officials in St. Louis had the
right to suspend a student for wearing a baseball cap depicting the Confederate flag. The court said schools may
restrict First Amendment free-speech rights "in certain limited circumstances."




               On the Web :        www.senate.mo.gov/senco m – Telephone : (573) 751- 3824

				
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