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									Working Together:
Supporting the delivery of the
Global Dimension in schools
through Statutory and
Voluntary Sector partnerships
Case Study of the relationship between Global Education
Derby, Derby City‟s Children and Young People‟s Services,
and Derbyshire‟s Advisory and Inspection Service




June 2009
Working Together                                                                                   EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


Contents


Summary                                                                                                                             2

Introduction                                                                                                                        3

Case Study of the relationships between Global Education Derby and Derby City and
Derbyshire Local Authorities                                                                                                        7

1. Background                                                                                                                       7

2. The partnership between GED and Derby City                                                                                       8

3. The partnership between GED and Derbyshire                                                                                     15

4. Benefits of the partnership                                                                                                    19

5. The role of EMNGPS                                                                                                             21

6. Conclusion                                                                                                                     22


Appendix 1: Service Level Agreement between Global Education Derby and
            Derby City Council                                                                                                    23

Appendix 2: Service Level Agreement (Community Cohesion) between
            Global Education Derby and Derbyshire AIS                                                                             28

Appendix 3: Service Level Agreement (ISA) between Global Education Derby and
            Derbyshire AIS                                                                                                        31




Publisher:

East Midlands Network for the Global Dimension in Schools, 128 New Walk, Leicester, LE1 7JA;
e: Rohini.Corfield@skillshare.org; t: 0116 257 6606


Author:

Bob Hirst (M.Sc; Cert. Mgmt. (Open)) has been a consultant to the voluntary sector since 1994, specialising in project management. He has
undertaken consultancy for the European Commission, national government, and national and local NGOs in a variety of research and
management capacities. Before 1994, he had worked within development education both at local and national levels for over 15 years.

Bob Hirst, Voluntary Sector Management Consultant, 46 Higher Fence Road, Macclesfield, SK10 1PY
e: wst.co@zen.co.uk; t: 01625 420950




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Working Together                                                     EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


Summary
In 2003, two changes were underway: the East Midlands Network for Global Perspectives in
Schools (EMNGPS) was launched, and Global Education Derby (GED) – a Development
Education Centre based in the city of Derby – was undergoing changes in direction and ethos.
There was harmony between the objectives of EMNGPS and the „new‟ GED as both had a
desire to promote partnership between the Statutory sector (in the form of Local Education
Authorities – now Local Authorities (LAs)) and the Voluntary sector (usually represented at a
regional level by Development Education Centres).

GED was able to improve and build relationships with staff from Derby City and Derbyshire
through close liaison within an EMNGPS-funded Locality Group. The successful
relationships were built on activity that was relevant and useful to both parties. Both LAs
wanted to increase the number of schools working towards the International School Award
and to improve the quality of work that schools undertook to that end. Such work provided
opportunities for the global perspectives that GED and EMNGPS wished to promote and was
flexible enough to relate to other Local Authority priorities, such as creative educational
pedagogies, modern languages, citizenship and community cohesion.

To make the partnerships successful it was crucial that GED build a track record of high
quality work within the Authorities‟ schools. It was vital that LA staff could be confident that
GED‟s work was professional and of a high enough standard so that they could unequivocally
recommend them to their schools.

In recent years, GED has formed Service Level Agreements with both Authorities, thereby
formalising the relationship. The partnerships and the SLAs have benefited both sides. The
LAs gain GED‟s expertise on the global dimension and their insights into the field generally.
This can result in practical benefit for the Authority or their schools, such as obtaining funds
from sources otherwise unknown or unavailable to them. The Agreements ensure that the LA
can depend upon a minimum amount of support and training from GED, quality controlled
through a reporting mechanism. GED gains credibility, LA staff members‟ expertise about
working in schools, access to schools and, perhaps most importantly, insights into shifting
priorities within schools during times in which formal education policy or guidance has
changed rapidly and frequently. It also gets a guaranteed payment for its work.

As a result of these successful partnerships, schools receive a more consistent and higher
quality service and the extent to which they can be supported to develop the global dimension
is increased.

EMNGPS has facilitated this process through funding the locality group and financially
supporting certain initiatives and publications arising from the partnerships. It has also
provided external support to both GED and LA personnel and has subtly influenced the
thinking and strategising of the participants. It is difficult to judge what would have happened
in Derby/Derbyshire if EMNGPS had not existed, but the opinion of contributors to this case
study is that not only has its role been central but without it the success of these partnerships
could not have been guaranteed.




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Introduction
Purpose of the case study
The evaluation plan of the East Midlands Network for Global Perspectives in Schools
(EMNGPS) includes a number of different learning mechanisms, including the research and
production of case studies. In general, EMNGPS case studies are used to
  describe particular events and actions in more qualitative detail than can be captured in
   regular reports or quantitative evaluation surveys;
  identify what can be learned by EMNGPS and others from the event or action;
  provide a means of sharing that learning with others.

Box 1 provides a brief summary of EMNGPS and its aims. Its Five Year Regional Strategy
(2008 – 2013) includes a priority to promote and work within partnerships between all
stakeholders, with the intention that such partnerships would “lead to increased profile,
influence and impact”. As described in Box 1, EMNGPS seeks to stimulate such partnerships
primarily through a system of support to Locality Groups throughout the region. There are
examples of successful partnerships in all of the Locality Groups, but EMNGPS decided that
the work within the Derby and Derbyshire group was particularly interesting and worthy of
further analysis, which led to this case study.


     Box 1: East Midlands Network for Global Perspectives in Schools (EMNGPS)
     EMNGPS is one of eleven regional networks funded by the Department for International Development (DFID) as
     part of its Enabling Effective Support (EES) strategy. It is a strategic regional network that builds capacity for the
     mainstreaming of the global dimension in formal education.

     EMNGPS:
       encourages cross-sector (statutory and voluntary) collaboration;
       contributes to the national debate about the development of global dimension policy;
       supports innovative global dimension activity in schools;
       shares learning.

     It has an Executive Committee to provide strategic direction, with a Working Group on Monitoring and Evaluation
     and another on Funding.

     It also funds seven Locality Groups at the County level, which are co-ordinated by staff from Local Authorities or
     NGOs such as Development Education Centres. These meet termly to bring together teachers from primary,
     secondary and special schools, Local Authority advisers, Initial Teacher Education lecturers and NGO staff to plan,
     run and evaluate local Global Dimension events (e.g, training sessions, conferences) in relation to the EMNGPS
     Regional Strategy.

     The role of Locality Groups is to plan and deliver the strategy to mainstream the Global Dimension in each local
     area, making use of local partnerships and contexts. They are responsible for:
      planning activities with local teachers and schools;
      financial planning and reporting to EMNGPS for all local activities;
      identifying and involving key local players from the statutory and voluntary sectors;
      intervention in local opportunities.

     Information about the diverse work of Locality Groups can be found on the EMNGPS website -
     www.emngps.org.uk/localitygroups




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Global Education Derby (GED) facilitates the Derby/Derbyshire Locality Group. On the
website (www.globaleducationderby.org.uk), GED describes itself as:

       “a specialist educational organisation, working across Derby, Derbyshire and the
       East Midlands encouraging active participation in initiatives that address global
       poverty and environmental degradation.

       We work with teachers, youth workers, and other educators to promote increased
       awareness of the importance of global citizenship in the lives of young people,
       and to offer opportunities for reflective, creative and innovative work that develop
       the themes of sustainable development within the policies and practices of the
       education system.

       We are a member of the Development Education Association and an accredited
       Development Education Centre.”

This case study outlines the partnerships between Global Education Derby (GED) and the two
local authorities with which it works: Derby City and Derbyshire. It attempts to describe
   what has happened between GED and the two local authorities;
   why this was done;
   what benefits have accrued from the partnerships; and
   what role EMNGPS played in the process.


The Enabling Effective Support strategy
Before considering the partnerships, it is useful to put EMNGPS‟s work, and that of the
players within this study, into the context of wider overall objectives. EMNGPS is mainly
funded by the UK Government‟s Department for International Development (DFID) within a
national initiative known as the Enabling Effective Support (EES) strategy. The strategy aims
to promote the teaching of the global dimension in schools, as outlined in a DfES (now
Department for Children, Schools and Families - DCSF) booklet1 and further described in a
more recent Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) document2.

DFID‟s paper describing EES, written in 2003, noted that “a diverse range of organisations are
already involved in the provision of resources and teaching support to those incorporating a
global dimension into their teaching. But so far there has been no overall strategy to ensure
that such support is co-ordinated and meets the real needs of schools and teachers”.3 It goes
on to identify key issues that each regional initiative should address, two of which are:
   Take account of the development of the capacity of key stakeholders to provide effective
    support for teachers, and
   ensure that broader stakeholders … - particularly Local Education Authorities - … are
    centrally involved …




1
  Developing the global dimension in the school curriculum, DfES, DFID and others (2005). One of the
Guidance on Curriculum and Standards series of publications (ref: DfES 1409).
2
  The Global Dimension in action. A curriculum planning guide for schools, QCA and others (2007).
3
  Enabling Effective Support – responding to the challenges of the global society: a strategy of support for the
global dimension in education, DFID (2003), page 2.

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Working Together                                                               EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


EES applies three separate but overlapping strategies:

   Voluntary – Statutory Sector Collaboration: Developing and applying collaboration
    between statutory and voluntary education sector organisations, authorities and institutions
    in the joint planning and implementation of global dimension education programmes and
    projects.
   Teacher/Tutor Engagement: Facilitating groups of teachers/ITT4 tutors/advisers in
    active engagement with the global dimensions of education, so they develop their own
    professional understanding, capacities and capabilities.
   Work With Schools and Colleges: Working with schools and colleges to integrate global
    dimension issues, concepts and approaches in development plans, and in response to
    national and local education initiatives and requirements.

The work of the EMNGPS Locality Groups seeks to promote these strategies.


The context for delivering the Global Dimension in schools
While some UK schools already have the skills and experience to provide a global perspective
across their curriculum, many others do not, and they benefit from external assistance. The
majority of specialist support to schools on the global dimension has come from two types of
organisations within the voluntary sector: large, national agencies with an overseas
development agenda (such as ActionAid, CAFOD, Christian Aid, Oxfam, Unicef, Save the
Children and others); and small, local organisations providing resources and training (often
called Development Education Centres - DECs). The national organisations are available to
all schools, usually through the Internet or through regional networks of support staff covering
huge geographical areas of the country. The DECs tend to focus their work on sub-regional
areas, sometimes supporting schools in only one or a small number of local authorities.
Where a DEC (or something equivalent) exists, support tends to be better than in other areas.

Sometimes local authorities are able to provide their own support. Often this consists of an
officer “wearing many different hats” and the global dimension might be just one small part of
her or his brief. However, in some cases a more substantial level of support is possible. For
example, within the East Midlands, Nottingham City has an International Development
Consultant who can make a major contribution to the support of the global dimension in
Nottingham City schools5.

Throughout the UK6 the relationship between DECs and local authorities varies, depending on
the importance that the authority places on the global dimension, the capacity of the
organisations to work in partnership, and the skills and expertise of the individuals concerned.
There is even the possibility that the two parties view each other as a competitor, as they are
both seeking to generate service income from schools in order to maintain staffing levels.




4
  Initial teacher training.
5
  EMNGPS has produced a case study report about this post: Brown, E.J., How the International Dimension
Consultant supports both International and Global Dimension activities in Nottingham City Schools, EMNGPS
(2007)
6
  While in the countries other than England the political structures of local educational support differ, the
fundamental point remains the same.

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Working Together                                                   EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


Methodology for this case study
Data was collected primarily by semi-structured, recorded interviews in April 2009.

For Global Education Derby (GED)
  Director

For the Children and Young People‟s Services (CYPS), Derby City Council
  Education Officer for PSHE/Citizenship and Religious Education; and Head of the PSHE
   & Citizenship Advisory Service
  Secondary PSHE/Citizenship Consultant (within the PSHE & Citizenship Advisory
   Service)
  Primary PSHE/Citizenship Consultant (within the PSHE & Citizenship Advisory Service);
   who on GED‟s Management Committee
  Advisory Teacher for Travellers (within the Social Development and Inclusion Service);
   also Operations Manager of the School Linking Network
  School Development Officer (within the School Development and Co-ordination Service)

For the Derbyshire Advisory and Inspection Service (DAIS), Derbyshire County Council
  Community Safety and Citizenship Consultant; also on the EMNGPS Executive
   Committee
  Primary Languages Consultant; also on GED‟s Management Committee




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Working Together                                                    EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


Case Study of the relationships between Global Education Derby and Derby
City and Derbyshire Local Authorities

1. Background
Before 2003 Global Education Derby (GED), previously called Derby Rainbow, mainly
focused on Derby City schools and worked very little in Derbyshire. Staff tended to work in a
few select schools with which they had built up a good relationship. The current opinion
within GED itself is that it was driven by internal personal interest rather than a more
objective analysis of need, and one Derby City LA staff member saw them as “individuals
with a passion, doing their own thing” with a mixed record for continuity and reliability. It
had an organisational ethos that promoted certain themes (e.g. green issues) and political
viewpoints (generally left-wing), leading to it being perceived in some quarters as being over
judgemental and too challenging. Yet, despite this ethos of challenge, the current GED
Director considers the general standard of work undertaken by GED in schools in those days
to have been “pedestrian and unchallenging” educationally. For this reason, the relationship
between GED and the City was not as good as it could have been. In a nutshell, GED/Derby
Rainbow did not come up to the professional standards expected by Authority staff.

The relationship began to change around 2003 when GED underwent an internal restructuring,
appointing an Education Co-ordinator (now the Director) with the task of changing the
organisation‟s direction and culture. Changes within GED at management level led to new
strategies and, over time, the appointment of new staff. GED wanted to change its working
style and:
   seek to provide a service to all schools in the City;
   extend services to include County schools;
   develop a more professional service;
   improve relationships with City personnel; and
   build relationships with County personnel.

The setting up of the East Midlands Network for Global Perspectives in Schools (EMNGPS)
from 2003 challenged GED to consider how it could contribute to a regional strategy and how
it could facilitate greater levels of co-operation between different stakeholders within the
Derby area. In fact, the interests of EMNGPS and those of GED at the time were in complete
harmony. Forming better relationships with colleagues across the region would help to raise
standards of work; working towards developing a local network would require making
contacts with local authority personnel in the City and the County, providing a vehicle for
presenting the „new‟ GED to them and a reason for building relationships.

After considerable preparatory work, GED was able to facilitate the first meeting of the Global
Network (the name given to the EMNGPS-funded Derby and Derbyshire Locality Group).
This took place in February 2005. Two people from the City and two from the County, along
with GED staff and the EMNGPS Co-ordinator, attended the first meeting. A further eight
people had expressed interest. The purpose of the Global Network was agreed as being “to
network and find out what we are all doing; support each other; pool expertise and resources,
especially relevant for supporting schools; explore possibilities of further rural/urban links
within the City and County; share good practice; plan projects to work in partnership.”7


7
    Extract from the minutes of the meeting, 22nd February 2005 .

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2. The partnership between GED and Derby City
In earlier years GED focused its curriculum work on Geography and Religious Education.
The Authority involved them occasionally by inviting them to conferences and using them as
a resource centre. More recently, GED‟s main connection with the Authority has been
through global citizenship, liaising with the PSHE8 & Citizenship Advisory Service (see Box
2). Both the Primary and Secondary PSHE/Citizenship Consultants currently attend The
Global Network (the Derby and Derbyshire Locality Group) and one represents the Authority
on GED‟s Management Committee.


     Box 2: Derby City Council
       In Derby, services relating to its 105 schools are delivered through the Learning Division within the Children and
       Young People‟s Services. The Learning Division is headed by the Assistant Director - Learning.

       The work of this Division falls into a number of services, two of which are:
        Social Development and Inclusion Service
        School Development and Co-ordination Service

       Social Development and Inclusion Service
       The Social Development and Inclusion Service includes a number of teams, two of which are:
        PSHE & Citizenship Advisory Service (PCAS), with a Head and two PSHE/Citizenship Consultants plus a Co-
           ordinator and three Workers for Healthy Schools. This service supports schools in response to the National
           Curriculum and non-statutory guidance through consultancy, training and publication of support materials. It
           assists schools in gaining the National Healthy Schools Award and supports school improvement through the
           development of emotional intelligence and emotional literacy. Its work is provided as part of the Authority‟s
           „core services‟ for which schools do not have to pay, as opposed to its „sold services‟ for which they do.
        Traveller Education Advisory and Support Team (TEAST), including the Head and two full-time and one
           part-time Advisory Teachers and two Teaching Assistants working with Gypsy and Traveller Pupils. It
           also has a dedicated Eastern European Roma Team. It works to encourage and assist schools to fulfil
           their responsibilities for the education of all Traveller pupils.

       School Development and Co-ordination Service
       This service has the following objectives
        To produce and deliver a high quality annual training and professional development programme within a cost
            neutral budget
        To support schools in implementing the National Remodelling Strategy
        To improve the quality of support for Gifted and Talented Pupils
        To effectively deploy Advanced Skills Teachers
        To promote and disseminate Good Practice
        To be a critical friend to Derby City Schools' Learning Network and disseminate Good Practice
        To ensure effective Recruitment and Retention of staff in Derby City Schools
        To effectively support the development of Teaching Assistants

       This information was obtained from various parts of Derby City Council website, as of April 2009:
       www.derby.gov.uk/EducationLearning/




This person‟s role on GED‟s Management Committee provides a useful two-way
communication. While GED benefits from her professional experience and knowledge of
what is happening within the Authority, she is better placed to respond to GED‟s new
initiatives, tap into their resources, and draw on their expertise on the global dimension. She

8
    Personal, Social and Health Education.

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Working Together                                                                               EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


is also able to guide their policies and plans, and even influence staff appointments, thereby
ensuring continuity of the quality service the Authority has come to expect from them.


     Box 3: The DCSF International School Award (ISA)
     The ISA is an accreditation scheme for curriculum-based international work in schools. It is open to all UK
     schools and is free of charge.

     The international dimension in education is an increasingly important part of agendas such as Every Child
     Matters and Community Cohesion in the way it supports the cultural heritage of teachers and learners and
     positive learning across schools.

     The ISA now features in Part One of the 2007-8 School Evaluation Framework (SEF) for schools in England
     as a 'significant award' that contributes to giving the school a 'distinctive character'. It is also featured in the
     new curriculum guidance from QCA, particularly with regard to the Global Dimension.

     The ISA supports schools to develop:
      An international ethos embedded throughout the school
      A majority of pupils within the school impacted by and involved in international work
      Collaborative curriculum-based work with a number of partner schools
      Curriculum-based work across a range of subjects
      Year round international activity
      Involvement of the wider community
      Evaluation from a variety of sources allowing you to improve your activities and your international
        programme.

     The ISA offers:
      a framework within which to form and develop international partnerships and achieve curriculum goals.
      ideas for developing collaborative curriculum-based international work with partner schools.
      recognition for teachers and their schools that instil a global dimension into the learning experience of all
        children and young people.
      opportunities to raise the school's profile through local and national media coverage.
      support for delivering on the Sustainable School agenda.

     The Sustainable Schools National Framework states that:
     „By 2020 the Government would like all schools to be models of good global citizenship, enriching their
     educational mission with activities that improve the lives of people living in other parts of the world. ‟

     This extract has been drawn from the global gateway website -
     www.globalgateway.org.uk/default.aspx?page=5057 – as of April 2009.




Service Level Agreement
In 2007 the Head of the PSHE & Citizenship Advisory Service concluded that it would be
beneficial to set up a Service Level Agreement (SLA) with GED. This was partly
philanthropic – he knew that GED would value the income – but mostly pragmatic. Crucially,
GED could supply a service needed by the Authority – they could “add value”. There was a
desire to promote global citizenship in general and to get more schools in Derby to achieve the
International School Award (ISA, see Box 3), and the resources of the Authority could not
stretch to achieve this properly. GED was the obvious organisation to involve to this end. By
this time, GED was considered to be well managed and seemed to have a secure future, and
his team considered the quality of their work to be high. He was confident that the Authority
could rely on GED‟s input and that it would get value for its money.



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The SLA (see Appendix 1) was formalised in December 2007 to run until the end of 2010. It
provides £9,550 over the three years to pay for GED to
  assist secondary schools to apply for and attain the International School Award (ISA) at
   Intermediate Level, and to use the ISA as a tool for development in school;
  assist primary schools in Derby to apply for and attain the ISA at Intermediate Level;
  provide three „Open Sessions‟ a year for Derby City teachers and teaching assistants and
   members of the PSHE & Citizenship Advisory Service.

The Head of the Service now considers the Agreement to be an essential part of the
partnership between the Authority and GED. It clarifies expectations, ensures continuity of
service from year to year, and improves the accountability of GED‟s work within the
Authority. He considers quality assurance to be very important, as it is essential that
Authority personnel can be confident about recommending them to schools. The SLA is a
manifestation of the confidence that GED engenders. As he pointed out, “there are lots of
other voluntary organisations in Derby that would like to work in schools but we wouldn‟t,
ever, go into a Service Level Agreement with them because we wouldn‟t have confidence in
their professionalism or quality of delivery”. In addition to GED‟s hands-on expertise, the
Authority values the information that they can provide. For example, GED introduced
Authority staff to the British Council‟s work, the School Linking Network (see below), and to
useful websites. Authority staff members do not have time to research information sources
and opportunities such as these and follow-up potential funding streams.

From GED‟s point of view, the SLA provides them with extra credibility with schools but
perhaps the most useful aspect is that the formal relationship enables GED to learn better ways
of working with schools and facilitates finding out what is going on in the formal sector of
education. While local authority staff recognise the complexity of the whole global dimension
field, organisations like GED find it difficult to keep up with the various new initiatives within
the sector and to monitor how priorities shift and change within schools. The income from the
SLA is helpful and necessary to enable GED to commit its resources, but it is a relatively
small part of GED‟s overall turnover and is not necessarily the main benefit of the
relationship.


School Linking Network
In 2006 GED developed an idea to work with Derbyshire schools to support them in depth to
achieve the Full ISA (further details about this can be found in the Derbyshire section). The
resulting DFID-funded project, „Frameworks for Global Citizenship – Raising Development
Awareness through the International School Award‟, started in 2007 and will run into 2010.
This provided GED with the staff time and expertise to meet its requirements under the
Service Level Agreement, but also to seek ways of extending school linking within Derby City
schools, based on the work of the Schools Linking Network (SLN) in Bradford (see Box 4).

GED encouraged the Authority to take advantage of grant funds from SLN that could be used
for Authority personnel to access professional development training from SLN and for
operating the programme of support with schools. The central purpose of the SLN programme
is to promote community cohesion by partnering schools across diverse communities within
England, but the educational benefits of running such school links and the values implicit
within promoting community cohesion have strong resonance with the global dimension and




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running international school partnerships9. GED‟s plan was to extend the usual SLN model
(which assumed that schools would form partnerships with others within the same Authority)
by seeking to partner Derby City schools with schools in Derbyshire, and then extend the
learning to the global.


     Box 4: The Schools Linking Network (SLN)
     The Schools Linking Network is joint-funded by Bradford Local Authority and central government. Its national
     remit is to promote school links between different communities within England, as a means of improving
     community cohesion. It has two main strategies. The first is to work with Local Authorities (LAs) throughout
     England over 3 years, to provide training, activities in schools and support to specially appointed part-time LA
     employees, who are expected to carry on the work once SLN and government finance is withdrawn. Its
     second strategy is to run a National Gateway website to support schools in Authorities that will not be
     reached during the programme.

     The following information was obtained from www.schoolslinkingnetwork.org.uk - as of April 2009.


     The SLN offers support for school linking within the UK in the following ways:
      Through strategic development of local authority work with school linking.
      Direct school-to-school linking across the country via the National Gateway.
      By providing resources, courses and advice for anyone interested in the way school linking can support
        active citizenship and greater understanding of issues of identity and diversity.

     The Schools Linking Network draws on six years' experience of local linking in Bradford and is now embarking
     on a national programme to support other local authorities across the UK to establish sustainable and effective
     linking programmes that respond to and meet local need.

     Successful school linking is a powerful vehicle which enables schools to fulfil the new DCSF guidance on
     Community Cohesion and enables students of all ages to meet the requirements of the citizenship curriculum
     and become confident and articulate young people. The Schools Linking Network has been developed to
     support schools and local authorities to tackle this work with clarity and enthusiasm.




In 2008 the City duly applied for and obtained funding from SLN and identified a team of
staff to carry out the work, with the support of GED. The Advisory Teacher for Travellers,
who works in the Traveller Education and Advisory Team, was asked by her manager to take
on the role of Operations Manager of this initiative named the City‟s School Linking Network.

She and two colleagues10 attended training with SLN in June 2008 and went on to work
closely with GED staff to deliver the project, with Operations Manager concentrating on the
City schools and GED working with the County‟s. The first school training session ran in
October 2008 and the third is planned for June 2009.

She has found GED staff to be very supportive and they provide her with confidence.
“They‟re very good people to work with – I can‟t emphasise this enough!” They often work
together on training sessions and the partnership extends beyond school linking, with GED
sometimes working with her on activity with Travellers. She also attends the EMNGPS

9
  This is recognised by the Schools Linking Network itself. In 2004, EMNGPS‟s sister organisation for the
Yorkshire and Humber Region (the Y&H Global Schools Association – YHGSA) funded Leeds Development
Education Centre to work with SLN to provide all SLN staff with training in the global dimension.
10
   One of whom, who worked in Derby City Council‟s Community Cohesion Unit, has now joined GED as
School Linking Officer and is helping to deliver GED‟s contribution to this initiative.

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Locality Group meetings, which help her to develop skills and enable her to offer assistance to
others.


Global Dimension Strategy Group
GED informed Authority staff about the national conferences run by the British Council to
promote the International School Award. It was after the Head of the School Development
and Co-ordination Service (see Box 2) had attended one of these conferences that he asked
one of his School Development Officers (SDO) to set up a Global Dimension Strategy Group
for the Authority. The SDO involved people concerned with Community Cohesion (see Box
5), Creative Partnerships (see Box 6) and Modern Languages, as well as the PSHE/Citizenship
team who brought GED onto the Group. She considers GED‟s role to have been “vitally
important – showing us how we could go forward and giving advice”. There were two main
outcomes from the Strategy Group – a publication and a conference.


   Box 5: Community Cohesion
   The Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) published “Guidance on the duty to promote
   community cohesion” (2007), which is downloadable from
   www.teachernet.gov.uk/wholeschool/Communitycohesion/Community_Cohesion_Guidance – as of April 2009.
   The following is drawn from this document and from the webpage addressed.



   In 2006, the Education Act 2002 was amended to include a duty on the governing bodies of maintained schools to
   promote community cohesion. This means “working towards a society in which there is a common vision and
   sense of belonging by all communities; a society in which the diversity of people‟s backgrounds and circumstances
   is appreciated and valued; a society in which similar life opportunities are available to all; and a society in which
   strong and positive relationships exist and continue to be developed in the workplace, in schools and in the wider
   community”.

   Broadly, a school's contribution to community cohesion can be grouped under the three following headings:
   1. Teaching, learning and curriculum
      Helping pupils to learn to understand others, to value diversity whilst also promoting shared values, to promote
      awareness of human rights and to apply and defend them, and to develop the skills of participation and
      responsible action.
   2. Equity and excellence
      To ensure equal opportunities for all to succeed at the highest level possible, striving to remove barriers to
      access and participation in learning and wider activities and working to eliminate variations in outcomes for
      different groups.
   3. Engagement and extended services
      To provide reasonable means for children, young people, their friends and families to interact with people from
      different backgrounds and build positive relations: including links with different schools and communities and
      the provision of extended services with opportunities for pupils, families and the wider community to take part
      in activities and receive services which build positive interaction and achievement for all groups.




                                                          12
Working Together                                                                           EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009




   Box 6: Creative Partnerships
   Creative Partnerships is a national initiative, funded by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and
   the DCSF. It was established to develop schoolchildren's potential, ambition, creativity and imagination. It
   provides school children across England with the opportunity to develop creativity in learning and to take part in
   cultural activities of the highest quality.

   It aims to establish genuine collaborative partnerships to enable the development of projects that reflect the
   interests, specialisms and shared vision of those involved.

   The idea behind Creative Partnerships is a simple one – to animate the national curriculum (the sciences as well as
   the arts!) and to enrich school life by making best use of the UK's creative wealth.

   Based at Arts Council England, Creative Partnerships has a unique approach to working with schools. It first helps
   schools to identify their individual needs and then enables them to develop long-term, sustainable partnerships with
   organisations and individuals including architects, theatre companies, museums, cinemas, historic buildings, dance
   studios, recording studios, orchestras, film-makers, website designers and many others.

   Its projects seek to transform expectations, provoking those involved – the children, the teachers, the partners – to
   continue learning and working creatively, and invoking shifts in thinking in the wider education system for the longer
   term.

   Source: www.derby.gov.uk/EducationLearning/School_Development/Creative_Partnerships.htm as of April 2009.



The publication was a 62-page set of Guidelines, entitled „Bringing a Global Dimension to
your School‟, which was launched at the conference and circulated to all Derby City schools.
This was one of an occasional series of Guidelines on educational aspects that the Authority
publishes and circulates from time to time. The members of the Strategy Group wrote different
sections, covering:
   General background and advice on the global dimension and how to introduce it into the
    classroom.
   Developing school partnerships.
   Gaining school awards.
   Opportunities for staff training and professional development.
   Learning a language.
   Case studies from Derby City schools.
   Exemplars of policies, International Co-ordinator job descriptions, school audits.
The EMNGPS Co-ordinator added some text and provided support to some of the Authority
staff for their sections.
The Guidelines can be downloaded, as of April 2009, from
www.derby.gov.uk/EducationLearning/School_Development/Global_Dimensions.htm.

GED was able to access funds from EMNGPS to contribute to the costs of the day conference,
„Put the World Into Your Class‟, which took place in September 2008 (see the webpage given
above for the conference programme and flyer). It was attended by approximately half of all
the schools in the City, which the SDO considered to be acceptable and quite pleasing. The
Assistant Director – Learning, who is Head of the whole Learning Division (see Box 2),
facilitated the „next steps‟ session at the end.

In addition to launching the Guidelines, the aims were to:
   raise awareness of the importance of the global dimension;
   explore the benefits and awareness of finding a partner school;

                                                          13
Working Together                                                      EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


   find out more about the Community Cohesion agenda; and
   learn from good practice in Derby City schools.
A senior member of the British Council introduced the International School Award (ISA) and
presented eight City schools with their Full Award.

Although the Strategy Group‟s work was considered complete, the SDO occasionally attends
the EMNGPS Locality Group – The Global Network. She thinks that “regional groups are
important, because…. local authorities can become inward-looking.” Outside organisations
and other authorities can provide examples of different approaches and ways of working that
can influence or help to strengthen Derby‟s own work. She also values funding that EMNGPS
and GED can access, which sometimes supports Authority work.

She echoed the views of others that it is very important that GED matches the Authority‟s
interests. For example, GED promotes interactive learning and reflection, using Philosophy
for Children (P4C) as a pedagogical tool, which ties in to P4C undertaken by Derby City‟s
Gifted and Talented Team.


In conclusion
The emergence of EMNGPS in 2003, and its objective to encourage and facilitate
partnerships, synchronised neatly with a desire on GED‟s part to change its strategic approach
and seek to work in a more professional and co-ordinated manner with Derby City Local
Authority. GED worked hard to form connections and was flexible enough to respond where
interest arose. This resulted in a number of different initiatives working with different staff
members within the Authority. GED now has a Service Level Agreement with the Authority
and has built up a strong reputation with its staff.


The future
The Authority cannot guarantee long-term support for the Service Level Agreement but, as
long as schools still need the service, GED maintains its quality service and the funds are still
available, it will probably continue. Certainly, Authority staff wish to continue the current
relationship they have with GED.

The PSHE & Citizenship team are aware that there are other initiatives within the Authority,
namely work on school grounds and sustainable schools, which are being pursued by other
sections within the Learning Division and which might be useful for GED and EMNGPS to
follow-up.

Within the Authority, the attraction of having an Authority staff member in future working full
time on school linking, the ISA and community cohesion is apparent to many but the feeling is
that this is unlikely to occur for financial reasons.

From GED‟s perspective, they are very happy with the relationship and want it to continue.
They note that the Authority does not yet have a policy about the global dimension. The
Guidelines are a start but their view is that there would be value in having a document stating
the Authority‟s intentions concerning its programmes of support for this dimension. It is also
GED‟s hope that the Authority, within the next 5 years, will be able to appoint a special post
for the global dimension, despite the potential financial problems.



                                             14
Working Together                                                                           EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


3. The partnership between GED and Derbyshire
Events
In 2004 GED (Global Education, Derby) approached the Assistant Director (Education
Improvement) within the Children and Younger Adults Directorate (see Box 7), requesting the
Authority‟s involvement in the Global Network, the EMNGPS Locality Group for the Derby
and Derbyshire area. The Citizenship Consultant with the Derbyshire Advisory and
Inspection Service (DAIS) was asked to take on this role. He attended meetings of the Global
Network throughout 2005. From his connections with GED and EMNGPS, he developed an
understanding of Global Dimension and how it could be a vehicle to help deliver other
educational priorities such as Every Child Matters (ECM) and Community Cohesion.



     Box 7: Derbyshire County Council
     In Derbyshire, services relating to its 415 schools are delivered through the Education Improvement Services (led
     by the Assistant Director for Education Improvement) within the Children and Younger Adults Directorate.

     The services for Education Improvement include:
       * The Derbyshire Advisory and Inspection Service
       * The Early Years Education Service
       * The 14-19 Education Team.

     Advisory and Inspection Service
     The Derbyshire Advisory and Inspection Service (DAIS) is managed by three Deputy Assistant Directors. The
     Service comprises 12 Senior Advisers for School Improvement, 24 School Improvement Advisers and 35
     Consultants within specialist teams, together with a business support team.

     The work of the Advisory Service is broken down into the 12 different portfolios of Educational Inclusion, Literacy,
     Numeracy, ICT, QDD, Early Years, Secondary Strategy, Leadership and Management, CPD, Information, Data &
     Target Setting, and Schools Causing Concern.

     Early Years Service
     The Early Years service provides support and challenge to non-maintained, independent and private providers of
     nursery education. It works closely with the Advisory Service to support maintained schools and to build
     partnerships and networks across the sector.

     14-19 Education Team
     Three 14-19 managers support schools, workplace and training providers to develop 14-19 curriculum pathways, in
     close liaison with the Advisory and Inspection Service. Their work is led strategically and quality assured by the
     Deputy Assistant Director (Secondary Strategy).

     This information was obtained from various parts of the Derbyshire County Council website, as of April 2009:
     www.derbyshire.gov.uk/education/




Two years later a new Primary Modern Foreign Languages (PMFL) consultant joined DAIS
with a brief to promote international links for primary schools. She discovered that there were
two regional networks of relevance. One of these was EMNGPS and the other was the
Regional Network for International Learning (RNIL) – see Box 8. Although it is set up with a
different brief, RNIL clearly has similarities with EMNGPS. Fortunately, she found that key
facilitators of RNIL in the East Midlands were also central players within EMNGPS and that
the two networks liaised closely to ensure there was no duplication of services. She started by

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Working Together                                                                      EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


relating the global dimension to her responsibility for primary languages but she came to
appreciate the wider implications. She remembers that talking to the EMNGPS co-ordinator
and others in the networks “opened my eyes to the possibilities for primary schools”. She
came to value the global dimension especially for its links with community cohesion (see Box
5), which was becoming a priority for Ofsted and something for which schools were seeking
assistance.


 Box 8: The Regional Network for International Learning (RNIL)
 The RNIL is funded by the British Council in order to support Local Authority personnel “to promote the international
 dimension and partnerships in education through proactive dissemination of information, as well as professional
 development and support to teachers” (see www.lgfl.net/lgfl/independentschools/nlsin/homepage/documents/RNILmap.pdf
 as of April 2009).

 The RNIL group in the East Midlands recently launched a programme of in-service training courses for Advisers, Head
 teachers, teachers and Governors, covering:
 • The global dimension in the curriculum
 • Linking with schools abroad (all phases)
 • Funding for international projects
 • Applying for the DCSF International School Award

 East Midlands RNIL Joint Coordinators:
 International Links Co-ordinator, Leicestershire
 International Dimension Consultant, Nottingham City




In 2006, GED worked with Derbyshire to develop a project to promote the International
School Award (ISA) in Derbyshire schools (see Box 3). This project proposal was submitted
successfully to the Department for International Development (DFID) Development
Awareness Fund in the autumn of 2006, leading to work starting in April 2007 and scheduled
to run to March 2010. GED‟s intention was to use the ISA as a vehicle for encouraging
schools to bring a global dimension to their work and to help to ensure that schools working
towards the ISA included a „Southern‟ dimension. GED‟s proposal states that “many schools
address the international dimension through links with schools in European or other
industrialised economies such as Japan or the US. This project will show schools how to
achieve the ISA through a focus on world development issues and links with schools in the
global South”11

Following the British Council conference in London in November 2006 a number of
conferences were held in Derbyshire to promote the global dimension generally and the ISA in
particular. This was the start of an effective working partnership with GED.

It was agreed that the ISA and school partnership package was a good vehicle for encouraging
more schools to develop the global dimension. This is a major priority but at the same time it
was accepted that quality was as important as quantity.

A key conference for Headteachers, funded by the British Council, was held at Chatsworth
House in March 2007. The aim was to promote the ISA and encourage schools to be involved
with the award. Various senior Authority personnel attended and were impressed by the

11
  Application to the DFID Development Awareness Fund 2007/08 for the project „Frameworks for Global Citizenship –
Raising Development Awareness through the International School Award‟.

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Working Together                                                    EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


concept and the quality of the conference presentation. This led to a rapid growth in interest
and the take-up of global dimension work in County schools. Further strengthening of the
Authority‟s support for the global dimension was generated by a presentation made at the
Authority‟s annual School Governors‟ conference, which elected members also attended.
Pupils and teachers from two local schools showcased their involvement and it was clear that
the global dimension had a crucial impact within the schools‟ curriculum and on the pupils
themselves.


Service Level Agreements
In 2008, GED had a series of meetings with Derbyshire to explore the possibility of the
Authority paying GED for specific services.

It was accepted that two separate formal agreements be created, one focusing on community
cohesion; the other on the work with schools on the ISA.

Community Cohesion Agreement
The DCSF-funded Schools Linking Network (SLN) (see Box 4) was extending its support to
Local Authorities around the country by making funding available to them. Money could be
used for Authority personnel to access professional development training from SLN and for
operating the programme of support with schools. GED helped the Authority to write a
successful application to SLN to run the programme for 20 schools. The Service Level
Agreement (see Appendix 2) runs for 1 year (08/09), providing GED with funding to pay for a
0.5 full-time equivalent Project Facilitator who works with the 20 schools. She supports them
to meet community cohesion objectives through partnerships with other County schools and to
explore how the global dimension can be based on local issues and relationships.

ISA Agreement
GED agrees to:
 provide support to 10 primary and 8 secondary schools that are seeking to achieve either
   an Intermediate Level or Full ISA;
 work in-depth with 2 primaries and 1 secondary to develop ambassador schools that can
   model best practice to inspire other Derbyshire schools;
 provide support to DAIS staff on promoting the global dimension in general.

This Agreement is provided as Appendix 3. It is for 1 year (2009) in the first instance.

Qualitative control of GED‟s work is ensured by GED being required to submit 6-monthly
written reports.


In conclusion
GED had to start from scratch in Derbyshire. They have involved the Authority in externally
funded projects – one with funds coming to GED and another where GED enabled the
Authority to draw down the money. Over the years, the two main contacts within the
Authority have become committed to promoting the global dimension and are involving senior
personnel at participative and decision-making levels. Two Service Level Agreements have
been set up that provide the Authority with substantial amounts of GED input and GED
financial support to ensure their continuing effectiveness.



                                            17
Working Together                                                   EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009




The future
The Agreements can only be made for 12 months but it is hoped that funding can continue in
future years.

In general it is recognised within the Authority that there is value in bringing an
international/global dimension to schools‟ work. They believe that, although there is no hard
data on the link between the global dimension and pupil attainment, there is evidence of its
impact on both primary and secondary pupils. This is demonstrated by pupils‟ positive
attitudes towards learning and the increased relevance of that learning to their daily lives.




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Working Together                                                     EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


4. Benefits of the partnership
The Local Authorities
The partnership with GED (and hence with EMNGPS) provides the Authorities with a number
of benefits:
   Information and resources and somewhere to direct schools. LA personnel value the
    existence of GED and the EMNGPS Co-ordinator as useful sources of information. All
    the staff know that they can call in, e-mail or phone as and when they need to. It is also
    very useful that they are able to refer schools to GED when schools approach them for
    help or advice.
   Training for LA staff. All the interviewees for this case study have gained professional
    development through their association with GED and EMNGPS, whether by attendance on
    training courses or conferences, or through working collaboratively with GED staff.
   Links with others through EMNGPS. LA staff report that they find practical ideas
    generated by their peers stimulating and useful. While it is not always possible or
    appropriate to adopt ideas from elsewhere, exploring the opportunities through contact
    with others is a valuable exercise. GED is able to facilitate such contacts through the
    locality group meetings and EMNGPS provides opportunities for pan-regional sharing.
   Proactive advice about the global dimension. LA staff typically find the global dimension
    field complex. Many terms are used to describe arguably similar though slightly different
    things (e.g. the global dimension, global perspectives, global citizenship, development
    education, international education, education for sustainable development) and these
    educational fields claim to relate to many other aspects of the curriculum. These
    initiatives are promoted by a variety of different organisations at local, regional and
    national levels and the message from different sources is not always consistent. GED
    helps to clarify these issues by providing useful documents, websites and other sources of
    information.
   Proactive advice about external opportunities. Among other things, GED has informed
    the LAs about British Council conferences that have, in fact, turned out to be influential on
    LA policy, and the School Linking Network grants programme that both Authorities have
    accessed successfully.
   Delivery of services. Both Authorities have been able to pay GED to help them deliver
    services that are a part of the Authority‟s programme. In some cases GED has supported
    LA personnel in that delivery, while in others GED has done the work themselves.
   Assistance with accessing external funds. GED‟s expertise in writing funding applications
    has helped the Authorities to be successful when approaching the School Linking
    Network.

Global Education Derby
The income gained by GED from the Service Level Agreements might seem to be the crucial
benefit from their perspective. However, while valuable, this is only one way that GED gains
and is probably not the most important.
  Access to schools. Being in partnership with the LA facilitates GED identifying schools
   with which to work. This might be by GED asking Authority personnel which schools
   they think a particular service would most benefit, or the Authority directing a school to
   GED, or GED asking the Authority to introduce them to a school, thereby gaining
   credibility. GED has also been able to use Authority networking structures to meet
   teachers at, for example, Citizenship or Geography meetings.
  Professional development. LA staff are highly experienced and knowledgeable in their
   own fields and can provide GED staff with advice or training through collaborative


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Working Together                                                   EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


    working. GED has gained a great deal of awareness from them about how best to work in
    schools.
   Advice about school priorities. Keeping track of the many initiatives within formal sector
    education is difficult for GED. Priorities for schools are influenced partly by national
    developments and partly by Authority activity, so while schools in one Authority might be
    particularly concerned with, say, the underachievement of boys, in another Authority the
    emphasis might be quite different. These priorities might also vary within Authorities,
    depending on the environment of the schools and local events. LA staff are a vital source
    of help on national and local initiatives and how they are affecting their schools.

Schools
Schools could benefit from GED‟s existence without there being a strong relationship between
GED and the schools‟ Local Authority. How, then, do the partnerships assist schools?
  Consistency of message. It is easier for schools to understand the complexity relating to
   the global dimension, referred to above, when their immediate sources of advice
   (Authority and GED) are clearly co-ordinating their support.
  Confirmation of quality. The endorsement of the Local Authority can make schools more
   confident that work they undertake with GED will be of an acceptable professional
   quality.
  Quality of support. The standard of support that schools receive from GED and Authority
   staff has been increased by the constant learning experienced by both partners.
  Services that otherwise would not be available. The number of schools that GED has been
   able to work with, and the depth of support they have been able to provide, has been
   increased due to the Service Level Agreements with both Authorities.
  Income generation. Within the Service Level Agreements, GED has been able to help a
   number of schools to apply for British Council grants to support professional development
   and travel relating to international school partnerships.




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5. The role of EMNGPS
Just as GED and the Local Authorities have to ask themselves what added value has been
gained from their partnership, so EMNGPS must constantly question what it brings to the
table. It is predominantly an enabling structure, facilitating others to do more, in a more
effective and sometimes different way. GED and the two Authorities existed before
EMNGPS was launched in 2003 and will probably continue to exist if and when EMNGPS‟s
role comes to an end. Has EMNGPS influenced or facilitated the work described in this case
study, or would the partnerships, and the benefits of them, have occurred in the same way
without EMNGPS‟s existence?

The answer to these questions is that EMNGPS most definitely has influenced this work. In
some instances the influence has been subtle while in others the relationship is quite clear.

Influence on GED
   “External ally”. The GED Director reflects that in 2003 and 2004 the EMNGPS Co-
    ordinator was extremely supportive for what she was trying to do at GED. Being able to
    turn for moral as well as practical support from EMNGPS was an invaluable aid.
   More professional. By encouraging greater partnership working between DECs and local
    authorities, EMNGPS was challenging DECs and other voluntary organisations to become
    more professional in their school work. In this case, GED had already recognised its need
    to go down this route, so it was in harmony with EMNGPS‟s intentions.
   More strategic. EMNGPS was originally funded for five years, with a probability of
    another five years afterwards, and government charged it with the task of making real
    achievements within that time. Within a sector that is used to having to plan in time
    frames of no more than a three-year project, being faced with bringing about a noticeable
    impact in five to ten years required more strategic, longer-term thinking and planning.
    That thinking has influenced EMNGPS participants like GED, and the relationships that it
    has built with the two local authorities are strategic in nature.
   Opportunity. DECs tend to be very reliant on project funding for their existence and in
    2003 GED was no exception. Without the funds provided by EMNGPS it would not have
    been possible for GED to facilitate the Locality Group, which in turn would have made
    much harder the formation of new contacts within the LAs. EMNGPS enabled GED to
    provide something of value to the local authorities, rather than GED merely asking for
    help from them.
   Credibility. Closely allied with the previous point, GED gained credibility by the
    existence of EMNGPS. Instead of seeming like an unconnected small organisation with
    its own particular niche interest, GED could negotiate as a representative of a national and
    regional movement that comes with governmental backing and finance.

Influence on the Local Authorities
   Credibility. The last bullet point in the section above has its corollary here: LA staff
    recognise that GED is part of a larger movement and is, therefore, seen as more likely to
    be a valuable partner.
   Financial support. Through the Locality Group, EMNGPS has been able to support
    initiatives financially, which enables things to happen and provides the LAs with a sense
    that they are not always being asked to “foot the bill”.
   Networking. While the contact with GED is useful, there is also value to be obtained by
    working with colleagues in other Authorities, both in the Derby environs and further afield
    within the East Midlands region. One LA interviewee commented that the “network is


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Working Together                                                       EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


    vital. It puts me in touch with others in this region [and] these contacts are important for
    when we need to support schools. This is very important.”




6. Conclusion
The relationship between Global Education Derby and the two Local Authorities, Derby City
and Derbyshire, has been beneficial to everyone concerned. Extending the partnerships with
the Service Level Agreements has been, as one interviewee stated, “essential”. From the
Authority‟s point of view, an Agreement ensures two key things:
      GED‟s work adds value to the Authority‟s service programme;
      GED‟s work can be quality assured through the formalised reporting process.

From GED‟s side, it provides stability in their relationship with each Authority and opens
doors to opportunities and to more schools.

It is difficult to judge what would have happened in Derby/Derbyshire if EMNGPS had not
existed, but the opinion of contributors to this case study is that its role has been crucial and
without it the success of these partnerships could not have been guaranteed. EMNGPS has
provided the means for the partnerships to develop, and thereby improved the service to
schools trying to bring a global dimension to their work.




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Working Together                                              EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009




Appendix 1

Service Level Agreement between Global Education Derby and Derby City Council




                                  Date December 13 2007




                            GLOBAL EDUCATION (Derby)

                                          AND

                                DERBY CITY COUNCIL

                   Specifically the Children and Young People‟s Service
                               (PSHE and Citizenship Team)




                                     AGREEMENT




                                                             M A Foote
                                                             Director of Corporate
                                                             Services
                                                             Derby City Council
                                                             Corporation Street
                                                             Derby
                                                             DE1 2FS




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Working Together                                                                  EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


THIS AGREEMENT is made on December 17 2007

BETWEEN Global Education Derby

12, Bramble Street, Derby DE1 1HU and

DERBY CITY COUNCIL of The Council House, Corporation Street, Derby DE1 2FS

BACKGROUND

This agreement is to contract Global Education (Derby) to work alongside members of the Derby City Council
Children and Young Peoples‟ Service (specifically the PSHE & Citizenship Advisory Service (Pcas)) between
January 1 2008 and December 31 2010 in order to support a cohort of schools in both the Primary and Secondary
phases of education through to a successful implementation of the Intermediate Level of the International Schools
Award (ISA) and the related development of an international perspective in the curriculum.

Specifically
Global Education (Derby) to provide:

The Secondary ISA
To assist secondary schools to apply for and attain the ISA at Intermediate Level, and to use the ISA as a tool
for development in school.
Schedule of support                                                                          Total Costs
Initial meeting with Senior Management Team                            Approx 1 hour         The complete
                                                                                             programme, with
Briefing meeting with key Citizenship staff / Heads of Faculty         Approx 1 hour         preparation time,
Support to Link Co-ordinator, who will need to have sufficient         Ongoing               involves 6 days of
responsibility to strategically lead the project in school.                                  staff time @ £100
Two days of dedicated support with in-school activities                Team teaching         per day.
                                                                       etc.                  Travel and
Assistance with the paperwork in applying for the International                              expenses for
Schools Award.                                                                               school visits @
Contribute to parts of the Every Child Matters agenda (and the                               £150.
related parts of the SEF)                                                                    OSDE training
Guidance to meet the duty to promote Community Cohesion                                      programme @
Guidance to address the global doorway of the National                                       £200 per
Framework for Sustainable Schools                                                            participant.
Support for classroom activity and Schools Council involvement,
giving a student voice in the project
Continuing Professional Development opportunity (one day               OSDE Level 1
minimum, with the option to extend to 3 days for an accredited         training for up to
course)                                                                2 teachers
Support at the end of a telephone or email                             Ongoing
                                                                                            £1,150
Discounts and subsidies                                                Subsidy from           £650
                                                                       DfID
Cost to Derby City Council per school of £500                          To recruit and       £3,500
                                                                       support seven
                                                                       schools


The Primary ISA
To assist primary schools in Derby to apply for and attain the ISA at Intermediate Level
Support schedule                                                                            Total costs
Meeting with key personnel/Senior manager                                                   1.5 staff days of
Leading a staff meeting on the ISA                                                          direct contact
Regular meetings with the designated Link Coordinator                                       time, plus 1.0 day
Support with preparing the ISA application                                                  support with



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Working Together                                                                    EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


Assistance with the paperwork in applying for the International                               paperwork @
Schools Award.                                                                                £100 per day.
Contribute to parts of the Every Child Matters agenda (and the                                Travel costs for 4
related parts of the SEF)                                                                     visits to school
Guidance to meet the duty to promote Community Cohesion                                       site @ £10 per
Guidance to address the global doorway of the National                                        visit.
Framework for Sustainable Schools                                                             Provision of
Support for classroom activity and Schools Council involvement,                               selected resources
giving a student voice in the project                                                         - £60 per school.
Guidance to address the global doorway of the National
Framework for Sustainable Schools
Support for classroom activity and Schools Council involvement,
giving a pupil voice in the project
Continuing Professional Development opportunity (one day                OSDE Level 1
minimum, with the option to extend to 3 days for an accredited          training for one
course)                                                                 teacher/member
                                                                        of staff
Support at the end of a telephone or email                              Ongoing

Cost to Derby City Council per school of £550                           To recruit and
                                                                        support maximum
                                                                        of eight schools
                                                                                                £4,400


Global Education Centre Open Sessions and use of meeting/resources room
To provide three „Open sessions‟ a year (dates and times to be arranged after consultation with appropriate
subject co-ordinators in Derby schools) for Derby City teachers and teaching assistants and members of the
PSHE & Citizenship Advisory service - to introduce the resources available for teaching Global Citizenship, try
out some activities, discuss new developments in the area and answer questions.
Schedule of support                                                Total costs
2 x staff members to give presentations,                           Total for annual programme of 3 sessions =
lead taster activities, show resources,                            £550
facilitate group discussions and answer
individual questions.                                              Initial design, planning & preparation of
                                                                   session (1 day of staff time). Delivery of
                                                                   activities (3 x 1 day of staff time @ £100 per
                                                                   day).
                                                                   Use of downstairs meeting and resource
                                                                   rooms (3 x half day @ £50 including
                                                                   refreshments i.e.
                                                                   (Fair Trade tea, coffee, biscuits etc)
Cost to Derby City Council per session of    To run a total of     £1,650
£188.33                                      nine open
                                             sessions

Total funding in the lifetime of the agreement between Derby City Council and Global Education (Derby) to be
nine thousand five hundred and fifty pounds (£9,550) to be paid in three equal instalments on January 1
2008, 2009 and 2010, subject to all aspects of this agreement still being fulfilled to the satisfaction of Derby City
Council


1.   CLAUSES

1.1 The recruitment and support for schools will be co-ordinated with and through the Primary and Secondary
    Citizenship Consultants and/or the Education Officer for PSHE and Citizenship.
1.2 Global Education (Derby) will provide a written report every six months for the Education Officer for
    PSHE and Citizenship identifying how support for the implementation of the ISA is progressing generally
    in Derby schools and specifically identifying progress in the schools recruited and supported through
    funding provided by this agreement.


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Working Together                                                                    EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


1.3 Where premises are required in order to carry out this agreement outside of those premises made available
    by the schools themselves or Global Education (Derby) then premises and associated costs must comply
    with Derby City Council policies and procedures. Such premises will be secured by the Primary and
    Secondary Citizenship Consultants and/or the Education Officer for PSHE and Citizenship.
1.4 Where is it is deemed essential for key staff in school to be released from their teaching commitments in
    order to support the implementation of the International School Award then a small sum of funding will be
    retained in support of this agreement by the City Council to reimburse the cost of supply cover at standard
    rates equivalent to one days supply cover per financial year.
1.5 The work of Global Education (Derby) in Derby schools will be informed by national and local best
    practice with regard to Citizenship education and developments to the National Curriculum, including
    assessment and inspection arrangements. Global Education (Derby) staff and representatives to be advised
    by the Primary and Secondary Citizenship Consultants and/or the Education Officer for PSHE and
    Citizenship on such matters and on any other issues relating to the management and context of the identified
    schools as may be relevant.
1.6 Personal data collected during the course of the agreement is subject to the normal Derby City Council
    restrictions.
1.7 This agreement is subject to an annual review in early January of years 2008, 2009 and 2010.

2. DEFINITION

“Personal Data” means personal data as defined in the Data Protection Act 1998
“Review Meeting” means the process by which both sides to this agreement agree progress and procedures and
actions for the future.

3. PERIOD OF AGREEMENT

The Agreement will start on the Commencement Date and, subject to Clauses, continue unless and until one of
the Parties gives the other at least six months notice in writing that it wishes to bring the entire Agreement to an
end.

4. SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

During the duration of the Agreement Global Education (Derby) agrees to:

4.1. provide the Local Authority - LA with the Services in a proper and efficient manner using all reasonable
     skill, care, diligence and speed.
4.2 comply with all relevant legislation in delivering the Service.
4.3 use all reasonable endeavours to fully utilise the attached funding for the purpose intended.
4.4 employ such staff as may be necessary to make sure the Services are administered in accordance with the
     Agreement.
4.5 maintain appropriate systems to ensure that staff are adequately trained and supervised.

5. EMPLOYMENT OF STAFF

The management of Global Education (Derby) will be primarily responsible for
employing the Staff associated with this agreement (other than those
employed directly by Derby City Council), and for all matters related to their
contracts of employment.

6. COMPLAINTS

6.1 In the event of there being a dissatisfaction with the quality of any work done by Global Education (Derby)
    under this agreement, a senior representative of The Director for Children and Young People will meet to
    discuss the concerns.
6.2 The Director for Children and Young People will investigate the matter and send a written response to the
    Directors of Global Education (Derby) within 21 days.
6.3 Should the complaint still remain unresolved then the matter may be referred to an arbitrator.




                                                      26
Working Together                                                                   EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


7. DISPUTE RESOLUTION

7.1 If any dispute as to the provision of the Service cannot be resolved by the Director for Children and Young
    People and the Directors of Global Education (Derby), then either party may in writing ask for it to be the
    subject of a Dispute Meeting.
7.2 A Dispute Meeting must be held within 14 days of either Party giving the other notice of this requirement
    for such a meeting.
7.3 A Dispute Meeting will be attended by a Senior Officer of the Local Authority and a Director(s) of Global
    Education (Derby).
7.4 Where the Parties fail to resolve a dispute at a Dispute Meeting, either Party can, by written notice, ask for it
    to be considered by the Chief Executive of Derby City Council or their nominee. Such a meeting must take
    place within 14 days from service of such notice.
7.5 Where the services Director or their nominees fail to resolve a dispute, then either Party can by notice refer
    the matter to an arbitrator agreed by both upon a written request from either so to do, or in default,
    appointed by the President of the Institute of Arbitrators upon application of either.
7.6 The decision of the arbitrator will be final and binding on the Parties other than in the case of manifest error.
7.7 The costs of the arbitrator will be borne by the Parties as he/she may so determine or, in the absence of any
    such determination, then equally by the Parties.

IN WITNESS of the above the duly authorised representatives of both Parties have signed this Agreement on the
date set out above.

Name ……………………………………..

Signed by ……………………………………                               duly authorised

For and on behalf of Global Education (Derby)
In the presence of:       …………………………………………..


Name ……………………………………………


Signed by ……………………………………                               duly authorised

For and on behalf of Derby City Children and Young People‟s Service
In the presence of:       ………………………………………….




                                                      27
Working Together                                                                 EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


Appendix 2

Service Level Agreement (Community Cohesion) between Global Education Derby and
Derbyshire AIS



THIS AGREEMENT is made 6 January 2009

Between Derbyshire Advisory & Inspection Service

John Hadfield House, 108 Dale Road, Matlock, Derbyshire, DE4 3RD and

Global Education Derby

12, Bramble Street, Derby DE1 1HU



BACKGROUND

The Schools Linking Project started in Bradford in late 2001. It has been highly successful in the Bradford
district and is an embedded strategy for community cohesion and developing the profile of active citizenship in
schools. It aims to develop community cohesion and increased understanding of diversity by building on good
local practice in several key areas:
      Cross-curricula professional development with particular emphasis on communication skills and
          citizenship
      Local knowledge and good relationships with schools
      Work with creative practitioners to enhance learning and inclusive practice
      Emphasis on raising attainment in underachieving sectors of the population

The DCSF is providing funding to local authorities and schools across the country to support the extension of the
Bradford programme. Key local authority personnel will be funded to access professional development from the
Schools Linking Network so that they will be equipped to offer support and training to schools in their own local
authorities. There will also be funding to operate the programme with up to 20 schools for one year in each new
authority.

This agreement is to contract Global Education Derby (GED) to work alongside members of the Derbyshire
Advisory and Inspection Service (DAIS) 1 November 2008 and 30 October 2009 in order to deliver the
Derbyshire Schools Linking Project.

IT IS HEREBY AGREED

1.   DEFINITIONS

     “Commencement Date” means 1 November 2009.

     “Personal Data” means personal data as defined in the Data Protection Act 1998

     “Review Meeting” means the process by which both sides to this agreement
      assess progress and agree procedures and actions for the future




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Working Together                                                                  EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


2. CONSIDERATION AND SERVICES
In consideration of the payment of …………. pounds by DAIS, GED agrees to provide:

Project Coordination
GED will provide a 0.5 FTE Project Facilitator to work under the guidance of DAIS to:
Provide advice, support, and training for Derbyshire Schools on how to link effectively with other
schools
Provide practical support for schools to enable them to continue involvement and reflect on their
learning and achievement
Develop project resources and support for identity and diversity issues.
Administration support and travel expenses included.
Specifically:                                                                           Timeline
Support the recruitment of 20 schools through publicising the opportunity,              September to
responding to queries, collecting expressions of interest, applying selection criteria, November 08
and informing schools of the decisions
Attend Schools Linking Network training event                                           November 08
Provide CPD for staff in 20 primary schools selected for the project                    Ongoing
Build relationships between schools to encourage them to make effective links with Ongoing
other schools
Work in cooperation with other agencies and organisations to enhance learning and Ongoing
teaching
Encourage the connection between inclusion and achievement in schools in areas          Ongoing
of underachievement
Coordinate evaluation and gather evidence of impact                                     Evaluation
                                                                                        report July 09
Deliver a conference where schools can share the practice and learning that has         July 09
taken place


The total funding in the lifetime of this agreement between Global Education Derby and DAIS will be ………
pounds. This amount is allocated to cover salary and on-costs of the Project Facilitator, and will be paid in two
instalments of ….. in January 2009 and ….. in July 2009. Other costs associated with the implementation of the
project (events, supply cover costs for participating schools etc.) will be held centrally by DAIS.

3.    CLAUSES
a.   The recruitment and support of the schools for each programme will be coordinated with and through the
     appropriate Consultants within DAIS
b.   GED will provide a short written report after six months identifying how implementation of the agreed
     programme has progressed.
c.   Where premises are required to carry out this agreement outside of those premises made available by the
     schools themselves or by GED, then premises must comply with Derbyshire County Council policies and
     procedures.
d.   The work of GED in Derbyshire schools will be informed by national and local best practice with regard to
     Citizenship education and developments to the National Curriculum, including assessment and inspection
     arrangements. GED staff and representatives to be advised by the DAIS Consultants on such matters and on
     any other issues relating to the management and context of the identified schools as may be relevant
e.   Personal data collected during the course of the agreement is subject to the normal Derbyshire County
     Council restrictions on data use.
f.   This agreement is subject to review at the end of March 2009 and September 2009.

4. SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
During the duration of the Agreement GED agrees to:
a. Provide DAIS with the Services in a proper and efficient manner using all reasonable skill, care, diligence
    and speed.
b. Comply with all relevant legislation in delivering the Service.
c. Use all reasonable endeavours to fully utilise the attached funding for the purpose intended.
d. Employ such staff as may be necessary to make sure the Services are administered in accordance with the
    Agreement.
e. Maintain appropriate systems to ensure that staff are adequately trained and supervised.



                                                     29
Working Together                                                                 EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


5. EMPLOYMENT OF STAFF
The management of GED will be primarily responsible for employing the Staff associated with this agreement
(other than those employed directly by DAIS), and for all matters related to their contracts of employment.

6. PERIOD OF AGREEMENT
The Agreement will start on the Commencement Date and, subject to Clauses, continue according to the schedule
above, unless one party is unable to fulfil its commitments. Two months written notice is required for any
variation.

7.   DISPUTE RESOLUTION
a.   In the event of there being dissatisfaction with the quality of any of the services performed by GED under
     this agreement, a senior representative of DAIS and GED will meet to discuss the concerns.
b.   If the concerns are deemed justified, GED and DAIS will agree and exchange signed minutes of the
     meeting which will record i) the extent of the deficiency in the services provided; ii) the remedial action
     necessary and iii) the period in which GED must remedy the agreed deficiencies.
c.   Should the complaint still remain unresolved then DAIS will serve a Notice either suspending the services
     or terminating the Agreement




IN WITNESS of the above the duly authorised representatives of both Parties have signed this Agreement on the

date set out above.



         Signed by ……………………………………                              duly authorised

         For and on behalf of Global Education Derby

         In the presence of:         …………………………………………..




         Signed by ……………………………………                              duly authorised

         For and on behalf of DAIS

         In the presence of:         …………………………………………..




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Working Together                                                                  EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


Appendix 3

Service Level Agreement (ISA) between Global Education Derby and Derbyshire AIS


THIS AGREEMENT is made 26 January 2009

BETWEEN Derbyshire Advisory & Inspection Service

John Hadfield House, 108 Dale Road, Matlock, Derbyshire, DE4 3RD and

Global Education Derby (GED)

12, Bramble Street, Derby DE1 1HU



BACKGROUND

This agreement is to contract Global Education Derby (GED) to work alongside members of the Derbyshire
Advisory and Inspection Service (DAIS) between January 1 2009 and December 31 2009 in order to support a
cohort of schools in both the Primary and Secondary phases of education through to successful implementation of
the International School Award (ISA). In addition it is to provide other support to further advance the delivery of
a global dimension to the curriculum in county schools.

ISA timeline
Work with schools will begin during January 2009, following the schedule of support (see below). There is a
rolling programme for schools to apply for the Intermediate Level. However, for schools applying for the Full
ISA, British Council deadlines have to be complied with. Once schools have identified the educational focus of
the international work and found a partner abroad, they need to prepare an action plan to be submitted to the
British Council by October 2009. Then each school compiles a portfolio of evidence over the coming months as
the action plan unfolds. This portfolio has to be submitted by June 2010 and the British Council adjudication
panel awards the ISA to successful schools in July 2010. For each school GED supports we will continue to offer
telephone and email advice to the schools in the post-funded period. In summary:

      January 2009                 October 2009                    June 2010                    July 2010

       Work begins             Action plans submitted         Portfolios submitted        Decision on Full ISAs



IT IS HEREBY AGREED

3.   DEFINITIONS

     “Commencement Date” means 1st January 2009

     “Personal Data” means personal data as defined in the Data Protection Act 1998

     “Review Meeting” means the process by which both sides to this agreement
      assess progress, and agree procedures and actions for the future




                                                     31
Working Together                                                                  EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


4. CONSIDERATION AND SERVICES
In consideration of the payment of …………. pounds by DAIS, GED agrees to provide:

The Secondary ISA
To assist 8 secondary schools to apply for and attain the ISA at Full Level.
Activity schedule                                                                      Total costs
The activity schedule below is set out as a rough guide only, specific plans will be
negotiated with each school depending on their priorities and particular
circumstances
The programme of support will include: an initial meeting with the Senior
Management Team; briefing meetings with key Citizenship staff/Heads of Faculty;
advice to the designated Link Coordinator; two days worth of dedicated support
with in-school activities; assistance with paperwork in applying for the ISA;
guidance on integrating the ISA with other school agendas such as Community
Cohesion, Every Child Matters, and Sustainable Schools; participation for up to 2
staff members in a CPD event introducing new methodologies for global
citizenship; support at the end of a telephone or email
Six months free membership of Global Education Derby (worth £50 per school).




The Primary ISA
To assist 10 primary schools to apply for and attain the Intermediate Level ISA
Activity schedule                                                                      Total costs
The activity schedule below is set out as a rough guide only, specific plans will be
negotiated with each school depending on their priorities and particular
circumstances
The support schedule will include: an initial meeting with key personnel/senior
managers; leading a staff meeting outlining the approach to the ISA; regular
meetings with the designated Link Coordinator; assistance with the paperwork in
applying for the ISA; guidance on integrating the ISA with other school agendas;
participation for a staff member in a CPD event introducing new methodologies for
global citizenship; support at the end of a telephone or email
Six months free membership of Global Education Derby (worth £50 per school).




Case study development
To work in-depth with 2 primary schools and 1 secondary school to develop model, ambassador
schools as examples of best practice to inspire other Derbyshire schools. Support to include:
Staff meeting session to explore issues at an adult level with regard to global North-South issues using
the Open Spaces for Dialogue and Enquiry methodology.
Advice to develop a standard conference case study presentation, involving the children.
Written case study for each school to showcase the impact of a global approach to citizenship, for use
on council and GED websites.



Consultancy support
To support key DAIS advisory staff on taking a strategic approach to developing the global dimension
and international links in schools throughout the county.
Activities
Presentations and taster workshops at conference events,     7 days @ £….
providing specialist information about significant
developments, help with drafting position papers and
informal advice.




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Working Together                                                                   EMNGPS Case Study – April 2009


The total funding in the lifetime of this agreement between Global Education Derby and DAIS will be ……….
pounds, to be paid in two instalments of …… in January 2009, and …… in July 2009, subject to all aspects of
this agreement still being fulfilled to the satisfaction of DAIS.

3    CLAUSES
     a. The recruitment and support of the schools for each programme will be coordinated with and through
        the appropriate Consultants within DAIS
     b. GED will provide a short written report after six months identifying how implementation of the agreed
        programme has progressed.
     c. Where premises are required to carry out this agreement outside of those premises made available by the
        schools themselves or by GED, then premises must comply with Derbyshire County Council policies
        and procedures.
     d. The work of GED in Derbyshire schools will be informed by national and local best practice with regard
        to Citizenship education and developments to the National Curriculum, including assessment and
        inspection arrangements. GED staff and representatives to be advised by the DAIS Consultants on such
        matters and on any other issues relating to the management and context of the identified schools as may
        be relevant
     e. Personal data collected during the course of the agreement is subject to the normal Derbyshire County
        Council restrictions on data use and in accordance with the Data Protection Policy of GED.
     f. This agreement is subject to review at the end of June 2009 and December 2009.


4. SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
During the duration of the Agreement GED agrees to:
    a. Provide DAIS with the Services in a proper and efficient manner using all reasonable skill, care,
        diligence and speed.
    b. Comply with all relevant legislation in delivering the Service.
    c. Use all reasonable endeavours to fully utilise the attached funding for the purpose intended
    d. Employ such staff as may be necessary to make sure the Services are administered in accordance with
        the Agreement.
    e. Maintain appropriate systems to ensure that staff are adequately trained and supervised.

5.    EMPLOYMENT OF STAFF
The management of GED will be primarily responsible for employing the Staff associated with this agreement
(other than those employed directly by DAIS), and for all matters related to their contracts of employment.

6.    PERIOD OF AGREEMENT
The Agreement will start on the Commencement Date and, subject to Clauses, continue according to the schedule
above, unless one party is unable to fulfil its commitments. Two months written notice is required for any
variation.

7.    DISPUTE RESOLUTION

     a.   In the event of their being dissatisfaction with the quality of any of the services performed by GED
          under this agreement, a senior representative of DAIS and GED will meet to discuss the concerns.
     b.   If the concerns are deemed justified, GED and DAIS will agree and exchange signed minutes of the
          meeting which will record a) the extent of the deficiency in the services provided; b) the remedial action
          necessary and c) the period in which GED must remedy the agreed deficiencies
     c.   Should the complaint still remain unresolved then DAIS will serve a Notice either suspending the
          services or terminating the Agreement

IN WITNESS of the above the duly authorised representatives of both Parties have signed this Agreement on the

date set out above.

          [Here follows signatures of both parties and witnesses, as in Appendix 2]




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