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					                                Instructors Manual
                                             Contents


Preface

Alternative Formats for the Introductory Course               v
Contents of the Instructor’s Manual                           v
Integrated Cases and Lecture Presentation Software            v
Electronic Slide Show                                        vi
Comprehensive/Spreadsheet Problems                          vii
Spreadsheet Models                                          vii
World Wide Web Site                                         vii
NewsWire: Finance in the News                               viii
Study Guide                                                 viii
Test Bank                                                   viii
Technology Supplement                                        ix
Instructor’s Resource CD-ROM                                 ix
Ordering Ancillary Materials                                 ix
Conclusion                                                    x

Course Syllabus                                              xi

Course Schedule                                              xv

Answers to End-of-Chapter Problems                          xvii

Chapter 1      An Overview of Financial Management            1

Chapter 2      Time Value of Money                            7

Chapter 3      Financial Statements, Cash Flow, and Taxes    49

Chapter 4      Analysis of Financial Statements              73

Chapter 5      Financial Markets and Institutions           103

Chapter 6      Interest Rates                               117

Chapter 7      Bonds and Their Valuation                    141

Chapter 8      Risk and Rates of Return                     179

Chapter 9      Stocks and Their Valuation                   213

Chapter 10     The Cost of Capital                          243



Preface                                                      iii
Chapter 11   The Basics of Capital Budgeting                                             265

Chapter 12   Cash Flow Estimation and Risk Analysis                                      303

Chapter 13   Other Topics in Capital Budgeting                                           341

Chapter 14   Capital Structure and Leverage                                              363

Chapter 15   Distributions to Shareholders: Dividends and Share Repurchases              399

Chapter 16   Working Capital Management                                                  425

Chapter 17   Financial Planning and Forecasting                                          453

Chapter 18   Derivatives and Risk Management                                             475

Chapter 19   Multinational Financial Management                                          493

Chapter 20   Hybrid Financing: Preferred Stock, Leasing, Warrants, and Convertibles      523

Chapter 21   Mergers and Acquisitions                                                    553




iv                                                                                    Preface
                                                Preface


This preface explains how we have used Fundamentals of Financial Management, Eleventh Edition, and it
then describes the instructional aids contained in the Instructor’s Manual or available separately from South-
Western.


Alternative Formats for the Introductory Course

There is no one best way to teach the introductory finance class—the optimal course structure varies with
students’ backgrounds, instructors’ interests, number of credit hours, and position of the course in the
overall curriculum. Further, since these factors change over time, most of us vary our approaches from year
to year. Still, you may find it useful to learn how Fundamentals has been used at Florida and elsewhere.

Fundamentals was designed for use in the introductory undergraduate finance course. This course is typically
taught in one term, although some schools cover the material in two terms. At Florida, we require a one-
semester, 4-credit hour course that has approximately 58 fifty-minute class periods. Our syllabus is provided
later in this manual.


Contents of the Instructor’s Manual

This Instructor’s Manual contains Learning Objectives, Lecture Suggestions, Answers to End-of-Chapter
Questions, Solutions to End-of-Chapter Problems, Solutions to Comprehensive/Spreadsheet Problems, and
complete restatement and full solution to the Integrated Cases. In addition, at the end of this preface we
have included brief quantitative answers for the quantitative end-of chapter problems, except for the
comprehensive problems. Appendix B, at the end of the text, provides quantitative solutions only to
even-numbered problems. So for those instructors who wish to provide solutions to all quantitative
problems, we provide this at the end of the preface. We have organized the Instructor’s Manual by chapter
for your convenience.


Integrated Cases and Lecture Presentation Software

One of the most important pedagogic aids in Fundamentals is the set of ―Integrated Cases‖ provided with the
end-of-chapter problems. In past editions of Fundamentals, these cases were called ―Integrative Problems,‖
but since they are actually mini cases, we changed the names. Whatever they are called, the integrated cases
have been extremely well received by instructors and students alike. They provide an excellent vehicle for
covering the key elements of each chapter in a coherent, systematic, and interesting manner. They are
equally effective in small, discussion-oriented classes or in larger lecture-based classes.

The cases are coordinated with the opening vignettes whose purpose is to motivate students to focus on
the chapter. For example, each vignette provides background material on a company and provides a lead-
in to the chapter. The case then covers the key elements of the chapter, and its solution is set up in a
lecture format, with more detail than our normal end-of-chapter problem solutions.




Preface                                                                                                     v
Since the cases are highly structured, one might think that they seriously reduce instructors’ flexibility.
However, this is less true than you would imagine, because the cases are written in a manner that makes it
easy to delete sections, to add new material, and to provide alternative and/or supplemental examples.

The cases are good lecture vehicles for three reasons. First, they reduce instructors’ preparation time—we
spent a tremendous amount of time producing carefully structured ―lecture problems‖ so that instructors
will not have to. Second, students like lectures based on the cases because this ensures that the lecture is
consistent with the text, and that the two reinforce one another. Third, the case-oriented lectures are useful
for both prepared and unprepared students, and that is helpful for instructors whose students don’t always
read the material before class.

Since our surveys indicate that more and more instructors are basing their lectures on the integrated cases,
we developed a set of electronic slides (Lecture Presentation Software). Dr. Larry Wolken of Texas A & M
University brought this idea to our attention and helped in the initial development of the electronic slides.
Both transparencies and the blackboard can be used effectively, but all of the instructors who participated
in debugging the slide show concluded that it dominates the older technologies. Electronic slides are easier
to use than transparencies (and far easier than the blackboard), crisper, more colorful, and more complete,
and they capture the attention of students brought up in the TV generation.

We originally thought the slides would be too inflexible, but that was not the case—it is extremely easy to
break away from the slides and use the blackboard to clarify examples, to make additional points, and the
like. All in all, the electronic slides really are a great addition to our ancillary package, and all instructors
would be well advised to get a set, insert the CD-ROM, and run a quick slide show to get an idea of just
how useful they can be.

Note also that the Integrated Cases can be assigned as homework or used by students as self-study problems if
you decide against using them as lecture vehicles. We have also added a Comprehensive/Spreadsheet Problem,
which we discuss later, for those instructors who want to assign a comprehensive problem and still use the slides
for their lectures.

One final point about the Integrated Cases is worth noting—they are particularly useful for new,
inexperienced teachers and for experienced teachers who are under too much time pressure to continually
update their lecture notes. To illustrate, at Florida and elsewhere, Ph.D. students who were under heavy
pressure to complete dissertations or other research have been able to teach the introductory
undergraduate financial management course for the first time and get excellent student evaluations with
relatively little preparation. We do not recommend teaching without adequate preparation, but we do
believe that almost anyone can use the Integrated Cases for lectures and obtain good classroom results
without an inordinate amount of preparation time.


Electronic Slide Show

As mentioned earlier, a set of electronic slides has been developed. Previously, we used the Integrated
Cases, transparencies, and a black board as a complete lecture system, and with good results. But just as
new computer and communication technologies are altering the world of finance, so are these advances
influencing the way we learn and teach. Thus, along with Larry Wolken, we created a computerized ―slide
show‖ lecture presentation that matches the Integrated Case solutions. In addition, Christopher Buzzard
has made improvements to the slides—adding even more current data and pictures to them. The slides are
developed in ―layers,‖ which makes them more effective than static slides and more similar to a blackboard
presentation, but neater. For example, we can create a slide that begins with an equation that shows how
historical rates of return are calculated, then brings in illustrative data, then plots the data on a graph, and


vi                                                                                                      Preface
then uses the graph to explain the concept of a beta coefficient. Color-coding is used to differentiate the
stock and market returns, which helps keep things clear and in focus.

On simpler slides, one can click down a list, much like moving the piece of tablet paper used to conceal
parts of a transparency until you want people to see it. But clicking is easier, static electricity is never a
problem, and things are always in alignment and never upside down or backwards!

In addition, new this year, are Turning Point slides. These slides are meant to make an instructor’s lectures
more interactive. A question can be posed to the class, students are given time to respond with their
student response units, and then with a click of the mouse the answer is given. Instructors can add these
slides to the ―main‖ slides for class participation as they wish.

The slide show is available in Microsoft PowerPoint®. Any instructors with access to PowerPoint will have
the ability to customize the Lecture Presentation Software.


Comprehensive/Spreadsheet Problems

We have added the Comprehensive/Spreadsheet Problem to all chapters, except Chapters 1 and 5. The
purpose of this section is to provide to those instructors who use the Integrated Case for their lectures with
another problem that integrates chapter concepts. In addition, for those instructors who want to
emphasize financial modeling, many of these problems can be used. Excel spreadsheet models have also
been developed for them.


Spreadsheet Models

Spreadsheet programs such as Microsoft Excel® are ideally suited for analyzing many financial issues, and a
knowledge of spreadsheets is rapidly becoming essential for people in business. Therefore, we ―modernized‖
the book by indicating how spreadsheets are used to deal with the issues discussed in the text.

We developed a spreadsheet model for each chapter in the book except Chapters 1 and 5. These models
show exactly how the decisions dealt with in the chapter can be analyzed with an Excel spreadsheet.
Therefore, our models include a good bit of explanation and serve both as an Excel tutorial and as a
template for analyzing whatever financial issues are covered in the particular chapter. Excel spreadsheet
models have also been added for the Integrated Cases and the Comprehensive/Spreadsheet problems.

The models are contained on the instructor’s resource CD-ROM. They are also accessible from the South-
Western Web site. The models are not necessary for going through the book and learning the essential financial
concepts. However, if a student wants to learn how these concepts are implemented in the real world, and thus
get a leg up in the job market, the disk and the models will be a big help. And, of course if an instructor wants
to build spreadsheet analysis into the course, our models will provide an excellent platform.


World Wide Web Site

Designed to be both a teaching and learning tool, the Fundamentals Web site, at http://brigham
.swlearning.com, has separate areas for instructors and students. In the instructor’s password-protected
area, a number of the Fundamentals ancillaries can be downloaded, and instructors also have access to
NewsWire: Finance in the News articles, chapter-specific finance links, data files for companies featured in
opening vignettes, spreadsheet problems, online quizzing, and many more financial resources.

Preface                                                                                                       vii
NewsWire: Finance in the News

One of the problems inherent in textbooks is keeping them current in a constantly changing world.
Fortunately, the advent of the World Wide Web can help us keep up to date. Adopters of Fundamentals will
have access to a password-protected portion of the South-Western Finance Web site, where they will be
provided with summaries of recent articles in The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, or other major
business publications, along with discussion questions and references to the text. These summaries, written
by Emery Trahan and Paul Bolster of Northeastern University, facilitate incorporating late-breaking news
into classroom discussions. One can also use the accompanying questions for quizzes and/or exams.


Study Guide

We have found, in common with reviewers, that many students need a supplement (1) that contains a
summarized treatment of the main concepts of each chapter, and (2) that gives students an opportunity to
apply the concepts to relatively short, focused problems with immediate feedback on the accuracy of their
solutions. Thus, a Study Guide has been prepared to accompany Fundamentals. The Study Guide contains
learning objectives, an overview, and an outline of each chapter, plus over 400 questions and 140
numerical problems in multiple-choice format with answers and solutions. The Study Guide is useful both to
help students get the ―big picture‖ prior to reading the text and later as a self-test tool. The Study Guide
can be ordered concurrently with the textbook, thus making it available at bookstores for purchase by
students who believe it would be beneficial. (We make the Study Guide available, emphasize that it is
optional, and find that about two-thirds of our students use it. Feedback from users is very positive.)


Test Bank

The Test Bank that accompanies Fundamentals is available (1) in bound-book form, (2) as self-contained
computer software (the standard computerized test bank), and (3) as Microsoft Word files. New this year, the
Test Bank has been divided into two sections. The first section consists of new questions which have been
carefully reviewed and revised and new problems for which algorithms are available to create numerous
additional problems for use in large classes to make up multiple exams of the same difficulty level or to use for
quizzes, homework, etc. The second section consists of our older problems that do not have algorithms.

The questions and problems are all machine gradable, and we have used them often enough so that most
of the ambiguities that frequently plague objective tests have been removed. The hardcopy test bank is
constructed such that questions and problems can be reproduced directly, after using white-out to remove
the correct answer and level of difficulty notation. The computerized versions of the test bank allow users
to select test questions and problems from the bank, add or modify them as necessary, and then print the
final product. Of course the algorithmic problems can be changed numerous times to give different unique
answers each time for use in large classes, different sections, or over time for instructors who want to keep
the difficulty level the same for multiple copies of the same exam or have favorite questions that they want
to use over and over again. The Microsoft Word version uses an endnote format that makes it very easy to
create and reorder exams since (1) the questions and problems selected are automatically renumbered as
you create an exam, and (2) the solutions to the problems selected are also ―pulled out,‖ renumbered, and
made available for review and printing.

We personally resisted using multiple-choice tests for years, but due to our own growing class sizes (and
pressure from adopters), we decided to assemble the best possible set of objective questions. Now that it
is done, we are glad that we did, because we have become convinced that relatively short, objective
questions really are the best way to construct and fairly grade an exam that covers a large amount of

viii                                                                                                   Preface
material and is given to a large number of students. Incidentally, it is very easy to make a set of short-
answer essay questions or ―regular‖ exam problems by removing the set of possible answers from selected
questions and problems.

We should also note that one of the biggest problems with multiple-choice exams is that the students
themselves resist being tested in this manner. We sought and obtained the help of education (as opposed
to finance) professionals, and the Test Bank now provides some useful information, including procedures for
reducing the luck element and for setting curves, which improve the process and help justify it to students.
For additional information regarding the Test Bank, read the preface provided in the Test Bank.


Technology Supplement

Another ancillary, called the Technology Supplement, contains calculator, spreadsheet, and presentation
software tutorials. We found that many of our students were having trouble with the rather huge manuals
now supplied with financial calculators. Those manuals have lots of useful information, but not all of it is
necessary for the introductory course, and the size of the manuals was keeping students from getting
started with their calculators. Therefore, we decided to write a 10- to 15-page set of instructions that
would tell our students what they needed for the course. Eventually, we produced similar instructions for
the four leading calculators (3 HPs and a TI); those instructions are contained in the Technology
Supplement.

We also decided to make available spreadsheet tutorials that students can use to learn the basics of
spreadsheet modeling. Although the spreadsheet tutorials are based on Excel, the command structure of
other spreadsheet software packages is sufficiently similar to permit the tutorials to be used with whatever
software is available to students. These tutorials provide students with an introduction to spreadsheet
modeling and its usefulness in financial management decision making. Then, students can learn on their
own the skills necessary to create and/or use spreadsheet models.

In addition to the calculator and spreadsheet tutorials, we’ve added a PowerPoint tutorial. This tutorial
covers all the basics, and it will aid both students who must make presentations with PowerPoint and
instructors who want to make slides for their lectures.


Instructor’s Resource CD-ROM

This innovative instructor’s resource system includes electronic versions of the Instructor’s Manual, Word
Test Bank, chapter spreadsheet models, solutions to the end-of-chapter spreadsheet problems, and
PowerPoint presentations. It is laid out so as to maximize accessibility and minimize search time.


Ordering Ancillary Materials

Ancillary materials may be ordered by adopters through their local South-Western sales representative or
directly by calling Thomson Learning Academic Resource Center at 1-800-423-0563.

The Study Guide, which is purchased by students from bookstores, can be ordered through your local
bookstore.

South-Western will provide complimentary supplements or supplement packages to those adopters qualified
under our adoption policy. Please contact your sales representative to learn how you may qualify. If as an

Preface                                                                                                  ix
adopter or potential user you receive supplements you do not need, please return it to your sales
representative.


Conclusion

We have tried to make this Instructor’s Manual as clear and error-free as possible; however, there are
almost certainly some mistakes and unclear sections. Any suggestions for improving the manual will be
greatly appreciated. Address your correspondence to us at the address below.


Eugene F. Brigham
Joel F. Houston

4723 NW 53rd Avenue, Suite A
Gainesville, FL 32606
e-mail address: Fundamentals@joelhouston.com

December 2005




x                                                                                            Preface
                                 Syllabus for Finance 3403
                                               Finance 3403
                                              Course Outline
                                                Spring 2006



Instructor:     Joel F. Houston
                321A STZ
                392-7546
                Office Hours: M W 10:30 A.M. – 11:30 A.M., and by appointment.


Course Pre-requisite:        ACG 2021 or an approved equivalent.


Required materials

E.F. Brigham and J. Houston, Fundamentals of Financial Management, Fundamentals Eleventh Edition.

Course Packet for FIN 3403: Includes the syllabus, a calculator tutorial, detailed solutions to some of the
end-of-chapter questions, and past exams.


Calculator

You must have a financial calculator to get through the course. Many of the exam problems involve complex
arithmetic and financial calculations—and a financial calculator is necessary to solve them.

I recommend either the HP-10BII or the HP-17BII. The 10BII does everything needed in the course. I will
use one in class and explain how to work various problems with it, so you can follow lectures most easily if
you use a 10BII. Moreover, the TAs will all know how to help you with a 10BII, but you might have trouble
getting help with another calculator. The HP-17BII does more and costs more. Some argue that the 17BII is
easier to use once you get used to it. Also, some students argue that the 17BII is better to have in some of
the upper level Finance classes. Again, however, everything in this class can be done with a 10BII.

As you will soon see, the ability to use a financial calculator is critical to success in the class. You are
responsible for learning how to operate your financial calculator—and it is crucial that you are familiar with
your calculator by the time we begin Chapter 2. Calculator tutorials for both the 10BII and 17BII are
included in the Course Packet.

Makes sure that you bring your calculator to class. Students may not share calculators on exams. Please
be sure to check your batteries before exams.


Optional materials

Study Guide for Fundamentals of Financial Management, Fundamentals Eleventh Edition. This workbook
contains learning objectives and outlines of the chapter plus questions and problems with detailed answers.
It is useful when studying, especially when preparing for exams, but it is not required.

Preface                                                                                                    xi
Course objectives

This course is designed for the general business student, not just the finance major. Since this is a survey
course, we will cover a lot of ground. We will begin with a general overview and then go into more detail
on several concepts, financial instruments, and techniques used in financial decision making.

The chief objectives of the course are:
1. To introduce you to the world of finance. Anyone involved with the management of a business needs
   to have at least some minimal knowledge of business finance.

2. To introduce you to basic financial concepts such as the time value of money, asset valuation, and risk
   and return.

My hope is that by the end of the class you have a basic grasp of finance principles and that you go beyond
just memorizing a number of facts and formulas. Doing so will enable you to better understand current
events in Finance and will provide a solid framework for any subsequent courses you may take in Finance.
Hopefully, by the end of the semester you will want to take additional classes in Finance!


Class procedures

1. The structure of this class makes your individual study and preparation outside class extremely
   important. The lecture material will focus on the major points introduced in the text. Reading the
   assigned chapters and having some familiarity with them before class will greatly assist your
   understanding of the lecture. After the lecture, you should study your notes and work relevant
   problems from the end of the chapter and sample exam questions.

2. Throughout the semester we will also have a number of review sessions. These review sessions will
   take place during the regularly scheduled class periods, and will generally be offered by the head
   teaching assistant (TA). I will generally conduct the review sessions prior to each of the examinations.
   You will find that the review sessions are much more helpful if you keep up with the assigned reading,
   and make an effort to work the relevant problems.

3. There are a number of learning aids offered in addition to the regularly scheduled lectures and review
   sessions. You should utilize those that may contribute to your understanding of the material.

      (a) There are several teaching assistants associated with this course. The TAs will hold office hours in
          Bryan 125A. The TA schedule will vary from week to week and will be posted (1) outside the
          Finance office, 321 STZ, (2) outside Bryan 125A, and (3) on the class Web page. The TAs know
          the material quite well and they are more than willing to help you, so you should use them. You
          should study the text, your notes, and the problems, and then ask the TAs for help in clearing up
          any questions you might have.

          The head TA has also established an e-mail address for the course: FIN3403@CBA.UFL.EDU.
          Students may use this forum to ask administrative questions about the course, or to provide any
          comments they have about the class. This forum is not appropriate for answering long and
          detailed questions about the course material—for those questions you should see the TAs in
          person.

          You may think that your questions are ―too dumb to ask,‖ but they aren’t! Finance covers some
          tough material, and most students have trouble with at least some of it. The TAs have all gone

xii                                                                                                  Preface
        through it recently, and they know what you are up against. They are also really nice people who
        want very much to help you, so use them!

    (b) Tapes of the lectures will be maintained on file in the Media Center for one week following the
        original presentation. Tapes can also be purchased from University Book and Supply.

4. There is also a home page for Finance 3403 on the World Wide Web. The address is
   http://www.cba.ufl.edu/classes/fin3403/index.html. The class Web page will include the
   course outline, office hours schedules, class examples, and exam solutions. As time goes by, the
   resources available on the class Web page will expand, so it is worth checking it from time to time.


Examinations

There will be three exams, two during the semester and one during the final exam week. The exam
schedule is as follows:
                 First Midterm: Tuesday February 7, 7:00-9:00 P.M.
                 Second Midterm: Monday March 20, 7:00-9:00 P.M.
                 Final Exam: Tuesday May 2, 1:00-3:00 P.M.

Exam locations will be announced in class, and posted at Bryan 125, the FIN3403 notice board outside STZ
321, and on the class Web page.

Your grade in the course will be determined based on your performance on the three examinations. Each
examination will count as one-third of your final course grade.

To determine your final grade in the course, we will first calculate your total score as follows:
                 Total Score = (1st Exam Score) + (2nd Exam Score) + (Final Exam Score).

Your total score has a maximum of 60 points.

To calculate the ―cutoffs‖ for each course grade, we calculate a weighted average of the lowest scores for
each grade. So, for example, to determine the cutoff for an A:
            Lowest A = (Lowest A, 1st Exam) + (Lowest A, 2nd Exam) + (Lowest A, Final Exam).

Likewise, the lowest C grade would be a weighted average of the lowest C grades from each of the exams.

Therefore, if the curve was set such that you needed 17 or higher to get an A on the first exam, 16 or
higher to get an A on the second exam, and 17 or higher to get an A on the final, the cutoff for an A in the
course would be 50 (17 + 16 + 17). In this hypothetical example, if your total score is 50 points or higher
you would earn an A in the class. Obviously, the actual cutoff for an A will depend on the curves set for the
individual examinations.

Please recognize that the size of this class makes it necessary for the cutoffs to be firm, i.e.,
there will be no rounding up, regardless of how close you are to the higher grade.

There will be NO makeup exams. If you have a valid excuse for missing either of the first two exams,
your final grade will be based on your performance on the other two examinations—each of these
examinations will count as 50% of your final grade. If you miss the final with a valid excuse, you must


Preface                                                                                                  xiii
make it up the following term. If you do not have a valid excuse for missing an exam, it will count as a
zero.

In order to be excused from an exam, the student must contact me before the exam. If you cannot
reach me, leave a message with the department secretaries at 392-0153. In most cases I will require
students to provide me with additional documentation to justify why the student is unable to take the exam.
Please note that a simple note indicating that you were seen at the health center the day of the exam does
not, in and of itself provide sufficient documentation. Excuses will be granted if the student is unable to
take the exam because of serious illness or injury, or a significant personal or professional commitment.
Excuses will not be granted for social activities such as ski trips, cruises, and trips to sporting events (unless
you are participating).

The exams will all be cumulative. Most of the questions on each exam will be taken from chapters covered
since the last exam, but some will come from earlier chapters. I will tell you several days before the exam,
how many questions will come from each chapter. In general, the coverage will reflect the amount of time
spent in class on the different chapters.

For the exams you will be allowed to bring in a financial calculator, and an 8½ by 11 sheet of paper on
which you can write, type, or copy anything that you like (yes you can write on both sides!) Included with
the test will also be sheets that summarize the major formulas used in the text chapters. No other
materials may be used during the exam.

The exams will all be multiple choice. Each will have 10 conceptual questions and 10 numerical problems,
for a total of 20 questions.

Since the exams are multiple choice, you will receive no partial credit. This lowers scores considerably from
what they would be if partial credit were given. Thus, if you get 50% correct, this does not mean that you
know only 50% of the material—you probably know a lot more. Therefore, we curve the exams, and only
the curved grade is meaningful.




xiv                                                                                                     Preface
                                     Course Schedule
                                          Spring 2006



This schedule is extremely tentative, and subject to change. Any variations will be announced
in class.

Jan 9      Introduction/Chapter 1:   An Overview of Financial Management
Jan 10     Chapter 2:                Time Value of Money
Jan 11     Chapter 2:                Time Value of Money
Jan 12     Chapter 2:                Time Value of Money

Jan 16     MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY (NO CLASS)
Jan 17     Chapter 2:          Time Value of Money
Jan 18     Chapter 3:          Financial Statements, Cash Flow, and Taxes
Jan 19     Chapter 3:          Financial Statements, Cash Flow, and Taxes

Jan 23     Chapter   4:              Analysis of Financial Statements
Jan 24     Chapter   4:              Analysis of Financial Statements
Jan 25     Chapter   4:              Analysis of Financial Statements
Jan 26     Chapter   5:              Financial Markets and Institutions

Jan 30     Chapter   6:              Interest Rates
Jan 31     Chapter   7:              Bonds and Their Valuation
Feb 1      Chapter   7:              Bonds and Their Valuation
Feb 2      Chapter   7:              Bonds and Their Valuation

Feb 6      Review
Feb 7      EXAM (NO CLASS)
Feb 8      Chapter 8:                Risk and Rates of Return
Feb 9      Chapter 8:                Risk and Rates of Return

Feb   13   Chapter   8:              Risk and Rates of Return
Feb   14   Chapter   9:              Stocks and Their Valuation
Feb   15   Chapter   9:              Stocks and Their Valuation
Feb   16   Chapter   9:              Stocks and Their Valuation

Feb   20   Chapter   10:             The Cost of Capital
Feb   21   Chapter   10:             The Cost of Capital
Feb   22   Chapter   10:             The Cost of Capital
Feb   23   Chapter   11:             The Basics of Capital Budgeting

Feb 27     Chapter   11:             The Basics of Capital Budgeting
Feb 28     Chapter   11:             The Basics of Capital Budgeting
Mar 1      Chapter   12:             Cash Flow Estimation and Risk Analysis
Mar 2      Chapter   12:             Cash Flow Estimation and Risk Analysis




Preface                                                                                   xv
Mar 6    Chapter 12:       Cash Flow Estimation and Risk Analysis
Mar 7    Chapter 13:       Other Topics in Capital Budgeting
Mar 8    Chapter 13:       Other Topics in Capital Budgeting
Mar 9    Review

MARCH 11-18 SPRING BREAK

Mar 20   EXAM (NO CLASS)
Mar 21   Chapter 14:       Capital Structure and Leverage
Mar 22   Chapter 14:       Capital Structure and Leverage
Mar 23   Chapter 14:       Capital Structure and Leverage

Mar 27   Chapter   15:     Distributions to Shareholders
Mar 28   Chapter   15:     Distributions to Shareholders
Mar 29   Chapter   15:     Distributions to Shareholders
Mar 30   Chapter   16:     Working Capital Management

Apr 3    Chapter   16:     Working Capital Management
Apr 4    Chapter   17:     Financial Planning and Forecasting
Apr 5    Chapter   17:     Financial Planning and Forecasting
Apr 6    Chapter   17:     Financial Planning and Forecasting

Apr 10   Review
Apr 11   Chapter 18:       Derivatives and Risk Management
Apr 12   Chapter 18:       Derivatives and Risk Management
Apr 13   Chapter 19:       Multinational Financial Management

Apr 17   Chapter   19:     Multinational Financial Management
Apr 18   Chapter   19:     Multinational Financial Management
Apr 19   Chapter   20:     Hybrid Financing
Apr 20   Chapter   20:     Hybrid Financing

Apr 24   Chapter 21:       Mergers and Acquisitions
Apr 25   Chapter 21:       Mergers and Acquisitions
Apr 26   Review

May 2    FINAL EXAM




xvi                                                                 Preface
                          Answers to End-of-Chapter Problems


We present here some intermediate steps and final answers to end-of-chapter problems. Please note that
your answer may differ slightly from ours due to rounding differences. Also, although we hope not, some of
the problems may have more than one correct solution, depending on what assumptions are made in
working the problem. Finally, many of the problems involve some verbal discussion as well as numerical
calculations; this verbal material is not presented here.


  2-1   FV5 = $16,105.10.                                 2-24 a. $279.20.
  2-2   PV = $1,292.10.                                        b. $276.84.
  2-3   I/YR = 8.01%.                                          c. $443.72.
  2-4   N = 11.01 years.                                  2-25 a. $5,272.32.
  2-5   N = 11 years.                                          b. $5,374.07.
  2-6   FVA5 = $1,725.22; FVA5 Due = $1,845.99.           2-26 $17,290.89; $19,734.26.
  2-7   PV = $923.98; FV = $1,466.24.                     2-27 a. Bank A = 4%.
  2-8   PMT = $444.89; EAR = 12.6825%.                    2-28 INOM = 7.8771%.
  2-9   a. $530.                                          2-29 3%.
        d. $445.                                          2-30 a. E = 63.74 yrs.; K = 41.04 yrs.
 2-10   a. $895.42.                                            b. $35,825.33.
        b. $1,552.92.                                     2-31 a. $35,459.51.
        c. $279.20.                                            b. $27,232.49.
        d. $499.99; $867.13.                              2-32 $496.11.
 2-11   a. 14.87%.                                        2-33 $17,659.50.
 2-12   b. 7%.                                            2-34 a. PMT = $10,052.87.
        c. 9%.                                                 b. Yr 3: Int/Pymt = 9.09%; Princ/Pymt =
        d. 15%.                                                   90.91%.
 2-13   a. 10.24 years.                                   2-35 a. PMT = $34,294.65.
        c. 4.19 years.                                         b. PMT = $7,252.78.
 2-14   a. $6,374.97.                                          c. Balloon PMT = $94,189.69.
        d(1). $7,012.47.                                  2-36 a. $5,308.12.
 2-15   a. $2,457.83.                                          b. $4,877.09.
        c. $2,000.                                        2-37 a. 50 mos.
        d(1). $2,703.61.                                       b. 13 mos.
 2-16   PV7% = $1,428.57; PV14% = $714.29.                     c. $112.38.
 2-17   9%.                                               2-38 $309,015.
 2-18   a. Stream A: $1,251.25.                           2-39 $36,950.
 2-19   a. $423,504.48.                                   2-40 $9,385.
        b. $681,537.69.
        c(2). $84,550.80.                                  3-1 $1,000,000.
 2-20   Contract 2; PV = $10,717,847.14.                   3-2 $2,500,000.
 2-21   a. 30-year payment plan; PV = $68,249,727.         3-3 $3,600,000.
        b. 10-year payment plan; PV = $63,745,773.         3-4 $20,000,000.
        c. Lump sum; PV = $61,000,000.                     3-5 a, possibly c.
 2-22   a. $802.43.                                        3-6 $89,100,000.
        c. $984.88.                                        3-7 a. $50,000.
 2-23   a. $881.17.                                            b. $115,000.
        b. $895.42.                                        3-8 NI = $450,000; NCF = $650,000; OCF =
        c. $903.06.                                            $650,000.
        d. $908.35.                                        3-9 10,500,000 shares.
        e. $910.97.


Preface                                                                                                  xvii
 3-10 a. $2,400,000,000.                                 6-7   5.5%.
      b. $4,500,000,000.                                 6-8   8.5%.
      c. $5,400,000,000.                                 6-9   6.8%.
      d. $1,100,000,000.                                6-10   6.0%.
 3-11 $12,681,482.                                      6-11   1.55%.
 3-12 a. $592 million.                                  6-12   0.35%.
      b. RE04 = $1,374 million.                         6-13   1.775%.
      c. $1,600 million.                                6-14   a. r1 in Year 2 = 6%.
      d. $15 million.                                          b. I1 = 2%; I2 = 5%.
      e. $620 million.                                  6-15   r1 in Year 2 = 9%; I2 = 7%.
 3-13 a. $90,000,000.                                   6-16   14%.
      b. NOWC05 = $192,000,000; NOWC04 =                6-17   7.2%.
         $210,000,000.                                  6-18   a. r1 = 9.20%; r5 = 7.20%.
      c. OC04 = $460,000,000; OC05 = $492,000,000.      6-19   a. 8.20%.
      d. FCF = $58,000,000.                                    b. 10.20%.
 3-14 a. $2,400,000.                                           c. r5 = 10.70%.
      b. NI = 0; NCF = $3,000,000.
      c. NI = $1,350,000; NCF = $2,100,000.              7-1 $935.82.
                                                         7-2 a. 7.11%.
  4-1 AR = $800,000.                                         b. 7.22%.
  4-2 D/A = 58.33%.                                          c. $988.46.
  4-3 TATO = 5; EM = 1.5.                                7-3 $1,028.60.
  4-4 M/B = 4.2667.                                      7-4 YTM = 6.62%; YTC = 6.49%; most likely yield
  4-5 P/E = 12.0.                                            = 6.49%.
  4-6 ROE = 8%.                                          7-5 a. VL at 5% = $1,518.98; VL at 8% = $1,171.19;
  4-7 $112,500.                                                 VL at 12% = $863.78.
  4-8 15.31%.                                            7-6 a. C0 = $1,012.79; Z0 = $693.04; C1 = $1,010.02;
  4-9 $142.50.                                                  Z1 = $759.57; C2 = $1,006.98; Z2 = $832.49;
 4-10 NI/S = 2%; D/A = 40%.                                     C3 = $1,003.65; Z3 = $912.41; C4 = $1,000.00;
 4-11 2.9867.                                                   Z4 = $1,000.00.
 4-12 TIE = 2.25.                                        7-7 10-year, 10% coupon = 6.75%; 10-year zero =
 4-13 TIE = 3.86.                                            9.75%; 5-year zero = 4.76%; 30-year zero =
 4-14 ROE = 23.1%.                                           32.19%; $100 perpetuity = 14.29%.
 4-15 ROE = +5.54%; QR = 1.2.                           7-8 15.03%.
 4-16 7.2%.                                              7-9 a. YTM at $829 ≈ 15%.
 4-17 a.                                                7-10 a. YTM = 9.69%.
 4-18 6.0.                                                   b. CY = 8.875%; CGY = 0.816%.
 4-19 $262,500.                                         7-11 a. YTM = 10.37%; YTC = 10.15%; YTC.
 4-20 $405,682.                                              b. 10.91%.
 4-21 $50.                                                   c. -0.54% (based on YTM); -0.76% (based on
 4-22 A/P = $90,000; Inv = $90,000; FA = $138,000.              YTC).
 4-23 a. Current ratio = 1.98; DSO = 76.3 days; Total   7-12 a. YTM = 8%; YTC = 6.1%.
         assets turnover = 1.73; Debt ratio = 61.9%.    7-13 VB = $974.42; YTM = 8.64%.
 4-24 a. TIE = 11; EBITDA coverage = 9.46; Profit       7-14 10.78%.
         margin = 3.40%; ROE = 8.57%.                   7-15 a. 5 years.
                                                             b. YTC = 6.47%.
  6-1 b. Upward sloping yield curve.                    7-16 $987.87.
      c. Inflation expected to increase.                7-17 $1,067.95.
      d. Borrow long term.                              7-18 8.88%.
  6-2 2.25%.                                            7-19 a. ABS = 6.3%; F = 8%.
  6-3 6%; 6.33%.                                        7-20 a. 8.35%.
  6-4 1.5%.                                                  b. 8.13%.
  6-5 0.2%.
  6-6 21.8%.

xviii                                                                                               Preface
  8-1    r = 11.40%;  = 26.69%; CV = 2.34.
         ˆ                                         9-12 a(1). $9.50.
  8-2   bp = 1.12.                                      a(2). $13.33.
  8-3   r = 10.9%.                                      a(3). $21.00.
  8-4   rM = 11%; r = 12.2%.                            a(4). $44.00.
  8-5   a. b = 1.                                       b(1). Undefined.
        b. r = 13%.                                     b(2). -$48.00, which is nonsense.
  8-6       ˆ
        a. r Y = 14%.                              9-13 a. rC = 8.6%; rD = 5%.
        b. X = 12.20%.                                          ˆ
                                                        b. No; PC = $32.61.
  8-7   bp = 0.7625; rp = 12.1%.                         ˆ
                                                   9-14 P = $27.32.
  8-8   b = 1.33.                                          3

  8-9   4.5%.                                      9-15 a. P0 = $32.14.
 8-10   4.2%.                                           b. P0 = $37.50.
 8-11   r = 17.05%.                                     c. P0 = $50.00.
 8-12   rM – rRF = 4.375%.                              d. P0 = $78.28.
 8-13   a. ri = 15.5%.                             9-16 P0 = $19.89.
        b(1). rM = 15%; ri = 16.5%.                9-17 a. $713.33 million.
        c(1). ri = 18.1%.                               b. $527.89 million.
 8-14   bN = 1.16.                                      c. $42.79.
 8-15   7.2%.                                      9-18 6.25%.
 8-16   rp = 11.75%.                               9-19 a. $2.10; $2.205; $2.31525.
 8-17   1.7275.                                         b. PV = $5.29.
 8-18   a. $0.5 million.                                c. $24.72.
        d(2). 15%.                                      d. $30.00.
 8-19   a. CVX = 3.5; CVY = 2.0.                        e. $30.00
        c. rX = 10.5%; rY = 12%.                   9-20 a. P0 = $54.11; D1/P0 = 3.55%; CGY = 6.45%.
        d. Stock Y.                                9-21 a. $24,112,308.
        e. rp = 10.875%.                                b. $321,000,000.
 8-20   a. rA = 11.30%.                                 c. $228,113,612.
        c. A = 20.8%; p = 20.1%.                      d. $16.81.
 8-21   a. ri = 6% + (5%)bi.                       9-22 $35.00.
        b. 15%.                                    9-23 a. New price = $44.26.
        c. Indifference rate = 16%.                     b. beta = 0.5107.
                                                   9-24 a. $2.01; $2.31; $2.66; $3.06; $3.52.
  9-1 D1 = $1.6050; D3 = $1.8376; D5 = $2.0259.         b. P0 = $39.43.
      ˆ                                                 c. D1/P0 2006 = 5.10%; CGY2006 = 6.9%; D1/P0 2011
  9-2 P0 = $6.25.
                                                           = 7.00%; CGY2011 = 5%.
      ˆ
  9-3 P = $21.20; rs = 11.30%.
          1

  9-4 b. $37.80.                                   10-1   rd(1 – T) = 7.80%.
      c. $34.09.                                   10-2   rp = 8%.
  9-5 $60.                                         10-3   rs = 13%.
  9-6 rp = 8.33%.                                  10-4   rs = 15%; re = 16.11%.
  9-7 a. 13.33%.                                   10-5   Projects A through E should be accepted.
      b. 10%.                                      10-6   a. rs = 16.3%.
      c. 8%.                                              b. rs = 15.4%.
      d. 5.71%.                                           c. rs = 16%.
  9-8 a. $125.                                            d. rs AVG = 15.9%.
      b. $83.33.                                   10-7   a. rs = 14.83%.
  9-9 a. 10%.                                             b. F = 10%.
      b. 10.38%.                                          c. re = 15.81%.
 9-10 $23.75.                                      10-8   rs = 16.51%; WACC = 12.79%.
 9-11 $13.11.                                      10-9   WACC = 12.72%.
                                                  10-10   WACC = 11.4%.
                                                  10-11   wd = 20%.


Preface                                                                                              xix
10-12 a. rs = 14.40%.                                     11-16 a. NPVA = $14,486,808; NPVB = $11,156,893;
      b. WACC = 10.62%.                                            IRRA = 15.03%; IRRB = 22.26%.
      c. Project A.                                             b. Crossover rate ≈ 12%.
10-13 re = 17.26%.                                        11-17 a. NPVA = $200.41; NPVB = $145.93.
10-14 11.94%.                                                   b. IRRA = 18.1%; IRRB = 24.0%.
10-15 a. g = 9.10%.                                             c. MIRRA = 15.10%; MIRRB = 17.03%.
      b. Payout = 50.39%.                                       f. MIRRA = 18.05%; MIRRB = 20.48%.
10-16 a. g = 8%.                                          11-18 a. No; PVOld = -$89,910.08; PVNew = -
      b. D1 = $2.81.                                               $94,611.45.
      c. rs = 15.81%.                                           b. $2,470.80.
10-17 a. g = 3%.                                                c. 22.94%.
      b. EPS1 = $5.562.                                   11-19 b. NPV10% = -$99,174; NPV20% = $500,000.
10-18 a. rd = 7%; rp = 10.20%; rs = 15.72%.                     d. 9.54%; 22.87%.
      b. WACC = 13.86%.                                   11-20 $10,239.20.
      c. Projects 1 and 2 will be accepted.               11-21 MIRR = 10.93%.
10-19 a. Projects A, C, E, F, and H should be accepted.   11-22 $250.01.
      b. Projects A, F, and H should be accepted; $12
         million.                                          12-1   a. $12,000,000.
      c. Projects A, C, F, and H should be accepted;       12-2   a. $2,600,000.
         $15 million.                                      12-3   $4,600,000.
10-20 a. rd(1 – T) = 5.4%; rs = 14.6%.                     12-4   b. Accelerated method; $12,781.64.
      b. WACC = 10.92%.                                    12-5   E(NPV) = $3,000,000; NPV = $23.622 million;
                                                                  CV = 7.874.
 11-1   NPV = $7,486.68.                                   12-6   a. -$178,000.
 11-2   IRR = 16%.                                                b. $52,440; $60,600; $40,200.
 11-3   MIRR = 13.89%.                                            c. $48,760.
 11-4   4.34 years.                                               d. NPV = -$19,549; Do not purchase.
 11-5   DPP = 6.51 years.                                  12-7   b. -$126,000.
 11-6   a. 5%: NPVA = $3.52; NPVB = $2.87.                        c. $42,518; $47,579; $34,926.
           10%: NPVA = $0.58; NPVB = $1.04.                       d. $50,702.
           15%: NPVA = -$1.91; NPVB = -$0.55.                     e. NPV = $10,841; Purchase.
        b. IRRA = 11.10%; IRRB = 13.18%.                   12-8   a. Expected CFA = $6,750; Expected CFB =
        c. 5%: Choose A; 10%: Choose B; 15%: Do not                  $7,650; CVA = 0.0703.
           choose either one.                                     b. NPVA = $10,036; NPVB = $11,624.
 11-7   a. NPVA = $866.16; IRRA = 19.86%; MIRRA =          12-9   NPV5 = $2,211; NPV4 = -$2,081; NPV8 =
           17.12%; PaybackA = 3 yrs; Discounted                   $13,329.
           Payback = 4.17 yrs;                            12-10   a. NPV = $37,035.13.
           NPVB = $1,225.25; IRRB = 16.80%; MIRRB =               b. +20%: $77,975.63; -20%: NPV = -$3,905.37.
           15.51%; PaybackB = 3.21 yrs; Discounted                c. E(NPV) = $34,800.21; NPV = $35,967.84; CV
           Payback = 4.58 yrs.                                       = 1.03.
 11-8   a. Without mitigation: NPV = $12.10 million;
           With mitigation: NPV = $5.70 million.           13-1 a. E(NPV) = -$446,998.50.
 11-9   a. Without mitigation: NPV = $15.95 million;            b. E(NPV) = $2,806,803.16.
           With mitigation: NPV = -$11.25 million.              c. $3,253,801.66.
11-10   Project A; NPVA = $30.16.                          13-2 a. Project B; NPVB = $2,679.46.
11-11   NPVS = $448.86; NPVL = $607.20; Accept                  b. Project A; NPVA = $3,773.65.
        Project L.                                              c. Project A; EAAA = $1,190.48.
11-12   IRRL = 11.74%.                                     13-3 NPV190-3 = $20,070; NPV360-6 = $22,256.
11-13   MIRRX = 13.59%.                                    13-4 A; EAAA = $1,407.85.
11-14   a. HCC; PV of costs = -$805,009.87.                13-5 Projects A, B, C, and D; Optimal capital budget
        c. HCC; PV of costs = -$767,607.75.                     = $3,900000.
           LCC; PV of costs = -$686,627.14.                13-6 NPVA = $9.93 million.
11-15   a. IRRA = 20%; IRRB = 16.7%; Crossover rate ≈      13-7 Machine B; Extended NPVB = $3.67 million.
           16%.                                            13-8 EAAY = $7,433.12.

xx                                                                                                     Preface
 13-9 Wait; NPV = $2,212,964.                               15-7 a. $1.44.
13-10 No, NPV3 = $1,307.29.                                      b. 3%.
13-11 a. Accept A, B, C, D, and E; Capital budget =              c. $1.20.
         $5,250,000.                                             d. 33⅓%.
      b. Accept A, B, D, and E; Capital budget =            15-8 a. 12%.
         $4,000,000.                                             b. 18%.
      c. Accept B, C, D, E, F, and G; Capital budget =           c. 6%; 18%.
         $6,000,000.                                             d. 6%.
13-12 a. NPV = $4.6795 million.                                  e. 28,800 new shares; $0.13 per share.
      b. No, NPV = $3.2083 million.                         15-9 a(1). $3,960,000.
      c. 0.                                                      a(2). $4,800,000.
13-13 a. NPV = -$2,113,481.31.                                   a(3). $9,360,000.
      b. NPV = $1,973,037.39.                                    a(4). Regular = $3,960,000; Extra = $5,400,000.
      c. E(NPV) = -$70,221.96.                                   c. 15%.
      d. E(NPV) = $832,947.27.                                   d. 15%.
      e. $1,116,071.43.
                                                            16-1   103.41 days; 86.99 days; $400,000; $32,000.
 14-1    QBE = 500,000.                                     16-2   73 days; 30 days; $1,178,082.
 14-2    30% debt and 70% equity.                           16-3   $1,205,479; 20.5%; 22.4%; 10.47%; bank debt.
 14-3    a. E(EPSC) = $5.10.                                16-4   a. 83 days.
 14-4    bU = 1.0435.                                              b. $356,250.
 14-5    a. ROELL = 14.6%; ROEHL = 16.8%.                          c. 4.87.
         b. ROELL = 16.5%.                                  16-5   a. DSO = 28 days.
 14-6    a(1). -$60,000.                                           b. A/R = $70,000.
         b. QBE = 14,000.                                   16-6   a. 32 days.
 14-7    No leverage: ROE = 10.5%;  = 5.4%; CV =                  b. $288,000.
         0.51; 60% leverage: ROE = 13.7%;  = 13.5%;               c. $45,000.
         CV = 0.99.                                                d(1). 30.
 14-8    rs = 17%.                                                 d(2). $378,000.
 14-9    a. P0 = $25.                                       16-7   a. 57.33 days.
         b. P0 = $25.81.                                           b(1). 2.
14-10    a. FCA = $80,000; VA = $4.80/unit; PA =                   b(2). 12%.
            $8.00/unit.                                            c(1). 46.5 days.
14-11    a. 10.96%.                                                c(2). 2.1262.
         b. 1.25.                                                  c(3). 12.76%.
         c. 1.086957.                                       16-8   a. ROET = 11.75%; ROEM = 10.80%; ROER =
         d. 14.13%.                                                   9.16%.
         e. 10.76%.                                         16-9   b. $420,000.
14-12    a. EPSOld = $2.04; New: EPSD = $4.74; EPSS =              c. $35,000.
            $3.27.                                         16-10   a. Oct. loan = $22,800.
         b. 339,750 units.
    c.   QNew, Debt = 272,250 units.                        17-1   AFN = $410,000.
14-13    Debt used: E(EPS) = $5.78; EPS = $1.05; E(TIE)    17-2   AFN = $610,000.
         = 3.49.                                           17-3   AFN = $200,000.
         Stock used: E(EPS) = $5.51; EPS = $0.85;          17-4   a. $133.50 million.
         E(TIE) = 6.00.                                           b. 39.06%.
                                                            17-5   a. $5,555,555,556.
 15-1    Payout = 55%.                                             b. 30.6%.
 15-2    P0 = $60.                                                 c. $13,600,000.
 15-3    P0 = $40.                                          17-6   $67 million; 5.01.
 15-4    D0 = $3.44.                                        17-7   $156 million.
 15-5    $3,250,000.                                        17-8   a. $480,000.
 15-6    Payout = 31.39%.                                          b. $18,750.
                                                            17-9   ∆S = $68,965.52.

Preface                                                                                                      xxi
  17-10 $34.338 million; 34.97 ≈ 35 days.                      19-12 b. $1.6488.
  17-11 $19.10625 million; 6.0451.                             19-13 a. $2,772,003.
  17-12 a. $2,500,000,000.                                           b. $2,777,585.
        b. 24%.                                                      c. $3,333,333.
        c. $24,000,000.                                        19-14 +$250,000.
  17-13 a. AFN = $128,783.                                     19-15 b. $19,865.
        b. 3.45%.                                              19-16 $468,837,209.
  17-14 a. 33%.                                                19-17 a. $52.63; 20%.
        b. AFN = $2,549.                                             b. 1.5785 SF per U.S. $.
        c. ROE = 13.06%.                                             c. 41.54 Swiss francs; 16.92%.

   18-1 a. $5.00.                                               20-1 55.6%; 50%.
        b. $2.00.                                               20-2 $196.36.
   18-2 $27.00; $37.00.                                         20-3 CR = 25 shares.
   18-3 a, b, and c.                                            20-4 a. D/AJ-H = 50%; D/AM-E = 67%.
   18-4 $1.82.                                                  20-5 a. PV cost of leasing = -$954,639; Lease
   18-5 rd = 5.95%; $91,236.                                            equipment.
   18-6 b. Futures = +$4,180,346; Bond = -$2,203,701;           20-6 a. EV = -$3; EV = $0; EV = $4; EV = $49.
           Net = $1,976,645.                                         d. 9%; $90.
   18-7 a. $3.06; $4.29.                                        20-8 a. PV cost of owning = -$185,112; PV cost of
        b. 16.67%, 61.46%; -100%.                                       leasing = -$187,534; Purchase loom.
        c. -16.67%; -100%; 63.40%.                              20-9 b. Percent ownership: Original = 80%; Plan 1 =
        d. No; $30.00 and $27.00.                                       53%; Plans 2 and 3 = 57%.
        e. Yes; $37.50 and $37.50.                                   c. EPS0 = $0.48; EPS1 = $0.60; EPS2 = $0.64;
                                                                        EPS3 = $0.86.
   19-1   0.6667 pound per dollar.                                   d. D/A0 = 73%; D/A1 = 13%; D/A2 = 13%; D/A3
   19-2   27.2436 yen per shekel.                                       = 48%.
   19-3   1 yen = $0.00907.
   19-4   1 euro = $0.68966 or $1 = 1.45 euros.                 21-1 P0 = $37.04.
   19-5                                                         21-2 P0 = $43.48.
                 Dollars per 1,000 Units of:                    21-3 $37.04 to $43.48.
Pounds Can. Dollars      Euros      Yen      Pesos    Kronas    21-4 a. 16.8%.
$1,747.10 $820.60    $1,206.90 $8.97 $93.10          $128.10         b. V = $14.93 million.
   19-7   6.49351 krones.                                       21-5 NPV = -$6,747.71; Do not purchase.
   19-8   15 kronas per pound.                                  21-6 a. 14%.
  19-10   rNOM-U.S. = 4.6%.                                          b. TV = $1,143.4; V = $877.2.
  19-11   117 pesos.




  xxii                                                                                                    Preface

				
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