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					                    How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the Presidency in 2004

How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the
Presidency in 2004

Source: http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Alt/alt.politics.bush/2008−03/msg00141.html



      • From: Middle Class Warrior <middle_class_warrior1@xxxxxxxxxxx>
      • Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2008 17:25:29 GMT

Ohio made a bug mistake in the 2004 election and paid for it. Will they get it wrong again in the Democratic
primary?


Patricia Weitsman

March 3, 2008 7:00 PM | Printable version

If you live in Ohio, it's hard to remember that the presidential election isn't happening on March 4. Usually by
the time of the Ohio primary, the candidates are pretty much decided and Ohio languishes until the lavish
attention it gets during the actual presidential campaign.

With closely watched races taking place in Texas and Ohio coming up, the money is definitely flowing.
Although the polls indicated that Barack Obama is closing Hillary Clinton's lead, the Clintons just seem to be
everywhere.

First Chelsea and then Hillary were at Ohio State University last week. The following day, Hillary was at
Columbus State Community College. Bill was in Athens, Ohio last Monday, home of Ohio University, and
then made a debut performance at Lancaster High School, in Fairfield County, a Republican stronghold.

Direct mailings from Hillary Clinton fill our mailboxes, replete with messages about her record of protecting
American workers. The Obama presence is not as pervasive in central and southeastern Ohio. His foreign
policy team, led by Anthony Lake, was also on Ohio University's campus last Monday, although he himself
was not. He has been concentrating on the more densely populated, delegate rich areas, such as the Cleveland
and Youngstown areas.

According to the Columbus Dispatch, Barack Obama has outspent Hillary Clinton on television ads. His
Obama's full−page ads in the Columbus Dispatch in the week leading up to the primary, and his four mailings
that arrived in our mailbox this past Saturday, also represent a last−minute push that might trump the
well−oiled Clinton machine. But in the Columbus metropolitan area, he still doesn't come close to matching
the Clinton presence.

The full−court Clinton press is very impressive. They are veterans of Ohio campaigning. In fact, I first saw
Hillary Clinton when she came to Ohio University to campaign for Ted Strickland, the now deservedly
popular governor. It's time for payback − and Strickland is using his popularity to rally the crowds behind
Hillary. His esteem, coupled with the Clinton saturation may successfully stave off Obama's challenge. Bill
Clinton was Ohio State University's commencement speaker last year. Hillary Clinton was Ohio University's
commencement speaker a full decade earlier.

How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the Presidency in 2004                                                  1
                    How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the Presidency in 2004


Yet the principal targets of today's campaigning are not institutions of higher learning, but rather blue−collar
laborers and the unemployed and disenfranchised workers. Ohio's economic woes are at last attracting
national headlines.

Ohio is at the forefront of the mortgage foreclosure crisis − northeastern
Ohio had the sixth highest foreclosure rate of any metropolitan area in the country last year. More than
150,000 homes were lost in the state to foreclosure in 2007 alone.

The unemployment level is a full percentage point worse than the nation as a whole, with major manufactures
in Ohio either closing up shop or laying off workers. Since 2000, Ohio has lost more than 257,600
manufacturing jobs. Today's 6% employment rate compares unfavorably to the 3.9% the state experienced in
2000. In 1995, General Motors was the largest private employer in Ohio, with 63,200 employees. By 2006, it
had sunk to seventh largest, with just 19,300 workers.

Domestic politics have definitely trumped foreign policy, except to the degree that Ohioans trace their
employment woes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta), which opened borders to trade with
Canada and Mexico. If Ohio is anything like Wisconsin, where exit polls showed that 7 out of 10 voters blame
Nafta for the job losses in the Midwest, then Nafta effectively stands in for the economic issues at stake in the
primary.

While this may be a popular message, the Columbus Dispatch reports that Ohio exports have actually grown
significantly in recent years, implying that job loss may come from economic efficiency rather than simply the
relocation of companies south of the border.

There is little talk about the wars since both Democratic candidates advocate a swift withdrawal of American
troops from Iraq. This will likely become a major issue in November, since Ohio has been hit hard by battle
deaths as well. Only four states in the country have experienced more combat deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq
than Ohio has.

Winning Ohio is crucial for the presidency. Midterm elections are always closely watched. Strickland's win as
governor was viewed as a good sign for the Democrats in the presidential race. Yet, as Clinton and Obama
duke it out over who is the best advocate for workers in the state of Ohio, who will improve the state's
economic woes more swiftly, one cannot help but wonder whether long after the voters have spoken in March
and in November, if the next president of the United States will continue to attend to
Ohio's interests.


−−
McCain on the Iraq War
* McCain said winning the war would be easy. I know that as successful as I believe we will be, and I
believe that the success will be fairly easy, we will still lose some American young men or women. [CNN,
9/24/02]
* At the 2004 Republican National Convention, McCain, focusing on the war in Iraq, said that while weapons
of mass destruction were not found, Saddam once had them and he would have acquired them again.
* "Make it a hundred" years in Iraq and "that would be fine with me." [Derry, New Hampshire Town Hall
meeting, 1/3/08]
* "Only the most deluded of us could doubt the necessity of this war."
* McCain on how long troops may remain in Iraq: A thousand years. A million years. Ten million years. It
depends on the arrangement we have with the Iraqi government. [Associated Press, 1/04/08]
McCain on Bush tax cuts

How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the Presidency in 2004                                                      2
                    How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the Presidency in 2004
* "I cannot in good conscience support a tax cut in which so many of the benefits go to the most fortunate
among us, at the expense of middle class Americans who most need tax relief (2001)."
* "But when you look at the percentage of the tax cuts thatas the previous tax cutsthat go to the wealthiest
Americans, you will find that the bulk of it, again, goes to wealthiest Americans. & A lot of Americans now
are paying a very large alow and middle−income Americans are paying a significantly larger amount of their
income in taxes. Id like to see them get the bulk of the relief (2003)."
* Promised to make the same Bush tax cuts he once opposed permanent (2008).
McCain on Healthcare
* John McCain supported President Bush's veto of health care for 10 million children.
McCain on evolution
* "I believe in evolution."
McCain on Iran
* "My greatest fear is the Iranians acquire a nuclear weapon and give it to a terrorist organization. And there is
a real threat of them doing that."
McCain on Chairman Mao
* "Remember the words of Chairman Mao: 'It's always darkest before it's totally black."
McCain of Family Values
* "My marriage's collapse was attributable to my own selfishness and immaturity more than it was to
Vietnam, and I cannot escape blame by pointing a finger at the war. The blame was entirely mine."
MCCain on the Keating 5 scandal
* "The appearance of it was wrong. It's a wrong appearance when a group of senators appear in a meeting
with a group of regulators, because it conveys the impression of undue and improper influence. And it was the
wrong thing to do."
McCain on torture
* "Waterboarding is a form of torture no matter how it is done and should be a prohibited among U.S. military
interrogation practices . . ."
McCain on economics
* "I'm going to be honest: I know a lot less about economics than I do about military and foreign policy
issues. I still need to be educated."
McCain on the Clintons
* "Do you know why Chelsea Clinton is so ugly? Because Janet Reno is her father."
McCain on immigration reform
* "F**k you! I know more about this than anyone else in the room."
Rush Limbaugh on John McCain
* If I really wanted to torpedo McCain, I would endorse him, because that would send the independents and
liberals that are going to vote for him running away faster than anything. . . .
Ann Coulter on John McCain
* McCain steamrolled the Republican Senate into adopting yet more federal restrictions on gun ownership in
the juvenile justice bill.
* She'd campaign for Clinton, stating "I think she's stronger on the war on terrorism." Coulter expressed her
opinion that Clinton is much more conservative than McCain . . .
*"She's smarter than John McCain."
McCain on Aging
* "I'm older than dirt, I've got more scars than Frankenstein, but I've learned a few things along the way."
McCain on the Estate tax
* "I am concerned that repeal of the estate tax would provide massive benefits solely to the wealthiest and
highest−income taxpayers in the country. A Treasury Department study found that almost no estate tax has
been paid by lower− and middle−income taxpayers. But taxes have been paid on the estates of people who
were in the highest 20% of the income distribution at the time of their death. It found that
91% of all estate taxes are paid by the estates of people whose annual income exceeded $190,000 around the
time of their death."

How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the Presidency in 2004                                                   3
                    How Bush paid back Ohio for giving him the Presidency in 2004
Cindy McCain on political payback
* "Cindy recently admitted that she keeps a grudge list".
.




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