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Cotswold Olimpick Games


Dover’s Meeting, 1851.    Anonymous poster


The Cotswold Olimpick Games were held near Chipping Campden in
England from the early 17th century, originally directed by a lawyer,
Robert Dover.    Early contests included horse-racing and field events,
as well as jumping, wrestling, shin-kicking and sword-play. Ending in
1852 but revived in 1966, they are held annually on Dover‟s Hill.


1851
Letterpress
Lent anonymously




Wenlock Olympian Games


Programme for the forty-fifth annual meeting of the Wenlock Olympian
Society at Much Wenlock on 4 June 1895


The Wenlock Olympian Games, a mix of athletics and traditional local
sports opening with a procession, were founded in England in 1850 by
a surgeon, William Penny Brookes.    A pioneer for the revival of the
Olympic Games, Brookes also contributed to the formation of the
National Olympian Association in 1865.


1895
Line-block and letterpress
Lent by the Wenlock Olympian Society




Athens 1896


Cover illustrations to The Olympic Games, B.C.776-A.D.1896

The illustrations and the two-volume book‟s title make an obvious
link between the ancient and modern Olympic Games. Athens, restoring
the ancient Panathenaic stadium as the venue, hosted the first modern
Olympic Games in 1896.
Two volumes published by Charles Beck, Athens, 1896-7
Cover illustrations: lithograph with litho-tint printed by K.
Grundmann, Athens
V&A: L.529-1896




Paris 1900


Concours Internationaux d’Escrime [international Fencing
Competition]. Poster by Jean de Paleologu („Pal‟) (1855-1942)


The second modern Games were held alongside the Paris 1900 Exposition
Universelle (World Fair) which showcased achievements in art, science
and industry.    Rarely described as „Olympic‟, they took place over
five months in scattered venues.    Although a female fencer is
portrayed here, women did not actually take part in the fencing
competition until 1924.


Issued by the Direction Générale de l‟Exploitation, Exposition
Universelle de 1900, Concours d‟Exercices physiques et de Sports.
Printed by Chardin, Paris, 1900
Colour lithograph
Olympic Museum Lausanne Collections



Paris 1900

Entry ticket to the Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1900

The second Olympiad ran alongside the 1900 Exposition Universelle in
Paris. This World Fair reflected de Coubertin‟s belief that the
Olympic Games shared the same spirit of international achievement.
However many athletes were unaware that they had taken part in
„Olympic‟ Games.

Executed by Daniel Dupuis and Georges Duval.    Printed by Chaix,
Paris, 1900
Line-block printed in blue
V&A: E.222-2006



St. Louis 1904

Official programme for the St Louis World‟s Fair, U.S.A., 1904
Once scheduled for Chicago, the 1904 Olympic Games instead became a
side-show of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, known as St Louis
World‟s Fair. Sports competitions were spread over almost five months
and lost among other events. No known official posters were
commissioned specifically for the Games – though competitions were
listed in the daily programmes.

Programme published by the World‟s Fair Program Company of St Louis,
1904
Cover illustration by „St. John‟: colour half-tone
V&A: E.223-2006



London 1908

Programme for the Olympic Games of London, 1908

The London 1908 Games were held alongside the Franco-British
exhibition. This programme cover shows the Great Stadium at
Shepherd‟s Bush in West London, and behind it the pearly-white domes
of the exhibition buildings, called White City. The oval stadium,
accommodating 70,000 people, was built in just ten months and
considered a technological triumph.

Programme printed by Hudson & Kearns, Ltd., London, and published by
British Olympic Council, London, 1908
Cover illustration: colour half-tone
V&A: E.332-2006



London 1908


Londres via Ostende-Douvres [London via Ostend-Dover]. Franco British
Exhibition 1908 / Fourth International Olympiad.    Poster designed by
Alfred Edwin Johnson (art agent); illustration by Noel Pocock


London hosted the Games of the IV Olympiad after an eruption of
Vesuvius caused Rome to withdraw.     Fortunately plans for a Franco-
British Exhibition to be held in London in 1908 included a sports
stadium, and so the Games were organised alongside that exhibition.
This French poster, illustrated by an English artist, advertises
cross-channel travel to both events.


1908
Colour lithograph and letterpress
Olympic Museum Lausanne Collections


[LARGE LABEL]
Stockholm 1912


A Pioneering Poster


The first poster to have a dramatic effect on how the Games were
promoted internationally was issued by the Swedish Olympic Committee
for   the     Stockholm    Games      of   1912,    as    part     of    a    well-organised
advertising campaign.


The Committee, seeing it as an opportunity to present Sweden in a
positive light to an international audience, organised a contest for
the   best    design.      Olle      Hjortzberg‟s     winning      image       represented   a
parade of nations marching towards the common goal of the Olympic
Games. It was also a celebration of the nude male body as an ideal of
athletic perfection in the classic tradition.                       However the poster
contravened the moral code in several countries; in some instances it
was banned from display.


The seven-colour lithograph was printed by A. Börtzell of Stockholm.
The   first    copies     of   the    poster   were      printed    in       eight   different
language editions, but in response to repeated demands, the number of
languages was doubled, so that eventually 88,350 copies were produced
in sixteen languages, including Russian, Hungarian, Japanese, Turkish
and Chinese.




Stockholm 1912


Olympic Games Stockholm 1912. Official poster by Olle Hjortzberg
(1872-1959)


Hjortzberg, a Swedish decorative painter and designer, belonged to
an „Artistic Posters‟ society which held that posters were more
effective when art was applied to advertising.                     Slight alterations
were made to his original design: flags and streamers were
strategically repositioned to mask some of the nudity.
Printed by A. Börtzell, Stockholm, 1911
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.705-1912




Stockholm 1912

Souvenir publication Den Femte Olympiaden Del 8: Gymnastik   [The
Fifth Olympiad Part 8: Gymnastics] for the Stockholm Olympic Games,
1912

A series of twenty four souvenir publications was made for the 1912
Games in Stockholm. An energetic advertising campaign included an
official poster, souvenir literature and postcards.
As shown here, women gymnasts participated in displays, although they
could not actually compete in gymnastics until 1928.

Brochure printed by Jacob Bagges Söners A.-B., Stockholm; published
by Åhlen & Åkerlunds Förlag, Göteborg, 1912
Cover illustration by Artur Sjögren (1874-1951): half-tone and colour
line-block
V&A: E.369-2006




Anniversary 1914


XXième Anniversaire du Rétablissement des Jeux Olympiques [2oth
      Anniversary of the
Olympic Games] 1894-1914.   Poster by Edouard Elzingre (1880-1966)


This poster marks the 20th anniversary of the 1894 resolution to
establish the modern Games, celebrated in 1914. Elzingre, known for
his circus, equestrian and history scenes, imagines the laurel-
crowned victor of an ancient Games holding a statue of winged
Victory.


Printed by Affiches Atar, Geneva, 1914
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.228-2006




Antwerp 1920
VIIe Olympiade Anvers [Antwerp] 1920.   Official poster by Martha Van
Kuyck (1881-1978) and Walter Van der Ven (1884-1923) & Co., Antwerp

The original design for this poster featuring well-known Antwerp
landmarks and the city‟s coat of arms, was conceived in 1914, when
Antwerp was bidding for the 1916 Games. These were cancelled by the
First World War, and when the Olympic Games came to a war-torn
Belgium in 1920, they unfortunately brought about huge debts.

Printed by Van Dieren & Co., Antwerp, 1920
Colour lithograph
V&A: E. 229-2006


Workers’ Olympiad in Prague, June 1921

Dělnická Olympiada V Praze.1921 Červen [Workers’ Olympiad in Prague
June 1921]. Poster by Václav Čutta (1878-1934)

Workers‟ Olympiads were a product of the burgeoning workers‟ sports
movements of the early twentieth century and were seen as a co-
operative and internationalist alternative to the bourgeois,
competitive, and - in the wake of the First World War – nationalist
tone of the official Olympic Games. Čutta‟s socialist realist poster
for the Prague event deployed the familiar iconography of the heroic
worker and the red flag against an industrial background.

1921
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.3-2007




Chamonix 1924


Chamonix Mont-Blanc.   Poster by Auguste Matisse (1866-1931)


This Paris-Lyon-Méditerranée railway poster heralded the 1924 Winter
Games, retrospectively recognized as the first Olympic Winter Games.
The golden eagle shown hovering above a bobsleigh team grasps a
victor‟s palm and wreath tied with the French colours. Railway
companies developed a special relationship with the Olympic Games,
both distributing and displaying the posters that promoted them.


Printed by Cornille & Serre, Paris, 1924
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.23-1926
Paris 1924

Paris - 1924 Jeux Olympiques.   Official poster by Jean Droit (1884-
1961)

During the 1920s and „3os the healthy body was seen as an expression
of individual and collective fitness reflecting a larger there was
enthusiasm for physical culture. Jean Droit‟s group of male athletes,
pictured amid laurels of victory, the Tricolour and the Paris coat of
arms, seem to embody national pride and strength.

Printed by Hachard et Cie., Paris, 1924
Colour lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of the American Friends of the V&A
in honour of Diana Quasha
V&A: E.329-2006


Amsterdam 1928

Official brochure for the IX Olympiad Amsterdam, 1928

The Netherlands Olympic Committee approached several Dutch artists to
design the official Amsterdam poster before selecting Joseph Johannes
(Jos) Rovers (1893-1967), a painter, etcher and designer. In a
conscious attempt to coordinate all printed publicity, Rovers‟ design
appeared on the Olympic flag, the official brochure (displayed here),
letter seals and postcards.

Brochure published by Joh. Enschedé en Zonen, Haarlem, 1928
Cover illustration by Jos Rovers (1893-1967): colour lithograph
V&A: E.4.-2007




Lake Placid 1932


III Olympic Winter Games Lake Placid, USA, February 4-13, 1932.
Official poster by Witold Gordon (about 1880s-1968)


Gordon was a Polish-born illustrator, designer and muralist.   His
pared-down design of a ski-jumper, also helpfully pinpointing Lake
Placid on a map of America, was in the modern, simplified style to be
found in contemporary advertising posters.


Printed in U.S.A., about 1932
Colour lithograph
Olympic Museum Lausanne Collections



Los Angeles 1932
Olympic Games 1932, Los Angeles California.   Variant of official
poster by Julio Kilenyi (1885-1959)

American-Hungarian sculptor Julio Kilenyi achieved a three-
dimensional effect in this image by first modelling the figure in
clay and then reproducing a coloured photograph of the model by means
of lithography.


1931
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.421-2007


Los Angeles 1932

Official programme for the Olympic Games 1932, Los Angeles
California.

This cover image by Julio Kilenyi (1885-1959) is the same as that
used on the official poster for the Los Angeles Games in 1932. It
shows a youth holding a peace garland, and refers to the ancient
Greek custom of sending out heralds to announce the Games.

Programme printed by Times-Mirror Printing & Binding House, Los
Angeles, 1932
Colour half-tone and letterpress
V&A: E.224-2006



Garmisch-Partenkirchen 1936


Deutschland 1936.   IV Olympische Winterspiele [Germany 1936. IV
Olympic Winter Games] Garmisch-Partenkirchen 6.-16. Februar 1936.
Official poster by Ludwig Hohlwein (1874-1949)


The 1936 Olympic Winter Games were opened by Hitler on 6 February and
featured an uneasy mix of pageantry and militaristic display. The
official poster was created by Ludwig Hohlwein, one of Germany‟s most
distinguished poster designers who had signed up to the Nazi cause in
1933. His figure of a skier, rendered in bold colours with high tonal
contrasts, exemplifies an Aryan archetype of physical strength and
perfection.


Published by the Reichsbahnzentrale für den Deutschen Reiseverkehr
(the German Railway Publicity Bureau), Berlin, 1934
Colour lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Delancey
V&A: E.370-2006




Berlin 1936


Germany Berlin 1936 Olympic Games. Official poster by Franz Würbel
(born 1896)


Heroic realism was the style approved by Hitler, and Würbel‟s poster
was designed to dominate and impress. His composition combined
symbols of the Olympic Games – a laurel-crowned victor and the five
Olympic rings - with an image of the quadriga of the landmark
Brandenburg Gate (symbolizing Berlin).


Published by the Reichsbahnzentrale für den Deutschen Reiseverkehr
(the German Railway Publicity Bureau), Berlin, 1934
Colour lithograph
V&A:   E.2905-1980




Helsinki   1940 (Cancelled Games)

XIIth Olympic Games Helsinki Finland 20.VII – 4.VIII.1940.   Poster by
Ilmari Sysimetsä (1912-1955)

The Second World War caused the cancellation of the planned 1940
Helsinki Games, but this poster had already been published. Its
image is based on a bronze statue of the great Finnish runner Paavo
Nurmi („The Flying Finn‟), whose athletic triumphs in the 1920s
helped put Finland (here prominently outlined in orange) on the world
map.

Printed by F. Tilgmann, 1939
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.301-2006



St. Moritz 1948


Jeux Olympiques d’Hiver 1948 St. Moritz Suisse [Olympic Winter Games
1948 St. Moritz Switzerland].   Official poster by Fritz Hellinger
(1923-1977); Photographer: Keerl
This radiant image seems to symbolize a post-war world free once
again to enjoy sport in surroundings of natural beauty. The poster
can also be read as a straightforward travel poster, and indeed a
variant of the design was issued by the Swiss National Tourist Office
in the same year.


Printed by Wolfsberg, Zürich, 1948
Colour lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Delancey
V&A: E.339-2006




London 1948


BEA / Olympic Games London.     Poster by Abram Games (1914-1996)
advertising British European Airways


Although the world‟s first scheduled international flight took place
in 1919, public air travel was still relatively new in 1948.    BEA was
founded in 1946.    Depicting an air-borne athlete racing on fuselage
marked up as a race track, the poster wittily links the airline with
an announcement of the Games.    It also heightens awareness of the
international character of both enterprises.


Printed by the Baynard Press, London, 1948
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.296-2006




London 1948


Olympic Games London 29 July-14 August 1948.     Official poster by
Walter Herz (born 1909) for Heros Publicity Studios Ltd.


Herz‟s design, superimposing an image of a classical statue of the
discus-thrower Discobolus over London‟s landmark Houses of
Parliament, stresses the link between the ancient and modern Games.
The hands on the clock of Big Ben stand at 4 o‟ clock, the time that
these first post-War Olympic Games were proclaimed open by King
George VI.


Printed by McCorquodale & Co. Ltd., London, 1948
Colour lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Graham and Jane Reddish
V&A: E. 331-2006




London 1948


Bienvenue A Londres /Welcome to London / Bien Venidos A Londres .
Anonymous poster promoting the London 1948 Olympic Games issued by
London Transport and British Railways


London Transport and British Railways, great patrons of the 20th
century poster, aimed this message of welcome in French, English and
Spanish, at an audience of international visitors.   Some perhaps were
negotiating the British transport system for the first time en route
to the Games.


Printed by the Baynard Press, London, 1948
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.2287-1948




London 1948

Official programmes for the London Olympic Games, 1948

Pictorial symbols identifying different sports and events were the
graphic innovation of 1948. They featured on tickets and programmes
– the programmes were also colour-coded according to day. This
allowed graphic consistency yet instant visual recognition.

Printed by McCorquodale & Co. Ltd., London, and published by the
Organising Committee for the XIVth Olympiad London
Line-block
Given by Jack Ladevèze
V&A: E.227-2006, 802.AH.0021


Helsinki 1952
XVth Olympic Games Helsinki Finland 19.VII – 3.VIII. 1952.    Official
poster by Ilmari Sysimetsä (1912-1955)

In 1952 Helsinki fulfilled plans first made for the aborted 1940
Games. A new poster competition yielded 277 designs, but none could
compete with Sysimetsä‟s original „Paavo Nurmi‟ image. Only minor
design modifications were required: the dates were altered, and
significantly the outline of the map of Finland was changed to show
the new borders of the country post-1940.

Printed by Tilgmann, 1952
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.423-2007




Stockholm 1956


XVI Olympiadens Ryttartävlingar [XVI Equestrian Olympic Games] 1956.
Official poster by John Sjösvärd (1890-1958) for the Equestrian Games
held in Stockholm, 10-17 June 1956


Quarantine regulations in Australia caused the 1956 equestrian
competition to be held in Stockholm instead of Melbourne.    This was
most unusual - normally the disciplines of the Games take place in
one venue and over the same period of time.


Sjösvärd was known for his portrayals of horses on „Western‟ film
posters.   Here he was possibly inspired by the horsemen depicted on
the Parthenon frieze.

Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.414-2007



Melbourne 1956

Olympic Games Melbourne 22 Nov – 8 Dec 1956.   Official poster by
Richard Beck (1912-1985)

Beck, an English graphic designer, emigrated to Australia in 1940.
His unashamedly modern, slightly surreal, design marked a departure
from the illustrative tradition of earlier Olympic posters. The
white invitation card floats like a paper craft through deep-blue
space, suggestive of the oceans or heavens that surround the
continent of Australia.

Printed by Containers Limited of Melbourne, about 1954-6
Colour lithograph
V&A: E. 302-2006
Rome 1960

Jeux de la XVII Olympiade [Games of the XVII Olympiad]. Official
poster (French language version) by Armando Testa (1917-1992)

The design combines images of a Roman capital featuring a victorious
athlete holding a palm, and of the bronze „Capitoline Wolf‟ with
Romulus and Remus, symbolizing Rome. Testa, a leading Italian
designer, said that „Synthesis was the law of my whole life both in
my works and in my words‟.

About 1960
Colour lithograph
V&A: E. 303-2006




Rome 1960


Giornata Olimpica 1959 [Olympic Day 1959].     Poster by Nino Gregori

In 1958 and 1959, the National Italian Olympic Committee (CONI)
organized „Olympic Days‟ to promote the official 1960 Games. Posters
by Gregori, executed in a style of heightened realism, proclaimed the
connection between modern and historic Rome. The depiction of an
incised „SPQR‟ [„Senate and People of Rome‟] suggests Rome‟s glorious
past.

Printed by Vecchioni and Guadagno, Rome, 1959
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E. 340-2006



Tokyo 1964


‘An Olympic Torch Runner’. Tokyo 1964 XVIII Olympic Games.     Official
poster by Yusaku Kamekura (1915-1997) (art director); Osamu Hayasaki
(photographer) (1933-1993); Jo Murakoshi (photo direction)


The subject of the photograph was student athlete Tanaka of Juntendo
University, chosen to epitomise the perfection and endurance of an
Olympic runner.     Interesting tonal qualities are achieved through the
colour printing process.


Printed by Toppan Printing Co. Ltd., Tokyo, 1964
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.304-2006
Tokyo 1964


‘The Start of the Sprinters’ Dash’. Tokyo 1964.     Official poster by
Yusaku Kamekura (1915-1997) (art director); Osamu Hayasaki
(photographer) (1933-1993); Jo Murakoshi (photo direction)


In many ways Tokyo 1964 was a modernising Games.     This poster broke
new ground by suggesting, through means of photography, the drama of
individuals striving in Olympic competition.     In fact the photograph
(chosen from about forty shots) was taken on a winter‟s night in
February 1962, and featured amateur Japanese athletes and American
servicemen stationed at the Tachikawa Air Base.


Printed by Toppan Printing Co. Ltd., Tokyo, 1962
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.341-2006




Grenoble 1968


Xmes Jeux Olympiques D’Hiver [Xth Olympic Winter Games] 1968
Grenoble.    Official poster by Jean Brian (1910-1990)


In this jaunty design by caricaturist and illustrator Jean Brian, the
five Olympic rings take on a life of their own, skiing downhill as
though in breakneck competition.    The Grenoble Games were opened by
General de Gaulle, who wished them to be a spectacular international
event for France.    They were the first Olympic Winter Games to be
broadcast by colour television.


Printed by Imprimerie Générale, Grenoble, 1967
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Delancey
V&A: E.342-2006
Mexico City 1968

Mexico XIX 1968.   Anonymous poster

This is one of the earlier posters issued by the Organising Committee
for the Mexico City Games. It predates the integrated graphic
identity that was later developed. The Roman numerals XIX declare
the 19th modern Olympiad, while the central motif evokes Mexican
culture through reference to indigenous symbols and patterning.

Printed by Miguel Galas S.A, Mexico, about 1965-8
Colour lithograph.
Purchased through the generosity of Mark Birley through the Bath and
Racquets Club
V&A: E.330-2006


Mexico City 1968

Libertad de Expresion [Liberty of Expression].   Protest poster by
Adolfo Mexiac (born 1927)

Student-led protests over the Government‟s heavy investment into
Olympic facilities rather than social programmes were quelled ten
days before the Mexico City Games opened. In sympathy with the
students, Adolfo Mexiac adapted and distributed a linocut he had made
in 1954. His addition of the „Mexico 68‟ logo draws a sarcastic
parallel between the Olympic rings and the links of the gagging
chain.

1968 (adapted from a design of 1954)
Lithograph
Gift of the American Friends of the V&A; Gift to the American Friends
by Leslie, Judith and Gabri Schreyer and Alice Schreyer Batko
V&A: E.1517-2004


Mexico City 1968

Mexico 68.   Official poster by Lance Wyman (born 1937); artistic
directors, Eduardo Terrazas (born 1936) and Pedro Ramirez Vázquez
(born 1919)

The dazzling and elegant „Mexico 68‟ logotype design expressed the
idea of modern Mexico. The radiating parallel lines referenced both
1960s Op Art and the pattern-making imagery of pre-Hispanic
indigenous cultures. It captured both the contemporary moment and a
sense of cultural place.

Colour lithograph, about 1968
V&A: E.338-2006


Mexico City 1968

Cultural poster for events at the Museo Nacional de Antropologia,
Mexico City, February 1968 Anonymous

Mexico City ran a year-long cultural festival as part of the Olympic
Games. This is one of the posters promoting arts events. The design
uses details from posters for previous Olympic Games in Amsterdam
1928, Berlin 1936 and London 1948 set within a film reel.

Colour lithograph, about 1968
Given by Margaret Timmers
V&A: E.426-2007


Mexico City 1968

Mexico 68. Poster by Lance Wyman (born 1937); artistic director,
Eduardo Terrazas (born 1936)

The „Mexico 68‟ logotype, based on the integration of the Olympic
symbol and the year number „68‟, formed the keynote of a celebrated
programme of visual communication. Printed in various colour
combinations it was applied as a brand image across all aspects of
design including posters, promotional literature, signage, three-
dimensional installations and uniforms.

About 1968
Colour screenprint
Accepted by HM Government in Lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to
the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2007
V&A: E.2819-2007


Mexico City 1968

Jeux Olympiques Mexico. Poster by Georges Kerfyser for the French
release of Alberto Isaac‟s film, 1969

This poster promotes a documentary feature film about the Mexico City
Games. The visual quotation of the powerful „Mexico‟ logotype,
standing in place of the hurdles on the track, demonstrates how the
Games‟ graphic identity became synonymous with the very idea of the
Mexico City Games.

Colour offset lithograph, about 1969
V&A: E.415-2007




Sapporo 1972


Sapporo ’72.   XI Olympic Winter Games.   Official poster by Takashi
Kono (1906-1999)


Takashi Kono was an advocate of traditional Japanese forms and
colours re-interpreted into a modernist aesthetic.   His poster (one
of four official posters) incorporates the Games‟ emblem, composed of
the Rising Sun, a snowflake and the five Olympic rings.    He suspends
this like a banner over the pure geometric forms of a snow-peaked
mountain and a reflection of the sun.
Printed by Dai Nippon Printing Co. Ltd., Japan, 1968
Colour screenprint
Purchased through the generosity of Delancey
V&A: E.343-2006




Munich 1972


München 1972.     Official poster by Otl Aicher (1922-1991)


Aicher was a pioneer in the development of visual identity systems
and his design team created the „look‟ of the Munich Games.    This
poster, featuring the translucent tented structure of the Munich
Olympic Stadium, conformed to the graphic vocabulary.   It kept to a
chosen range of colours, used the selected Univers font, and bore the
Games‟ official emblem of a radiant spiral.


Printed in Germany by Mandruck, München, 1970
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.876-1970




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.   Poster by Richard Smith (born 1931)
from Edition Olympia 1972, fourth series


In his early career, British painter and printmaker Richard Smith
found inspiration in the work of American abstract painting.    Here he
plays with relationships of space and colour, structure and drawing,
transforming the winners‟ podium into the athletes‟ ultimate goal as
their green track rushes down towards it.


1971
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.369-1972




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.     Poster by Peter Phillips (born 1939)
from Edition Olympia 1972, fourth series


In much of his work, Phillips combined images taken from advertising
with abstractions derived from a variety of mass media.    Here the
selected images are characteristically layered to suggest both a
multiplicity of sporting events and the endeavour of competitors.


1972
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.368-1972




Munich 1972


München Olympia.     Poster by Alfonso Hüppi (born 1935) from Edition
Olympia 1972, fifth series.


Hüppi‟s flat, puppet-like figures are inspired by his work with
plywood and paper.     This particular split-surface figure seems to
suggest at once both high jumper and diver, upward thrust and
downward trajectory.


1972
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.399 -1972




Munich 1972
Olympische Spiele München 1972.    Poster by Horst Antes (born 1936)
from Edition Olympia 1972, second series


Antes‟ trademark „cephalopod‟ figure was characterised by a huge
head, minimal torso and prominent feet.    Here it becomes a powerful
physical presence, but also a deeply vulnerable one, apparently
unsettled by the challenging victors‟ steps and a symbolic ladder.


1970
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.145-1971




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.    Poster by   David Hockney (born 1937)
from Edition Olympia 1972, third series


The swimming pool has been a favourite motif of Hockney‟s over many
years.   This image of a diver at the perfect point of entry is one of
numerous works in which he explores the conjunction of the human form
with the play of light on water.


1971
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.357-1972




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.    Poster by Allen Jones (born 1937)
from Edition Olympia 1972, second series


Jones is widely recognised for his erotic portrayal of women,
focusing on specific body parts, such as legs and breasts.     Here,
using his characteristic air-brush technique, he portrays two pairs
of physically perfect athletes‟ legs, fused together yet in dynamic
opposition.   The image is open to conjecture and imagination.


1970
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.149-1971




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.   Poster by Victor Vasarely (1908-
1997) from Edition Olympia 1972, second series


Vasarely, generally acclaimed as the father of Op Art, was fascinated
by ideas of perception and visual illusion.   Although following
strict theories of colour and geometric form, the work he created was
extraordinarily luminous.   While this particular image does not seem
to say anything specific about sport, its composition evokes notions
of strength, unity and confidence.


1970
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.151 -1971




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.   Poster by Josef Albers (1888-1976)
from Edition Olympia 1972, third series


Albers‟ well-known style of superimposed rectangles and squares of
colour have influenced innumerable artists and designers across the
world.   In this context, his simple abstraction could easily be
interpreted as a swimming pool.   At the same time, we recognise that
perfection of form is also an Olympic ideal.


1971
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.362-1972




Munich 1972


Olympia 72 München.   Poster by Gerd Winner (born 1936) from Edition
Olympia 1972, fifth series


Winner is known for his artistic exploration of urban culture and
urban structures, which he often views from unusual angles.   Here, he
focuses on the powerful engineering behind the tented roof of the
Munich Olympic Stadium, designed by Günther Behnisch & Partner.


1972
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.393-1972




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.   Poster by Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000)
from Edition Olympia 1972, fourth series


Lawrence, himself an African American, is notable for his epic
narratives of black history.   This image, the first Olympic poster to
focus exclusively on the black contribution to sport, captures the
agonising heroism of runners striving for the line.


1972
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.367-1972
Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.    Poster by R. B. Kitaj (Ronald Brooks
Kitaj) (1932-2007) from Edition Olympia 1972, third series


Kitaj‟s skill in expressing human anatomy is deployed here to convey
grace and vitality.   At the same time the swimmer‟s fragmented figure
suggests the excruciating demands the Games places on the human
frame.


1971
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.358-1972




Munich 1972


Olympische Spiele München 1972.    Poster by Tom Wesselmann (1931-2004)
from Edition Olympia 1972, third series


American Pop Artist Tom Wesselmann is known for his stylised, glossy
images of still lives and nudes.   In the early 1970s he began
focusing on a few details of the body, such as hands, feet and
breasts, investing them with a symbolic life of their own.    Here, the
monumental foot has a powerful, slightly humorous, „in-your-face‟
presence.


1971
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.360-1972




Munich 1972
Olympische Spiele München 1972.     Poster by Max Bill (1908-1994) from
Edition Olympia 1972, third series


Max Bill was a Swiss architect, designer, painter and sculptor who
engaged with modern science and mathematics.     This design might be
read simply as a colourful pattern, but it also interprets the
scientific concept that all colours meet together to make light (seen
at the centre of the image), giving it a deeper meaning.


1971
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Organising Committee for the Games of the XX Olympiad
V&A: E.363-1971




[LARGE LABEL]
 Montreal 1976


The Artists-Athletes Coalition for the Celebration of the 1976
Olympics


This poster project, organised in association with the Montreal
Olympic Games was chaired by Canadian academic and Olympic athlete
Bruce Kidd.     In his words it was „an initiative to broaden public
support for the Montreal Games … bring the sports and arts
communities closer together…and have some fun.‟ More than 300 artists
submitted posters in 1974 for a pan-Canadian competition, with ten
designs chosen for printing and distribution.     Series design was by
Burton Kramer Associates.     Since the funds came from the Canada
Council, a federal agency seeking a federal presence in the Games, a
condition of the funding was that the word 'Canada' appeared on the
posters.




Montreal 1976


Canada 1976 Olympiques Olympics.     Poster by Pierre Ayot (1943-1995)
from Artists-Athletes Coalition for the Celebration of the 1976
Olympics


Throughout the 1960s Ayot produced many poster-like images, as well
as installations.     Here he presents the archer‟s target as a printed
image on crumpled paper, lending it dynamic edge and suggesting
graphic creativity.


1976
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Artists-Athletes Olympic Poster Project
V&A: E.45- 1977




Montreal 1976


Canada 1976 Olympiques Olympics.     Poster by Guido Molinari (1933-
2004) from Artists-Athletes Coalition for the Celebration of the 1976
Olympics


Molinari‟s particular brand of abstraction is made up of colourful,
hard-edged juxtapositions.     Here he applies it to suggest the race-
track as a wall rising to challenge the runner.


1976
Colour offset lithograph
Given by Bruce Kidd
V&A: E.3182-2007




Montreal 1976


Canada 1976 Olympiques Olympics.     Poster by Lucy [Lucy Qinnuayuak]
(1915-1982) from Artists-Athletes Coalition for the Celebration of
the 1976 Olympics (1976)


There was growing political activism amongst the Inuit in the 1960s
and „70s, leading to greater awareness of their culture amongst the
larger population.     Qinnuayuak, one of the most popular Inuit visual
artists, suggests here that daily life can be a challenge but, with
imagination, also a game.


Colour offset lithograph
Given by Bruce Kidd
V&A: E.3183-2007




Montreal 1976


Canada 1976 Olympiques Olympics.     Poster by N.E.Thing Co. (Artists‟
collective including Ian Baxter, Louise Chance and others) (active
1966-1978) from Artists-Athletes Coalition for the Celebration of the
1976 Olympics


N.E. Thing Co. created numerous installations and events which they
documented with photography or video.     Many were to do with modes of
communication.     In this poster they combined an appeal to artists and
athletes with a witty combination of alphabet, language and the
activity of the human body.


1976
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Artists-Athletes Olympic Poster Project
V&A: E.48-1977




Montreal 1976


‘Invitation’.    Montréal 1976 .   Poster by Ernst Roch (1928-2003) and
Rolf Harder (born 1929), one of a series of themed official posters


Though the Graphics and Design Directorate of the Montreal Olympic
Games issued strict guidelines, within these freelance designers
operated with relative freedom.     The set of eight themed posters
stressed different aspects of the games, such as „Olympic Stadium‟ or
„Flag‟.   In „Invitation‟ the vibrating rings of the Olympic symbol
transmit their message of welcome.


1972
Colour offset lithograph
Olympic Museum Lausanne Collections



Moscow 1980

Olympiad 80 Moscow.   Version of official poster by Vladimir Arsentyev
(born 1951)

Arsentyev, a young artist from Latvia, won an international
competition in 1975 to devise the official emblem for the Moscow
Games. The Organizing Committee had stipulated that the emblem must
incorporate the Olympic rings and a design representative of the host
city. Arsentyev‟s winning concept, featured on this poster, suggests
athletics tracks converging in a symbol of the Moscow skyline.

Lithographed in Canada
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.425-2007



Moscow 1980

The USSR has supported and will support the modern Olympic movement.
Poster by V. Vorontsov

Vorontsov‟s poster quotes a statement of support by Soviet leader
Leonid Brezhnev prominently lettered below the image of the Olympic,
Soviet and Moscow Olympic flags flying above the Central Lenin
Stadium. Within the stadium, the pictorial display made by the crowd
of spectators with blocks of colourful scarves recalls the tradition
of communist mass rallies. 100,000 copies were issued.

Published by Plakat, Moscow, 1978
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Gundle
V&A: E.344-2006



Moscow 1980

Moscow Capital of the XXII Olympic Games.   Poster by S. Pegov

Pegov‟s design possibly sought to popularise the Games with a home
audience through its portrayal of an Olympic torch against the proud
backdrop of Moscow‟s Kremlin Palace and towers, sports stadium, two
of the „Stalin skyscrapers‟ and other architectural landmarks.
120,000 copies were issued.

Published by Plakat, Moscow, 1977
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Lt Cdr Paul Fletcher (Ret‟d)
V&A: E.345-2006




Moscow 1980


Sport Peace Friendship.     Poster by A. Archipenko

Though conceived in the long-established tradition of state publicity
and propaganda, many of the Moscow Olympic posters were also aimed at
an international audience.   Archipenko‟s design, incorporating the
exhortation into the shape of the Olympic torch, was lettered in
Russian, English and French. 40,000 copies were issued.

Published by Plakat, Moscow, 1979
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen McClelland
V&A: E.305-2006



Sarajevo 1984


Poster by Andy Warhol (1928-1987) reproducing Speed Skater from Art
and Sports portfolio, 1983


The Sarajevo Games were complemented by a programme of cultural
activities.     This included the production of a portfolio of prints by
international artists.     The original prints were issued in limited
editions, but were also reproduced as posters.        Warhol‟s image, based
on a photograph, used two overlapping images to suggest movement and
speed.


Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.3185-2007




Los Angeles 1984


Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.     Poster by April Greiman (born 1948)
and Jayme Odgers issued in association with the Los Angeles Olympic
Games 1984


April Greiman, an emerging artist new to Los Angeles, was among those
commissioned to contribute to a series of fine art posters for the
Los Angeles Games.   Her collaboration with photographer Jayme Odgers
produced a montage that played with different dimensions of time and
space, reality and imaginative illusion.


Published by Knapp Communications Corporation, 1982
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.347-2006




Los Angeles 1984


Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.   Poster by David Hockney (born 1937)
issued in association with the Los Angeles Olympic Games 1984


Hockney, a British artist, had won international renown in the 1970s
with his paintings of Californian scenes.   This image is based on his
photomontage technique whereby he created an image by arranging a
series of Polaroid photographs in a grid format, which here
emphasises the swimmer‟s progress through the water.


Published by Knapp Communications Corporation, 1982
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.306-2006




Los Angeles 1984


Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.   Poster by Robert Rauschenberg (born
1925) issued in association with the Los Angeles Olympic Games 1984


For this design Rauschenberg used his characteristic collage style to
rework „The Star in Motion‟, the official Games emblem designed by
Robert Miles Runyan and Associates.   The star is a universal symbol
of high aspiration, the horizontal bars imply speed.   The collage
suggests another layer of fast-moving and fragmented experience.


Published by Knapp Communications Corporation, 1982
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.3187-2007




Los Angeles 1984


Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.     Poster by Roy Lichtenstein (1923-
1997) issued in association with the Los Angeles Olympic Games 1984


For this poster Lichtenstein chose to reproduce one of his earlier
works, „The Red Horsemen‟ (1974).     This dynamic design, based on a
painting by the Futurist Carlo Carra and reworked in the style of
Fernand Léger, uses curves, diagonals and overlaps to convey a sense
of energy and speed.


Published by Knapp Communications Corporation, 1982
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.346-2006




Los Angeles 1984


LA Summer Games 84.    Print by Laura Smith (born 1956)


The „LA Summer Games‟ set of prints were not official publications
but they added to the visual diversity of the Los Angeles Games.
Each of the images by graphic designer Laura Smith was directly
inspired by the simplified forms and immediate impact of Art Deco
posters, and employed period typography.


Printed by ProCreations, 1983
Colour lithograph
V&A: E.348-2006




Los Angeles 1984


LA Summer Games 84.    Print by Laura Smith (born 1956)
Printed by ProCreations, 1983
Colour lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Lady Purves
V&A: E.349-2006




Los Angeles 1984


Collect the Series from Coca-Cola.     Anonymous poster advertising
Coca-Cola, an official sponsor of the Los Angeles Olympic Games 1984


Coca-Cola, an official corporate sponsor of the Los Angeles Games,
produced special cans with designs representing each of the 24
Olympic events.     This poster shows Sam the Olympic Eagle, a character
developed by C. Robert Moore of Walt Disney Productions as the
official Games‟ mascot.


Published about 1982
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.416-2007




Wir rufen die Jugend der Welt [We call upon the youth of the world]
Poster by Klaus Staeck (born 1938)


This 1988 poster questions the increasing commercialism of the Games.
Metamorphosing the Olympic rings into the company logos of Coca-Cola,
McDonald's, Adidas, Mercedes and BMW, Staeck comments on the role of
corporate sponsorship and its infiltration into popular culture.      The
words „We call upon the youth of the world‟, normally used as an
invitation to the next Olympiad, are subverted to become a comment on
consumerism.


Printed by Steidl, Göttingen, 1988
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.427-2007
Seoul 1988

Seoul 1988.   Emblem poster by Yang Seung-Choon

This poster showcases the official emblem of the Seoul Olympic Games,
designed by Professor Yang Seung-Choon of Seoul National University.
The design is an energised version of the Samtaeguk design, a
popular Korean decorative motif, being a variant of the circular yin-
yang symbol representing the dynamic duality of the universe.

About 1984
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.356-2006


Seoul 1988

‘Hunting’.    Culture poster by Zun Hoo-Yon for Seoul Olympic Games
1988.

This scene is based on a detail from a 5th century AD tomb mural of
the Koguryô period – the vigorous and spirited „Tomb of the Dancers‟.
The choice of an image from the pre-7th century northern kingdom (now
North Korea) for one of the culture posters may have had significance
as a unifying gesture.

1987
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.3301-2007


Seoul 1988

‘Royal Screen Pattern’.    Culture poster by Yang Seung-Choon for Seoul
Olympic Games 1988

The design of this culture poster is a contemporary interpretation of
a traditional screen painting of the Sun, Moon and Five Peaks.
Screen paintings of this subject were customarily placed behind the
thrones of the Joseon rulers of Korea.

1987
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.359-2006



Seoul 1988

Mascot poster by Kim Hyun for Seoul Olympic Games 1988

The official mascot of the Seoul 1988 Olympic Games was a tiger named
Hodori. The artist reinvented the formidable tiger of Korean myth
and legend as an accessible and lovable cartoon-like character. The
billowing streamer on Hodori‟s traditional Korean sangmo hat spells
the „S‟ of Seoul.

1984
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.358-2006


Seoul 1988

Seoul 1988.    Official poster by Cho Young-Jae

Professor Cho Young-Jae‟s poster for the Seoul Games engaged with
established Olympic imagery. The Olympic rings are depicted as a
powerfully radiant force, illuminating the world with the Olympic
ideal. The image of the runner carrying the Olympic torch symbolise
mankind‟s progress towards happiness and prosperity.

1985
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.355-2006


Seoul 1988

‘Woman Fan Dancer’.     Culture poster by Kim Hyun for Seoul Olympic
Games 1988

The twelve culture posters designed for the Seoul Olympic Games
evoked a distinctive Korean aesthetic. They drew on traditional
patterns, well-known paintings, architectural motifs and colourful
images of Korea‟s visual and performing arts. This poster creates a
sense of space, movement and colour to capture the festive mood of
the fan dance.

1987
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.350-2006


Seoul 1988

‘Fan Dance’.    Culture poster by Ahn Chung-Un for Seoul Olympic Games
1988

These culture posters were „intended to introduce Korean culture to
the world and to generate diverse images of the Games ‟. Here the
characters of the Korean alphabet Han-gul frame a vivid photograph of
a fan dance in motion.

1987
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.354-2006




Nagano 1998


‘Thrush’.     Official poster by Masuteru Aoba (born 1939) for Nagano
1998
In keeping with the Nagano Olympic Organizing Committee‟s desire for
a Games in harmony with nature, this poster (designated after the
Games as the official poster) was this photomontage entitled
„Thrush‟, combining the themes of sport, winter and nature.        It also
incorporates the Games emblem within the design.


Printed in Japan, 1994
Colour offset lithograph
Given by the Wenlock Olympian Society
V&A: E.3184-2007




Barcelona 1992


Barcelona ’92.     Poster by Josep Maria Trias (born 1948)


This motif, which suggests a leaping human figure, was chosen as the
official emblem for the Barcelona Games.     The colours are symbolic:
red and yellow are the main colours in the flags of the city
(Barcelona), the region (Catalonia) and the country (Spain); blue
represents the     Mediterranean sea.   The silhouetted skyline shows
Barcelona landmarks.


Published 1988
Colour offset lithograph
Accepted by HM Government in Lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to
the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2007
V&A E.2613-2007




Barcelona 1992


Cobi.     Poster by Javier Mariscal (born 1950), one of four official
posters


This poster features „Cobi‟, the surreal dog which Mariscal had
created in 1988 as Barcelona‟s official Games mascot.        Using flat
colours and a thick black outline Mariscal gave a strong graphic
identity to the character.     The quirky typography, with the arbitrary
combination of upper and lower case letters, was also his invention.


Published 1990
Colour offset lithograph
Accepted by HM Government in Lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to
the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2007
V&A: E.2614-2007




Barcelona 1992


Barcelona ’92.     Poster by Enric Satué (born 1938), one of four
official posters


The poster shows five raised arms each coloured in different
combinations of red, yellow, blue, green and black, the official
Olympic colours.     Each hand makes a „V for Victory‟ gesture, but they
also seems to depict an eager audience of animal-like figures.

Published 1990
Colour offset lithograph
Accepted by HM Government in Lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to
the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2007
V&A: E.2610-2007



Barcelona 1992


Games of the XXV Olympiad 1992.     Poster in the designer series by
Arcadi Moradell (born 1949)


Moradell was one of eighteen leading Catalan artists and designers
selected to contribute to the designer series of posters for the
Barcelona Games.     His abstract design made witty reference to the
Olympic symbol.


Published 1990
Colour offset lithograph
Accepted by HM Government in Lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to
the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2007
V&A: E.2606-2007
Barcelona 1992


Barcelona ’92.     Poster in the designer series by Josep Pla-Narbona
(born 1928)


Sculptor and painter Pla-Narbona‟s surreal composition shows five
sculpture-like figures moving across a blue sky like cirrus clouds,
each holding one of the five Olympic rings.


Published 1990
Colour offset lithograph
Accepted by HM Government in Lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to
the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2007
V&A: E.2609-2007




Barcelona 1992


Games of the XXV Olympiad Barcelona 1992.     Poster in the designer
series by Peret [Pere Torrent] (born 1945)


The image by Peret, graphic designer and illustrator, of a figure
leaping a hurdle shows the influence of Joan Miro, a leading figure
in 20th century art and himself from Barcelona.


Published 1990
Colour offset lithograph
Accepted by HM Government in Lieu of Inheritance Tax and allocated to
the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2007
V&A: E.2608-2007




Be a good sport
Poster by Simons Palmer agency (designer Gary Martin; copywriter Mark
Goodwin), issued by the AIDS and HIV charity, the Terrence Higgins
Trust, at the time of the Barcelona Olympic Games 1992


The message is simple, witty and direct.     Subverting the famous
Olympic symbol, five condoms in the Olympic colours are arranged like
the Olympic rings to remind the viewer of the importance of safe sex.
The poster, created before the Barcelona Games 0f 1992, played on
international recognition of Olympic imagery.


About 1992
Colour lithograph
Given by Rosie Miles
V&A: E.516-1993




Atlanta 1996


Paralympics Atlanta 1996.     Poster by Per Arnoldi (born 1941)
commissioned by the Danish Committee for the Paralympics in
association with its participation in the Games of 1996.


The International Paralympic Committee was founded in 1989, bringing
together organisations promoting sporting activity of the disabled.
In this poster, Arnoldi subverted the Olympic symbol, changing the
perfect circles into various interlinked geometric shapes to suggest
diversity.


1995
Colour offset lithograph
Given by Per Arnoldi
V&A: E.361-2006




Atlanta 1996


Atlanta.     Official poster by Primo Angeli (born 1931)


This design reflects the Atlanta Organizing Committee‟s decision to
avoid any graphic reference to specific countries or national flags
in the official poster.    Instead, Angeli designed a Classical
androgynous athlete-figure profiled against four of the Olympic
colours and patterned with the stars and flames of the Atlanta torch
mark emblem.


Printed by Fine Art Ltd, St. Louis, M.O., about 1996
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Preston Fitzgerald
V&A: E.307-2006




Sydney 2000


Sydney 2000.     Emblem poster by FHA Image Design


Designed to express key Australian themes of energy and irreverence,
the official emblem poster for the Sydney Games featured the Games‟
emblem, an athlete also known as „Millennium Man‟. The figure is made
up of freely drawn boomerang shapes with the flare from the torch
echoing the „sails‟ of the iconic Sydney Opera House shown below.


Published 1999
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.308-2006



Sydney 2000


Games of the XXVII Olympiad.     Official design poster no. 3 by Lynda
Warner


This image of an athlete is a composite of drawn and photographic
fragments in contrasting styles suggesting a diversity of cultures.
The design was inspired by IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch who
described the ideal of the Games as a peaceful bringing together of
people “irrespective of race, religion and political convictions”.


Printed by Ink Group Publishers, Sydney, 1999
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Mrs Joan Hampson
V&A: E.352-2006
Sydney 2000


‘Citius Altius Fortius’ [‘Faster Higher Stronger’]. Games of the
XXVII Olympiad.    Official Design Poster no. 5 by Barrie Tucker (born
1937)


Interpreting the Olympic motto of endeavour, an androgynous figure
leaps above the stars of the Southern Cross, symbolising the
exuberant spirit of the Olympic Games.   The design is bordered with
striped bands in four of the „Olympic‟ colours, the fourth – black –
being used as the background colour.


Printed by Ink Group Publishers, Sydney, 1999
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Mrs Joan Hampson
V&A: E.351-2006




Sydney 2000


‘Peace Roo’.   Games of the XXVII Olympiad .    Official Design Poster
no. 1 by David Lancashire


David Lancashire‟s poster reproduces a painted illustration of a
kangaroo holding a green branch, an inspired Australian twist on the
traditional Dove of Peace emblem.   It expresses the spirit of peace
and reconciliation represented by the new millennium and manifested
in the Sydney Games.


Printed by Ink Group Publishers, Sydney, 1999
Colour offset lithograph
Purchased through the generosity of Mrs Joan Hampson
V&A: E.353-2006




Athens 2004
Athens 2004.  Poster featuring the emblem designed by Wolff Olins in
1999, in collaboration with Red Design Consultants

The Athens 2004 emblem was a freely-drawn olive wreath (kotinos) in
the Greek national colours of white against blue. Despite its
apparent simplicity the image presents a rich array of messages and
symbols: peace, unity, the circle of life, Greece, the Aegean and the
ancient Games. The olive is the traditional symbol of Athens.

Issued by the Athens 2004 Organising Committee for the Olympic Games
(ATHOC)
V&A: E.230-2006


Athens 2004

Athens 2004.   Anonymous poster

This poster reproduces a relief of about 460 B.C. found near the
Temple of Athena in Sounion.
A youthful athlete places a wreath of victory on his head, neatly
summarizing four values of the 2004 Games: heritage, humanity,
participation and celebration. The ancient tradition of crowning
winners in olive wreaths was reinstated in 2004.

Printed by Editions M. Toubis S.A., Athens
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.418-2007




Turin 2006


Short Track Speed Skating.   Poster by Iconologic; lead designer Elise
Thomason (born 1978)


This is one of a series of posters created by Iconologic, an Atlanta-
based design company, symbolising the different sports that made up
the Winter Games.   Their bold and fluid compositions were homage to
the aerodynamic sleekness of Italian design and were incorporated
into the entire look of the Games.


Published by Bolaffi S.p.A., about 2006
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.419-2007




Turin 2006


Torino 2006.   Official poster by Armando Testa (Agency)
An abstract profile of the soaring dome of Turin‟s landmark building,
the Mole Antonelliana, is tilted on its side and metamorphosed into a
downhill ski slope.   An image of the building was also transformed
into an abstract motif that became the Game‟s official emblem: it is
featured here above the Games‟ slogan, „Passion lives here‟.


Published by Bolaffi S.p.A., about 2006
Colour offset lithograph
Given by Margaret Timmers
V&A: E.344-2007




Beijing 2008

‘Chinese Seal – Dancing Beijing’. Beijing 2008. Poster by Beijing
Armstrong International Corporate Identity Co. Ltd (AICI) featuring
the official emblem created by AICI in collaboration with the
Beijing Organizing Committee.

The official emblem was chosen in 2003 after an open competition. It
depicts a dancing human figure resembling the Chinese character
„jing‟ ) 京,     and so referring to the host city‟s name Bei-jing (=
                京
north capital) 北 .    . The figure, arms outstretched in a welcoming
gesture, is delineated in white on the symbolic colour red within the
form of a Chinese seal. Above the Olympic symbol appears the text
„Beijing 2008‟ in bold cursive brushstrokes evoking Chinese
calligraphic characters. This vigorous design provides a dynamic
visual identity for the Games.

Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.231-2006



2008-2012. London – Beijing. Poster by Liu Wenrong, one of a series
for the „2008-2012‟ poster competition organised by the Cultural and
Education Section of the British Embassy in Beijing, and the Beijing
Industrial Design Promotion Organisation, 2005.

The Olympic motto is „Citius Altius Fortius‟ [ „Faster Higher
Stronger‟], and this image of a weightlifter interprets the
„stronger‟ aspect of endeavour. Following the „One World One Dream‟
theme of the Beijing Games, it also suggests the historical
trajectory and the common goals of the Olympic Games.

2005
Colour offset lithograph
V&A
Ultimate Dream. Poster by Lu Jing, one of a series for the „2008-
2012‟ poster competition organised by the Cultural and Education
Section of the British Embassy in Beijing, and the Beijing Industrial
Design Promotion Organisation, 2005.

This highly calligraphic design of lines and ink blots extends the
meaning of the well-known Olympic symbol. The traditional symbol of
the five interlocking rings has been invested with new sharp energy,
giving it a contemporary edge.

2005
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: FE.20-2006



Bird of Dream.   Poster by Wu Zheiwei, one of a series for the „2008-
2012‟ poster competition organised by the Cultural and Education
Section of the British Embassy in Beijing and the Beijing Industrial
Design Promotion Organisation, 2005.

Combining the art of paper folding with an interpretation of
Beijing‟s „One World One Dream‟ Olympic Games‟ theme, this image
evokes speed and forward progress.

2005
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: FE.25-2006




[LARGE LABEL]
London 2012



Back the Bid posters by M&C Saatchi (established 1995)


The bid by London to host the 2012 Games began in 2003, gathering
momentum in 2004. London was announced the winner on 6 July 2005.
The series of six Back the Bid posters were an integral part of the
campaign, the concept founded on the idea of a „Leap for London‟,
showing the giant step forward that the Games would represent.     Each
featured an athlete who transforms a London landmark into a component
of a sporting activity, so that Tower Bridge represents a hurdle, the
London Eye a high jump, and so on.


The posters, in many formats, were displayed across the capital
ranging from vast hoardings and transport networks to schools and
doctors‟ surgeries.
San Francisco 2012 Bid


The Bridge to the Future.     Poster by Michael Schwab (born 1952)


In 2002, San Francisco bid to be the official US Candidate City for
the 2012 Games.   Local artists were invited to design a poster on the
theme „Bridge to the Future‟, referring to the city‟s most famous
landmark and to the benefits of winning.    Although New York triumphed
as the city, San Francisco developed a new graphic identity.


2002
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.422-2007



London 2012

Back the Bid [Tower Bridge]

2004
Colour offset lithograph
V&A: E.417-2007


London 2012

Back the Bid [Nelson‟s Column]

Paralympic athlete Ade Adepitan, wheelchair basketball team member,
is featured here scoring a goal. Nelson‟s Column is substituted for
the stand of the hoop.

2004
Colour offset lithograph
Given by Lynn Parker
V&A: E.333-2006


London 2012

Back the Bid   [„The Gherkin‟]

A gymnast balances atop one of London‟s most architecturally
adventurous new buildings, the Swiss Re Building, known as „the
Gherkin‟, at 30 St. Mary Axe, London.

2004
Colour offset lithograph
Given by Event Merchandising Limited
V&A: E.335-2006
London 2012

Back the Bid   [The London Eye]

A high-jumper clears the London Eye, at the time of its building (it
opened in March 2000) the biggest observation wheel in the world.

2004
Colour offset lithograph
Given by Event Merchandising Ltd
V&A: E.337-2006
chandising Ltd
V&A: E.337-2006

								
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