Cetrom IT: Cloud Computing Goes to Outer Space

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					Cetrom IT: Cloud Computing Goes to Outer Space

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena California, tasked
with managing the project, indicated that their gained confidence in
using cloud computing was based on successful experiences with other uses
of the technology.

Vienna, VA, November 09, 2010 -- NASA has announced that their Mars
Exploration Rover Project has become the first space mission in the
agency's history to use cloud computing services for daily mission
operations. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena
California, tasked with managing the project, indicated that their gained
confidence in using cloud computing was based on successful experiences
with other uses of the technology.

"This is a change to thinking about computer capacity and data storage as
a commodity like electricity, or even the money in your bank account,"
said JPL's John Callas, rover project manager. "When we need more
computing capacity, we don't need to install more servers if we can rent
more capacity from the cloud for just the time we need it. This way we
don't waste electricity and air conditioning with servers idling waiting
to be used, and we don't have to worry about hardware maintenance and
operating system obsolescence."

"The rover project is well suited for cloud computing," said Khawaja
Shams, a JPL software engineer supporting the project. "It has a
widespread user community acting collaboratively. Cloud enables us to
deliver the data to each user from nearby locations for faster reaction
time." Also, the unexpected longevity of the mission means the volume of
data used has outgrown the systems originally planned for handling and
sharing data, which makes the virtually limitless capacity of cloud
computing attractive.

"NASA's decision to use cloud computing as the technology platform for
this project makes sense in multiple areas. The ability to add scalable
and redundant computing resources on demand, coupled with a swift path
for the deployment is a huge advantage in supporting such a vital
mission. Additionally, cloud computing gives the agency the ability to
accurately scale project costs to the precise mission requirements,
without the additional burden of lifecycle management for internal
resources," said Chris Stark, Cetrom IT president and CEO. "I believe
that NASA's successful use of cloud computing for this mission will open
up additional opportunities for future missions and set a standard for
other agencies to follow going forward, while also showing another
excellent example of how cloud computing can be applicable to virtually
any organization."

Cetrom Information Technology, Inc. is an industry leading Application
Services Provider (ASP), delivering a full spectrum of “Cloud Computing”
solutions with their hosted technology services platform for small and
medium businesses. Cetrom offers Hosted Applications, otherwise known as
“Software as a Service” (SaaS), for Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft Office,
as well as many other software programs. In addition, they deliver
scalable Managed Services options such as Network Monitoring, Disaster
Recovery and Remote Data Back-Up. As a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner,
they have been recognized for their depth of industry knowledge,
technical expertise and superior customer service ranking. C etrom stands
behind all their services with 24x7x365 Help Desk Support, 99.9% uptime
guarantee.

Contact:
Mitch Jones
Cetrom Information Technology, Inc
8000 Towers Crescent Drive 13th Floor
Vienna, VA 22182
240-631-8407
mitch.jones@cetrom.net
http://www.cetrom.net

				
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Description: NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena California, tasked with managing the project, indicated that their gained confidence in using cloud computing was based on successful experiences with other uses of the technology.