CPA 2010 - Patrol and FTO by fjwuxn

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									Frisco Police Department




   Uniformed Patrol Division
  and Field Training Program
      Sgt. Bob Fortenberry
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program

About the Presenter: Bob Fortenberry, Sergeant

        March 2002 – Hired by Frisco Police Department

        November 2002 to December 2004 - Worked as Patrol Officer

        January 2005 to April 2007 – Assigned to the Criminal Investigations
         Divison as a Detective

        April 2007 to present – Promoted to the rank of Sergeant and transferred
         to the Patrol Division as a Patrol supervisor

        December 2009 - Selected as Field Training Sergeant responsible for the
         day-to-day operation of the Field Training Program
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Objectives

At the conclusion of this module, attendees should be able to:

         Identify the function of the Uniformed Patrol Division;

         Review issues relating to officer scheduling and training;

         Recognize the geographic layout of the City of Frisco and its associated
          patrol districts;

         Identify equipment used by patrol officers;

         Define the role and function of the department’s Field Training Program;

         List the phases of recruit officer training;

         Define the minimum standards required for successful completion of the
          FTO Program; and

         Review the selection of training officers and their training function.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Uniformed Patrol

The Frisco Police Department Patrol Division is the largest and most visible aspect of
the department with 80 dedicated officers. The division is responsible for the
response to and preliminary investigation of calls for service. The patrol officer is
generally the first contact citizens have with a police officer.

The division provides coverage 365
days a year, 24 hours a day, seven
days a week.

Regardless of weekends, weather
conditions, holidays, natural disasters,
or anything else that might otherwise
signal a day away from work for other
professions, police officers assigned
to the Patrol Division are at work and
serving the public.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Uniformed Patrol (Continued)

The Patrol Division utilizes 12-hour shifts for its officers, rotating two shifts on and off
duty during each 24-hour period. Each shift contains three squads that cover all 80+
square miles of the City of Frisco during their 12-hour rotation.

There are a total of four patrol shifts assigned to the Patrol Division: two day and two
night shifts. Each shift is commanded by a lieutenant (a.k.a. ―Watch Commander‖)
who has three patrol sergeants (a.k.a. ―Sarges‖) reporting directly to them at all
times.

The three patrol sergeants each manage a squad of officers that are assigned to
different geographic regions of the city. To assist the sergeants, a corporal is
assigned to each squad and is responsible for assisting in first-line supervision of
each squad’s officers, approving reports and paperwork, directing and supervising
officers in the sergeant’s absence, and the like.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


The Patrol Shift

For six months at a time, officers, corporals, sergeants, and watch commanders
operate as a patrol shift team. These shifts work closely with one another on a daily
basis, regardless of the district they’re assigned.

Currently, all patrol shifts in the
department are compromised of
three squads that are responsible
for reporting to duty at different times
of day and patrolling different parts
of the city.

The off-set times for reporting to
duty help to ensure that at any
given time there is ample manpower
on the streets to ensure that any
incident—large or small—can be
safely and efficiently handled by
Patrol.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


The Patrol Shift (Continued)

The three squads that comprise each and every patrol shift in the department
operate as follows:

Day Shift

0500-1700 hrs – East Side
0530-1730 hrs – North Side
0600-1800 hrs – West Side

Night Shift

1700-0500 hrs – East Side
1730-0530 hrs – North Side
1800-0600 hrs – West Side
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Day Shift Patrol

                                   Lieutenant
                               ―Watch Commander‖

   North Sergeant                East Sergeant               West Sergeant
         130                          140                         150

                    Corporal                     Corporal                    Corporal
                      129                          149                         159

                    Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                     121                            141                       151

                    Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                     131                            142                       152

                    Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                     132                            143                       153

                    Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                     133                            144                       154

                                                                             Officer
                                                                              155
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Night Shift Patrol

                                    Lieutenant
                                ―Watch Commander‖

   North Sergeant                 East Sergeant               West Sergeant
         230                           240                         250

                     Corporal                     Corporal                    Corporal
                       229                          249                         259

                     Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                      221                            241                       251

                     Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                      231                            242                       252

                     Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                      232                            243                       253

                     Officer                        Officer                   Officer
                      233                            244                       254

                                                                              Officer
                                                                               255
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


The Patrol Squad

The most basic element of a patrol shift is an individual squad. Commanded by a
patrol sergeant, the squad is the most basic unit in a police department. On
average, it is the squad that must ensure manpower needs are met and that proper
scheduling and training are met.

Though a watch commander will mandate and sometimes ensure that a shift is
meeting all manpower and training needs, it is the individual squad that operationally
ensures that this occurs.

On a more personal level, the squad is more often than not comprised of officers who
enjoy working together and, therefore, normally work well together. Since officers
are given the ability to ―bid‖ for who they work for every six months, it is not unusual
to see groups of officers continually working on the same squad or following
particular supervisors around from shift to shift.

This aspect of the shift bid is well-received by officers and ensures a positive working
environment. With four different watch commanders and 12 patrol sergeants
available to bid for, it’s easy for those officers with seniority to manage their work
environment.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Shift Bid

As previously noted, the patrol shift bid occurs every six months. Running from
January to July and vice-a-versa, lieutenants, sergeants, corporals, and officers bid
for the shifts and squads that they wish to work for and with.

First, lieutenants will bid in order of
seniority which shift they would like to
manage: days or nights and days
on/off alignment. In regard to days
on/off alignment, a shift’s assigned
work days are set for six months in
advance. During the second bid that
occurs each year, officers will review
where holidays fall or special events
to try and ensure that their schedule
is the most suitable for their situation.

Next, sergeants bid in order of
seniority, selecting not only days or
nights, but also the days on/off alignment and which lieutenant they most wish to
work with. Then corporals go through the same process, and ultimately the patrol
officers themselves (all in their respective order of seniority).
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Patrol Shift Scheduling

With as many as 20 officers on-shift at any given time—not including those officers
assigned to Traffic or other specialized divisions operating simultaneously with
Patrol—the need to manage vacation requests, training schedules, and desk officer
duty, to name a few, is paramount.

Each shift’s lieutenant and sergeants work
closely with one another to ensure that minimum
manpower requirements are met on a daily basis.

Currently, the department requires that no fewer
than 12 officers are working at any given time, not
including the desk officer or those on their 8-hour
day. This becomes very tedious and time
consuming for supervisors.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Patrol Shift Scheduling (Continued)

On a personal level, officers like the 12-hour shifts and knowing their schedules for
the upcoming six months in order to schedule vacations and training dates. If
officers time their vacations right, they can burn only two days (or 24 hours) of
vacation time in order to get a full seven days off from work.

Here’s how the days on/off work for officers assigned to Patrol:



  Week 1      Mon         Tue        Off         Off        Fri        Sat        Sun



  Week 2       Off        Off        Wed        Thur        Off        Off        Off




Obviously, if you do the math and realize that officers work seven days during a
pay period for 12 hours per shift, they’re working a total of 84 hours; therefore, one
day in the pay period is what officers call their ―eight.‖ In other words, one day
during the pay period is only eight hours in duration to ensure that there is a total of
80 hours in one pay period (excluding overtime, court, or other such factors).
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Geographic Layout

To this point, we have discussed the patrol shifts, squads, and the officers who
present the face of the department to the public. Now let’s talk about the city that
these officers protect and serve.

The City of Frisco encompasses 80+ square miles and resides in two counties: Collin
and Denton. Officers with this agency are afforded great opportunities to patrol
commercial, residential, and undeveloped areas of the city that provide a uniqueness
to the sometimes routine patrol function.

Additionally, due to the city’s size officers routinely work with surrounding agencies,
which are many. The police departments of Plano, McKinney, Little Elm, The Colony,
and Prosper all share common borders with Frisco, in addition to the two sheriffs
departments. And now with the completion of the Dallas North Tollway and the SH-
121 toll road, the Texas Department of Public Safety and Frisco Police Department
work closely with one another.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Training

Officers are required by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer
Standards and Education (TCLEOSE) to perform 40 hours of training every two
years. This includes numerous mandated courses and those that are specific to
officer’s interest and/or job functions.

Currently, our officers train no fewer than 40 hours every year to ensure that we
exceed those standards set forth by the state. The bulk of our training hours come in
the form of firearms, defensive tactics, and driver training.

Though officers assigned to specialized divisions such as CID, Traffic, or even the
School Resource Officer program attend more training than those officers assigned
to Patrol, this is mainly due to the fact that the Patrol Division is the largest single
division in the department, does not require finely specialized courses, and has
manpower restraints not present in the other divisions.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Training (Continued)

Officers assigned to Patrol normally identify those trainings courses that they wish to
attend and send ―training requests‖ up through their chain-of-command. Most
training can be offered regionally, but some courses require travel and overnight
stays outside of the Metroplex.

As previously noted, firearms,
defensive tactics, and driver
training is conducted every year
and accounts for a bulk of the
training hours accumulated by
officers. These three training
areas are conducted in-house
by certified instructors employed
by the department.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Firearms Training

Officers are required to qualify with their firearms twice a year, achieving a score of
80% or better in order to maintain certification. One of these qualifications is focused
on day shooting and the second qualification on night shooting. In addition, shotgun
and off-duty or back-up firearms qualifications is conducted simultaneously.

Prior to qualifications, numerous
firearms training scenarios are
provided to officers that focus on
shoot/no shoot decision making,
move-and-shoot, low light situations,
cover and concealment, etc. This
training helps to provide officers with
the skills and ―time on range‖ needed
in order to maintain proficiency with
their firearms.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Firearms Training (Continued)

Additionally, a growing number of officers are certified as Rifle Operators and
can carry AR-15 patrol rifles on-duty. In order to do this, officers must first attend and
pass a two-day training course in order to gain patrol rifle certification, and then must
qualify annually with their rifles.

For this course, officers are required to
achieve a score of 100% in order to
maintain certification.

The department currently employs a
large number of officers that are
certified firearms instructors. Some
of these instructors specialize in
pistols, others in patrol rifles, and yet
others in armory and firearm repair.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Defensive Tactics

Each year, officers attend a two-day, 16-hour refresher on defensive tactics. The
Frisco Police Department uses Pressure Point Control Tactics (PPCT) training that
focuses on pain compliance techniques to physically subdue combatants. This
training uses both classroom and hands-on exercises to ensure that officers meet
minimum requirements.

PPCT training teaches everything from handcuffing and handcuffing techniques to
strikes, baton usage, and even weapons retention and disarming. Though the
course is physically demanding, the only way to ensure that officers obtain the real-
life training needed in order to act appropriately in times of stress is through this
training methodology.

The department currently employs four officers who are certified instructors of PPCT.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Driver Training

Firearms and defensive tactics ensure that officers can handle any use of force
confrontation that they encounter, which is essential. However, the frequency at
which officers use their firearms or go ―hands on‖ with subjects is minute when
compared to the number of hours spent behind the wheel of their patrol vehicles
operating on city streets, down alleyways, and during pursuits.

Officers attend a three-day, 24-hour
initial qualification course that uses
the National Academy for Professional
Driving (NAPD) template for driver
training. Then, officers are required
to attend a one-day, eight-hour
re-qualification course each
subsequent year.

The department currently employs
three officers who are certified by
NAPD and are in the process of
selecting a fourth.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Equipment

Patrol officers’ offices are in their cars. All the tools that an officer needs to complete
his or her job is in the vehicle or on their person. Everyone has been given the
opportunity to see what is carried in a patrol vehicle during the driving
demonstrations. Now it’s time to see what officers carry on their ―bat belts.‖

Officers must have on their person those ―tools‖ that they may need in order to
protect themselves or others, as well as take persons into custody at any given time.
The duty belt that is worn by all police officers contains all of those items that an
officer can call upon at any given time. This convenience does have its
consequence, however, mainly in the form of weight.

We’ll get to the added weight that we carry around on a daily basis, but first let’s
examine what makes up an officer’s duty belt.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Firearm

Obviously, the most visible and often observed item on a duty belt is the officer’s
firearm. Frisco police officers are allowed to carry any firearm that they wish, so long
as it meets certain caliber and safety requirements as outlined in our general orders.

The majority of officers with this
agency carry Glock firearms, as is
the standard duty weapon of agencies
such as the Federal Bureau of
Investigation. However, numerous
other officers carry Sig Sauer, Kimber,
Heckler & Koch, and Springfield.

The flexibility provided by this agency
to allow officers to carry their firearm
of choice means that officers can tailor
their choice of firearm to their particular needs and requirements. Officers with
smaller hands tend to select smaller-framed firearms. Officers in specialized
divisions such as CID tend to select firearms that are more easy to conceal, and so
on. The only caveat is that officers must purchase their own weapon.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Holster

Every officer is required to carry their firearm in a holster that is Level I in retention or
greater. Most officers carry Level II holsters, but there are those who carry up to a
Level III while on-duty.

The Level I, II, and III designation refers to
the number of safety features present on
the holster that help to prevent it being
taken from the officer.

Additionally, many officers are now carrying
holsters that allow for tactical lights to
attached to the firearm at all times, thus
eliminating the need to use a smaller tactical
flashlight during low-light exercises. This
new addition to the law enforcement arsenal
has been well-received by officers,
especially those working on night shift.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Handcuffs

Next to the firearm, handcuffs are the most symbolic of items carried by police
officers. A number of manufacturers offer handcuffs that offer a greater variety of
options than one might think.

Officers now have the ability to carry chrome, metal, or even black handcuffs. In
addition, there are now plastic-metal combination handcuffs that can come in a
variety of colors such as red, brown, and even pink.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Flashlights

Obviously, the need to see at night means that a flashlight is always within reach of a
patrol officer. Many officers carry small flashlights on their duty belts that allow them
to always have a flashlight present. In addition, many officers carry D-cell flashlights
for traffic stops where repeated and extended use would wear down smaller
flashlights.

Thankfully, flashlight technology has
progressed significantly to the point
where officers can recharge their
flashlights every night after duty and
not purchase batteries every few weeks.

And the brightness that’s now offered
rivals that which the military might use!
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Defense Spray

Though Frisco officers do not carry tasers, we are allowed to carry defense spray.
Defense spray, or OC spray, is used to spray combatants in the face and eyes,
causing an extremely painful and irritating reaction that can
last 30-60 minutes, depending on the spray and other personal
factors.

Word of advice: If you see an officer take out his spray, move
out of the way!
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Baton

Officers no longer carry the long wooden batons seen in the old cop movies. Now,
officers are armed with expandable batons from manufacturers such as ASP. The
expandable baton is made of a lightweight metal polymer that is short enough to be
worn on a duty belt and then expanded prior to use.

The baton is not a required item to be worn by
officers at Frisco, but most officers do carry
them for use in striking combatants or for even
simpler uses such as removing snakes from
residences, breaking glass, and bending metal
out of the way of tires on wrecked automobiles.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Radio

Many offenders who don’t want to be caught by the
police run away and cause a foot pursuit. It is at this
point that one must remember one of the best sayings
and officer can recite: You may outrun me, but you
won’t outrun my Motorola.

The Frisco Police Department utilizes many different
radio channels for a variety of purposes. Everyone
has most-likely seen police radios and knows about
10-codes. I’m sure your time with the dispatchers
during the Communications Division presentation
told you all about radio usage.

From an officer’s perspective, the radio is our most
important tool that can call for help, run offender’s
personal information and get important details about
their background, and relay any bit of information
deemed important.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Duty Belt – Extra Magazines

Lastly, officers carry two additional magazines for their firearms on their person.
Some officers carry mag holders that are open-top, while others carry those that
have flaps over the magazines.

Obviously, the variety of the mag
holder varies just as much as the
position in which the magazine is
carried on the duty belt. Regardless
of what mag carrier is used or how
it is worn, the presence of two
additional magazines is a requirement
for all officers on duty.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


The Duty Bag

The last bit of equipment to be discussed is that equipment which is carried in an
officer’s duty bag.

The duty bag is usually carried in the front seat of the officer’s patrol vehicle and
contains items such as clipboards, ticket book, flashlights, extra magazines, rain
gear, snacks, etc.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Field Training Program

The Field Training Officer (FTO) Program is what all officers must first go through
and successfully complete prior to being sent out to patrol the streets on their own.
Regardless of whether an officer is fresh out of the academy or a transfer from
another agency, all officers must successfully complete the program.

The FTO Program is comprised of two major elements: Recruit Precursive Training
(RPT) and Field Training.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


FTO Program – Recruit Precursive Training

Recruit Precursive Training training consists of five weeks (200 hours) of instruction
that exposes the recruit officers to finer points of instruction not normally provided in
basic academies. Additionally, this training focuses on providing that training which
is unique to the Frisco Police Department.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


FTO Program – Recruit Precursive Training (Continued)

The 200 hours of instruction during RPT is broken up into 37 individual training
modules. These modules are taught by current field training officers, former field
training officers assigned to specialized divisions, and subject matter experts such as
crime scene investigators, city attorneys, etc.

In order to successfully complete RPT, recruits must pass a 100-question written
cumulative final examination and receive a passing score on the 2-day, 24-hour
practicals training that serves as a culmination of all the skills and knowledge they
learned during the 5-week program and their academy training.

Practicals training consists of real-life scenarios ranging from traffic stops, high-risk
vehicle stops, building searches, family violence investigations, defensive tactics,
and the like. Actors are used to more closely simulate what the recruit will encounter
in the field and to add to the realism of what’s being experienced. The more realistic
the training, the better it equates to real-life experiences.

In other words, we expose the recruits to the field before they actually experience it
themselves.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


FTO Program – Field Training

Once recruit officers complete RPT, they proceed to the actual field training portion of
their academics. Field training can also be referred to as on-the-job training that
exposes officers to applying what they learned in the classroom to real-life work on
the streets.

Field training normally consists of four phases of training: Three four-week phases
(Phases I, II, and III) and a two-week Ghost Phase. Recruits that demonstrate
deficient or substandard performance may be extended into prescriptive training,
which will serve as a fourth four-week phase (Phase IV) of training prior to their entry
into Ghost Phase. Those officers who do not demonstrate measurable improvement
at the conclusion of prescriptive training are released from the program.

Each phase of training is supervised by a Field Training Officer (FTO), who is an
experienced officer specially trained to coach and mentor the recruit officer through
the field training experience. Additionally, the recruits’ training officer for Phase I will
also serve as their FTO for Ghost Phase. This allows the FTO to see first-hand the
transformation from new recruit to formally trained and experienced recruit officer.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program




                Ghost Phase                 RPT
                  2 weeks                 5 weeks




                         FTO Program
                              19 weeks
                                                    Phase I
         Phase III
                                                    4 weeks
         4 weeks




                              Phase II
                              4 weeks
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Success Rates for Recruit Officers

In order to illustrate just how difficult the Field Training Program can be for recruits,
let’s examine the past 12 months. From April 2008 to today, 15 recruit officers have
entered the program and been released in one form or another. Of these 15 recruit
officers:

             8 recruits successfully completed the program in 19 weeks (53%);

             4 recruits received prescriptive training (26%). Of these recruits,
              2 completed the program in 23 weeks and 2 were released from duty;

             1 recruit was extended to Phase IV training for disciplinary reasons and
              ultimately completed the program in 23 weeks (7%);

             1 recruit resigned during Phase I training prior to non-voluntary release
              from duty (7%);

             1 recruit was released from duty during RPT for medical reasons and has
              since re-entered the current recruit class (7%);

For the past year, 78%* of those recruit officers who entered the Field Training
Program successfully completed it.

* This statistic does not include the officer held over for medical reasons.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Release from FTO Program

Once recruit officers have completed their full training cycle, to include 19 weeks of
total instruction and testing (and as many as 23 weeks), they are released to Patrol
as a patrol officer.

Shortly after their release from the program, the new patrol officers (no longer
referred to as recruit officers) have the pleasure of having Chief Renshaw ride with
them for a few hours as a form of ―confirmation‖ for their release from the program.
This is a tradition that dates back to his first years as police chief when the
department was much, much smaller. Back then, Chief Renshaw determined
whether the recruit officers should be released from the program or not.

However, these days with the size of our agency and the number of recruits that are
cycled through the program, Chief Renshaw does not have the time to be the final
say, but still likes getting out of the office and being able to talk to his new officers
one-on-one in a patrol car.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


The Training Officers

Obviously, a recruit’s success through the FTO Program is dependent on the quality
of training officers that he or she has. Officers wishing to be field training officers
must apply for the position and meet certain requirements, such as being an
experienced officer with no fewer than two years of full-time patrol experience,
receive recommendations from their supervisors for the assignment, and pass a
structured panel interview with current FTOs and the FTO command staff.

Currently, the department has 14 field training
officers who are assigned to both day and night
shift patrols. There is also a FTO Sergeant who
oversees the daily operation of the FTO Program
and a FTO Coordinator who is a lieutenant in rank and reports directly to the
Operations Commander.

With the size of the training cadre, a recruit’s personality and training needs are able
to be addressed by placing those training officers with the recruit for particular
phases of training who will serve the recruit the best.
Frisco Police Department
Uniformed Patrol Division & FTO Program


Conclusion

We have discussed the following items:

        Identified the function of the Uniformed Patrol Division;

        Reviewed issues relating to officer scheduling and training;

        Recognized the geographic layout of The City of Frisco and its associated
         patrol districts;

        Identified equipment used by patrol officers;

        Defined the role and function of the department’s Field Training Program;

        Listed the phases of recruit officer training;

        Defined the minimum standards required for successful completion of the
         FTO Program; and

        Reviewed the selection of training officers and their training function.

								
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