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CiA_Outline by sgr8ful2god

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									How to Involve Children in Missions: Includes Guides for Girls in Action and Children in Action Children in Action Conference Outline
Preparation: Get a copy of How to Involve Children in Missions for each participant as well as handouts, pens, displays, books, curriculum, and posters (as suggested below) for each conference segment. This conference has been designed with eight segments. As the conference leader, you will customize the conference by selecting segments that your participants need to learn most. Plan to teach A, B, C, and add D, E, F, and/or G, depending on the time available and participants’ learning needs and interests. End the conference with a closing prayer. Segments: A. Why Missions and Missions Education? (15 minutes) B. Why WMU’s Missions Education? (15 minutes) C. Children in Action: “Change a Child, Change the World“ (30 minutes) D. Teaching Children (15 minutes) E. Growing Your Missions Organization (15–25 minutes) F. Live Action Projects (15 minutes) G. Ten Commandments of Ordering (15 minutes) H. Closing Prayer (5 minutes)

Segment A
Why Missions and Missions Education? 15 Minutes Preparation: “Change A Child, Change the World” brochure (available by calling WMU and asking for product number W075007), paper, and pens for each participant. Begin discussion by asking participates to share why children doing missions is important. Then ask, Why is teaching children about missions so important? Give each participant a piece of paper, and have them number to ten. We are going to play True or False. I will say a statement, and you will write on your paper True or False. 1. Mission education demonstrates how God is at work in the world through the missions stories. 2. Missions education instills godly characteristics in boys and girls. 3. Missions education encourages children to learn and apply the Bible to their lives. 4. Missions education teaches children how to pray and intercede for others.

5. Missions education teaches children the importance tithing and giving to support mission. 6. Missions education cultivates an atmosphere of acceptance among children. 7. Missions education offers opportunities for parents to serve. 8. Missions education offers outreach to unchurched families. 9. Missions education provides outreach to the community and the church. 10. Missions education changes lives as children learn what God desires of them and are encouraged to live out the Great Commission. Have leaders discuss how to make these statements true, and how these are true (or can be true) in their missions education organizations. Encourage leaders to share these ideas with staff members, parents, and church members to help others see the value and importance of missions education for children. If available, distribute to each participant a copy of the brochure “Change A Child, Change the World” to share with leaders in their church.

Segment B
Why WMU’s Missions Education? 15 Minutes Preparation: Create posters of each of the six Areas of Missions Focus, and supply markers. Explain the following while displaying the Areas of Missions Focus posters: WMU has been developing missions education for children for over 100 years. This has been at the heart of WMU. WMU’s mission statement is to challenge Christian believers to understand and be radically involved in the mission of God. WMU’s missions education is learner-centered, which mean it engages preschoolers, children, students, and adults in the mission of God with age-appropriate subject matter, learning experiences, and ministry projects. WMU shares with others the big picture of how God is working through various types of ministries, people groups, and mission strategies. For more information on WMU, read What’s the Big Picture in How to Involve Children in Missions. WMU’s Areas of Missions Focus are: praying for missions, engaging in missions action and witnessing, learning about missions, developing spiritually toward a missions lifestyle, and participating in the work of the church and denomination. These are interwoven throughout the curriculum. See pages 6–7 of How to Involve Children in Missions for a description of each missions focus area. Divide the participants into six groups. Assign one missions focus area to each group. Allow five minutes for groups to review their area of missions focus on page 6 or 7. Say, “Take five minutes to brainstorm ideas on how to incorporate these into your Children in ActionSM group, and use markers to write ideas on the poster.” Give each group one minute to share their ideas.

If time permits, share these examples of how these areas are taught in the curriculum: • Praying for missions—praying weekly for missionaries and MKs. • Engaging in missions action and witnessing—participating in monthly Live Action Projects. • Learning about missions—weekly learning experiences. • Developing spiritually toward a missions lifestyle—learning the biblical basis of the missions and specific Scripture verses that teach them they have a part in God’s plan. Also, WorldVenturesSM individualized achievement teaches a scripture verse in each lesson. • Participating in the work of the church and denomination—through learning about Baptist missionaries and ministries. • Supporting Missions—supporting the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering, Lottie Moon Christmas Offering® , state missions offerings, and other special ministries throughout the year.

Segment C
Children in Action: “Change a Child, Change the World” 30 minutes Preparation: Duplicate listening guide for each participant. Provide pens and a copy of How to Involve Children in Missions: Includes Guides for Girls in Action and Children in Action. Distribute the listening guide for Children in Action: “Change A Child, Change the World” and How to Involve Children in Missions: Includes Guides for Girls in Action and Children in Action as participant arrive. Have them respond aloud to the question, How does Children in Action change lives? Children in Action is a life-changing experience. An integral part of the Children in Action is the book How to Involve Children in Missions: Includes Guides for Girls in Action and Children in Action. This is the leader’s resource book for leading Children in Action. Please, take the time to learn and apply the concepts in the book to your Children in Action organization. Use the reproducible pages you’ll find toward the back to keep organized. And memorize the Children in Action Pledge, Scripture, Motto, and song to make the mission of Children in Action a vital part of your own life. Remember that as a leader, you and the girls and boys are part of a global network of Christians that have a heart for missions and reaching the world for Christ. What do children learn? Each week girls and boys grow in their understanding of God’s mission. Session units are designed to build on the prior week’s learning experiences. The first week children learn about the biblical basis of missions; the second week, they learn about the missions needs; the third week, they learn about how the missions needs are being met through missionaries, national Christians, or missions partnerships; and the fourth week, leaders have the option is doing Special AssignmentsSM or participating is a Live Action Project (Children in Action ministry project) or a simulation activity.

For the past two years, WMU has researched how to enhance Children in Action. This project culminated in April 2006, when 40 churches tested a redesigned unit for one month. We tested a Children in Action student guide and added more pages the leaders’ guide. The churches’ responses were clear. In the end, churches said they liked the simplicity of the current Children in Action. Based on feedback, WMU created a new design for Children in Action that is similar to the current curriculum but with a few enhancements: a new look and with online tools to make it relevant, redesigned, and ready to use. Note: If this conference is done before August 2007, before the first edition is available, display a copy (in color, if possible) of the Children in Action Leader cover. Children in Action Leader is the all-in-one planning resource for Children in Action. This 32- page, spiral-bound resource includes everything a leader needs to plan two months of Children in Action missions experiences. The guide has a new look and layout. It is ready to use, with all a leader needs to do coed missions in one convenient guide. Children in Action Leader includes the weekly lesson plans, reproducible activity pages,“Family Missions Focus” take-home page, leadership articles, MK trading cards, game-and-activity posters, and shared ideas from other Children in Action leaders. The weekly sessions are format as follows: • Orientation (15 minutes) o Snack and an active introduction • Investigation (15 minutes) o Children explore the Scripture passage, culture, or missionary focus of the session. • Reconnaissance (20 minutes) o Additional information about the missions area and activities to reinforce learning • Debriefing (10 minutes) o MK prayertime and any other closing activities Extras in Each Month’s Kit Live Action Project • Steps to prepare for, participate in, and debrief Family Take-Home Page • A reproducible half-page to send home to parents at the beginning of the month that tells the parents what children will be studying and gives family ministry ideas Children in Action Web site (www.wmucia.com) • Your online source for current information, ideas, and Web training Special Assignments is an individual achievement plan. It includes activities related to the Areas of Missions Focus. Children grow in their understanding of missions through

participating in Special Assignment. Yearly achievement awards are available for completion of Special Assignments. Children in Action offers a variety of extra resources to enhance the experience. To find out the latest Children in Action resources, visit www.wmustore.com or request a WMU Catalog at 1-800-968-7301. • Children’s Ministry Day is a nationwide event for children on February 16, 2008, to participate in ministry. For more information, get the Children’s Ministry Day Promotional Pack 2008, available in November. • WMU offers badges to award to children for participation. Find ideas for how to use the badges at www.wmucia.com. • The Exploring God’s World Reading Club is a free resource available online at www.wumcia.com. • Families on Mission emphasis includes the Family Missions Focus monthly takehome page; yearly missions project ideas for families; resources for parents, such as Missions Moments: Foundational Messages and Activities for Children and Families on Mission: Ideas for Teaching Your Preschooler How to Love, Share, and Care; and promotion of WMU’s FamilyFest. • Children in Action identity items • Children in Action events (Tell about any associational or state events. These may include a Children in Action day, Children in Action and RA or GA camp, joint ministry projects, etc.) Children in Action could not thrive without exceptional leaders that love missions and enjoy working with children. The Children in Action leadership team is made up of a Children in Action coordinator, Children in Action leader(s), and assistant Children in Action leader(s). The Children in Action coordinator help organize leadership, resources, and special events, among other duties outlined in How to Involve Children in Missions. The Children in Action leader is responsible for preparing and leading missions learning experiences, enlist children, and providing for the safety and security of the children. The assistant Children in Action leaders help Children in Action leaders perform their duties. Review pages 33 and 36 for more ideas on how to prepare for the year.

Segment D
Teaching Children 15 Minutes Supply List: chalkboard and chalk, whiteboard and dry-erase markers, or poster board and markers to record ideas. Every child is different! Each child comes from a different environment and life experience. Plus, each child has been uniquely created with his or her own personality and gifts. However, some general principles can help us teach children better. In How to Involve Children in Missions, there are helpful ideas. Take five minutes to read pages 8– 11.

Allow participants to read pages, and then say, Tell us about a child that you were reminded of when you were reviewing this material? Allow five minutes to share. For the remaining five minutes, brainstorm missions learning experiences for each of the different learning styles—visual, auditory, kinesthetic. Use a chalkboard or a poster board to record the ideas as they are given.

Segment E
Growing Your Missions Organization 15–25 minutes Preparation: Make a copy of each of the case studies to assign to a group. The first key to a strong growing missions education organization is support. Children’s programs need support from the church staff, parents, and church members. The most successful organizations are those that keep the church informed. The church members know what the children are doing and are supporting the organization through prayer, encouragement, and/or participation. It is important to communicate regularly with the church family to gain their support. What are some ways that you might be able to communicate with church staff, parents, and church members? Tell the story in such a way that people understand that what the children are doing is changing lives. Divide participants into three groups. Assign one of the following case studies to each group. (Tools of communication may include bulletins, newsletters, announcements in worship services or Sunday School, emails, bulletin boards, letter to parents, skits, recognition events, etc.) Case Study 1 The children are planning a special project. How do you communicate it to the church to get them involved? How will you convey the message that lives will be changed, and what tools of communication will you use? Case Study 2 The children have just completed a Live Action Project. How will you communicate how this project changed someone’s life to the church? How will you convey the message that lives were changed, and what tools of communication will you use? Case Study 3 The children will be studying China the next month. How will you communicate the importance of what the children are studying to the church? How will you convey the message that lives will be changed, and what tools of communication will you use? Give groups five minutes to brainstorm, and give each group three minutes to share their idea.

Continue to think of fun and creative ways to communicate to the church how missions education is changing lives. The second key to growing your missions education organization is reaching out to children and families in your community. Children love missions education because it is experiential. They get to learn about different people and countries and hear how God is working around the world through the mission stories. Parents like missions education because it teaches their children how to respect other people while teaching them godly characteristics and Scripture. Let’s brainstorm way how missions education can be a bridge between the church and families in the community. Take about five minutes to share ideas. When you consider your organization a bridge between children and the church, the eternal potential of your group expands. Just think, teaching missions education is the missions field where God has placed you to serve.

Segment F
Live Action Projects 15 minutes Preparation: Make a poster for each type of Live Action Projects listed below. Leave room for leader to list their ideas on the poster. Place the each poster around the room before the conference begins. Live Action Projects are a very important part of missions education. It is through these projects that children actively apply what they are learning in missions education. Say, Around the room, I have display various types of Live Action Project. You have five minutes to write your Live Action Project ideas on each poster. Use the remaining time to discuss these ideas: Poverty Witnessing Acts of Kindness Visiting other Disaster Relief Other Projects

Segment G
Ten Commandments for Ordering Children in Action Resources 15 minutes Preparation: Make copies of the handout for each participant. Review and discuss the handout Ten Commandments for Ordering Children in Action.

Ten Commandments of Ordering Children in Action

1. Thou shall call WMU Customer Service at 1-800-968-7301 to place your initial Children in Action curriculum order. Find additional information on starting Children in Action at www.wmu.com/start 2. Thou shall order the basic Children in Action curriculum, which includes one How to Involve Children in Missions: Includes Guides for Girls in Action and Children in Action and one subscription to Children in Action Leader for each leader. Subscription items are only sold through WMU. 3. Thou shall renew current curriculum subscriptions at least six weeks before the expiration date to assure a seamless transition. If you have questions about your subscriptions, refer to a customer service representative. 4. Thou shall keep notes of orders and specific dates orders were placed. If you talk to a customer service representative, record the person’s name for future reference. 5. Thou shall have product name and order number ready when ordering. 6. Thou shall not wait until the last minute to order badges and/or pins for special services or emphasis. Plan ahead when ordering and allow one-2 weeks delivery for all products—badges, identity items, etc. Order four to six weeks in advance in May or August, when the demand for badges is high. This will help WMU keep items well stocked. 7. Thou shall find information on how to use badges or the Exploring God’s World Reading Club at www.wmucia.com. Many of the books must be ordered through their publisher. 8. Thou shall call customer service if you have problems with your order. Call your state WMU office for information about Children in Action leadership training in your state. 9. Thou shall view Children in Action resources at www.wmustore.com and purchase through WMU by visiting to www.wmustore.com or calling 1-800-9687301. 10. Thou shall enjoy using Children in Action resources to minister to children and change the world!

Closing Prayer 5 minutes Read Ephesians 1:15–20. Give a word of encouragement to the participants, and pray for the participates and the children that they will be ministering to.

Ten Commandments of Ordering Children in Action
11. Thou shall call WMU Customer Service at 1-800-968-7301 to place your ________ Children in Action curriculum order. Find additional information on starting Children in Action at www.wmu.com/start 12. Thou shall order the ______ Children in Action curriculum, which includes one How to Involve Children in Missions: Includes Guides for Girls in Action and Children in Action and one subscription to Children in Action Leader for each leader. Subscription items are only sold through WMU. 13. Thou shall ________ current curriculum subscriptions at least six weeks before the expiration date to assure a seamless transition. If you have questions about your subscriptions, refer to a customer service representative. 14. Thou shall keep ________ of orders and specific dates orders were placed. If you talk to a customer service representative, record the person’s name for future reference. 15. Thou shall have ____________ name and order number ready when ordering. 16. Thou shall not wait until the last minute to order badges and/or pins for special services or emphasis. _________ ahead when ordering and allow one to two weeks delivery for all products—badges, identity items, etc. Order four to six weeks in advance May or August when the demand for badges is greatest. This will help WMU keep items well stocked. 17. Thou shall find ________________ on how to use badges or the Exploring God’s World Reading Club at www.wmucia.com. Many of the books must be ordered through their publisher. 18. Thou shall _________ customer service if you have problems with your order. Call your state WMU office for information about Children in Action leadership training in your state. 19. Thou shall view Children in Action resources at www.wmustore.com. And _____________ through WMU by visiting to www.wmustore.com or calling 1-800-968-7301. 20. Thou shall enjoy using Children in Action resources to ________________ to children and change the world!

Children in Action Change A Child, Change the World
How does Children in ActionSM change lives? What is the Children in Action leader’s resource book? What do children learn? Each week children grow in their understanding of God’s mission. Week 1—___________ basis of mission Week 2—_________________ needs Week3—How missions needs are being _________ Week 4 and/or 5— ___________________ or ________ _________ Projects or __________________ Children in Action Basics Children in Action Leader Special Assignments Children in Action Leader Session Format • Orientation (15 minutes) • Investigation (15 minutes) • Reconnaissance (20 minutes) • Debriefing (10 minutes) Extras for Each Month’s Unit Live Action Project Family Take-Home Page. Special AssignmentsSM Children in Action _____________ achievement plan.

Children in Action Extras • Children’s Ministry Day, February 16, 2008 • www.wmucia.com • Badges • Exploring God’s World Reading Club • Families On Missions • Children in Action Identity Items • Children in Action Events Note: Current information and products available at www.wmustore.com. Request a WMU catalog at 1800-968-7301.

Children in Action coordinator

Children in Action leader

Children in Action assistant leaders

Make a list of all the things you hope to do this year in Children in Action.


								
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