Sample session plan - PDF by rae18192

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									Sample session plan
RepoRting back
Writing and making reports
time: 2 ½ hours
no. of learners: 8 –10

aim:
To give learners confidence to approach involvement in health, social care or educa-
tion in an assertive manner. To help them turn their feelings about their experiences
in health and social care into input that isn’t blurred by emotion.

objectives – Learners will:-
•    Have the confidence to present a report verbally
•    Be able to make sure that reports reflect the needs of the particular audience.
•    Know how to find their way around a report when sourcing information from it.


timing                tutor activity         Learner activity   Resources
15 minutes            Housekeeping           Listening and      Flipchart paper
                      Introductions          participating in   Pens
                      Agree ground-rules     deciding on        Wall adhesive
                      State objectives for   ground-rules
                      the session

25 minutes            Introduce ice          Participate in     Name badges
                      breaker                exercise           Flipchart, pens and
                      Introductions                             paper




                                                                                       1
20 minutes   Confidence builder Participate in         Flipchart, paper
                                exercise               and pens




15 minutes   Break
25 minutes   How do people       Participate in        Flipchart paper
             communicate?        exercise              Pens




40 minutes   Word search         Participate in        Flipchart paper
                                 exercise              Pens. Handouts




10 minutes   Summary of          Each learner says     Evaluation forms
             learning and        one thing that they
             evaluation          have learnt from
                                 the session and
                                 how they can be
                                 more assertive in
                                 future.
                                 Complete evalua-
                                 tion forms




                                                                          2
introductions and ground-rules
time                  Level                 Materials required How trainer can
                                                               check on learning
15 minutes            All levels            Flipchart paper    Observation and
                                            Pens               questioning of
                                            Wall adhesive      learners


instructions for the trainer
1. Inform the learners of housekeeping arrangements for the venue and the session
– include fire exits and procedure, drinks facilities and toilet facilities.

2. Introduce yourself and ask the learners to introduce themselves to the group saying
their name and why they are at the session.

3. Ask them what ground-rules they want to agree for the session, explain that these
ground-rules will be the way that you will all work together during the training session.

4. Include in the ground-rules:

•     Confidentiality
•     Respect for one another
•     Only one person speaking at one time
•     Everyone is allowed equal time to speak

5. Write the ground-rules on flipchart paper and display on a wall for the rest of the
session.




                                                                                         3
icebreaker: introductions
time                  Level                  Materials required How trainer can
                                                                check on learning
25 minutes            All levels             Flip chart         Observation and
                                             Paper and pens     questioning of
                                             Coloured cards     learners


objective – Learners will :-
•     Have the confidence to present a report verbally

instructions for the trainer

1. Ask each person to choose a piece of A5 coloured card from the pack.

2. Tell the learners that they can use any pen that they like from the table.

3. Ask the learners to write their first name on the card and then to draw how they
are feeling today.

4. When all the learners have finished, ask them one by one to stand at the front of
the room to introduce themselves to the rest of the group and talk through what they
have drawn on their card. It would be useful if you take part and be the first one to
introduce yourself and talk about your own drawing of feelings.

5. While the learners are doing this, note any body gestures that you observe, e.g.
going red, not looking at the group, mumbling to the card etc.

6. Then ask the group ‘How did you feel when you stood in front of the class to talk?’

7. Write what people said about the feelings on the flipchart for people to see.

8. Feedback might include:




                                                                                      4
•    Nervous
•    Embarrassed
•    Confident
•    Apprehensive
•    Unsure
•    Anxious
•    Worried

9. Discuss these feelings with the group and ask if they think this is similar to the
way that they might feel when they go to a meeting or speak out to challenge either
a person or a report.

10. You can use the responses in this session to decide whether to offer activities to
build confidence that are at the beginning of ‘More Power to You’.

Suggestions for changing the exercise
•    Allow support workers to act as writer or to do the drawing if required and give
     support when giving feedback to the group.




                                                                                         5
Building your confidence
time                  Level                Materials required How trainer can
                                                              check on learning
25 minutes            All levels           Flip chart         Observation and
                                           Paper and pens     questioning of
                                           Coloured cards     learners


objective – Learners will :-
•    Have the confidence to present a report verbally

instructions for the trainer

1. Ask the group to look at how they felt in the introductory exercise when they were
asked to stand in front of the group.

2. Divide the group into pairs and ask them to discuss: What could people do to
build their own confidence when presenting or challenging a report?

3. Suggest that someone in each pair could write their answers on flipchart paper or
offer your help as scribe.

4. Ask each pair to feed back to the main group. Feedback might include:

•    Practicing the report delivery prior to the meeting
•    Practicing the points of the challenge
•    Making notes on cards to help deliver the report
•    Making notes on cards to prompt on the points of the challenge
•    Discussing with friends and colleagues

Suggestion for changing the exercise
•    Allow support workers to act as scribes if required and give support when
     giving feedback to the group.



                                                                                        6
How do people communicate?
time                  Level                  Materials required How trainer can
                                                                check on learning
20 minutes            All levels             Flip chart         Observation and
                                             Paper and pens     questioning of
                                                                learners

objective – Learners will :-
•     be able to make sure that reports reflect the needs of the particular audience.

instructions for the trainer

1. Ask the group ‘how do people communicate?’

2. Thought shower answers from the learners onto flipchart – they should include
things like, facial gestures, writing, emails, etc.

3. Explain to the group that we communicate in many ways but mostly it is through
the written word. Ask the group how we make sure that a report is accessible to the
group or person it is intended for.

4. Ask the group what factors they would like to have in a report that would make it
interesting.

5. List comments on the flipchart – this should be visible for the rest of the session.
Feedback is likely to include:

•     Easy to read
•     Easy to understand
•     Inclusion of pictures
•     Use of colour
•     Short and to the point
•     Bullet points




                                                                                          7
Suggestion for changing the exercise
•   Allow support workers to act as scribes if required and give support when
    giving feedback to the group




                                                                                8
Word search
time                  Level                 Materials required How trainer can
                                                               check on learning
40 minutes            All levels            Handouts of word Observation and
                                            search exercise,   questioning of
                                            handouts of points learners
                                            raised,
                                            flipchart pens


objective – Learners will :-
•     Know how to find their way around a report when sourcing information from it.

instructions for the trainer
You will need to know whether your learners are sufficiently literate to do a word
search. Give learners the chance to opt out without embarrassment.

part 1

1. Give out a sheet to each individual learner or one between two people.

2. Ask learners to read the handout and then to find each of the 14 words

3. When all have finished, go through each word in turn asking the group why each
is important. For example: Why is size of print so important? What font is good to
use? What is important about headings in reports?

4. Write answers on the flipchart.

5. Use the handout to bring out or add to any of the points not raised in the group.

6. Give handout to each learner to take away.




                                                                                       9
Handout: Word search
Look at the grid and find the 14 words that are all related to writing reports. The
words may read from top to bottom, bottom to top, left to right, right to left or
diagonally!

print             language           layout           accuracy           sentences
non-factual       subject            clear            length             words
headings          bullets            space            detail



   L        a        n        g        U       a        g        e        a           S

   a        c        o        J       W        o        R        D        S           e

   Y        c        n        L        i       a        t        e        D           n

   o        U        F        S        U       b        J        e        c           t

   U        R        a        H        t       g        n        e        L           e

   t        a        c       W         t       o        e        D        e           n

   X        c        t        n        i       R        p        g        a           c

   k        Y        U        e        c       a        p        S        R           e

   H        e        a        D        i       n        g        S        Z           S

   b        U        L        L        e        t       S        c        o           L




                                                                                          a
Handout
print: The size, the type: if it is too small some people with sight impairment, people
with mental health needs or older people may find it difficult to read without support.
You need to think about who you are writing reports for.

print type: Try to use a font that is easy to read. Ariel and Century Gothic are clear.

print size: Font size 14 should be the minimum size. This is typed in size 14. Writ-
ing and typing in large print can be helpful for people whose first language is not
English, children and people with sight impairment.

Language: Some people will be put off reading your report by long complicated
words, abbreviations or jargon. Think about who the report is intended for. Will the
reader understand the jargon you use – e.g. a PCT, PD, or ILP? It is safer to write
the words out in full and from then on use the abbreviations. For instance Primary
Care Trust, Personal development, Individual Learning Plan.

Layout: Reports need to have structure. The layout needs to be interesting – use
colours and pictures if you think this will help the reader to understand the content
better. A picture might explain something better than using words. A well-presented
report will leave the reader with a good first impression and wanting to read more
with interest.

Your sections need to be ‘tight’. Each point should logically fit into only one section.
But this is not always possible as you may need to remind your readers of some-
thing you said earlier. Bear in mind that over-repetition may be a sign of bad design.

Don’t have too much information in each section – or too many headings in a string.
Your readers will only be able to cope with a maximum of about six points if you
want them to remember the points that you are making.

Sentences: Keep them short with the correct spelling and grammar. Think comma
– think full stop! Too many people use rambling sentences rather than structuring
each sentence to have a purpose. Ask what is the sentence telling you? What is
that one piece of information in that specific sentence?




                                                                                       b
accuracy: If there are inaccuracies in a report a reader will either not read it or start
to look for more inaccuracies in order to challenge it at the first opportunity. Think
about who will be reading the report. Inaccurate information can be damaging and
legally it may leave you liable to prosecution.

Under the Data Protection Act people have the right to examine information that
has been collected about them. The Human Rights and the Freedom of Information
Acts all now allow us to question records. If you are not sure about the facts make it
clear that you are just stating your own opinion.

Subject: It may be difficult for readers to concentrate on complicated information.
Use other ways to make the report interesting e.g. pictures, photographs etc. Make
sure that you have plenty of spaces around the sentences. It will make it more invit-
ing to read.

clear: Are you making the reading easy? Are you using short sentences? Can eve-
ryone understand what you mean?

Length: Keep your report as short as possible. Generally, people will only skim
read a long report, so put your summary at the start. It might be the only piece of
the report that some people will read.

Words: Try to use plain English. Keep the words short and simple. Explain within
the body of the report if and why you have not been able to do this.

Headings: By using headings and side headings a reader will be able to identify the
main points quickly. They also break up the text on the paper. Your headings must
be helpful and clear. One-word headings can be vague and misleading so don’t be
afraid of using sentences as headings. They will help you to be certain what to put
in each section and will help the reader find the details that they need.

bullets and numbers: These can be used to break up text on a paper and give the
impression of space. They also make it more easy to recognise that some things
appear as a list e.g. Today I am going to the supermarket. I have to go to the doc-
tors today before my prescription runs out; which I suppose means I’m going to
have to fill up the car. I’ve got to fit in seeing my mother sometime too.




                                                                                        c
This could have been laid out as:

Today I am going to:
•    My mothers for a visit
•    The supermarket for some fruit
•    The garage for some petrol
•    The doctors to collect some medication

This would be much easier to read.

Some people find reading reports hard to do. Help them by using the space on the
paper.


plan: Before you write, think about what you want to achieve. What do you want to
say? If you plan well it will save you time.

Think about these steps:

1.    What are you aiming to do?
2.    Collect up your ideas for the report – including photos, extracts from other
      papers
3.    Think about the headings and side heading in the layout
4.    Structure your ideas on the paper
5.    Add the detail to the structure


You will now find the report much easier to write.




                                                                                     D

								
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