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					            KANSAS
S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
   Implementation PLAN
         2007-2010



             STATE OF KANSAS
          OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR
             300 SW 10th Avenue
               Suite 212 South
              Topeka, KS 66612

                                   Updated March 2009
Table of Contents

Introduction                                       1

Description of Planning Process                    1

Needs and Context                                  5

Plan Priorities and Approaches                     10

Overall Goal                                       10

     Identified Priorities                         18

     Relation to Prior Implementation Plans        20

     Priority Areas                                20

     Grant-making Strategy                         24

     Timeline for S.T.O.P. VAWA Grant Cycle        25

     Addressing the Needs of Underserved Victims   26

     Monitoring and Evaluation                     28

Conclusion                                         29
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I.    Introduction
MISSION
The Governor’s Office mission with S.T.O.P. Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
funding is to reduce and ultimately eliminate violence against women in the State of
Kansas. As crimes against women continue, the justice system must hold offenders
accountable and provide victims with the necessary services and safety.
In addition, the State of Kansas values Kansas living in communities that are healthy,
where they can grow, learn, feel safe and thrive economically. Kansas strives to
remove obstacles in communities, neighborhoods, schools, businesses and faith-
based organizations and aims to enhance the criminal justice system, improve public
safety, support crime victim services and drug and violence prevention programs
throughout the state.
The Governor’s Office is dedicated to ensuring a S.A.F.E. Kansas where:
      Services are available and accessible in every community;
      Accountability of all systems, agencies, programs and individuals is provided;
      Funding is provided for adequate resources; and
      Empowerment of individuals is encouraged.


II.   Description of Planning Process
The process used to develop the plan was multi-faceted. First, the survey that was
conducted with law enforcement, prosecutors, victim advocates, courts and other
victim service organizations, was developed with the assistance of the Kansas
Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence and their member programs. In
addition, we obtained feedback from the criminal justice professionals regarding the
survey questions. Also, the Governor’s Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board
(FRB) assisted in analyzing the results of the survey and provided feedback which
assisted in the development of the implementation plan. Our office works very closely
with the state domestic violence and sexual assault coalition to ensure a meaningful
plan is developed.
It is difficult to provide a specific percentage for the number of agencies survey that
represented underserved or diverse populations. Many organizations serve diverse
populations to some extent. The most accurate estimate would be at least 25 percent
of those surveyed represented underserved populations.
The Governor’s Office relied upon a number of sources when developing the 2007-
2010 Kansas State Implementation Plan For Violence Against Women. A statewide
survey, completed in the summer of 2005, was the primary source of information for
the 2007-2010 Kansas plan as well as other statistical reports. Law enforcement
agencies, prosecutors, victim advocates and courts were all included to make this
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                        P AGE 2
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effort as comprehensive as possible. The intention was to survey those in the field to
gather accurate information on the “real-life” perspective.
The statewide survey was an inclusive effort with 690 recipients participating. The
Governor’s Office ensured that non-profit, non-governmental victim services, Indian
tribes, and diverse populations were surveyed, and thereby, directly involved in the
planning process. The survey’s first question asked recipients if they worked in rural,
urban, or suburban areas. Of the respondents, 80 percent described their service area
as “rural,” 10 percent described their service area as “urban” and nine percent
described their service area as “suburban.” This helped ensure the survey results
would be representative of rural areas. Additionally, seven surveys were mailed to the
four Indian tribes in Kansas. Surveys also were distributed to victim service programs
serving those communities. Moreover, all victim service providers in the state received
the survey. It was important for the survey to include as many professionals in the field
as possible to ensure that the results would accurately depict the response to
underserved populations.
The secondary source of information was a more academic look at domestic violence.
On October 11, 2004, the Governor established the Governor’s Domestic Violence
Fatality Review Board (FRB). A 60 percent increase in the number of domestic
violence homicides occurred between 2003 and 2004, and solidified the need for this
Board. The theory underlining the fatality review process is to gain a better
understanding of why and how a homicide occurred to learn important lessons to help
prevent future deaths. The core belief underlying the FRB’s work is that every death is
preventable and the FRB is working to make this belief a reality. The FRB is charged
with reviewing all adult domestic violence-related fatalities in Kansas, describing trends
and patterns regarding the facts and circumstances of these fatalities, recommending
improvements to prevent future fatalities and determining if adequate resources and
trainings are in place for those who respond to domestic violence crimes. According to
Kansas law enforcement reports, 15 adult deaths occurred due to domestic violence in
2003, 25 in 2004, 21 in 2005 and 2006, and 17 in 2007.
The FRB also took a multi-disciplinary approach. It is chaired by a former Kansas
Attorney General and includes a judge, an assistant professor, a parole officer, an
attorney in private practice, the attorney general, a district coroner-medical examiner, a
parole officer, a law enforcement officer, a clinic director, a court services officer, and
representatives from the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center, Kansas Coalition
Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, and domestic violence program. In addition to
representing multiple disciplines, the FRB also contains people from 10 different
counties located across the state. Including professionals from both urban and rural
areas offers the review process a more thorough approach and a better understanding
to fatalities occurring throughout the state.
From its review of domestic violence-related fatalities, several general themes have
emerged allowing the FRB to make the following recommendations:
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1. Increase public awareness initiatives.
2. Develop a systemic manner to track and report criminal data on the relationship of
   the victim and offender from time of incident to disposition of the criminal case—not
   just if a domestic violence battery.
3. Train all professionals involved with domestic violence cases—advocates, law
   enforcement, judges, probation and parole officers, community corrections officers,
   prosecutors, as well as non-criminal justice professionals such as healthcare
   providers, educators and school personnel and social workers, etc.
4. Encourage safety and accountability assessments in local communities.
5. Develop an assessment tool to ascertain the level of protection needed for victims
   seeking protection from abuse and protection from stalking orders.
6. Ensure third time convicted offenders of domestic violence battery spend time in a
   state correctional facility.
7. Encourage courts to give strong consideration to domestic violence incidents when
   considering custody issues.
8. Urge all child protective services to assess for domestic violence and be non-
   punitive towards the non-abusing parent.
9. Adopt and require standards for working with batterers.
10. Ensure adequate funds are available for community-based domestic violence
    programs regarding capacity building.
11. Improve the death investigation system in Kansas.
12. Develop screening tools to be used by health care professionals.
13. Establish screening and assessment tools to be used by mental health and
    substance abuse providers.
14. Develop training and screening tools for those working with the elderly population.
15. Create culturally sensitive training and resources.
16. Continue to increase awareness and promote successes of domestic violence
    services. Every effort must be made to increase the public’s knowledge about
    domestic violence. The Docking Report noted that in the random phone survey of
    2,567, women, that there was not enough information and awareness provided
    about domestic violence. It is suggested that a best practice guide for the media be
    developed. The public learns about domestic violence through the media and the
    manner in which domestic violence tragedies are told. The media can be a source
    to help inform the public by developing stories and information that does not
    promote the myths and stereotypes of the crime domestic violence.
17. Recommend legislation that would create a domestic violence tag for all crimes.
    This proposal includes a new definition for domestic violence. The bill would
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    require courts to order a domestic offender to obtain an assessment and allow the
    court to order any other evaluation deemed necessary. The new proposal would
    repeal the current domestic battery statute.
18. Increase dissemination of information/brochures to victims of domestic violence
    when law enforcement officers respond to these crimes.
19. The Kansas Department of Corrections should screen inmates for domestic
    violence at the RDU (Reception and Diagnostic Unit) and upon release from a
    correctional facility. Planning for safety with victims and family members should be
    provided prior to the release of an inmate identified with a history of domestic
    violence. Adequate resources should be available and expanded to assist with this
    process.
20. The majority of domestic violence homicides result in the use of a firearm and the
    state should do everything possible to keep guns out of the hands of abusive and
    violent batterers. Perpetrators of domestic violence should be given notice of the
    federal firearms prohibition at the time of conviction or at the issuance of a
    protection from abuse or stalking order.
21. Perpetrators of domestic violence who seek mental health services should be
    served with the utmost consideration for the safety of the victim; screen the
    perpetrator for level of dangerousness; and make appropriate referrals.
While the majority of the planning process has been completed, efforts will continue.
With ambitious goals, work will continue as the FRB moves toward accomplishing
those objectives. In addition, the FRB will continue to meet throughout the year as it
investigates adult domestic violence fatalities and produces its recommendations and
findings in its annual reports.
The Docking Institute of Public Affairs at Fort Hays State University collaborated with
the Governor’s Office to design a study to assess multiple aspects of domestic
violence and domestic violence services. The report is based on a random telephone
survey and a survey of victims seeking help from Kansas domestic violence programs.
The findings indicate women who seek intervention services are successful in
improving their situation and if more women sought services, domestic violence could
be reduced dramatically .
The women surveyed ranked domestic violence as the third major health issue for
women in Kansas, following cancer and heart disease. According to the survey, an
estimated 106,419 women were victims of domestic violence in Kansas this past year
although they may not have reported it to law enforcement. Of those seeking
intervention services, nearly 91 percent reported that their situation improved since
receiving services.
Three areas in which women felt domestic violence services helped the most were:
•   Helping them to be ready to make changes to improve their situation;
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•      Feeling safer because of help received; and
•      Using skills learned to improve their situation.
The report also offered several policy considerations including promoting the success
of victims’ services as a way to encourage others to seek help, increasing awareness
of services such as the state’s toll-free hotline: 1-888-END-ABUSE, and ensuring
health care benefits for victims.
The surveys’ results and the FRB’s work will continue to influence the way Kansas
addresses violence against women by shedding light on the effectiveness of current
policies. This work will certainly be evident in the future plans.
The surveys’ results, the FRB’s recommendations and the Docking Report provided a
solid base from which the Governor’s Office was able to develop this state plan. It has
been the most comprehensive planning process to date, and will benefit the
development of future plans. Kansas looks forward to accomplishing its goal and
watching dating and domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking fade from its
communities.


III.      Needs and Context
Population Demographics
Kansas faces funding challenges because of its population demographics. The
population’s age is similar to the national average with slightly more people over the
age of 65. Therefore, the needs of the elderly must be recognized within the
underserved population. Additionally, the 2006 U.S. Census showed the Asian and
Hispanic populations are growing within the state.
“Minorities now make up at least half the population in four of the state’s 18 largest
cities, new Census numbers show. The figures show that non-Hispanic whites are
now a minority in Liberal, Dodge City and Kansas City, Kansas. And in Garden City, at
least 50 percent of residents are minorities. Sixteen of the 18 Kansas cities in the
survey have become racially diverse since 2000, with the suburban communities of
Derby, Olathe and Overland Park showing some of the fastest gains in minority
population.” (Data provided by the American Community Survey, released by the U.S.
Census Bureau as reported in the Lawrence Journal World newspaper December 23,
2008). The 2007 U.S. Census provides some basic statistical information about the
racial diversity within the State of Kansas. With a total population of 2,757,827 in
2007, Kansas is predominantly Caucasian at 85.4 percent (2,354,424). This is
followed by Hispanic and Latino at 8.5 percent (234,814), Black/African American at
5.7 percent (158,551), Asian at 2.1 percent (59,162), American Indian and Alaska
Native at 0.8 percent (23,235), Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander at less than
one-tenth percent (1,020), those reporting other races at 3.4 percent (93,478) and
those reporting two or more races at 2.5 percent (67,957). Source U.S. Census
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Bureau, 2005-2007 American Community Survey. Although these numbers clearly
illustrate Kansas is predominately Caucasian, the Hispanic population is on the rise,
particularly in the southwest portion of the state.
Kansas ranks 15th in geographic size, it has an average of only 32.9 persons per
square mile. This leaves concerns about funding services for the geographically
isolated. However, the total number of people living in an urban setting is 1,290,669,
or 71.4 percent, while the total number of people living in a rural setting is 767,749, or
28.6 percent. Kansas must address geographically isolated victims, but an appropriate
balance has to be found to serve its largely urban population.
In addition, Kansas has a significant portion (14.6 percent) of the population living with
a disability (365,905). This means Kansas will need to be prepared to serve victims
with disabilities. An estimated 109,046 adults living in Kansas have a mental illness.
This figure, provided by the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services,
shows the system needs to be capable of serving mentally ill victims as well. The U.S.
Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts provided the information discussed
above and highlighted in the chart on the following page.
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 PEOPLE                                      KANSAS
 Population, 2007 estimate                   2,775,997
 Population, percent change, April 1, 2000   3.2%
 to July 1, 2007

 Percent of persons 18 years old and over,   67.8%
 2007
 Percent of persons 65 years old and over,   13%
 2007

 Percent of female persons, 2007             50.4%
 Percent of Caucasians, 2007                 88.9%
 Percent of African Americans, 2007          6.1%
 Percent of American Indians and Alaska      1%
 Natives, 2007

 Percent of Asians, 2007                     2.2%
 Percent of Native Hawaiians and Other       0.1%
 Pacific Islanders, 2007
 Percent of persons reporting two or more    1.8%
 races, 2007
 Percent of Hispanic or Latino origins,      8.8%
 2007

 Percent of foreign-born persons, 2000       5%
 Percent of persons speaking a language      8.7%
 other than English at home, pct age 5+,
 2000
 Percent of persons with a disability, age   14.6%
 5+, 2007

 GEOGRAPHY
 Land area, 2000 (square miles)              81,815
 Persons per square mile, 2000               32.9
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Kansas Statistics on Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking
The Kansas Bureau of Investigation releases an annual report on the statistical data
relating to domestic violence and rape in Kansas as submitted by law enforcement
agencies.
The number of domestic violence incidents reported to law enforcement agencies in
Kansas increased in 2007 to 22,429 reports, as compared to 20,817 in 1992. And, the
number of arrests increased from 38 percent being arrested in 1992 to 51 percent in
2007. These arrests have increased due to the impact S.T.O.P. Violence Against
Women Act Grant funds have had in Kansas. In addition, the number of adult
domestic violence homicides has decreased since 1992. In 1992, there were 27
reported domestic violence homicides, and in 2007, that number fell to 17. However,
there was an increase in the number of domestic violence homicides from 15 in 2003
to 25 in 2004, spurring the creation of the Governor’s Domestic Violence Fatality
Review Board.
The number of rapes reported to Kansas law enforcement decreased 0.6 percent in
2007 from the number reported in 2006. Since 1995, the number of rapes reported to
law enforcement has increased 1.16 percent. In 2006, 21.4 percent of all reported
rape offenders in Kansas were arrested, compared to 24 percent who were reported as
arrested for the same time period in 2005. This is a very small portion of rape
offenders when one considers that approximately 76.8 percent of the offenders were
known to the victim.
The number of Protection from Abuse orders filed increased 57 percent from 4,528 in
1992 to 7,903 in 2007. In 2007, 200 stalking violations were reported to law
enforcement. The number of Protection From Stalking orders filed increased 26
percent from 1,073 orders in 2002 to 4,159 in 2007.
In State Fiscal Year 2007 (July to June), domestic violence and sexual assault
programs reported the following information. Domestic violence programs provided
face-to-face services to 25,828 victims, and sexual assault programs provided face-to-
face services to 4,370 victims. A total of 66,447 bed nights were provided to domestic
violence victims, and 2,036 bed nights were provided to sexual assault victims.
Regretfully, a total of 2,286 victims were turned away because shelters were too full.
The programs responded to 24,115 domestic violence crisis calls, and 1,613 sexual
assault crisis calls. The table below highlights the number of services provided to
primary and secondary victims of domestic violence and sexual assault during SFY
2007. The numbers illustrate the services provided, not the number of victims served.
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                        P AGE 9
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                                           Domestic Violence       Sexual Assault
       Counseling Services                      32,482                  4,379
       Group Counseling Services                11,428                  1,682
       Information and Referral Services        34,128                  2,824

       Criminal Justice & Court                  8,345                   761
       Advocacy Services
       Personal Advocacy Services               22,787                  2,288

       Transportation Services                   7,321                   511
       Victim Related Calls                     18,055                  1,907
       Public Presentations                      1,440                  1,221
The Docking Institute’s Domestic Violence Victim Services Awareness, Use and
Satisfaction Project found that:
•   About 91 percent of victims indicate that their situation has improved since
    receiving domestic violence services.
•   About 86 percent indicate that the amount of violence has decreased since
    receiving domestic violence services.
•   Services with the highest satisfaction ratings include: follow-up assistance (93.8
    percent ), court preparation support (92.8 percent), and one-one-one counseling
    sessions (92.2 percent).
•   Victims from smaller and mid-sized towns tend to report greater satisfaction
    compared to victims from large towns.
•   Victims from the largest towns and smallest towns (23.7 percent and 26.1 percent
    respectively) are more likely than victims of middle-sized towns (7.9 percent) to say
    that they had problems getting transportation to a shelter.
•   The three areas in which women felt domestic violence services helped them most
    are: helping them to be ready to make changes to improve their situation (92.3
    percent), feeling safer because of help received (91.3 percent), and using skills
    learned to improve her situation (91.1 percent).
•   In most service areas the frequent users of domestic violence services report that
    they have been helped more by services when compared to moderate and new
    users of domestic violence services.
•   Of the women indicating that the police came due to physical violence, only 62
    percent of those women report that the abuser was arrested for domestic violence,
    and only 57.7 percent report that they received a domestic violence brochure.
•   For each of the following situations experienced, the most commonly rated as
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      helpful are (in order): receiving a brochure from the police (97.4 percent), having a
      hearing or court involvement (84.2 percent), abuser being arrested (79.2 percent),
      and getting a protection from abuse order (78 percent).


IV.      Plan Priorities and Approaches
The funding priorities established in the Kansas Implementation Plan are based on the
overall goal which treats every victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking or
dating violence with respect and sensitivity throughout her involvement in the civil and
criminal justice systems and hold offenders accountable for their crimes. The tasks
used to achieve the goal will be:
•     All applicants will be reviewed and evaluated on how the proposed activities will
      help victims and hold offenders accountable.
•     Quarterly grant progress reports will be closely monitored to determine results in
      meeting the goal.
•     On-site compliance reviews are conducted yearly with each subgrantee and
      information is discussed regarding progress and results.
•     On-going meetings and discussions with the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and
      Domestic Violence will be held throughout the year to determine if the goal is being
      met, to assist with technical assistance to local programs and to provide joint
      training if needed.
•     On-going meetings and discussions with the Governor’s Domestic Violence Fatality
      Review Board will be conducted to determine if the goal is being reached and if any
      changes in policy are needed at the state level.
•     Staff will monitor feedback and recommendations from these groups, as well as
      others in the criminal and civil justice systems and adjust the results accordingly to
      the implementation plan.
As noted earlier, a statewide survey was conducted in 2005 among law enforcement
agencies, prosecutors, victim advocates, and courts to shape its funding priorities and
goals. The Governor’s Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board’s recommendations
and the Docking Report also build from the survey’s results. Below are significant
findings from the survey:


SURVEY RESULTS
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
•     53 percent of respondents said their community effectively assists and responds to
      domestic violence victims.
•     43 percent said the largest impediment to their community’s ability to more
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                  P AGE 11
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    successfully assist domestic violence victims is that budgets do not allow for
    specialized units of advocates, law enforcement and/or prosecutors to focus on
    those victims.
•   83 percent of respondents have a crisis center or another program in their area
    offering support and services to domestic violence victims. Of those who did not
    have a crisis center or another program offering support and services to domestic
    violence victims, 11 percent have another center or program less than 30 miles
    away, three percent have another center or program less than 31 to 60 miles away,
    two percent have another center or program 61 to 90 miles away, and one percent
    have a center or program more than 90 miles away.
When asked how their community provided safety for victims during prosecution of
domestic violence, respondents identified several measures including:
       •   Patrolling the victim’s home by law enforcement
       •   Providing protection orders
       •   Offering victim advocacy (safety planning, locating a place to stay, and
           support throughout the trial)
       •   Arresting the offender
       •   Providing security at the courthouse for victims
       •   Providing stalking kits
       •   Providing cellular phones
When asked what percentage of domestic violence victims report the incident to law
enforcement the majority of respondents believed it to be between one and 25 percent.
When asked for suggestions on reaching out to domestic violence victims respondents
listed the following:
•   More aggressive prosecution
•   Easier access to filing protection orders
•   More public awareness
•   More personnel (advocates, law enforcement, and court staff)
•   Utilization of support groups
•   Quicker financial help
•   More police response advocate programs
•   More education
•   More specialized courts
•   Better partnership between law enforcement and victim services
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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ANALYSIS –
While Kansas has made great strides in eliminating domestic violence, the survey
results suggest more work needs to be done. Roughly half of all respondents did not
feel their community effectively assists and responds to domestic violence victims.
Additionally, there is a clear desire and need for specialized units of advocates, law
enforcement and/or prosecutors to focus on domestic violence victims. Kansas
recognizes the importance of specialized units by placing the funding of these units
squarely within the 12 grant purpose areas. Our more populated counties have begun
making specialized domestic violence units a priority, but with the help of VAWA
funding, more Kansas counties will be able to afford such divisions.
Of the survey respondents, 17 percent did not have a crisis center or another program
in their area offering support and services to domestic violence victims. While 83
percent did have a crisis center or a corresponding program, it is unacceptable for
some victims to face the choice of traveling a significant distance or foregoing services.
To address this deficiency Kansas will develop, enlarge and strengthen victim service
programs as a funding priority.
The survey also suggests that a great number of domestic violence victims are not
reporting the incident to law enforcement. This question provoked suggestions for
reaching out to domestic violence victims, and generally, those suggestions affirmed
many of the funding priorities. For example, it is hoped that additional training would
lead to better work by professionals making the process more attractive to victims. We
also have always believed that greater public awareness would create an environment
where victims could come forward, and that simply more services facilitated by more
programs would encourage victims to seek assistance as well. Finally, we have
supported coordination between agencies thinking victims would feel more welcomed
by the system if they received consistent services and treatment among all
professionals and agencies.
The results from the Docking Institute’s report also stated that the most frequently
mentioned recommendation for improving domestic violence services in Kansas is to
increase awareness and promotion of domestic violence services. About three out of
five victims do not know where to go to receive domestic violence services. When
asked whether people in their town have enough access to information about domestic
violence, less than half of victims say “yes.” This is especially true for small towns,
where even fewer victims think their town has enough access to information. The
suggestions given by respondents reveal the funding priorities were on target and
provided guidance in the formation of goals.


SEXUAL ASSAULT
•   41 percent of respondents felt their community effectively assists and responds to
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                     P AGE 13
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    adult victims of sexual assault.
•   46 percent said the largest impediment to their community’s ability to more
    successfully assist sexual assault victims is that budgets do not allow for
    specialized units of advocates, law enforcement and/or prosecutors to focus on
    those victims.
•   84 percent of respondents have a crisis center or another program offering support
    and services to sexual assault victims. Of those who did not have a crisis center or
    another program offering support and services to sexual assault victims, 10 percent
    have another center or program less than 30 miles away, three percent have
    another center or program 31 to 60 miles away, two percent have another center or
    program 61 to 90 miles away, and one percent have a center or program more than
    90 miles away.
When asked what percentage of sexual assault victims report the incident to law
enforcement, the majority of respondents believed it to be between 26 and 50 percent.
When asked for suggestions on reaching out to sexual assault victims respondents
listed the following:
       •   More public awareness of the problem to address the perception that the
           victim is at fault
       •   More personnel (advocates, law enforcement, and court staff)
       •   Better protection by courts during hearings
       •   Less interviews by individual agencies and more joint interviews
       •   Quicker access to trained psychologists
       •   More training for law enforcement on how to properly interact with victims
       •   More training for first responders and hospital staff on how to properly
           interact with victims
       •   Better prosecution and judicial response
       •   More reporting of incidents by universities and colleges


SEXUAL ASSAULT ANALYSIS –
The number of rapes reported to Kansas law enforcement decreased 0.6 percent in
2007 from the number reported in 2006. Since 1995 the number of rapes reported to
law enforcement has increased 1.16 percent. During 2007, approximately 21.4 percent
of all reported rape offenders in Kansas were arrested, compared to 24 percent that
were reported as arrested for the same time period in 2005. This is a very small portion
of rape offenders when one considers that approximately 76.8 percent of the offenders
were known to the victim.
When comparing responses from the domestic violence section and the sexual assault
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section, it appears that Kansas has to do more for sexual assault victims. Only 41
percent of respondents felt their community effectively assists and responds to adult
victims of sexual assault. In addition, an even greater number of respondents believed
that specialized sexual assault units were needed to successfully respond to victim
needs. It does appear that sexual assault victims are just as likely to have access to a
crisis center or another comparable program. However, it is still unacceptable that
services are not available to some victims, and our funding purpose areas make filling
this gap a priority.
The suggestions given for reaching out to sexual assault victims were similar to those
for reaching out to domestic violence victims. Training, public awareness, additional
services and greater coordination were all cited to make the system more attractive to
sexual assault victims. Training for hospital staff was explicitly mentioned as a way to
reach out to sexual assault victims. Kansas recognizes this need by listing the training
of medical personnel as one of its seven grant purpose areas.


STALKING
•   38 percent of respondents felt their community effectively assists and responds to
    victims of stalking.
•   48 percent said the largest impediment to their community’s ability to more
    successfully assist stalking victims is that budgets do not allow for specialized units
    of advocates, law enforcement and/or prosecutors to focus on those victims.
•   When asked what percentage of stalking victims report the incident to law
    enforcement, the majority of respondents believed it to be between one and 25
    percent. When asked for suggestions on reaching out to stalking victims,
    respondents listed the following:
       •   More community education on what constitutes stalking
       •   More public awareness of the problem
       •   More personnel (advocates, law enforcement, and court staff)
       •   Better prosecution response
       •   More training for law enforcement on the seriousness of the offense
       •   Better partnership between law enforcement and victim services


STALKING ANALYSIS –
The number of Protection from Stalking Orders filed increased 26 percent in 2007 from
the number filed in 2006. In 2007, 200 stalking violations were reported which is an
increase from the 183 violations in 2006.
Clearly, Kansas communities are not serving stalking victims effectively.         Just 38
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YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


percent of respondents felt their community effectively assists and responds to victims
of stalking. One explanation for this level of service is that stalking is still new to the
consciousness of the public and professionals. Education and training must be at the
forefront of efforts to better serve stalking victims. Respondents appear to agree. As
with domestic violence and sexual assault, respondents call for the funding to create
specialized units as a means to combat stalking.
It is important to note that Kansas does not favor the funding of any one area over
another. For example, a grant project focused on domestic violence will not
automatically be funded over a sexual assault project because of its focus. When
respondents say training is needed on domestic violence and stalking, Kansas will try
to fund training in both areas. Kansas is committed to combating dating and domestic
violence, sexual assault and stalking equally.


PROTECTION ORDERS
When asked how feasible it is for a domestic violence victim to obtain an order of
protection removing the abuser from the home so the victim and children do not require
emergency shelter, 54 percent said that it is “very feasible.” The following suggestions
were offered to further improve the feasibility of obtaining an order of protection:
       •   Increase public awareness
       •   Provide better training for prosecutors and judges
       •   Increase communication between prosecutors and victim advocates
       •   Provide better training and more education for law enforcement
       •   Hire more personnel (advocates, law enforcement, and court staff)
       •   Provide additional funding for on-site legal aid
       •   Make Protection From Abuse (PFA) orders available after hours and on
           weekends
When asked to rate the district court system’s response to protection from abuse
orders, 45 percent rated the district court system as “very responsive” to protection
from abuse orders. The following suggestions were offered to enhance the district
court system’s response:
       •   Reduce the number of “no shows” or dismisses
       •   Hold people accountable for violations of orders
       •   Train judges and court staff on the dynamics of domestic violence
       •   Increase communication among law enforcement, victim services and
           prosecutors
When asked whether violations of protection orders are prosecuted, 64 percent
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                     P AGE 16
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


answered “yes” and 36 percent answered “no.” Respondents gave these reasons:
      •   Lack of aggressive prosecution
      •   Law enforcement views it as a civil matter and does not arrest
      •   Judicial personnel and law enforcement blame the victim
      •   Because the penalty is minimal, it is not taken seriously by some courts
      •   SANE/SART programs needed in local hospitals


PROTECTION ORDERS ANALYSIS –
Protection orders are one of many tools victims can use to gain independence from an
abusive relationship or stalking situation. It appears that the use of protection orders
has increased in Kansas in recent years, but it also is clear they are not being used in
the most effective manner. It is vital for advocates to thoroughly explain to victims
what a protection order is and assist victims in determining whether or not it is
appropriate in the victim’s circumstances. The separation period is one of the most
dangerous times for victims of domestic violence, and it is important for them to
understand there are limits on how much “protection” a protection order can provide.
Thus, training advocates to use protection orders appropriately is incredibly important.
While 54 percent of respondents rated the district court system as “very responsive” to
Protection From Abuse orders, and 64 percent believed violations of protection orders
were prosecuted, Kansas can do better. A current VAWA subgrantee is working on a
statewide project to build better collaboration among judges, private and legal service
attorneys, law enforcement officers and advocates providing better accessibility to and
enforcement of protection orders. By mainstreaming the process, judges, lawyers, and
advocates will be more responsive and victims will be better served.
On-site legal aid is greatly needed. If attorneys were immediately available to help
victims through the protection order process, then there would be fewer pro se litigants.
This would lessen some of the frustration from courts, and protection orders would be
used more effectively.


Other Questions
When asked to rate the response of the health care community to violence against
women, 25 percent rated the health care community as “very responsive.” The
following suggestions were offered to improve the medical community’s response:
      •   Increase education/training for medical personnel working with victims and
          law enforcement
      •   Implement a SANE/SART program in every hospital
      •   Provide more specialized staff in rural areas
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                  P AGE 17
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


      •   Develop a domestic violence advocate program in every community
      •   Encourage doctors to testify in court
ANALYSIS – This question shows an enormous need for training directed at the health
care community. The success of SANE/SART programs in Kansas cannot be denied,
and there is a need for this level of expertise in every hospital in Kansas.
When asked to rate the coordination between victim service providers and individuals
within the court system, including prosecutors and law enforcement, 40 percent of
respondents rated the coordination as “positive.” The following suggestions were
offered to improve such coordination:
      •   More aggressive prosecution
      •   Better communication
      •   More training and accountability for law enforcement and courts
      •   More community protocols
      •   More personnel (advocates, law enforcement, and court staff), such as
          victim advocates in every courthouse
      •   Better teamwork skills
ANALYSIS – Only 40 percent of respondents rated coordination as positive among
professionals. Kansas believes joint training efforts will increase dialogue among
professionals and improve coordination.         Moreover, when professionals are
overworked, because of understaffing, the collegial atmosphere suffers as do victims.
When asked if their communities need assistance in developing adequate protocols
and procedures, 58 percent said “yes” and 42 percent said “no.” Respondents offered
the following comments:
      •   Enforce the protocols/procedures already in place
      •   Educate the community on what the protocols/procedures are
ANALYSIS – While communities need to develop adequate protocols and procedures,
many communities need to be pushed into implementing the ones they already have.
When asked whether their communities need more law enforcement officers,
prosecutors, or advocates, 77 percent of respondents answered “yes.”
ANALYSIS – Throughout this survey, respondents called for more personnel. Kansas
has made this a priority, but salaries remain one of the most expensive requests to
fund.
When asked if training is needed on legal remedies regarding foreign-born victims’
special needs/concerns, 73 percent of respondents answered “yes.”
ANALYSIS – Sometimes victims are undocumented, and they need informed
advocates.
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YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


We asked those surveyed about the services that are available to accommodate the
special needs of underserved victims. Specifically, respondents were asked about the
availability of transportation, special outreach services, sign language interpreters/TDY
machines, literature prepared in Braille, special literature aimed at encouraging these
victims to report and pursue crimes, safety tools that are free of charge (panic buttons,
cellular phones, etc.), social workers/special needs counselors, handicap accessibility,
and translation services/staff members who speak multiple languages. The special
services most widely available are: 1) handicap accessibility, 2) transportation, 3)
translation, 4) social workers, 5) safety tools, 6) special literature and 7) special
outreach services. Sign language interpreters and TDY machines are less prevalent,
and literature in Braille is generally not available.
ANALYSIS – Kansas is pleased with the progress in this area, and will continue to fund
programs seeking to fill gaps in service to underserved populations.


       A.     Identified Priorities
The funding priorities established in the Kansas implementation plan are based on the
overall goal which treats every victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, or
dating violence with respect and sensitivity throughout her involvement in the civil and
criminal justice systems and holds offenders accountable for their crimes. The
Indentified Priorities also complement the FRB’s Recommendations. Below is an
updated on the status of the FRB’s Recommendations:
•   The Governor’s Office received a $25,000 Recognition Grant from the Kansas
    Health Foundation to develop a domestic violence public awareness plan. As a
    result, the Governor’s Office contracted with Desieghardt Strategic
    Communications, LLC. to develop a domestic violence public awareness campaign
    plan. The plan titled “Do Something. Today—Not here. Not now. Not ever.” will be
    used to secure funding to implement the statewide public awareness campaign.
•   The Governor’s involvement in the Federal Encourage Arrest Policies and
    Enforcement of Protection Orders Grant Program evolved directly from the FRB’s
    recommendation to train all professionals involved with domestic violence cases.
    Again, the purpose of this grant project is to saturate the State of Kansas with a
    continuum of uniform training for all professions of the criminal justice system
    serving offenders and victims from the time of a 911 call reporting an incident;
    through the investigation, arrest, prosecution, probation or parole and release of an
    offender; including emphasis on Protection From Abuse (PFA) and Protection From
    Stalking (PFS) orders.
•   In addition, the Governor’s Office is partnering with the Kansas Network of
    Visitation Providers, the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence,
    the Kansas Office of Judicial Administration and the Kansas Attorney General's
    Office to form the Governor and the Attorney General’s Committee on Supervised
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                     P AGE 19
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


    Visitation and Safe Exchange Centers with the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation
    and Safe Exchange Grant Program. The purpose of the grant program is to
    establish a comprehensive system for providing safe and secure visitation and
    exchange services.
•   A FRB subcommittee has reviewed and revised standards for working with
    batterers and developing a certification process for such programs. The FRB’s
    approved the subcomittee’s standards for Batterer Intervention Programs (BIP).
    The Attorney General’s Office has agreed to be the oversight agency for BIP. In
    addition, the Attorney General’s Office will develop a plan to implement and phase
    in the standards.
Kansas is involved in these and various other efforts to prevent and reduce crime and
violence statewide which has been beneficial as it developed the 2007-2010 Kansas
State Implementation Plan for Violence Against Women.


       B.    Relation to Prior Implementation Plans
The Kansas S.T.O.P. Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) 2007-2010 plan utilizes
the wisdom of previous plans while incorporating recently compiled data. The 2004-
2005 plan was developed by a statewide committee that functioned from 1995 through
2002. The committee consisted of law enforcement, prosecutors, mental health
professionals, courts, sexual assault and domestic violence advocates, the state
coalition against sexual and domestic violence, crime victims, parole/probation officers,
campus staff and batterer treatment providers. Also, all of the domestic violence and
sexual assault programs in the state had an opportunity to know about the plan and
provide input into the general goals of the plan. A new Governor took office in January
2003, and since that time she has developed and distributed a survey and established
the Governor’s Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board to gather current information
regarding violence against women in Kansas. The 2007-2010 plan is the culmination
of these efforts coupled with the solid foundation provided by previous plans.
By expanding the investigation during the planning process beyond committee work to
include the survey findings and the FRB’s recommendations, Kansas has engaged a
great number of knowledgeable people in the development of this plan. Because we
received similar input from each of these resources we are confident that the plan is
factually-based and representative of the needs of Kansans. Additionally, because
the early work of the committee was consistent with our recent findings we know that
more work needs to be done, but that no major shifts in direction are necessary to
combat violence against women in Kansas. Therefore, we have no significant changes
to report.
       C.    Priority Areas
Grant awards will be made to communities in which applicants can show how they
work with criminal justice agencies and victim service providers in responding to
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                    P AGE 20
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


victims’ needs and holding offenders accountable for their actions. Developed to
complement the Federal statutory purpose areas, Kansas has established 12 priority
areas specific to Kansas for the allocation of funds. Applicants must identify which
purpose area(s) they are targeting in order to be considered for funding. The 12 grant
project purposes are as follows:
1. Developing, training, or expanding specialized units or individual law enforcement
   officers targeting violent crimes against women, including sexual assault, domestic
   violence, dating violence and stalking. Creation of specialized units should focus
   on multi-disciplinary approaches, which include victim advocates.
2. Developing, training, or expanding specialized units or individual prosecutors
   targeting violent crimes against women, including sexual assault, domestic
   violence, dating violence and stalking. This may include implementing effective
   services to assist victims through the criminal justice process and should focus on
   multi-disciplinary approaches, which include victim advocates.
3. Developing, training, or expanding specialized units or individual court personnel
   targeting violent crimes against women, including sexual assault, domestic
   violence, dating violence and stalking. This may include implementing effective
   services to assist victims through the criminal justice process and should focus on
   multi-disciplinary approaches, which include victim advocates.
4. Developing, training, or expanding data collection and communication systems,
   including computerized systems linking law enforcement officers, prosecutors and
   court personnel or systems designed to identify and track arrests, protection orders,
   violations of protection orders, prosecutions and convictions for violent crimes
   against women, including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and
   stalking.
5. Developing, enlarging, or strengthening victim service programs, including sexual
   assault, stalking, dating violence and domestic violence programs, to develop or
   improve delivery of victim services to racial, cultural, ethnic and language
   minorities; to provide specialized court advocates; or to increase reporting and
   reduce attrition rates for cases involving violent crimes against women, including
   sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and dating violence; or to address the
   needs and provide services to older and disabled women who are victims of these
   crimes.
6. Developing and implementing more effective police, court and prosecution policies,
   protocols, orders, and services specifically devoted to preventing, identifying, and
   responding to violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault
   and domestic violence.
7. Maintaining the 24-hour statewide toll free number for victims of domestic violence,
   sexual assault, stalking and dating violence in order for victims to know where to
   find available services to assist them.
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8. Training forensic medical personnel to respond effectively to victims of domestic
   violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking and other violent crimes
   against women.
9. Supporting formal and informal statewide, multidisciplinary efforts, to the extent not
   supported by state funds, to coordinate the response of state law enforcement
   agencies, prosecutors, courts, victim service agencies and other state agencies
   and departments, to violent crime against women, including the crimes of sexual
   assault, domestic violence and dating violence.
10. Developing, enlarging or strengthening programs to assist law enforcement,
    prosecutors, courts and others to address the needs and circumstances of older
    and disabled women who are victims of domestic violence or sexual assault,
    including recognizing, investigating and prosecuting instances of such violence or
    assault and targeting outreach and support, counseling and other victim services to
    such older and disabled individuals.
11. Supporting the placement of special victim assistants (to be known as “Jessica
    Gonzales Victim Assistants”) in local law enforcement agencies to serve as liaisons
    between victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking
    and personnel in local law enforcement agencies in order to improve the
    enforcement of protection orders. Jessica Gonzales Victim Assistants shall have
    expertise in domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking and may
    undertake the following activities:
          • Developing, in collaboration with prosecutors, courts and victim service
             providers, standardized response policies for local law enforcement
             agencies, including triage protocols to ensure that dangerous or
             potentially lethal cases are identified and prioritized;
          • Notifying persons seeking enforcement of protection orders as to what
             responses will be provided by the relevant law enforcement agency;
          •   Referring persons seeking enforcement of protection orders to
              supplementary services (such as emergency shelter programs, hotlines,
              or legal assistance services); and
          • Taking other appropriate action to assist or secure the safety of the person
             seeking enforcement of a protection order.
12. To provide funding to law enforcement agencies, nonprofit nongovernmental victim
    services providers and State, tribal, territorial and local governments, (which
    funding stream shall be known as the Crystal Judson Domestic Violence Protocol
    Program) to promote:
          • The development and implementation of training for local victim domestic
             violence service providers and to fund victim services personnel, to be
             known as “Crystal Judson Victim Advocates,” to provide supportive
             services and advocacy for victims of domestic violence committed by law
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YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


               enforcement personnel;
            • The implementation of protocols within law enforcement agencies to
               ensure consistent and effective responses to the commission of domestic
               violence by personnel within such agencies (such as the model policy
               promulgated by the International Association of Chiefs of Police
               [‘Domestic Violence by Police Officers: A Policy of the IACP, Police
               Response to Violence Against Women Project’ July 2003]³;
            • The development of such protocols in collaboration with State, tribal,
               territorial and local victim services providers and domestic violence
               coalitions.
These funds will support law enforcement training centers, law enforcement agencies,
prosecutors’ offices, court programs, legal services, domestic violence and sexual
assault programs and other victim assistance agencies. Funds will pay for additional
law enforcement officers, prosecutors, court advocates, safer shelters, etc. Special
consideration will be given to projects seeking to fill gaps in services for victims of
sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, and stalking or that target underserved
and isolated communities and populations. Funds also will be used for training
medical personnel in developing SANE/SART programs and coordinated community
response teams. Discretionary funds will assist in paying for the statewide toll-free
number, 1-888-END-ABUSE.
Grant funds will be allocated as follows:
•   25 percent of the funds to law enforcement agencies
•   25 percent for prosecution
•   5 percent for courts
•   30 percent for non-profit victim service organizations (10 percent of which will go to
       culturally specific community-based organizations)
•   15 percent for discretionary purposes.
The amount of subgrant awards is based on the number of applications received and
the amount of funds available for distribution. Kansas does not use a specific formula
to determine the amount of subgrants based on population or geographic area.
Instead, the grant review committee evaluates each application individually based on
need and impact the proposed service would have on addressing crimes against
women.
       D.      Grant-making Strategy
As stated earlier, the Governor’s Office works closely with the Kansas Coalition
Against Sexual and Domestic Violence to provide technical assistance to domestic
violence and sexual assault programs, as well as other criminal justice agencies. The
coalition also is involved in numerous trainings throughout the year that assist our
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                       P AGE 24
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


subgrantees in addressing violence against women.
The Governor’s Office also provides technical assistance to subgrantees through
written correspondence, email, phone calls, on site compliance reviews and providing
information and feedback on their grant projects.
Because geographic isolation is recognized under the definition of underserved
populations, it is treated similarly as other populations in that category. All applications
must address the needs of underserved populations, including geographically isolated
victims. The applicant must discuss how the project will respond to those needs, or the
proposal will be rejected. The application also contains a section where the applicant
must illustrate that the proposed grant project is not already adequately provided to
residents in the community. This requirement helps prevent a build-up of services in
any particular area of the state and increases coordination among agencies.
Additionally, during the grant review process, special consideration is given to
programs targeting isolated communities.
Applications are provided to statewide domestic violence and sexual assault programs
and to the four Indian Tribes in Kansas. A grant review committee, which has been in
place for a number of years, reviews each of the grant applications based on prior
accomplishments, needs assessment, goals/objectives, monitoring/evaluation,
coordinated community response information, how underserved populations are
targeted and non-duplication of services. As mentioned above, the review takes into
account the lack of services in rural locations throughout the state and how applicants
address the issue of victims accessing services due to geographic location.
Each grant application will be evaluated using the following criteria:
       •   The record of successful implementation of services to victims of violent
           crimes against women;
       •   Documentation and understanding of a problem as it relates to victims of
           violent crimes against women;
       •   Quality of the needs assessment in terms of proposed services for victims of
           violent crimes against women;
       •   Demonstration of clear, measurable and appropriate grant project objectives
           that are consistent with the purpose areas outlined in the grant application
           instructions;
       •   The efficacy of evaluative components, both programmatic and fiscal;
       •   Community support and collaboration for the S.T.O.P. VAWA proposed grant
           project;
       •   Relevant budget information; and
       •   Receipt of other federal, state, or local funding.
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                     P AGE 25
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       E.     Timeline for S.T.O.P. VAWA Grant Cycle
The VAWA grant application packet is prepared with a deadline for submission
approximately six weeks after release of the application. A copy is forwarded via email
to all current S.T.O.P. VAWA subgrantees. An email notice of the open grant
application process also is sent by email to a distribution list. The Kansas Secretary of
State’s Office receives a notice of the open solicitation that is published in the Kansas
Register. The notice includes the grant application deadline, a brief description of the
grant program purpose areas, as well as information on how to receive a grant
application packet and access the Grant Portal, a web-based program specifically
designed for Kansas used by potential grant applicants to apply for funding and
manage grant awards. The League of Kansas Municipalities and the Kansas
Association of Counties also are notified and post information to their membership.

A PDF copy of the grant application packet is posted on the Governor’s website with
an announcement on the Governor’s homepage that the grant application process is
open.   The grant application packet may be accessed via the Internet at
www.governor.ks.gov or through a search on the Grant Portal.

Grant awards are made approximately 30 days prior to the start of the grant award
period. Each grant project funded under this grant fund is for a period of 12 months
from January 1 to December 31.

Subgrantees are required to submit the following Reporting Requirements:
1. Monthly Financial Status Report
2. Quarterly Grant Project Narrative Report
3. Projection of Final Expenditures
4. Equipment Inventory Form
5. Budget Summary Form
6. Authorization for Electronic Deposits
7. Annual Progress Report


Governor’s Grant Program staff conducts grant project analysis and on-site or desk
compliance reviews.


       F.      Addressing the Needs of Underserved Victims
Underserved populations are defined as ethnic, racial, or cultural background;
language diversity; physical disabilities; or geographic isolation, etc. All grant
applicants are required to submit information about underserved populations in their
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                     P AGE 26
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


communities and how they plan to provide services to them. Otherwise, the proposal
will be rejected. Each applicant is accountable to gender equitable and culture
relevant services and materials provided by their agencies.
Kansas domestic violence and sexual assault programs make every effort to reach
those who are underserved. Many of the programs have volunteers and staff of
different ethnic, racial, cultural and language diversities in order to meet victims and
their children’s needs. Some programs have developed specific services for the
underserved areas of their communities. Programs have their brochures and literature
to assist victims in various languages or have access to interpreters. Shelter facilities
are accessible to those with physical disabilities or an alternative safe shelter is
provided. Volunteers in the rural isolated areas provide transportation. Many
programs also provide access to toll-free numbers for victims to call without a long
distance charge. In addition, Kansas has a toll-free number to assist local programs
with AT&T interpreter services, 888-END-ABUSE.
Ten percent of the victims’ services grant funds from S.T.O.P. VAWA will be set aside
for culturally specific community based organizations. Currently S.T.O.P. VAWA funds
are used for the Kansas City Anti-Violence Project providing assistance to lesbian, gay,
bisexual and transgender domestic violence and sexual assault victims.
The Docking report recommends the State of Kansas address two areas to better
assist underserved victims. The recommendations include:
•   Address Transportation Barriers. Many victims from small towns and large
    towns report problems getting transportation to domestic violence services. While it
    is difficult with limited funding and staffing to ensure every woman in need be
    transported to services, collaborations with other agencies or recruiting additional
    volunteers may serve to address this need. Women cannot be helped if they
    cannot get access to services.
•   Address the Needs of the Hispanic Community. The intensity of violence tends
    to be higher when the abuser is of Hispanic background. (Racial groups were too
    small to analyze for statistical significance.) In addition to making promotional and
    educational materials available in Spanish, a needs assessment and development
    of culturally appropriate programs is warranted.
The following data represents the services provided to underserved victims in 2007.
Domestic Violence Victims Served by Race:
       Alaskan Native—7
       Asian—136
       African American—2,447
       Caucasian—10,819
       Hispanic/Latino—3,061
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                P AGE 27
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


      Native American—319
      Pacific Islander—40
      Other—489
      Unknown—1
Sexual Assault Victims Served by Race:
      Alaskan Native—1
      Asian—6
      African American—338
      Caucasian—2,219
      Hispanic/Latino—358
      Native American—51
      Pacific Islander—26
      Other—102
      Unknown—0
Domestic Violence Victims with Special Needs:
      Persons with physical disabilities—454
      Pregnant—436
      Mental health conditions—1,034
      Undocumented citizens living in the U.S.—356
      Non-English speaking—638
      Other—183
Sexual Assault Victims with Special Needs:
      Persons with physical disabilities—51
      Pregnant—21
      Mental health conditions—197
      Undocumented citizens living in the U.S.—16
      Non-English speaking—104
      Other—32
In addition, 275 domestic violence victims and 49 sexual assault victims were served
who were 60 years of age and over.
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                     P AGE 28
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


        G.     Monitoring and Evaluation
Each approved subgrantee will be required to develop a written evaluation component
for its grant project. Staff provide on-site compliance reviews, reporting forms and
review of all services and training being provided with these grant funds. All
subgrantees have received a copy of the Urban Institute evaluation manual.
Subgrantees must explain in writing how the funded grant project will be monitored, a
description of the criteria used to evaluate the grant project and activities, procedures
for collecting information and how the information will be used to improve the grant
project.
The following reports are required if Federal S.T.O.P. VAWA grant program funding is
received:
        1.     The Financial Status Report Form, a monthly expenditure report,
               provides fiscal information on the actual expenditures during the month.
               Monthly reimbursements will be made based on this expenditure report.
               These reports are due 30 days following the end of each month;
        2.     The quarterly Grant Project Narrative Report provides a narrative
               description of the activities provided with the grant funds during the
               previous quarter. This report is to be submitted 30 days following the end
               of each quarter;
        3.     An Annual Progress Report due 30 days following the end of the grant
               project period;
        4.     Grant project monitoring and on-site visits will be conducted by the
               Governor’s Grants Program staff; and
        5.     Any other reporting procedures, which at times may be required by the
               federal government or the Governor’s Grants Program.


V.      Conclusion
In CY 2007, 25 grant projects received $1,354,375. During the grant period, VAWA-
funded grant projects provided services to more than 11,957 domestic violence, sexual
assault and stalking victims and trained more than 4,260 individuals. The type of
service provided included:
•    Hotline calls
•    Crisis Intervention
•    Hospital Response—meeting victim/survivor at the hospital, usually for a forensic
     exam
•    Counseling/Support Groups
•    Criminal Justice Advocacy/Court Accompaniment
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YEAR PLAN 2007-2010


•   Civil Legal Advocacy/Court Accompaniment
•   Civil Legal Assistance
•   Victim Witness Notification
•   Victim/Survivor Advocacy


Inspiration from the Community
       “We are overwhelmingly pleased that now we have opened a Family First
       Center (FFC). This center serves all of our clients. At our FFC, we are able to
       offer clothing and household items that have been donated to the Crisis Center
       for our clients. The fantastic part of having the FFC is that our clients are
       allowed to select their own items, their own clothes, colors, sizes and styles. By
       beginning with such a small step as making their own selection, our clients are
       able to take a small step toward regaining control over their lives. Our Victim
       Advocate has been able to utilize our FFC in unique ways for our clients. Some
       of the clients have immigration issues and by being able to volunteer at the FFC
       they can safely satisfy the requirements for low income housing.
       The clients feel comfortable in the safe and secure environment of the FFC and
       are eager to participate in other opportunities offered there.”
                                                              - Crisis Center of Dodge City


       “Building, as it did, on a history of cooperation, this project has institutionalized a
       degree of collaboration that is rare. Participation in the Domestic Violence Task
       Force is purely voluntary. Now in the 11th year of existence, the Task Force is a
       vital group with active participation from a variety of agencies, including law
       enforcement, prosecution, child protective services, legal services, court
       services and probation and parole. Police Response Advocates On Call (PRA’s)
       have responded with Riley County Police Department to every domestic call for
       seven years. Controversial with the police department at the time of its
       inception, the PRA Program has proven to be good for victims and officers. The
       Program is taken for granted. Finally, the Records Analyst position made
       possible by this grant has proven to be invaluable to prosecutors and
       corrections personnel throughout the region. By pulling together thorough
       domestic violence histories on perpetrators, authorities are able to make more
       informed decisions.
                      - Crisis Center, Inc.—Riley County Domestic Violence Task Force
KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAIN ST WOMEN THREE YEAR PL AN 2007-2010




KANSAS S.T.O.P. VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN THREE                                          28
                                                                                P AGE 30
YEAR PLAN 2007-2010




                                                                     APPENDIX
2007 Kansas Crime Statistics as reported by Law Enforcement Agencies—http://
www.governor.ks.gov/grants/policies/docs/2007DVreport.pdf


2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Federal S.T.O.P. VAWA Grant Fact Sheets—http://
www.governor.ks.gov/grants/grants_vawapp.htm

Location of Sexual and Domestic Violence Programs in Kansas—http://www.kcsdv.org/
ksresources.html

Fort Hays State University’s Docking Institute Report on Domestic Violence Victim
Services Awareness Use and Satisfaction Project - http://www.governor.ks.gov/grants/
policies/docs/DockingReport.pdf

Governor’s Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board—http://www.governor.ks.gov/
grants/gdvfrb.htm

Current S.T.O.P. VAWA Subgrantees—http://www.governor.ks.gov/grants/policies/
docs/2008_VAWA_Grant_Awards.doc

				
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