Responding to Complaints – Guidance for Schools by pptfiles

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									                        Responding to Complaints
                          Guidance for Schools

Contents
Section                                                Page

Introduction                                            3

Principles                                              3

School based stages of the procedures                   6

Beyond the school                                       10

Repairing relationships                                 11

Recording Complaints                                    12

Appendix A – Outline procedures for complaints panel    13

Appendix B – sample complaints policy for parents       15

Appendix C – sample complaints form                     17




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007     1
Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007   2
                        Responding to Complaints
                           Guidance for Schools

1.       INTRODUCTION
1.1      From September 2003 governing bodies of all maintained schools including
         nursery schools are required under Section 29 of the Education Act 2002 to
         have in place a procedure to deal with complaints relating to the school and to
         any community facilities or services that the school provides.

1.2      The law also requires the procedures to be publicised.

1.3      The law does not specify what the process should be. Many schools already
         have a procedure in place. There is now an opportunity to review existing
         documents or adopt and publicise a procedure.

1.4      This document draws on DfES guidance and extensive local experience of
         complaints. It is intended as a practical guide which will help schools resolve
         complaints at an early stage and avoid damaging and stressful formal
         proceedings.


2.       PRINCIPLES
2.1      Concerns or complaints?
         Almost all complaints start as a concern expressed by an individual about
         something that matters to them. If the response is seen as reasonable it is
         less likely that anything further will develop.

         Concerns can become complaints if the initial response is perceived as
         unreasonable or dismissive. If a matter is important to someone their point of
         view needs to be taken seriously. Dismissing a concern may well LAd to a
         formal complaint.

2.2      Complaints happen in all organisations
         No organisation or school operates perfectly all the time so comments or
         complaints will occur. They can be important feedback or an indication that
         some practices may need change.

2.3      An effective complaints procedure will
          encourage resolution of problems by informal means wherever possible
          be easily accessible and publicised
          be simple to understand and use
          be impartial
          be non-adversarial
          allow swift handling with established time limits for action and keeping
            people informed of progress
          ensure a full and fair investigation by an independent person where
            necessary




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007         3
            seek and take account of the complainant’s suggestions for ways of
             addressing the issue
            respect people’s desire for confidentiality
            address all the points at issue with a response and appropriate redress
             where necessary
            identify areas of agreement between the parties and clarify any areas of
             misunderstanding.
            provide information to the school’s senior management team so that
             services can be improved

2.3      Freedom of information and Confidentiality
         The Data Protection Act, Human Rights Act and Freedom of Information Act
         are all relevant in the context of complaints. All parties must have access to
         the same information. Everyone involved must be clear that any information
         which they provide, written or verbal will be made available to other parties.
         Investigators must also be aware that anyone involved is entitled to access
         their written or electronic personal records, which include notes of meetings
         and conversations.

         However, everyone involved must be assured that the complaint and its
         investigation will remain confidential within the confines of the procedures.

2.4      Equal opportunities
         Equal opportunities legislation requires schools to ensure that no one is
         discriminated against because of their gender, race, disability or for any other
         reason. It is important to ensure that translations and interpreters can be
         made available where necessary. Complainants should be reassured that
         they (or their child) will not be treated adversely because they have made a
         complaint.

2.5      Training
         Staff may benefit from training in how to deal with conflict and equal
         opportunities issues. People who are anxious and worried often speak and
         act quite aggressively. Knowing how to respond in these circumstances is
         important. Reacting defensively or angrily can aggravate a situation.
         Listening carefully and responding positively will calm a situation and help to
         resolve issues more quickly.

2.6      Publicising
         There is a legal requirement for complaints procedures to be publicised. It is
         important that everyone in the school knows what to do if they are concerned
         about something. People may become angry and distressed if they cannot
         express their concerns or are put off in some way. Accessibility is therefore
         vital.

         It is up to the school to decide how to publicise the procedures, but details
         could be included in
          the school prospectus
          the Governors’ Annual Report to parents
          the information given to new parents when their children join the school
          newsletters
          a specific complaints leaflet
          posters on noticeboards in public areas
          the school web-site


Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007          4
         The tone of what is said is important – it should seem a genuine invitation and
         interest in what parents and others in the school community have to say,
         together with a commitment to make appropriate changes

2.7      Resolving complaints
         Any response to a complaint should be clear, open and honest, addressing all
         the points raised. Continued discussion with the person who complained is
         also important in order to restore good relations. If they are not satisfied that
         their concerns have been acknowledged and responded to another complaint
         is likely.

         Throughout the procedure schools will want to keep in mind ways in which a
         complaint can be resolved. If the complaint is justified, or partly justified it
         might be sufficient to acknowledge that it is valid in part or in whole. In
         addition it would be appropriate to offer one or more of the following:
          an apology
          an explanation
          an admission that the situation could have been handled differently or
            better
          an assurance that the event complained of will not happen again
          an explanation of the steps taken to ensure that it will not happen again
          an undertaking to review school policies in the light of the complaint

2.8      Vexatious complaints
         Schools occasionally experience what they consider to be vexatious
         complaints (or complainants). A good complaints procedure and open
         response should limit the number of complaints which become protracted.
         Each separate complaint must be dealt with fairly and individually, and the
         person treated with respect. If a complainant tries to reopen the same issue,
         the chair of governors should inform them in writing that the procedure has
         been exhausted and the matter is now closed.

         If an individual’s approaches become disturbing or distressing, intimidating or
         harassing the LA should be consulted and legal advice sought.

2.9      The role of the Local Authority (LA)
         This guidance does not refer to areas where there are set procedures and the
         LA has a statutory role (see 2.10)

         The LA has no formal authority to investigate general school complaints or
         impose remedies.

         However, parents and members of the public often contact the LA in the first
         instance with concerns and complaints about schools. In these circumstances
         officers will refer complainants back to the school with advice on how to
         proceed and what to expect. Officers may also contact the school. The LA
         must play an impartial role, and is happy to provide both complainant and
         school with information and advice at any stage of the proceedings.

         If a complainant contacts the LA after exhausting all school based procedures
         the Director will nominate an officer to liaise with the school and ensure that
         the complaint has been dealt with in accordance with the school’s Complaints
         Policy and that governors have acted reasonably and properly.



Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007          5
         This does not constitute a general right of appeal, and the LA cannot carry out
         an investigation simply because a complainant disagrees with the decision of
         the governing body. Nor can it overturn a governing body’s decision. The aim
         will be to clarify and help resolve matters.

2.10     What’s not covered?
         The guidelines outlined below refer to complaints about those aspects of
         school life for which there is no specific statutory requirement. They do not
         therefore cover complaints or appeals about:

            The delivery of the National Curriculum, arrangements for Collective
             Worship and religious education
            Disapplication of the National Curriculum
            Special needs assessments
            Admissions appeals
            Pupil exclusions
            Staff discipline, grievance, dismissals
            Allegations of child abuse and other child protection issues
            Allegations of financial impropriety or criminal activity



3        SCHOOL BASED STAGES OF THE PROCEDURES
         The following stages are recommended for a complaints procedure:

3.1      Stage 1: Dealing with concerns and complaints informally
         Most concerns can be resolved at this stage, whereby the complainant
         speaks directly to the class teacher, or other person responsible for the issue.
         (Governors who are approached should refer a complainant to the
         headteacher in the first instance).

         At this stage it may be unclear whether the person is asking a question or
         expressing a concern rather than making a complaint. This is an opportunity
         to clarify the matter and identify what sort of outcome the person is looking
         for. At the end of the discussion the person dealing with the concerns should
         be sure that the complainant is clear what action (if any) has been agreed,
         and what to do if the concern recurs or is not resolved. Although this stage is
         informal it may prove helpful to keep a record of the issue and responses
         made.

3.2      Stage 2: referral to the headteacher
         A headteacher may wish to designate another senior member of staff to deal
         with complaints, but will generally be the contact point (unless the complaint
         is about the head, in which case the chair of governors is the contact).

         At this stage the complainant may convey their concerns in writing. This may
         not always be possible, or even advisable. To insist could result in a genuine
         complaint not being resolved due to fear or lack of confidence on the part of
         the parent. Written complaints can also lead to entrenched positions from
         which it is difficult to achieve a resolution. Schools need to make judgements
         about individual cases, but it can be helpful to have a form for parents to
         complete. See appendix B




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007         6
         The headteacher (or designate) should:
          acknowledge the complaint within 5 working days and give a target date
            for providing a response (normally within 20 working days).
          provide an opportunity to discuss the issue. The complainant is entitled to
            be accompanied by a friend, and this should be made cLAr in an invitation
            to a meeting.
          try to establish what sort of outcome the complainant is looking for to
            resolve the situation.
          gather information in relation to the complaint, eg. by interviewing
            witnesses, taking statements, etc.
          keep records with dates of meetings, telephone conversations and other
            contacts, or documentation
          come to a conclusion about the issue and how to resolve it. This could be
            communicated as a written response, or a meeting with the complainant
            could be arranged. However a record of the outcome should be
            maintained. The complainant should also be informed of what to do next
            if still not happy.

3.3      Stage 3: Referral to the Chair of Governors (or other designated
         governor)
         If a complainant wants to take the complaint further they should contact the
         chair or other designated governor in writing. The complainant should explain
         why they are complaining, who they have already spoken to and what they
         want from a further review of the situation.

         At this stage the chair should look into the issue and what has already been
         done and seek some mutually agreeable resolution of the difficulty.

         The chair of governors should:
          acknowledge the complaint within 5 working days and give a target date
            for providing a response (normally within 20 working days). In
            acknowledging the complaint the chair may need to explain the powers of
            the governing body on the matter in question and the extent to which it
            may or may not be possible to achieve the outcome desired by the
            complainant. Eg a parent may be unhappy with their child’s class
            placement. Whilst governors can look at whether the placement was
            made in a fair, reasonable and consistent way they do not have the power
            to change the placement, which is the headteacher’s decision.
          look into the complaint. The Chair may need to interview the headteacher
            and possibly other members of staff and may need to meet or contact the
            complainant. Notes should be kept of meetings.
          check what has been done so far, and consider whether anything further
            might be done
          communicate her/his conclusions and/or suggestions to the complainant,
            either in writing or at a meeting.
          provide the complainant with the option of a review by a panel of the
            governing body by contacting the clerk to governors.

3.4      Stage 4: Review by a Complaints Panel of the Governing
         Body
         Complaints only rarely reach this formal level, but schools need to be
         prepared. Complaints should not be considered by the full governing body
         because:




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007        7
            governors dealing with an issue need to be seen to be impartial – they
             should have no previous involvement in an issue
            it is possible that a complaint could lead to disciplinary action against a
             staff member, and other governors would be needed to hear the matter in
             an impartial way

         The Panel must have the authority of the governing body to act, therefore
         arrangements should be agreed at the beginning of every school year for
         convening a complaints panel when necessary.

         At this stage a complaint needs to be put in writing. The Panel should be
         clerked, and it is strongly recommended that the Complaints Panel has a
         clerk who is not a governor to undertake the administration.

3.4.1    Stage 4 - Preparation
         The Panel should remember that some parents/carers are unused to dealing
         with groups of people in formal situations and may feel inhibited. Parents may
         also feel emotional about discussing an issue that affects their child. The
         Chair of the Panel will need to ensure that the proceedings are as informal as
         the situation allows.

         On receipt of a written complaint the Clerk should convene a Complaints
         Panel.
          the Panel members should be governors with no prior direct involvement
            with the issue.
          the make-up of the Panel should, if possible, reflect the range of governor
            categories, take into account the value of parent representation and be
            sensitive to race, religion and gender issues.
          it is not appropriate for the headteacher to have a place on the Complaints
            Panel. The Chair of Governors / complaints governor should not be on the
            Panel as they have been involved at an earlier stage.
          governors should also consider whether it is advisable to have staff
            governors who may not be regarded as impartial by the complainant.
          The Panel will need to consider how to proceed to investigate and resolve
            the complaint (see procedures below).

3.4.2    The Clerk to the Governors should write to the complainant to acknowledge
         receipt of the written request within 5 working days and inform the
         complainant that the complaint will be investigated by three members of the
         school's Governing Body’s Complaints Panel within 20 working days of
         receiving the request.

            the letter will also explain the procedures to be followed and that the
             complainant has the right to submit any further documents relevant to the
             complaint, which must be received in time for them to be sent to the Panel
             and other parties.

3.4.3    The headteacher should be informed immediately that a complaint has been
         received and consulted about the proposed date of any hearing.

3.4.4    Both parties should be invited to submit relevant documentation in time to be
         circulated 5 days before any hearing or formal consideration by the
         Complaints Panel.




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007         8
3.4.5    Stage 4 – procedures
         The examples below describe alternative ways of Stage 4 of a procedure

         i)      A formal hearing (see Appendix A for full details)
         This is the model for a Governors’ Complaints Panel which is advocated by
         DfES and other organisations.

         The complainant and the Headteacher and any other staff / witnesses should
         be invited to make representations concerning the complaint and may be
         questioned by the Panel members so that they can form a clear and unbiased
         view of the complaint. The procedure at the meeting should allow:

            the complainant to explain their complaint;
            the Headteacher / other party to explain the school's response
            the Complaints Panel members to have an opportunity to question both
             the complainant and the Headteacher / other party
            all involved to have the right to call witnesses (subject to the approval of
             the Chair), and the Panel to have the right to question all the witnesses;
            both the complainants, the headteacher and staff to have the right of
             representation at the interview if they so wish.
            the meeting to be minuted

         The Chair of the Panel will explain to the complainant and the Headteacher
         that the Panel will consider its decision, and a written response will be sent to
         both parties within 5 working days.

         The advantage of this approach is that all parties can hear what the other has
         to say and can question and comment. There is a risk of the procedure being
         adversarial and stressful for both parties.

         ii) Separate interviews with complainant, headteacher, nominated
         witnesses etc.
         An alternative approach is for the Panel to interview the complainant,
         headteacher and relevant staff and witnesses separately, either at the same
         meeting or at other convenient times. The procedure should allow

            both the complainants, the Headteacher and staff to have the right of
             representation at the interview if they so wish.
            notes of the interview to be made, checked with the interviewee and made
             available to the other parties on request.

         The Chair of the Panel should explain to the complainant and the
         Headteacher that the Panel will consider its decision, and a written response
         will be sent to both parties normally within 5 working days of final
         representations / comments being received .

         The advantage of this approach is that it avoids the possibility of direct
         confrontation and associated stress. The disadvantage is that the parties
         cannot hear what the other has to say or question directly, although notes of
         meetings and other documents should be made available. The procedure
         may become protracted if one or other side queries the process and
         evidence.




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007          9
         iii)    An external review
         In very exceptional circumstances it may be difficult or inappropriate for a
         Panel of governors to investigate a complaint. This could happen where a
         complaint is very complex or technical, where emotions are running high or
         where there are insufficient impartial or available governors.

         In such cases the Panel or governing body may wish to commission an
         outside consultant to act as an investigating officer and provide a report with a
         recommendation. This has the advantage of bringing an external perspective
         and reassuring a complainant of the impartiality of the result. The
         disadvantage is the cost which would need to be borne by the school.

         The LA can provide advice on this and the other options with suggestions for
         organisations to approach for consultants

3.5      Stage 4 - outcomes
         The aim of the Panel will be to resolve the complaint and achieve
         reconciliation between the school and the complainant. However, it has to be
         recognised that sometimes it may only be possible to establish facts and
         make recommendations, which will satisfy the complainant that their
         complaint has been taken seriously.

         The Panel will need to consider the complaint and all the evidence presented
         and
          reach a decision on the complaint;
          decide upon the appropriate action to be taken to resolve the complaint;
          where appropriate, suggest any changes to the school's systems or
            procedures to ensure that issues of a similar nature do not happen again.

         A written statement outlining the decision of the Panel and the reasons for
         reaching that decision should be sent by the Clerk to the main parties. If any
         action is to be taken against a member of staff, to protect the rights of the
         staff concerned, only the phrase “appropriate action has or will be taken”
         should be used. The letter to the complainant should also explain whether a
         further appeal can be made and if so, to whom.

         The Clerk to the Governors should keep a copy of all correspondence and
         notes on file. These records must be kept separately from any pupil's
         personal records.



4.       BEYOND THE SCHOOL
4.1      The Local Authority
         If the complainant is still unhappy after having followed the school based
         procedures identified in Stages 1-4 the complainant may refer the matter to
         the LA by writing to:

         Director for Schools and Learning,
         Westminster City Hall,
         64 Victoria Street
         London SW1E 6QP.
         Or e-mail: educationcustomerservices@westminster.gov.uk



Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007         10
          Complainants must be made aware that the LA has no formal authority to
          investigate school complaints or impose remedies. The Director may
          nominate an appropriate officer to look into the matter to ensure that the
          complaint has been dealt with in accordance with the school’s Complaints
          Policy and the governing body has acted reasonably and properly. The aim
          will be to clarify and resolve matters.

          If parents and members of the public contact the LA in the first instance then
          officers will refer complainants back to the school with advice on what to
          expect and how to proceed and they may also contact the school. The LA is
          happy to provide advice and information to both sides on handling the
          complaint at any stage of the proceedings.

4.2       The Secretary of State
          Complaints can be made to the Secretary of State for Education and Skills on
          the grounds that the Governing Body or the Local Education acted
          unreasonably or failed to discharge its duties under the Education Act. An
          official of the DfES may contact the Governing Body or the Local Authority for
          more information in order to consider the complaint.

          The Secretary of State could step in if a governing body or a LA had not
          carried out its legal duty or had acted unreasonably. The Secretary of State
          would not do anything until the school and the LA had finished looking into the
          complaint. The Secretary of State can be contacted at:

          The Secretary of State for Education and Skills
          Sanctuary Buildings
          Great Smith Street
          London
          SW1P 3BT.

4.3       The Local Government Ombudsman
          Complaints about the maladministration of Local Authority services can be
          made to the Ombudsman. However, the Ombudsman does not look at
          internal school management matters. The Ombudsman can be contacted at:

          The Local Government Ombudsman
          21 Queen Anne's Gate
          London SW1H 9BU

4.4       Ofsted
          Under the Education and Inspections Act 2006 parents may complain about a
          school to Ofsted. Ofsted will refer individual cases to an appropriate channel,
          but may investigate more general concerns about schools.

         Ofsted can investigate complaints about the work of the school as a whole,
          but are not in a position to investigate any matter that relates only to individual
          children. For a copy of the Ofsted guidance see
          http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/publications/070115
          e-mail: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk


5.        REPAIRING RELATIONSHIPS



Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007           11
5.1      A good complaints procedure and an open approach should ensure positive
         relationships between home and school whatever the outcome of the
         complaint. Occasionally though outside help is needed to restore constructive
         dialogue. The National Mediation Centre can help in such situations:

         National Mediation Centre
         The Hawthorns
         23 St James Gardens
         Ffynone
         Swansea SA1 6DY
         Telephone:    01792 469626
         E-mail        mediation@dispute.co.uk

6.       RECORDING COMPLAINTS

6.1      Schools should have a reliable system for recording complaints and their
         progress. A simple form is needed to record the time and date of an informal
         complaint, the name of the person making the complaint, what it is about and
         the response that was given.

         The governing body should monitor the number and nature of complaints ,
         without individuals being identified. If it becomes clear that there are several
         complaints about a particular issue then governors should ensure that
         appropriate action is taken.




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007         12
                                                                    APPENDIX A

OUTLINE PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS PANEL HEARINGS

Before the hearing

1. The complainant and the headteacher should be provided with details of the way
   in which the hearing will be conducted.

2. If necessary support for the complainant should be arranged, for example,
   translation of any of the papers provided by the school or the LA, provision of an
   interpreter or any arrangements necessary to give the complainant full access to
   the proceedings, for example if the complainant has a disability.

3. The members of the panel should elect one of their number to act as Chair.

The hearing

4. The complainant and the headteacher should simultaneously be invited into the
   room where the hearing is being held. At this point the Chair may wish to reiterate
   the scope of the governing body’s powers and clarify the aims of the hearing, i.e.
   to resolve the complaint, reconcile differences between the complainant and the
   school and to help identify the way forward.

5. The Chair should introduce all those present and ensure that all parties have
   been advised of the way in which the hearing will be conducted.

6. The complainant to begin by explaining the basis of their complaint and the
   headteacher to respond by stating the reasons for the school’s response.

7. The head to ask the complainant any questions regarding their complaint and the
   complainant to raise questions with the headteacher about the school’s response.

8. The Panel may ask questions of either the complainant or the headteacher.

9. The complainant and head have the opportunity to make any final statement.

10. The Chair to confirm that a decision will be issued within 5 school days.

11. The complainant and the headteacher should then leave the hearing.

The decision making process

12. The panel should then consider a decision based on the information and
    evidence presented to them. It should decide whether or not to uphold the
    complaint, suggest any actions which may be taken to resolve the complaint and
    consider whether it would be appropriate to suggest a review of any school




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007       13
    policies in the light of issues raised in the course of the complaint. The Panel
    should reach a unanimous or majority decision on the complaint.

Communicating the decision

13. The findings of the panel should be notified to the complainant and the
   headteacher in writing within 5 school days of the hearing




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007        14
APPENDIX B
SAMPLE COMPLAINTS POLICY

Information for parents or carers who have concerns about their child’s
education

At Greengates Primary School we welcome comments and suggestions for
improving our work in the school.

We encourage parents or carers to discuss any queries about their child’s work and
progress or other issues with teachers.

If you have concerns please tell us. Most concerns can be resolved quickly and
easily. If, however you wish to make a complaint you can use the following
procedure. We will endeavour to deal with your concerns promptly and fairly. All
complaints will be treated seriously and our relationship with you and your child will
be not be affected if you express dissatisfaction.

1.       What to do first
Most concerns and complaints can be sorted out quickly by speaking with your
child’s teacher who will try to resolve issues informally. The teachers will make sure
that they understand what you feel went wrong, and will ask what you would like the
school to do to put things right. They will also explain their actions.

2.      What to do next
If you are dissatisfied with the teacher's response you can raise your concerns with
the Headteacher in writing or by making an appointment to discuss the issue. You
may find it helpful to use our complaints form. The Headteacher will ask to meet you
to discuss the issue. You may take someone else with you if you wish. The
Headteacher will investigate the complaint and may interview any staff or pupils
involved. You will then receive a written response to your complaint which you may
wish to discuss with the Headteacher.

3.      If you are still unhappy
If you are still not satisfied, or if the complaint is about the headteacher you should
contact the Chair of Governors c/o the school. The chair, or another impartial
governor will try to resolve issues by looking at what has happened so far and
suggesting a solution. Of course, this does not mean that in every case they will
come round to your point of view but it will help both you and the school to
understand all sides of the question. It may also help to prevent a similar issue
arising again.

4. If you are still not satisfied
You can write to the Clerk to Governors at the school address to ask for referral of
your complaint to the Governing Body’s Complaints Appeal Panel. You will need to
explain why you are not satisfied and what you expect from a further review. Your
complaint will then be considered by a group of three governors who have had no
prior direct involvement with the issue and so will be able to give it fresh assessment.
You will receive more information about procedures at this stage when the school
acknowledges your request for a Panel meeting.

5.       Further Action



Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007        15
We hope that all concerns and complaints can be settled within school but in
exceptional cases it may be possible to refer the issue to outside bodies.

        You could contact the Local Authority (LA) c/o the Director for Schools and
         Learning at Westminster City Council. The LA has no power to re -investigate
         general school complaints or impose solutions, but will try to help resolve
         disputes:

         Director for Schools and Learning
         Westminster City Hall
         64 Victoria Street
         London SW1E 6QP.
         e-mail: educationcustomerservices@westminster.gov.uk
        You could contact the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if you
         think the school or LA has acted unreasonably or not fulfilled its legal duties:

         The Secretary of State for Education and Skills
         Sanctuary Buildings
         Great Smith Street
         London
         SW1P 3BT

        The Ombudsman can look at maladministration of Council functions but will
         not investigate internal school issues:

         The Local Government Ombudsman
         21 Queen Anne's Gate
         London SW1H 9BU

        Ofsted can investigate complaints about the work of the school as a whole,
         but are not in a position to investigate any matter that relates only to your
         child.

         Enquiries
         National Business Unit
         Ofsted
         Royal Exchange Building
         St Anne’s Square
         Manchester M2 7LA
         e-mail: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk

         or complete an online complaint form:

         http://live.ofsted.gov.uk/onlinecomplaints/ .




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007         16
APPENDIX C – COMPLAINT FORM

Greengates Primary School welcomes parents’ views and values comments and
suggestions. Any parent who has a concern can talk to their child’s class teacher
before/after school. Most concerns can be resolved quickly and easily. If however
you want to complain more formally you can contact the headteacher or complete the
form below. All complaints will be treated seriously.




Name



Name and class of child


Details of the incident or issue about which you are complaining
 Please give as much information as possible, including details of any witnesses
 Please describe the steps which you have taken so far to try to resolve the matter
 Please give details of what you think should be done to resolve the problem




Signed

Date

Please return this form to either the headteacher or the chair of governors c/o the
school office.




Issued Sept 2003; updated June 2007       17


								
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