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Method And Apparatus For Surgical Electrocautery - Patent 7794461

VIEWS: 21 PAGES: 11

1. Technical FieldThe invention relates to medical devices. More particularly, the invention relates to a method and apparatus for surgical electrocautery.2. Description of the Prior ArtElectrocauterization is the process of cauterizing, coagulation, and/or destroying tissue with electricity. A small probe with an electric current running through it is used to cauterize (burn or destroy) the tissue. The procedure is frequentlyused to divide tissue structures in a fashion which is hemostatic (seals blood vessels, thereby preventing bleeding). See, for example, Y. C. Jou, M. C. Cheng, J. H. Sheen, C. T. Lin, P. C. Chen, Electrocauterization of bleeding points for percutaneousnephrolithotomy, Urology 64(3):443-6 (September 2004). The use of electrocautery has been extremely beneficial for the performance of surgical procedures, such as hysterectomy (the surgical removal of the uterus), where relatively long spans of tissuemust be sealed and divided to remove the organ. Experiments to date with a set or sets of single continuous electrode pairs running the length of a device's long jaws have resulted in inconsistent arterial sealing and tissue cauterization. Theseinconsitent outcomes are likely due to inconsistent electrode contact with the long (1-15 cm), complext tissue sheets. That is, while the electrodes and their backing surfaces are rigid, the tissue sheets are highly variable in their thickness andcomposition, given that the tissue sheets frequently contain arteries, veins, nerves, ligaments, lymphatics, etc.To achieve sealing along the entire tissue length, the electrode or its backing surface must be conformable, but also must still be able to deliver adequate force to produce an adequate electrocautery seal. While a compressible material, such asa polymer or foam, can work, these materials do not transfer consistent force because the compressed regions of the material exert higher force than in those regions where tissue is thinner, and the materia

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United States Patent: 7794461


































 
( 1 of 1 )



	United States Patent 
	7,794,461



 Eder
,   et al.

 
September 14, 2010




Method and apparatus for surgical electrocautery



Abstract

The invention provides a surgical electrocautery method and apparatus that
     achieves sealing along the entire tissue length, and that also is able to
     deliver adequate force to produce an effective electrocautery seal. This
     problem is solved by using an incompressible fluid contained in a sac or
     sacs positioned to support the one or more electrodes used for
     electrocauterization. The profile of the electrodes thus conforms to the
     tissue surface and thickness variations, while exerting an optimized
     pressure along the entire length of the surface.


 
Inventors: 
 Eder; Joseph (Los Altos Hills, CA), Nordell, II; Benjamin Theodore (San Mateo, CA), Edelstein; Peter Seth (Menlo Park, CA) 
 Assignee:


Aragon Surgical, Inc.
 (Palo Alto, 
CA)





Appl. No.:
                    
12/410,299
  
Filed:
                      
  March 24, 2009

 Related U.S. Patent Documents   
 

Application NumberFiling DatePatent NumberIssue Date
 11371988Mar., 2006
 

 



  
Current U.S. Class:
  606/51  ; 606/52
  
Current International Class: 
  A61B 18/18&nbsp(20060101)
  
Field of Search: 
  
  


 606/51,49-50,52
  

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  Primary Examiner: Dvorak; Linda C


  Assistant Examiner: Lee; Benjamin


  Attorney, Agent or Firm: Glenn; Michael A.
Glenn Patent Group



Parent Case Text



CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS


This application is a divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No.
     11/371,988, filed 8 Mar. 2006, which application is incorporated herein
     in its entirety by this reference thereto.

Claims  

The invention claimed is:

 1.  An apparatus for surgical electrocautery, comprising: a pair of opposing jaws that are movable between an open position and a closed, clamping position;  at least
one electrode associated with one of said jaws, said at least one electrode being disposed between said jaws for contact with a tissue surface;  a plurality of springs, said springs consisting of a combination of coil springs and leaf springs, associated
with one of said jaws and positioned between said jaw and said at least one electrode to support said at least one electrode;  wherein said at least one electrode exerts pressure upon said springs when said jaws are moved to a closed, clamping position
and said at least one electrode is brought into contact with said tissue surface, wherein said at least one electrode comprises a profile that conforms to variations in said tissue surface and thickness while exerting an equal pressure along an entire
length of said tissue surface.


 2.  A method for surgical effecting electrocautery, comprising the steps of: providing a device having a pair of opposing jaws that are movable between an open position and a closed, clamping position;  associating at least one electrode with
one of said jaws, said at least one electrode being disposed between said jaws for contact with a tissue surface;  associating a plurality of springs, said springs consisting of a combination of coil springs and leaf springs, with one of said jaws and
positioned between said jaw and said at least one electrode to support said at least one electrode;  wherein said at least one electrode exerts pressure upon said springs when said jaws are moved to a closed, clamping position and said at least one
electrode is brought into contact with said tissue surface, wherein said at least one electrode comprises a profile that conforms to variation in said tissue surface and thickness while exerting an equal pressure along an entire length of said tissue
surface.


 3.  An apparatus for surgical electrocautery, comprising: a pair of opposing jaws that are movable between an open position and a closed, clamping position;  at least one electrode associated with one of said jaws, and said at least one
electrode being disposed between said jaws for contact with a tissue surface;  at least one conformance member associated with said one of said jaws with which said electrode is associated, positioned between said jaw and said at least one electrode to
support said at least one electrode;  wherein said at least one electrode exerts pressure upon said at least one conformance member when said jaw with which said electrode and said conformance member is associated is moved to a closed, clamping position
and said at least one electrode is brought into contact with said tissue surface, and wherein said at least one electrode comprises a profile that conforms to variations in said tissue surface and thickness while exerting an optimized pressure along an
entire length of said tissue surface;  wherein said conformance member comprises at least one coil spring and at least one leaf spring, each associated with said one of said jaws with which said electrode and said conformance member is associated,
positioned between said jaw and said at least one electrode to support said at least one electrode.


 4.  The apparatus of claim 3, further comprising one or more additional conformance members which comprises a gel material.


 5.  The apparatus of claim 3, further comprising one or more additional conformance members which comprise any one or combination of gel material and fluid-filled sacs.


 6.  The apparatus of claim 3, further comprising one or more additional conformance members which comprise a solid polymer-based material.


 7.  The apparatus of claim 3, wherein said conformance member further comprises a patterned surface.


 8.  The apparatus of claim 3, wherein said conformance member is comprised of a balanced set of materials having material properties and that share intimate contact with varying tissue thicknesses from less than 1 millimeter to 1 centimeter or
more along a tissue surface contacted by said device.  Description  

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION


1.  Technical Field


The invention relates to medical devices.  More particularly, the invention relates to a method and apparatus for surgical electrocautery.


2.  Description of the Prior Art


Electrocauterization is the process of cauterizing, coagulation, and/or destroying tissue with electricity.  A small probe with an electric current running through it is used to cauterize (burn or destroy) the tissue.  The procedure is frequently
used to divide tissue structures in a fashion which is hemostatic (seals blood vessels, thereby preventing bleeding).  See, for example, Y. C. Jou, M. C. Cheng, J. H. Sheen, C. T. Lin, P. C. Chen, Electrocauterization of bleeding points for percutaneous
nephrolithotomy, Urology 64(3):443-6 (September 2004).  The use of electrocautery has been extremely beneficial for the performance of surgical procedures, such as hysterectomy (the surgical removal of the uterus), where relatively long spans of tissue
must be sealed and divided to remove the organ.  Experiments to date with a set or sets of single continuous electrode pairs running the length of a device's long jaws have resulted in inconsistent arterial sealing and tissue cauterization.  These
inconsitent outcomes are likely due to inconsistent electrode contact with the long (1-15 cm), complext tissue sheets.  That is, while the electrodes and their backing surfaces are rigid, the tissue sheets are highly variable in their thickness and
composition, given that the tissue sheets frequently contain arteries, veins, nerves, ligaments, lymphatics, etc.


To achieve sealing along the entire tissue length, the electrode or its backing surface must be conformable, but also must still be able to deliver adequate force to produce an adequate electrocautery seal.  While a compressible material, such as
a polymer or foam, can work, these materials do not transfer consistent force because the compressed regions of the material exert higher force than in those regions where tissue is thinner, and the material is less compressed.


One solution in addition to the incorporation of conformable electrodes is to create multiple electrodes, where each electrode may have a different sealing profile, either from an electric power or energy standpoints, or from a conformability
standpoint; and/or electrodes with a conformal surface, either under the electrode or as a standoff to the sides of the electrodes.  While this approach is promising, there is still more to do.


It would therefore be advantageous to provide a surgical electrocautery method and apparatus that achieves sealing along the entire tissue length, and that also is able to deliver adequate force to produce an effective electrocautery seal.


SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION


The invention provides a surgical electrocautery method and apparatus that achieves sealing along the entire tissue length, and that also is able to deliver adequate force to produce an effective electrocautery seal.  One way to solve this
problem is by using an incompressible fluid contained in sac positioned to support the one or more electrodes used for electrocauterization.  The profile of the electrodes thus conforms to the tissue surface and thickness variations, while exerting an
equal pressure along the entire length of the surface.  Alternative embodiments of the invention comprise the use of various gels, either contained within a sac or in place and not contained within a sac; and various arrangements of springs and
combinations of springs and fluid substrates upon which the electrodes are placed.  The invention also contemplates the unique forming electrodes on the fluid filled sac itself, for example by sputtering, spraying, or dipped coating; as well as the use
of various springs as conformance members and as conductors, i.e. electrodes. 

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS


FIG. 1 is a side view of an electrocautery device according to a first embodiment of the invention; and


FIG. 2 is a side view of second embodiment of an electrocautery device according to the invention.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION


The invention provides a surgical electrocautery method and apparatus that achieves sealing along the entire tissue length, and that also is able to deliver adequate force to produce an effective electrocautery seal.  One way to solve this
problem is by using an incompressible fluid contained in sac positioned to support the one or more electrodes used for electrocauterization.  The profile of the electrodes thus conforms to the tissue surface and thickness variations, while exerting an
optimized pressure along the entire length of the surface.  Alternative embodiments of the invention comprise the use of various gels, either contained within a sac or in place and not contained within a sac; and various arrangements of springs and
combinations of springs and fluid substrates upon which the electrodes are placed.  The invention also contemplates the unique forming electrodes on the fluid filled sac itself, for example by sputtering, spraying, or dipped coating; as well as the use
of various springs as conformance members and as conductors, i.e. electrodes.


FIG. 1 is a side view of an electrocautery device according to a first embodiment of the invention.


The invention may comprise a fluid filled sac.  The fluid may comprise, for example, a liquid, such as saline or Ringer's solution, or another biocompatible liquid or gel.  Biocompatibility is desired due to the potential for rupture of the
liquid or gel-containing portion of the inventive sac.  One or more electrodes are mounted to the liquid filled sac.  The sac, or balloon, can either be pre-filled with liquid or gel, or filled once it has been delivered to the site at which the
electrocautery (electrosealing) is to be performed.  Thus, the amount of liquid or gel contained in the sac may be adjusted as desired for the application to which the device is put.  The sac itself may be made from any biocompatible material, such as a
surgical rubber or vinyl material, as is known in the art.  The material should also be non-conductive and heat resistant.  Further, the sac may be either a flexible, leak proof covering for a well formed within the jaws of an electrocautery device, or
it may be a balloon-like sac that entirely contains the liquid or gel and that is attached to a jaw of the electrocautery device.


The device of FIG. 1 comprises a pair of jaws 10, 12 each of which comprises a rigid support member.  The jaws are movable between a first, closed position for clamping a tissue therebetween for electrocautery and a second, open position.  The
manner for effecting this movement is not shown in the figures and is considered to be a matter of choice for the person skilled in the art.


At least one of the jaws comprises a liquid or gel filled sac 13, 14.  In this embodiment, a single electrode 15 may be provided on either side of the device jaws, or a plurality of electrodes 16a-16i may be provided on one or both jaws of the
device.  In the case of individual electrodes, the electrodes may be of varying lengths and thicknesses.  Further, the materials from which the electrodes are formed may be varied, all based on the sealing needs of the tissue in the specific region to be
sealed.


FIG. 1 shows a first jaw comprising a liquid or gel filled sac having a plurality of electrodes attached thereto, with a second jaw comprising a single (or multiple) return electrode(s).  Those skilled in the art will appreciate that a fluid
filled sac may be provided on either or both jaws, or on just portions of one or both jaws.  The sacs may be filled with a liquid, gel, small particles, compressed gas, or any combination thereof, although an incompressible fluid is presently preferred
and a compressed gas would not be appropriate for many applications to which the device is intended to be put.  Nonetheless, a compressed gas is contemplated as one medium for filling the sacs that is within the scope of the invention.


Key to the invention is that the electrodes overlay a conforming substrate which forms a portion of the jaw with which the electrode is associated.  A liquid or gel filled sac allows liquid or gel to be displaced in regions beneath the electrodes
that contact tissues that are thicker, for example, and thus fill in those regions of the sac that underlay tissue contacted by the electrodes that is thinner.  Thus, thicker tissues push electrodes into the sac and thus force the liquid or gel to push
the electrodes at or near the thinner tissue closer to the tissue at these locations.  In this way, conformity of the electrodes to the tissue is achieved.  This is advantageous not only during initial contact of the electrodes with the tissue to offset
variations in the thickness of the tissue, but also as the process of cauterization proceeds and the thickness of the tissue is altered.  That is, as the tissue is cauterized, some regions that are thicker may become thinner.  Because the thickness
profile of the tissue is altered in an unpredictable fashion by the cauterization process, the ability of the electrodes to conform with the tissue becomes an important factor in assuring even and complete cauterization across the span of tissue that is
clamped between the jaws of the device for cauterization.


In other embodiments of the invention, the sac may be partitioned, based upon a profile of the tissue or electrodes.  For example, the sac may have one portion that contains more liquid or gel and that thus presents those electrodes to the tissue
somewhat more displaced from the jaw than electrodes associated with a portion of the sac that is less highly filled.  This differential in liquid or gel contained in the sac partitions provides a profile to the electrodes that more nearly matches the
thickness/thinness of the tissue, and yet allows for conformity of the electrodes within each region.  That is, partitioning the sacs serves to both predispose the electrodes to a thinner or thicker tissue, while retaining the ability of the electrodes
to conform to local variations in the tissue thickness.


Further, the partitions within the sac may be communicatively coupled to allow a restricted flow of liquid or gel therebetween.  The restriction allows some redistribution of the liquid or gel between the sacs, and yet provides for a differing
electrode profile at different regions along the length of the jaws.


An alternative embodiment that approximates the desired results uses a gel or foam material, or mechanical spring geometry either in one or more sacs or, in the case of a gel having more mechanical integrity, i.e. solidity, or as one or more
stand-alone mounting materials that replaces the sac entirely and upon which the electrodes are disposed.


The sac material itself can constitute the electrode, as well as functioning to contain the incompressible fluid.  In this embodiment of the invention, a thin coating of a conductive material or a coating filled with conductive material can be
preferentially applied onto a portion of the surface of the sac that comes into contact with the tissue to be sealed.  The conductive material can be applied by any known technique, such as sputtering, spraying, photolithography, or dipped coating. 
Further, the material can be patterned when applied, such that a plurality of electrodes may be formed, and where the electrodes each have a different shape, size, or other constitution, as desired.  The leads necessary to connect the electrodes to a
power source may be formed in this matter as well.  This embodiment of the invention avoids the problems that may occur where the sac provides a conformal substrate for the electrodes, but the electrodes are formed of relatively rigid material that
defeats the conformal nature of the sac.  Electrodes that are formed integrally on the surface of the sac according to this embodiment of the invention are always in conformance with the surface of the tissue to which they are contacted because they are
part of the sac itself.


In other embodiments of the invention, the conformal material contained within a sac may be a solid polymer based material which provide increased pressure on the thickest tissue, for example where the arteries are located.  In these locations,
it is necessary to provide the most sealing force and, therefore, the most energy must be transmitted through the device to the tissue.  In the embodiment employing a polymer based material, the material may have a surface pattern that is provided to
optimize conformity while maintaining adequate support for the tissue to hold the tissue intact after the tissue is cauterized, for such procedures as cutting or sectioning the tissue, the surface pattern may be formed by any of molding, cutting,
patterning, and the like, and may provide any desired topological relief, such as a pattern of bumps, notches, projections, ridges, weaves, depressions, and the like.  Further, such surface patterning is not limited to the poly based material, but may
also be employed with sacs and other conformance members.


In this embodiment of the invention, a balanced set of material properties in the conformal material insures intimate contact with varying tissue thicknesses from less than 1 millimeter to 1 centimeter or more to insure uniform sealing of the
tissue, and also to exert the highest pressure in the area where it is needed most, i.e. the thickest region of the tissue.  In one embodiment of the invention, the balancing of types of conformal materials provided to provide a profile of pressure is
accomplished by a hybrid of technologies, such as a combination of liquids, gels, solid polymers, and springs (see below).  For example, the embodiment of the invention which contemplates compartments within the sac may comprise a different material in
each sac, where those portions of the device that contact areas of the tissue, such as arteries, are provided with a portion of the sac that is filled with a material that provides greater pressure to the tissue.  Alternatively, such portions of the
tissue may be confronted by a spring, or a spring may underlies a portion of the sac in those regions where additional pressure must be provided.  Further, the substrate upon which the sac is placed could be profiled such that the fluid within the sac is
predisposed to exert greater pressure at certain regions of the sac where such additional pressure is desired.


FIG. 2 is a side view of second embodiment of an electrocautery device according to the invention.  This embodiment of the invention comprises a pair of jaws 21, 22, as above, and approximates the desired results mechanically by using springs,
which may be, for example, coil springs 25 or leaf springs 26 (one example shown), or a combination thereof (as shown in FIG. 2), to effect compliance of the electrodes to the tissue.  Those skilled in the art will appreciate that other types of springs
may be used as well.  However, this embodiment of the invention has similar limitations as that of an elastomer.  The use of springs or elastomers may prove valuable in optimizing the distribution of force because the spring force is higher in areas
where the springs are more compressed, such as in thicker tissue regions which are harder to cauterize.  To allow control over this effect, springs with different tension may be provided across the span of the jaws, such that stronger or shorter springs
are provided, for example, a regions of the tissue that are known to be thicker and that, thus, require more pressure and/or less travel to make proper contact with the tissue, while weaker springs or longer springs are provided, for example, in regions
of the tissue that are known to be thinner and that, thus, require less pressure and/or more travel to make proper contact with the tissue.


Another embodiment of the invention is a hybrid of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, in which a liquid or gel filled sac is provided beneath a portion of the electrodes, while one or more springs may be provided beneath other electrodes. 
This embodiment of the invention may be applied to tissues that exhibit different properties along the region to be electrocauterized.


In an alternative embodiment of the springs, the springs may take the shape of a coil or they may be a loop spring or other spring.  Further, the springs themselves may act as electrodes, as well as providing a resilient pressure bearing surface
at the point in which the device contacts the tissue.  In this embodiment of the invention, it is not necessary to provide separate electrodes.  Further, the springs can be chosen for the amount of pressure they exert, such that a profile may be provided
to the device that provides more pressure to those regions that which greater pressure is needed and less pressure at regions where less pressure is necessary.  Further, the coil or spring electrodes can be formed from a material such as nitinol and may
be used in conjunction with liquids, gels, or solid polymers to optimize the force and conformability balance of the device.


In another embodiment of the invention, the gel, liquid, polymer, or springs can compensatorily increase volume to maintain pressure as the tissue begins to electocauterize and thereby shrink.  This embodiment of the invention maintains a
somewhat constant pressure throughout the sealing cycle.  The material used to effect the increase in volume of the sac or the material underlying the electrodes can be any known material that somewhat swells or stiffens during the electro-cauterizing
cycle as the material gets warmer, for example through conduction of heat from the tissue.  Alternatively, a more complex system can be provided, as a dynamic pressure monitoring system with a compensation mechanism built into the fluid system of the
sack, for example a thermistor could be provided that monitors the temperature of the tissue and that actuates a pump to increase the pressure in the sac by adding fluid to the sac.  Alternatively, an end-point detection system as is used for
electro-cautery could be coupled to the device to actuate a pump that compensates for shrinkage of the tissue by increasing the volume of the sac.


Although the invention is described herein with reference to the preferred embodiment, one skilled in the art will readily appreciate that other applications may be substituted for those set forth herein without departing from the spirit and
scope of the present invention.  Accordingly, the invention should only be limited by the Claims included below.


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