Japanese Society and Culture

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					CHINESE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Conversational Chinese I

Listed as 039:001

This is an introductory course for modern Chinese. It focuses on the communicative survival
skills of the spoken language covering a variety of tasks such as discussing oneself, family, daily
activities, interests, personal preferences, food, shopping, travel and lodging. Class instruction
emphasizes situational activities and performance.

Conversational Chinese II

Listed as 039:002

This course is a continuation of 039:001. It provides an introduction to modern Chinese focusing
on communication survival skills. The focus is on speaking and listening.

First Year Chinese: First Semester

Listed as 039:008 and a duplicate of 039:115

The purpose of this course is to lay groundwork for the study of modern Chinese. The course
provides instruction in all four language skills of aurally understanding, speaking, reading, and
writing. While the learning of sentence patterns is a major component of the course, efforts are
made to help students handle simple tasks such as discussing daily routines, asking for and
giving simple directions, shopping, talking on the phone, and reading and writing notes and
letters. Activities designed for the course include both deductive and inductive lectures on
grammatical constructions and cultural conventions as they relate to the language, and intensive
drills on sounds and tones, vocabulary, sentence patterns, and traditional and simplified
characters in meaningful contexts. Both pedagogically prepared texts and authentic materials are
used in this course. For the reading and writing tracks, emphasis is placed on the acquisition of
character recurring components in order to systematically improve students' Chinese
orthographic awareness. A daily grading system is employed.

First Year Chinese: Second Semester

Listed as 039:009. Continuation of 039:008

Second Year Chinese: First Semester

Listed as 039:010

Continuation of 39:009, which is prerequisite; focus on all skills. Offered fall semesters.
 This course helps students expand from their base in first year Chinese (or its equivalent) to
continue to develop their four skills of aurally understanding, speaking, reading and writing.
Many of the grammatical constructions introduced in first year Chinese are repeated in this
course with increasing sophistication in terms of style and usage. Similarly, while many of the
linguistic tasks students will learn to handle are similar to those of first year Chinese, the level of
language required to carry out these tasks is more advanced. In this course students are required
to comprehend and produce paragraph-level Chinese. Rigorous practice of spoken and written
Chinese in complex communicative activities is conducted. Students will also do intensive
reading of expository writings on a variety of cultural topics. A daily grading system will be
employed. This means that student's performance will be assessed every day, rather than by mid-
terms and finals.

Second Year Chinese: Second Semester

Listed as 039:011 and a duplicate 039:118

This course is a continuation of 039:010. Students expand from their base in the first semester of
Second-Year Chinese (or its equivalent) to continue to develop their skills of aurally
understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Many of the grammatical constructions
introduced in First-Year Chinese are repeated in this course with increasing sophistication in
terms of style and usage. Similarly, while many of the linguistic tasks students learn to handle
are similar to those of First-Year Chinese, the level of language required to carry out these tasks
is more advanced. Rigorous practice of spoken and written Chinese in complex communicative
activities is conducted. Students complete intensive reading of expository writings on a variety of
cultural topics. A daily grading system is employed. Each student's performance is assessed
every day, rather than by midterms and final exams.

Approved GE: Foreign Language. This course is part of a possible sequence of courses
approved for GE: Foreign Language.

Third Year Chinese: First Semester

Listed as 039:105, a duplicate of 39:008. Graduate standing required.

This course is part of a possible sequence of courses approved for GE: Foreign Language.

Third Year Chinese: Second Semester

Listed as 039:106

Continuation of 039:105.

Fourth Year Chinese: First Semester

Listed as 039:128

In this course, reading is used as an integrated skill for other skills. Students read rigorously both
literary and nonliterary texts on a wide range of topics related to current events, social sciences,
history, and literature. Elaborate discussions on the reading materials are conducted regularly in
order to help students develop the skills necessary to accomplish abstract reasoning in addition to
being able to narrate and describe. There is a weekly writing assignment based on materials
covered in class.

Fifth Year Chinese: First Semester

Listed as 039:165, Repeatable: May be taken 3 times.

This course is designed to help students to continue to improve their modern Chinese skills in
listening, speaking, reading, and writing; and to develop the skill to read authentic texts related to
topics of student interest. For general modern Chinese proficiency improvement, students read
rigorously both literary and nonliterary texts on a wide range of topics related to current events,
social sciences, and the humanities. Discussions of the reading materials are conducted regularly
to develop students' skills in modern Chinese at a professional level. There is a biweekly writing
assignment based on materials covered in class.

Fifth Year Chinese: Second Semester

Listed as 039:166

Continuation of 039:165.

Business Chinese

Listed as 039:130

Skill development in communication with Chinese counterparts; focus on oral bargaining,
authentic materials (invoices, price lists, business letters, etc.). Prerequisite: 039:011. Offered in
spring semesters.

Chinese Historical Phonology

Listed as 039:139, same as: 103:139

This course introduces the phonology of Mandarin and the other major Chinese dialect groups
and proceeds to a detailed reconstruction of the sound system of Middle and Old Chinese. If
time allows, possible relationships between Chinese and other language families will be explored.
There will be a final examination.

Classical Chinese: First Semester

Listed as 039:108

This course covers the written language of the late Zhou period. The focus is on grammatical
analysis and exact translation. Readings are from the Zhanguoce. Grading: Instructor has the
option of using S-U grades for Graduate College, School of Management, and graduate students
in the College of Public Health

Classical Chinese: Second Semester

Listed as 039:109

Continuation of 039:108.

Beginning Chinese for Grad Student I

Listed as 039:115

Sound system of Mandarin Chinese, basic sentence patterns; aural understanding, speaking,
reading, writing, same content as 039:008. Graduate standing required, Offered fall semesters.

Beginning Chinese for Grad Students II
Listed as 039:116

Continuation of 039:115; same content as 039:009. Graduate standing required, offered spring
semesters, prerequisite 039:008.

Beginning Chinese for Grad Students III

Listed as 039:117

Continuation of 039:116; same content as 039:010. Graduate standing required, offered fall
semesters, prerequisite 039:009.

Beginning Chinese for Grad Students IV

Listed as 039:118

Continuation of 039:117; same content as 039:010. Graduate standing required, offered spring
semesters, prerequisite 039:010.

Chinese Literature Poetry

Listed as 039:141, same as 48:141.

Readings in classical and modern Chinese poetry in English translation.

Translation Workshop: Original Language

Listed as 048:260 in Cinema and Comparative Literature, same as 08W:260, 181:260

Grading: Instructor has the option of using S-U grades for Graduate College, School of
Management, and graduate students in the College of Public Health

Section 1 - Original Language

This workshop focuses on the practical aspects of literary translation as well as on the theoretical
and critical issues related to this act. The core of the class is student presentations of translations-
in-progress, which will engender discussion and critique and serve as the basis for the
exploration of theoretical questions and practical strategies in approaching translation. Students
also may read articles on theoretical issues in translation and examine our own assumptions and
personal stances and the ways these might affect and inform our translation practices. The class
provides students not only the opportunity to hone their skills as translators, but also a forum in
which to explore issues of language and literariness and a host of other fascinating questions that
arise during the complex process of translation. Requirements include a good command both of
English and of another language (college-level skills are desirable). Students also are asked to
bring to the class an open-minded, respectful, and supportive attitude and a willingness to share
ideas. In all, this graduate workshop provides students with the opportunity to receive extensive
feedback from the instructor and from other students on the translation into English of published
literary works in languages other than English. Students enrolled in the CCL translation program
often use this course as a forum for completing and/or editing the required MFA thesis in
translation. Students from other departments and disciplines are also welcome, if they wish to
work on their own translation into English of a previously published novel, a collection of poems,
or short stories. Students are asked to periodically provide copies of a chapter, a story, or a few
poems for the class to discuss. There are no exams.

Section 2 - Interactive

If you like the poetry of Tomaz Salamun, then you may love the International Writing Program's
(IWP) Translation Workshop, which pairs off writers from abroad with writer-translators from
the University of Iowa to create new works of poetry and fiction in English. Salamun is one of
scores of poets and writers to profit from collaborating with members of the Workshop, whose
own works have been profoundly shaped by their encounters with IWP writers. The Translation
Workshop meets on Friday afternoons. Students don't need to be fluent in another language to
participate, they only need to be excited by the prospect of working closely with another writer.

Introduction to Chinese Linguistics

Listed as 039:144, same as: 103:144

Reading in Chinese Literature

Listed as 039:171

This course is designed for advanced modern Chinese learners to further improve their Chinese
reading and writing proficiency through literary texts. Readings include excerpts from novels,
more poems as well as non-fiction writings besides short stories written by contemporary
Chinese writers. Discussions of the reading materials are conducted regularly. Requirements
include four response essays, an oral presentation, one mid-term and one final. The course is
conducted in Chinese.

Modern Chinese Writers

Listed as 039:180.

The course covers readings of fictions by modern Chinese authors in English translations.

Chinese Literature: Prose

Listed as 039:142

Readings in Chinese prose, primarily fiction, from third century B. C. to 1900 A. D. in English
translation.

Seminar: Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema

Listed as 039:244

Roles played by cinematic icons and topologies in the discourse of modernity in China. May be
repeated.

East Meets West: A Cross-Cultural Course

Listed as 039:192, same as 048:192
Overview of cross-cultural perceptions in modern period based on films, literary, and
philosophical texts from and East and West.

Seminar in Chinese fiction

Listed as 039:240.

Readings and discussions of novels, novelettes from 16th to 18th century (Ming and Qing periods.
Prerequisite: ability to read original Chinese text.

Second Language Classroom Reading

Listed as 039:177

Same as: 07E:183, 07S:183

Teach Chinese as a Foreign Language II: Curriculum/Methodology/Assessment

Listed as 039:203.

The course covers multi-levels of major Chinese textbooks, curricular organizational schemes,
existing language programs, communicative language instruction; development of
supplementary materials for a University Chinese course. The objectives of the course will be
fourfold: (1) to familiarize students with various curricular organizational schemes and existing
language programs. Selected articles and materials will be assigned as bases for discussion of
those schemes and programs; (2) to introduce students to some of the major Chinese language
textbooks and tests at a number of levels; Brief (10-15 minutes) oral critiques of two of those
materials will be required; (3) to familiarize students with both teacher-guided and student-
centered classroom instruction and the roles that each type of instruction plays in different
curricular organizational schemes and language programs. A three-week teaching practicum is
required in which students demonstrate effective use of both teacher-guided and student-centered
teaching methodologies, with emphasis on the latter types; (4) to give students an opportunity to
develop materials for the UI Chinese Language Program.

Individual Chinese for Advanced Students

Listed as 039:215

An instructor number and approval are required for registration in this course. Contact the
instructor (or designated individual) for the instructor number, which you enter as the section
number when you register. At the same time you should make the required semester hours, time,
and place arrangements. Grading: Instructor has the option of using S-U grades for Graduate
College, School of Management, and graduate students in the College of Public Health

Principles of Teaching and Learning Foreign Languages

Listed as 039:234:001; Same as: 009:234, 013:221, 041:234

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of current thinking about the
teaching and learning of foreign languages through consideration of both practice and theory.
The major approaches to foreign language teaching are discussed with particular emphasis on
approaches that focus on communicative language learning and teaching. In addition, research on
second language acquisition is discussed along with its application to the classroom teaching of
foreign languages. Note that this course is not designed as a lecture course; student input is both
welcome and expected. The course is open to graduate students in the departments of German,
French and Italian, Russian, and Asian languages, as well as other interested students.

MA Thesis

Listed as 039:291

An instructor number and approval are required for registration in this course. Contact the
instructor (or designated individual) for the instructor number, which you enter as the section
number when you register. At the same time you should make the required semester hours, time,
and place arrangements. Grading: Instructor has the option of using S-U grades for Graduate
College, School of Management, and graduate students in the College of Public Health


JAPANESE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Elementary Japanese: Review

Listed as 39J:011

This course is designed for students with previous study of Japanese. Students should know all
of the syllabaries prior to taking this course. Review of material presented in 39J:010.
Prerequisite: Japanese language study.

First Year Japanese: First Semester

Listed as 39J:010

This course aims at continuous development of the four basic skills of communication. While
reviewing the basic grammar, expressions, and characters covered in first-year Japanese, this
course helps students expand their structural as well as sociolinguistic knowledge of the
language. The goal is to establish the ability to be able to communicate everyday needs in
common conversational situations and the ability to read and write simple memos, letters, and
essays.
First Year Japanese: Second Semester

Listed as 39J:012

Continuation of 39J:010 focusing on development of four basic skills of communication.

Second Year Japanese: First Semester

Listed as 39J:101, a duplicate of 39J:117

Prerequisite 39J:012 or equivalent as demonstrated in written and oral examinations. GE:
foreign language. Offered fall semesters.

This course aims at continuous development of the four basic skills of communication. While
reviewing the basic grammar, expressions, and characters covered in the First Year Japanese, the
course helps students expand their structural as well as sociolinguistic knowledge of the
language. Our goal is to establish the ability to be able to communicate everyday needs in
common conversational situations and the ability to read and write simple memos, letters, and
essays. Approved for GE: Foreign Language. This course is part of a possible sequence of
courses approved for GE: Foreign Language.

Second Year Japanese: Second Semester

Listed as 39J:102

Continuation of 39J:101, which is a prerequisite; same content as 39J:118. Open only to
undergraduates. Offered spring in semesters. GE: Foreign language

Third Year Japanese: Conversation I

Listed as 39J:105

This course covers modern Japanese with focus on speaking and listening. It provides the
development of functional ability to understand and speak Japanese. Objectives of the course are
to learn how to ask and answer with ease questions dealing with the topics of everyday living, to
acquire a broader, basic, practical vocabulary, and to gain practice in discussing matters of
everyday concerns. Grades are determined by preparation of and participation in assignments,
oral expressions, quizzes, and exams. Students are urged to take this course concurrently with
39J:107 (Third Year Japanese: Reading and Writing I).

Third Year Japanese: Conversation II

Listed as 39J:106

Continuation of 39J:105, which is a prerequisite. Offered in spring semesters.

Third Year Japanese: Reading & Writing I

Listed as 39J:107

This course covers modern Japanese and is designed to develop reading and writing skills in
Japanese. The main goals are to develop the ability to read more authentic materials, expand
student knowledge of Japanese culture and people, and to develop the ability to express ideas and
opinions in Japanese. During the semester, students become more familiar with modern
technology such as electronic mail, Japanese word processor, the Internet, and other language
programs available through the use of computers. Requirements include homework assignments,
frequent kanji quizzes, speed-reading exercises, quizzes, and exams. Students are urged to take
this course concurrently with 39J:105 (Third Year Japanese: Conversation I).

Third Year Japanese: Reading & Writing II

Listed as 39J:108

Continuation of 39J:107 which is a prerequisite. Offered in spring semesters.

Classical Japanese: First Semester

Listed as 39J:119
The course focuses on grammar, reading in classical Japanese. Consent of instructor required.
Offered fall semesters. Prerequisite: 39J:106

Classical Japanese: First Semester

Listed as 39J:120

Continuation of 39J:119 which is a prerequisite. Offered in spring semesters.

Fourth Year Japanese: First Semester

Listed as 39J:121

This course covers modern Japanese with an emphasis on communication skills. Focus is on the
development of effective communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
Students are introduced to various authentic materials (newspaper articles, videos, essays) and
computer-aided communication (World Wide Web, e-mail). Grades are based on class
performance, quizzes, exams, oral presentations, and a project. Repeatable: May be taken 3 times.

Fourth Year Japanese: Second Semester

Listed as 39J:122

This course is a continuation of 39J:121. The focus is on the development of effective
communication skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to
various authentic materials (newspaper articles, videos, essays) and computer-aided
communication (World Wide Web, e-mail). Grades are based on class performance, quizzes,
tests, oral presentations, and a project.

Fifth Year Japanese: First Semester

Listed as 39J:131

Improvement of Japanese for academic and professional purposes. Offered fall semesters. May
be repeated; prerequisite:39J:121 or consent of instructor.

Fifth Year Japanese: Second Semester

Listed as 39J:132

Continuation of 39J:131. Offered spring semesters. May be repeated.

Beginning Japanese for Graduate Students I

Listed as 39J:115

Modern Japanese, same content as 39J:010

Beginning Japanese for Graduate Students II

Listed as 39J:116
Continuation of 39J:115, same content as 39J:012

Beginning Japanese for Graduate Students III

Listed as 39J:117

Continuation of 39J:116, same content as 39J:101

Beginning Japanese for Graduate Students IV

Listed as 39J:118

Continuation of 39J:117, same content as 39J:102

Language in Japanese Society

Listed as 39J:103

The course covers aspects of the Japanese language that reflect culture, social structures of Japan;
communication styles and strategies, cross-cultural communication, language in media,
metaphors.

Introduction to Japanese Linguistics

Listed as 39J:124

Phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics; enhanced understanding of basic
structural features of the Japanese language. Prerequisite: 39J:010, 011, 012.

Workshop in Japanese Literary Translation

Listed as 39J:130

This is a workshop in translation from Japanese to English, with emphasis on literary translation,
issues in the theory and practice of translation, and special features of Japanese as a source
language for translation. Grading: Offered on S-F basis only for undergraduates; instructor has
the option of using S-U grades for Graduate College, School of Management, and graduate
students in the College of Public Health

Modern Japanese Fiction in Translation

Listed as 39J:142; same as: 048:142

Theme: Japanarchy A Japanese woman was executed for thinking about killing the emperor in
1911. In the 1970s, another Japanese woman led a "terrorist army" dedicated to global revolution
and the abolition of Japan's imperial house. In the late 1990s, yet another Japanese woman took
up the subjects of violence and the emperor, but with a very different political sensibility. She
gained notoriety as a punk rock singer who defended the sanctity of the emperor and advocated
the "re-militarization" of contemporary Japan. All of these women have inspired curiosity,
admiration, and loathing for their positions on the perennially contentious question as to what
extent Japan is or should be a hierarchical society. This survey course critically examines images
of Japan as an "authoritarian" and "hierarchical" society through the study of literary texts and
films. The required material covers the period from 1890 to the present and includes fictional
works by major authors, epistolary writings by anarchists, and controversial works by recent
writers, artists, and filmmakers. Prior study or knowledge of Japanese or Japanese literature is
not required. All of the course readings will be in English, and film and television programs will
be subtitled. Written Assignments: Students will be required to submit weekly response papers
(1-3 pages) on assigned topics and make one in-class presentation. There will be one in-class
midterm and a take-home final exam.

Topics in Japanese Literature in Translation

Listed as 39J:143

Post-economic miracle. Japan's rise to G7 member state status has often been explained in terms
of the strength of the "Japanese family" and how this model is extended to inform relationships
in the workplace. While discussions of Japanese "family values" contribute to predictable and
comforting views of cultural identity and national achievement, they fail to address the diverse
realities of those whose families do not conform to the highly touted model of middle class
success. In this course, we will explore a wide variety of postwar representations of Japanese
family experience. The fiction, poetry, films, and TV shows we study will allow us to think
beyond the limits of stereotypes and ideals so that we can better understand the many changing
meanings of "family" in Japan from 1945 to the present. We will also look at what the "Japanese
family" means to several Japanese American writers, as well as to a group of elderly Korean
women. Prior study of Japanese literature or knowledge of Japanese is not necessary. All
readings will be in English, and film and television programs will be subtitled. Written
Assignments: There will be one short assignment or in-class quiz each week in addition to an
essay (5-7 pages) or project (determined in consultation with the instructor) due at the end of the
semester. There will be one in-class midterm and a take-home final exam.

Major Authors in Modern Japanese Literature

Listed as 39J:144.

The course covers authors such as Soseki, Ogai, Kafu, Tanizaki, Abe, Oe and their major works
in English translation.

The Tale of Genji

Listed as 39J:145; same as: 048:144

Closing reading in English of Murasaki Shikibu’s Tale of Genji ; literary and social contexts;
later reception.

Warriors Dreams

Listed as 39J:146; same as: 048:147

This course focuses on images of the warrior in traditional Japanese literature (in English
translation) from poetry of the 8th century to romances of the 19th century. No knowledge of
Japanese is required.

East Meets West: A Cross-Cultural Course
Listed as 039:192, same as 048:192

The course is an overview of cross-cultural perceptions in modern period based on films, literary,
and philosophical texts from and East and West.

Japanese Linguistics

Listed as 39J:200

This course introduces various aspects of the languages of Japan, focusing on the structure of the
Japanese language that will be useful in teaching Japanese as a foreign language. The course
begins with a brief introduction of the Ainu language and proceeds to a general overview of the
Japanese language: genetic affiliation, history, phonetics & phonology, morphology, semantics,
syntax, and pragmatics. Discussion will then turn to grammatical structures that are
characteristics of Japanese and may be problematic to students of Japanese. The primary
objective of the course is to gain a general understanding of the Japanese language beyond the
prescriptive grammar and to be able to analyze selected structures consulting grammar
references written by linguists. Prerequisite: Introductory course in general linguistics.

Second Language Acquisition Research/Theory I

Listed as 39J:201; same as: 009:237, 035:201, 039:200, 164:201

This course is an overview of, and introduction to, theories about how people acquire (or don't
acquire) second and later languages. A primary focus is on understanding the various
perspectives (e.g., linguistic, psychological, sociological) that have been brought to bear on this
question and on evaluating various current theories. A second focus is on the various paradigms
(e.g., experimental designs, case studies, discourse analysis) used in second language acquisition
research, with the goal of enabling students to read the relevant literature critically and
intelligently. Students develop their own second language acquisition research project and
prepare and defend a detailed proposal. Students who then take 164:202 carry out their project
and write a full research report. The course is taught in English.

Japanese as Foreign Language: Practical Applications

Listed as 39J:202.

This course is an introduction to methods of foreign language teaching with a special emphasis
on Japanese. The first half of this course focuses on both theoretical and practical issues on
curriculum development, syllabus design, factors related to classroom language acquisition. The
latter half of this course deals with class management, material development, and assessment.
Grades are based on class performance, assignments, the midterm and a final project. This is a
required course for a M.A. in Asian Languages and Literature and the teacher certification in
Japanese. Instructional methodology, curriculum and material design; hands on experience.
Prerequisite: 39J:122 or consent of instructor.

Individual Japanese for Advanced Students

Listed as 39J:215
An instructor number and approval are required for registration in this course. Contact the
instructor (or designated individual) for the instructor number, which you enter as the section
number when you register. At the same time you should make the required semester hours, time,
and place arrangements.

Principles of Teaching and Learning Foreign Languages

Listed as 039:234; same as: 009:234, 013:221, 041:234

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of current thinking about the
teaching and learning of foreign languages through consideration of both practice and theory.
The major approaches to foreign language teaching are discussed with particular emphasis on
approaches that focus on communicative language learning and teaching. In addition, research on
second language acquisition is discussed along with its application to the classroom teaching of
foreign languages. Note that this course is not designed as a lecture course; student input is both
welcome and expected. The course is open to graduate students in the departments of German,
French and Italian, Russian, and Asian languages, as well as other interested students.

Analysis of Japanese Discourse

Listed as 39J:240

Methodological frameworks for analyzing discourse, linguistic structures examined in actual
context of their use.

Reading in Modern Japanese

Listed as 39J:251

Readings in modern Japanese. May be repeated, consent of instructor required.

Readings in Japanese Literary Texts

Listed as 39J:252

Readings, translation of classical or modern works. May be repeated, consent of instructor
required. Prerequisite 39J:251.

Second Language Acquisition of Japanese

Listed as 39J:258.

No detailed description is provided.

MA Thesis

Listed as 039:291

An instructor number and approval are required for registration in this course. Contact the
instructor (or designated individual) for the instructor number, which you enter as the section
number when you register. At the same time you should make the required semester hours, time,
and place arrangements. Grading: Instructor has the option of using S-U grades for Graduate
College, School of Management, and graduate students in the College of Public Health


KOREAN

First Year Korean: First Semester

Listed as 039:040

This course is an introduction to the language and culture of Korea. The skills of speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing are practiced. Drills on pronunciation, grammar, and
vocabulary are an integral part of the course. Emphasis is on providing students with a
background in the structure of the language. Requirements include homework assignments, a
midterm, frequent quizzes, and a final exam.

First Year Korean: Second Semester

Listed as 039:041

Continuation of 039:040.

Second Year Korean: First Semester

Listed as 039:042

This is an intermediate Korean course. Students develop skills in reading and writing sentences,
and also learn social and cultural aspects of the language. Chinese characters are introduced.
Grades are based on homework assignments, frequent quizzes, and exams.

Second Year Korean: Second Semester

Listed as 039:043

Continuation of 039:042.


EAST ASIAN CULTURE AND SOCIETY

Japanese Society and Culture

Listed as 113:125 in Anthropology, same as: 39J:125

This course will examine Japanese society and culture from an anthropological perspective. It
will address such topics as religious tradition, linguistic patterns, social organization and conflict,
human ecology, identity formation and manipulation, educational and political systems, business
ethos, and Japan's position and role within a global context.
Japan has a very long history, and its society and culture are products of an ongoing
developmental process. Accordingly, a historical dimension has been built into the course. This
is important not just in recognizing how past events and conditions influence life in the present,
but also in considering how present needs and attitudes result in reconfiguring the past. The
course will reconsider, for example, the conventional image of the Japanese as a homogeneous
society whose culture is firmly rooted in the traditional rice-cultivating villages of a bygone era.
Several alternative examples will be presented in challenging this image, drawing in particular
from the Ainu and Okinawan cultures.

Asian Art and Culture

Listed as 01H:016 in Art and Art History; same as: 039:016

Major Asian art works in many media and forms in their cultural and historical contexts,
presented chronologically within each of three parts: India, then China, then Japan. Students are
introduced to the cultural distinctions of these different yet related civilizations of Asia through
the visual arts. The chronological structure highlights historical processes and provides
perspectives on continuity and change. The wide variety of materials and methods demands
interdisciplinary approaches. The course will have two lectures each week, conducted by the
professor, plus one weekly discussion section led by a TA. The entire class will meet together
for the lectures, but will be divided into sections of approximately 22 students each for the
discussions. Texts include Craven, Indian Art; Tregear, Chinese Art; Stanley-Baker, Japanese
Art. Selected supplementary material will be on reserve in the Art Library. Grades will be based
on three exams (India; China; Japan ;), brief written exercises assigned in discussion sections,
and attendance and participation.

Approved GE: Foreign Civilization and Culture or Historical Perspectives or Fine Arts

Introduction to the Art of China

Listed as 01H:031 in Art and Art History; same as 039:028

This is an introductory-level, chronologically structured course on selected visual arts of China
and their historical and cultural contexts. Topics include painting, ceramics, sculpture,
architecture, metals, calligraphy, and others, including aspects of their styles, techniques,
archeology, documentation, and criticism, as pertinent. Requirements include a midterm, a final
exam, and a short written paper. The text is Sullivan's The Arts of China.

Introduction to the Art of Japan

Listed as 01H:033 in Art and Art History; same as: 39J:033

The course is intended primarily for undergraduates. Chronological (Neolithic to Recent) survey
of the visual arts of Japan in their historical and cultural contexts will be covered. Class meetings
include discussion and lectures conducted by the instructor and based on readings and other
assignments. Slides, films, and other visual materials used extensively. Mid-term and final
examinations; one or two written exercises will be required. Other materials will be available in
the Art Library and on the Web.

Chinese Art and Culture

Listed as 01H:119 in Art and Art History

The course is intended for both undergraduate and graduate students. Selective treatment of
Chinese visual arts in historical and cultural context will be covered. The plan for Fall 2004 is
to concentrate on Chinese painting and printmaking, 10th through 20th centuries, with special
emphasis on (1) Song and Yuan periods (10th through 14th centuries) and (2) developments in
the last 150 years (late Qing dynasty and "Modern" periods). Class meetings include discussion
and lectures conducted by the instructor and based on readings and other assignments. Slides,
films, and other visual materials used extensively. Mid-term and final examinations; a small
number of written exercises.

Chinese Painting I

Listed as 01H:120 in Art and Art History, same as 039:120

The course focuses on early Chinese painting from fourth century B. C. through 13th century A.
D.; figure style, emergence of landscape.

Chinese Painting II

Listed as 01H:121 in Art and Art History, same as 039:121

The course focuses on landscape of 14th through 18th century, with sources in earlier periods.

Japanese Painting

Listed as 01H:006 in Art and Art History

No detailed description.

Japanese Art and Culture

Listed as 01H:122 in Art and Art History, same as 39J:156

The course focuses on art and architecture of Japan and their relation to philosophies such as
Shintoism, Buddhism, and Zen.

Themes in Asian Art History: The Asian Potter

Listed as 01H:124 in Art and Art History, same as 039:131

This is a pro-seminar-style course on the ceramics of China, Korea, and Japan. The
chronological structure examines historical and cultural contexts and developments, with
considerable emphasis on techniques, styles, documentation, criticism, and other aspects of
ceramics as a visual art. Brief quizzes and short written exercises supplant exams, but a longer
written paper, class presentation, or other project (to be agreed on by each individual participant
in consultation with the instructor) is a major determinant in the final grade.

Topics in Asian History: U.S.-East Asian Relations

Listed as 16W:178; same as 039:175

This course examines relations of the United States and China, Japan, and Korea from the early
19th until the late 20th century. This was a period of far-reaching changes in these four societies,
including the development of modern state structures, industrialization, and social and cultural
upheavals, and the interactions between these countries have been significant influences. The
main purpose of this course is to give you the opportunity to acquire a good understanding of the
history of these relations and how they affected these four societies. In addition to historical
analyses, we will study such documents as treaties and policy papers. Coursework includes
quizzes, a midterm and a final examination, and an analysis of a treaty between the United States
and China, Japan, or Korea. Repeatable: May be taken 2 times.

Civilizations of Asia: China

Listed as 016:005 in History; same as 039:055

This course provides an introductory survey of Chinese history and civilization from its origins
to the present day. Students explore Confucian philosophy, Buddhism and Daoism, art and
literature, the writing system and calligraphy, the imperial political system, family and women,
foreign encroachments, 20th-century revolutions, and Chinese society today. Readings include
history, fiction translated from Chinese, and biography. No previous knowledge of China (or of
Chinese) is required. Although the primary course format is lecture, students work on writing
and discussion skills. Approved GE: Foreign Civilization and Culture or Historical Perspectives

Modern China 1600s to 1920s

Listed as:16W:196 in History, same as 039:154

This survey of modern Chinese history begins with the decline of the Ming dynasty and the
conquest of China by Manchus in the 1600s, followed by the glorious years of the Qing (Manchu)
dynasty in the 1700s. In the 1800s, social problems brought huge internal rebellions. Western
encroachments weakened China further, ending the dynasty in 1912. The new government of the
Republic of China was accompanied by efforts to create a new culture and by new political
parties. The course ends with the rise to power of the Nationalist Party and its bloody split with
the Communists in the 1920s. Readings include translations of original sources. No previous
knowledge of China is necessary. Approved GE: Foreign Civilization and Culture

History of Modern China since 1927

Listed as: 16W:198 in History, same as 039:196

This course is a survey of twentieth-century Chinese history, beginning with to coming to power
of the Nationalist Party under Chiang Kai-shek in 1927. We will study Nationalist rule and
Japanese invasion in the 1930s; the rise of the Communist Party and the establishment of the
People’s Republic under Mao Zedong in 1949; the sweeping changes of the early Communist era;
Maoist radicalism and the Cultural Revolution; the reforms of Deng Xiaoping; and the situation
in China (and Taiwan) today. The course logically follows 16W:196/39:154, but that course is
not required as a prerequisite, and no previous knowledge of China is needed.

Colloquium for History Majors: The Communist Revolution in China 1937-49

Listed as 16W:051 in History

This colloquium is to help History majors develop their skills at historical thinking, reading,
research, and writing. We will discuss and ponder the writing of history, its methods and goals,
how written history differs from the past as experience, the distinction between primary and
secondary sources, and different styles of historical writing. We will read and analyze historical
articles, books, and primary sources. You will have the experience of doing research using
primary historical materials, and of writing a long paper based on it, having the paper read and
critiqued by others, and rewriting it. You will also practice other kinds of writing: short
reactions to readings, a book report, and suggestions for improvements on colleagues’ research
papers. We will work on these skills while learning about the revolution which brought Mao
Zedong's Communist Party to power in 1949 and its background in the Japanese invasion of
China in 1937, and the civil war with the ruling Nationalist Party under Chiang Kai-shek. No
previous knowledge about China is expected.
I
Civilizations of Asia: Japan

Listed as 016:006 in History, same as 039:056

This is an overview of Japanese political, social, economic, and cultural history from the
emergence of Japanese civilization until the last half of the 20th century. There are many
continuities and breaks in this long history. We will look at how major political and social
institutions, such as the emperor and court, the samurai, religion, arts, and family structure
developed and changed. Coursework includes two short papers, a midterm and a final
examination.

Japan - Age of the Samurai

Listed 16W:172 in History, same as 39J:172

This course examines Japanese history in the age of the Samurai, beginning with the rise of the
warrior ruling class in the 12th century and concluding with the overthrow of the Tokugawa
Bakufu in 1867. This is not a military history, but rather a history of social, political, and cultural
developments during Japan's long feudal period, when the warrior class ruled Japan. The course
makes extensive use of Japanese feature films. Requirements include quizzes, two short papers, a
midterm, and a final exam.

Modern Japan

Listed as 16W:173; same as: 39J:173

The course covers the period from the early nineteenth until the end of the twentieth century, a
period when Japanese society changed enormously. We will examine such topics as the end of
feudal society, the establish of the institutions of a modern nation-state after 1868, rapid
industrialization and social transformation, the acquisition of a modern colonial empire, Japan's
brief career as a military rival of the Great Powers, Japan's devastating defeat in the Second
World War and the political, socio-economic and cultural changes in the second half of the
twentieth century. Coursework includes quizzes and short writing assignments, a midterm and a
final examination, and a longer paper on assigned readings.

Readings Japanese History

Listed as 016:294; same as: 39J:257

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to recently published English-language
scholarship on selected topics in modern Japanese history. The timeframe is flexible but most
readings will be in the period 1840-1960. The course is intended to serve the needs of graduate
students who wish to do a second or outside field in modern Japan, but anyone with a serious
interest in Japanese history is welcome to enroll. Some college level course work on Japan is
desirable but not absolutely necessary. Students without college level course work should speak
to me before enrolling.
The course will divide into pre and post-spring break sessions. Up to spring break we will meet
to discuss weekly readings and students will write short critiques. After spring break, students
will pursue individual reading projects consistent with their needs. Individual projects can take a
variety of forms, ranging from research papers to annotated bibliographies.

Students may register for 3 or 4 semester hours, depending on the scope of the individual project.
Students interested in enrolling are encouraged to call or email me before the start of the spring
semester. The reading list is flexible and I try to accommodate students’ interests.

Finally, we anticipate visits to campus of several distinguished Japan scholars. Their lectures and
specially organized workshops will be integrated into the syllabus. Grading: Instructor has the
option of using S-U grades for Graduate College, School of Management, and graduate students
in the College of Public Health

Japan-US Relations

Listed as 16W:175 in History; same as 39J:175

Since Commodore Perry landed in Japan in 1853, the United States has influenced the course of
Japanese history, and Japan has also played an important part in American national life. This
course covers relations between Japan and the United States 20th centuries, with an emphasis on
diplomatic and military as well and cultural and economic interactions. Course materials include
historical texts, fiction and film. Graded work included class participation (attendance and active
participation is expected of all students), in-class and other writing assignments, including a
longer paper, and a midterm and a final examination.

Issues: Vietnam War in Historical Perspective

Listed as 016:011 in History

This course examines the historical conditions of conflict in Vietnam that existed prior to the
American intervention, and then moves on to consider the intervention itself. Topics include
peasant economy and social structure, French colonial rule, Cold War politics at home and
abroad, U.S. sponsored nation-building and counter insurgency, Communist social and military
strategies, American soldiers and the war, and the war and American society. Students are urged
to contact the Department of History for descriptions of the topics dealt with in each section
offered. These topics also are posted on the web site, http://www.uiowa.edu/~history, when they
become available.

Vietnam War on Film

Listed as 16W:183

This course examines Vietnamese history from the mid-19th century to the defeat of American
power in 1975, and aspects of 20th-century U.S. diplomatic and political history that shaped
America's confrontation with the Vietnamese revolution. The course also deals with a series of
films that address American attitudes about military conflict, politics, and social change, as well
as the U.S. war in Vietnam. What, if anything, do these films say about the horrific military
conflict that devastated Southeast Asia? What do these films say about 20th-century American
civilization and a Hollywood film industry that has been one of the most dynamic and influential
forces in contemporary culture? Approved GE: None Prerequisites: (4 s.h. option) history major
with junior or senior standing

Law in Asia in Transition

Listed as 091:304 in Law

Focuses on the development and reform of law and legal institutions in selected Asian countries,
including Vietnam, China and India. Topics of discussion will include the changing role of
socialist constitutions; law and the regulation of civil society nonprofit organizations,
philanthropy, grassroots organizations and the state; the reform of courts, prosecutorial
institutions and legal process; the transformation of the legal profession; the struggle for the
authority of law and against corruption in socialist transitional states; law in the service of
globalization and the case of export labor; and foreign models and foreign donor support in
Asian legal reform. Students will write a research paper due in December

Government and Politics of the Far East

Listed as 030:143 in Political Science; same as 039:178

This course examines the two major Asian political systems, the People's Republic of China and
Japan. Students explore three general themes: historical, cultural, and socioeconomic bases of
politics; the functions of key government institutions; and the dynamics of political process. The
goal is to understand how and why political life is organized as it is in the two political systems.
Requirements include a midterm, a final exam, and two short papers.

Chinese Foreign Policy

Listed as 030:163 in Political Science

This course introduces major topics in the foreign policy of the People’s Republic of China from
its founding in 1949 to the present. It will explore a number of important events, including
China’s entry into the Korean War in 1950, the Sino-Soviet split in the 1960s, rapprochement
between China and the United States in the 1970s, tensions with Taiwan in the 1990s, and
China’s recent accession to the World Trade Organization. The underlying goals are two-fold.
First, the course challenges students to investigate multiple accounts of events with a critical
mind in order to come up with the most compelling version of the truth. Second, by considering
competing explanations for these important turning points, students will have an opportunity to
understand and assess some of the major theoretical approaches to the study of international
relations.

Voluntary Organizations & Politics Comparative Perspectives

Listed as 030:173 in Political Science

Though they have existed for centuries, voluntary organizations have recently become a central
focus of political study and public debate. The boundaries of this category are rather diffuse,
including what are called non-government organizations (NGOs), some kinds of non-profit
organizations, “civil society,” and other concepts. In poor and rich countries alike, voluntary
organizations are seen by some as enhancing development and democracy by providing services,
calling attention to problems, stimulating civic engagement, demanding government
accountability, and increasing “social capital.” Acting internationally, non-state organizations
have influenced major actors such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, and the
World Bank. This course critically explores the politics of the voluntary sector in all its
manifestations and in a diverse set of countries.

Asian Studies

Listed as 039:199

Grading: Offered on S-F basis only for undergraduates; instructor has the option of using S-U
grades for Graduate College, School of Management, and graduate students in the College of
Public Health. Repeatable: Up to a total of 15 s.h.

An instructor number and approval are required for registration in this course. Contact the
instructor (or designated individual) for the instructor number, which you enter as the section
number when you register. At the same time you should make the required semester hours, time,
and place arrangements.

Living Religions of the East

Listed as 032:004 in Religious Studies; same as 039:064

This course provides a survey of the salient religious ideas and practices of India, China, Tibet,
Japan, and Southeast Asia. These include Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto,
and other unclassified religions of Asia. Materials used are readings and videos. The classes will
consist of lectures, videos of varying length, and discussion sections. Attendance is mandatory,
as the lectures will include information not in the readings. Approved GE: Foreign Civilization
and Culture or Historical Perspectives

Introduction to Buddhism

Listed as 032:006 in Religious Studies; same as: 039:006

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the main ideas and practices of Buddhism as
they developed in Asian history. Course material is arranged chronologically, covering the
origins of Buddhism, the formulation of its early teachings, the Mahayana revival, and later
elaborations in the East Asian context. Readings include both modern secondary works and
selected primary texts in translation. Grades are based on in-class exams, perhaps some short
written assignments, and class participation. No prior study of Buddhism is required or expected.
The course provides critical background for understanding the traditional cultures of India, Sri
Lanka, Southeast Asia, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan; it fulfills the Asian religions foundation
requirement for the Religion major.

Asian Humanities: Japan

Listed as 032:007 in Religious Studies; same as 039:020

This course is an introduction to Japanese culture from early times to the modern period as
presented in literature as well as drama, architecture, landscaping, tea practices, and the visual
arts. Reading assignments will include translations of selected Japanese literary and dramatic
works as well as background readings in cultural history. Visual presentations (videos, slides,
etc.) will be used in class whenever possible. Requirements for the course in addition to the
readings will include in-class examinations and one or two short written assignments. No
prerequisites.

Religion in Japan

Listed as 032:116 in Religious Studies; same as 39J:109

This course introduces students to the principle ideas and practices of Japanese religion
presented in the context of their historical development. Topics range from popular religious
phenomena to the teachings of great Buddhist thinkers. Course format is lecture and discussion.

Asian Religious Traditions

Listed as 032:202 in Religious Studies

This course is an introduction to the fundamental ideas and practices of the major religious
traditions of Asia. It is required of all graduate students in Religious Studies.

Chinese Religions

Listed as 032:010 in Religious Studies; same as: 039:007

This course is a general survey of Chinese religions. It will focus on Chinese traditional
religious beliefs and practices, both among the elite and the general population, and will also
address recent developments in mainland China and Taiwan, as well as Chinese religions in the
West. In the course we will discuss the religious ideas of Confucianism, Daoism, and aspects of
Buddhism, and we will also examine ancestor worship, cults of deities, and practices such as
spirit possession, faith healing, and ghost marriages.

Topics in Asian Religions: Reading Buddhist Scripture

Listed as 032:170 in Religious Studies

In this course participants will explore some of the major doctrinal and philosophical movements
within Buddhism through reading a selection of Buddhist scriptures translated from the Sanskrit,
Pali, Chinese and Tibetan. The course will also address issues such the classification of Buddhist
scriptures, scriptural authority, translation and its problems, and the role of commentary. Finally,
the notions of “scripture” and “canon” in religious studies will be discussed and the applicability
and usefulness of these terms in the case of Buddhism debated.

Asian Religions Colloquium: Asian traditions of monasticism.

Listed as 032:208 in Religious Studies

In this colloquium we are going to address broad issues in Asian monasticism, from historical,
doctrinal, political and anthropological perspectives. Although the most important Asian
monastic traditions which will form the core of the course are Buddhist, we will also address
Hindu, Jain and Daoist traditions of monasticism. Furthermore, we will look at traditions of
Christian monasticism in order to try to establish a comparative framework.

Seminar: Religion and Society
Listed as 032:231 in Religious Studies

The topic of the seminar is confraternities and lay religious groups. By reading and discussing
secondary scholarship during the first several weeks of the seminar we will seek to identify the
defining characteristics, social roles, and cultural significance of confraternities across a range of
contexts. We will delve into confraternity scholarship on Europe as well as the growing body of
literature on Latin American and East Asian lay groups. Themes of interest may include the role
of confraternities in the development of charitable activities, death practices, art production, lay-
clerical relations, and pilgrimages, among others. Seminar participants will be expected to do
research on a related topic in their own field of interest and to share their findings with the class
before submitting a final paper. Graduate students from all areas of concentration are welcome.

Readings in Asian Religions

Listed as 032:265 in Religious Studies

An instructor number and approval are required for registration in this course. Contact the
instructor (or designated individual) for the instructor number, which you enter as the section
number when you register. At the same time you should make the required semester hours, time,
and place arrangements. Grading: Instructor has the option of using S-U grades for Graduate
College, School of Management, and graduate students in the College of Public Health

				
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