SPR PI Guide _08-34_ by MarijanStefanovic

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 75

									                                                                                     Appendix B 




                    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR’S GUIDE 


                            Writing the SPR Research Report 


                                                 by 


                                     Mary Kathryn Tri 
                                  Department of English 
                               College of Arts and Sciences 
                                  University of Kentucky 



                                              for the 

                             Kentucky Transportation Center 
                                 College of Engineering 
                                 University of Kentucky 

                                                and 

                                  Transportation Cabinet 
                                Commonwealth of Kentucky 



The contents of this report reflect the views of the authors who are responsible for the facts and 
accuracy of the data presented herein. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official views 
or policies of the University of Kentucky or of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. This report 
does  not  constitute  a  standard,  specification  or  regulation.  The  inclusions  of  manufacturer 
names  or  trade  names  are  for  identification  purposes  and  are  not  to  be  considered  an 
endorsement.
ii
                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS 
LIST OF FIGURES........................................................................................ v 

LIST OF TABLES ......................................................................................... v 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ............................................................................. vii 

WRITING ABSTRACTS .............................................................................. ix 

WRITING SUMMARIES................................................................................ 1 

INTRODUCTION........................................................................................... 5 
  1.1 Background .............................................................................................. 5 
  1.2 Objectives and Scope ............................................................................ 8 
  1.3 Plan of Discussion .................................................................................. 9 
  1. 4 Optional Content and Audience Considerations ...........................10 

DISCUSSION CHAPTERS ......................................................................... 13 
 2.1 Chapter 1: Introduction and Research Approach...........................13 
 2.2 Chapter 2: Findings ...............................................................................13 
 2.3 Chapter 3: Interpretation, Appraisal and Applications…………...14 

CONCLUSIONS AND SUGGESTED RESEARCH.................................... 17 

TEXT LAYOUT AND DESIGN.................................................................... 21 
 4.1 Organizing Report Parts .......................................................................21 
 4.2 Formatting Typed Text, White Space, and Headings.....................22 
   4.2.1 Typed Text..........................................................................................22 
   4.2.2  White Space and Page Layout........................................................23 
     4.2.2.1 Margins.........................................................................................23 
     4.2.2.2 Line spacing.................................................................................23 
     4.2.2.3 Paragraphs ..................................................................................23 
     4.2.2.4 Page numbers .............................................................................23 
   4.2.3 Headings.............................................................................................23 

CREATING AND INTEGRATING VISUALS .............................................. 27 
 5.1 Classifying And Naming Visuals ........................................................27 
 5.2 Creating Visuals: Recommendations and Caveats ........................28 
   5.2.1 Visu­rules for Visuals.........................................................................28

                                                       iii 
    5.2.2 Common Errors in Designing and Incorporating Visuals ..............29 
    5.2.3 Uses and Design of Tables ..............................................................30 
    5.2.4 Uses and Design of Figures in Illustrated Reports ........................31 
      5.2.4.1 Bar Graphs...................................................................................32 
      5.2.4.2 Pie Graphs ...................................................................................34 
      5.2.4.3 Line Graphs .................................................................................35 
  5.3 Presenting Visuals Effectively and Ethically ...................................36 

REFERENCES: TEXT CITATIONS AND REFERENCES LIST................ 39 
 6.1 Council of Biology Editors (CBE) System of Documentation ......39 
 6.2 Cooperative Research Programs Style Manual 2005.....................40 
   6.2.1 CRP Style Manual In­Text Citation Guidelines ..............................40 
     6.2.1.1 What should be cited as a reference both in text and on my 
     References list?........................................................................................40 
     6.2.1.2 What does not have to be cited in the References list?.........40 
     6.2.1.3 What does an in­text reference citation look like?...................41 
     6.2.1.4 What determines the number placed in the citation?..............41 
     6.2.1.5 Are parenthetical citations acceptable shortcuts for the names 
     of authors and works? .............................................................................41 
     6.2.1.6 Are parenthetical direct quotations handled in the 
     same way as other references?………………………………………...41 
   6.2.2 CRP Style Manual References List Guidelines ..............................42 

REFERENCES............................................................................................ 43 

APPENDIX A: SENTENCE STYLE............................................................ 45 
 SENTENCE STYLE .......................................................................................45 
 ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VOICES.................................................................47 
 TO BE CLAUSES...........................................................................................49 
 PRONOUNS....................................................................................................52 

APPENDIX B: NUMBERS STYLE ............................................................. 55 
 CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE..................................................................55 
 CRP STYLE MANUAL ..................................................................................56 
 USGPO STYLE MANUAL.............................................................................56 
 CBE STYLE MANUAL ..................................................................................56 

APPENDIX C: STYLE MECHANICS ......................................................... 59 

APPENDIX D: ONLINE RESOURCES ...................................................... 61

                                                      iv 
LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure 1  Transportation expenses by household income for 1994 ................. 32 

Figure 2  Summary of water quality ratings from samples collected at 52 
stations along Volunteer Creek, 17 May 2004 .................................................. 34 

Figure 3  Volunteer Creek Sites 1 and 2, June phosphorus concentrations 
1991­1997............................................................................................................ 35 


LIST OF TABLES 
Table 1  Estimated Numbers of U. S. Registered Vehicles by Type, 2002 ...... 30




                                                           v 
vi
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

[This is a really great place to recognize or express thanks for those that have helped 
make the project successful.  You could mention the SAC chair and members or other 
central office or district staff that facilitated the research.  Others may deserve 
recognition that helped with projects tasks or preparation of the report beyond those 
listed on the cover page.]




                                           vii 
viii
WRITING ABSTRACTS 

The abstract briefly—usually in 200­250 words—summarizes the research report’s problem and 
question(s)—thus, the project’s purpose—as well as research methods, findings, conclusions, 
and recommendations. An SPR report abstract must engage and inform a specialized audience of 
scientific and technical readers as well as SPR program executives and administrators. The 
scientific and technical reader will judge the report’s contents by the abstract: the abstract will 
provide enough information for this audience to decide whether or not he or she has anything to 
learn from reading the entire report. The abstract will enable the administrator to judge the 
report’s usefulness and potential for application in relation to other research reports’ conclusions 
and recommendations. Your academic and scientific peers want to know what you did and what 
came of it; the program executive or administrator wants to know how your lessons learned can 
influence actual practice or lead to further research into recognized problems. An effective and 
complete abstract provides enough information for peers to know whether or not your report 
supplies a missing piece to the puzzle; the same abstract informs the decision­making official 
where that piece fits into the puzzle of present and future research, theory, and application. 

        Abstracts may be descriptive or informative. The descriptive abstract, true to its name, 
describes the proposal’s topic, scope, and methods in broad terms. C. Arnold’s “The Writing of 
Abstracts” argues that the informative abstract surpasses the descriptive abstract by explaining 
not only what a proposal does, but also what it says, in language accessible to the specialist as 
well as to the administrator or executive (1). A good informative abstract includes report 
specifics, contains no citations or illustrations, and can be read and understood independently of 
the report manuscript. The abstract may appear on a page preceding the title page or on the title 
page itself if there is room for attractive placement of the abstract paragraph. Abstracts of 
Kentucky Transportation Center (KTC) research reports appear as the item 16 box to be filled in 
on Form DOT 1700.7 (8­72) placed between the KTC title page with its disclaimer and the 
report’s Table of Contents page. 

       Arnold supplies these examples of descriptive and informative abstracts written by 
Library of Congress professional technical abstracters: 
Descriptive. Results are presented of a series of cold­room tests on a Dodge diesel engine to 
             determine the effects on starting time of (1) fuel quantity delivered at cranking speed 
             and (2) type of fuel­injection pump used. The tests were made at a temperature of 
             ­10°F with engine and accessories chilled at ­10°F at least 8 hours before starting. [Not 
             preferred for SPR reports, read on…] 
Informative. A series of tests was made to determine the effect on diesel­engine starting 
           characteristics at low temperatures of (1) the amount of fuel injected and (2) the type 
           of injection pump used. All tests were conducted in a cold room maintained at ­10°F 
           on a commercial Dodge engine. The engine and all accessories were “cold­soaked” 
           in the test chamber for at least 8 hours before each test. Best starting was obtained 
           with 116 cu mm of fuel, 85 per cent more than that required for maximum power. 
           Very poor starting was obtained with the lean setting of 34.7 cu mm. Tests with two 
           different pumps indicated that, for best starting characteristics, the pump must




                                                  ix 
             deliver fuel evenly to all cylinders even at low cranking speeds so that each cylinder 
             contributes its maximum potential power. (1) 

        The first example describes the cold­room test in some detail: the reader learns why the 
test took place—the experiment’s purpose and questions, as well as the scope of those 
questions—their focus on the interplay of starting time, fuel quantity, and cranking speed in a 
Dodge diesel engine fuel­injection pump. The abstract uses specific key terms and describes the 
experimental method of time, temperature, and sequenced conditions and actions. 

       But the reader does not learn the answers to the research questions, does not learn the 
experiment’s results or range of results, and does not learn the implications of those results or the 
conditions that must be duplicated to repeat and confirm the results. 

        On the other hand, the second abstract on page vi includes all information from the first: 
it describes purpose, scope, and method. Then, at the abstract’s midpoint, the reader learns 
more—the exact quantities of fuel recorded at the extremes of best starting and very poor 
starting. The reader also learns of the test’s expansion to two pumps, with resulting duplication 
and confirmation of findings. Analysis of those findings has then led the test conductors to 
conclude that a successful pump must not only deliver 116 cu mm of fuel to the cylinders, but 
must distribute the fuel evenly among all the cylinders. In addition, the testers’ findings imply 
that starting an engine consumes markedly (85 per cent) more fuel than does the post­starting 
operation of the pump at maximum power. This last revelation sets the stage for further 
research into conserving fuel at engine start­up. 

        With this abstract, both the scientist and the executive decision­maker learn what they 
need to know for their next decisions: to read or not read the entire report, to recommend or not 
recommend a new problem question for duplicated and expanded research. And while the 
abstract contains specific language easily decoded by peers, the writer has presented these key 
words early in the abstract so the non­technical reader can infer meanings from context. By the 
time any reader arrives at the abstract’s second half, that reader understands the questions and 
procedures, and is ready to learn answers and implications. Then three “new” findings—about 
two exact fuel quantities and cylinder­fuel equilibrium—appear in the second half of the abstract. 
The abstract concludes with logical extensions of what testers recorded and observed. 

        What is the lesson learned from comparing and contrasting these two abstracts? Attach 
informative abstracts to your reports. Write your abstracts after completing a full draft of your 
report body. Think of your abstract as having a mini­introduction followed by discussion of 
findings followed by a mini­conclusion that is itself followed by recommendations (or caveats) 
for duplicating the research. Your introduction must be crisply complete: omit background or 
references to previous research, but do state the problem and your research objective. Use the 
language of your research in a context from which readers can decipher why and how you 
conducted your research; then continue using those terms to explain what actually happened and 
why—even if this last information is speculative and requires further research for confirmation.




                                                  x 
       For excellent discussion, examples, and instructions for writing your abstracts, go to 


                      http://www.technical­writing.net/articles/Abstract.html 

where J. Ramey’s “How to Write a Useful Abstract” walks writers through her 1­2­3 “easy­to­ 
follow guide” (2). For a hyperlinked list of online articles about writing scientific and technical 
abstracts, consult Appendix D page 61.




                                                 xi 
xii
WRITING SUMMARIES 

Writing an executive summary requires the principal investigator­report author to learn and 
practice the skills of a movie director designing the trailer for his movie. But unlike the director, 
the principal investigator does not enjoy the luxury of teasing readers without divulging his 
work’s “end”—that is, its findings, conclusions and recommendations. A different cinematic 
analogy—the fast­forwarding feature of a DVD player—applies here, because executive 
summary writers must decide where to pause for succinct explanations or descriptions rendered 
in necessary detail, and where to skim or leave out other details, steps, and instructions fully 
blown in the report itself. The executive summary binds the writer rhetorically, professionally, 
and ethically: he or she must craft a product that is, above all, readable without condescension to 
peers or others, thorough in its revelations, and honest in its assessment of those revelations’ 
potential for duplication in a research forum and for application in the real world of 
transportation. 

        The Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) division of the Transportation Research 
Board refers to the executive summary as the Summary of Findings. The CRP’s Instructions for 
Preparation of Cooperative Research Programs Reports includes this paragraph of guidelines 
for writing the summary of findings: 
       The summary of findings is often the most influential part of the report and must be 
       written with the busy transportation administrator in mind. It should contain a readable 
       yet condensed description, explained within the context of the project scope and 
       objectives, of the research findings and conclusions that evolved from the project. It 
       should contain only information that is essential to an understanding of the findings and 
       how they relate to the solution of operating problems. It is not an abbreviated version of 
       the full report (3, p. 5). 

        Pay attention to that last line. CRP distinguishes the Summary of Findings from 
traditional executive summaries that present ideas in the same order those ideas appear in the 
report body. Such summaries may spend equal time describing problem background and 
previous research, as well as limitations to that research, because these sub­sections and 
paragraphs appear early in the report text itself. In contrast, CRP emphasizes summaries of 
findings as overviews of information gleaned through project research, rather than chronological 
briefings that “start at the beginning” with descriptions of pre­project state­of­the­art knowledge, 
application, and problems. 

        In other words, CRP wants summaries that open bluntly, with succinct statements of 
project purpose and scope—the project objectives. Though methods must of course be clarified, 
the summary writer should describe them quickly, or devise sentences that couple findings with 
subordinated allusions to methods. Like the abstract, the summary of findings should be 
informative rather than descriptive. Unlike the abstract, its proportion of specific and at times 
detailed discussion related to findings, analyses, conclusions, and recommendations will usually 
outweigh the amount of space devoted to project purpose, scope, and methods. Purpose, scope, 
and methods—the latter expressed in key terms and exact numbers—comprise about 50 percent 
of the informative abstract on page vi. Your summary of findings will be longer than your


                                                  1 
abstract, but project purpose, scope, and methods should comprise a smaller percentage of the 
summary’s length. 

        What, exactly, does the previous paragraph of advice mean? Again, a model may suffice. 
Here is the summary of findings developed from the NCHRP report Effective Slab Width For 
Composite Steel Bridge Members (NCHRP Report 543). As you read the summary, determine 
the point at which the summary author focuses directly on research findings. 
       The objective of this research was to develop recommended revisions to the AASHTO 
       specifications for the effective slab width of composite steel bridge members. 
       The objectives of this work were to (1) propose criteria for effective width and 
       recommended specifications and commentary for effective width and (2) provide worked 
       examples illustrating the use of those proposed new criteria. The principal focus was 
       common slab­on­girder configurations. 
       A new definition for effective width that accounts for the variation of bending stresses 
       through the deck thickness has been needed. A finite element modeling approach was 
       developed, corroborated with experimental data by others and by the authors, and applied 
       to a suite of bridges designed according to industry guidelines. Effective widths 
       according to the new definition were extracted from this finite element parametric study 
       of the suite of bridges. Draft criteria for effective width were developed by applying 
       regression approaches in order to account for different subsets of the parameters varied in 
       the extensive parametric study of bridge finite element models. The effects of those 
       criteria were assessed using the Rating Factor (RF) as the measure of impact. Based on 
       the impact assessment, draft criteria based on using the full physical slab width were 
       recommended and illustrated in the context of positive and negative moment region 
       worked examples. 
       Principal findings from the parametric study were as follows: (1) full width was typically 
       acting “at cross sections where it is most needed,” i.e., where moments and hence 
       performance ratios would be highest, and (2) where the effective width was less than full 
       width at such cross sections, that cross section had considerable excess flexural capacity. 
       An extensive “impact analysis” based on Process 12­50 principles revealed that more 
       cumbersome curvefit expressions for effective width, although more accurate, were not 
       significantly so in terms of the governing rating factor (RF) of the bridge investigated. 
       This study has resulted in the recommendation that full width may be used for effective 
       width in composite steelbridge members for most situations of practical interest. This 
       recommendation was determined to be suitable for the Service as well as Strength limit 
       states, for exterior as well as interior girders, and for skewed as well as right alignments. 
       It is recommended that the AASHTO Subcommittee on Bridges and Structures (SCOBS) 
       consider the draft revisions to Article 4.6.2.6.1 of the LRFD Specifications and 
       Commentary as developed herein. 
       Research is recommended for evaluation of instrumentation used for measuring strain on 
       rebars that are embedded in concrete. Further investigation of crack patterns and how 
       they relate to composite beams versus slip regions of noncomposite beams with 
       developed rebar may be useful in developing and verifying refinements to concrete and



                                                 2 
       rebar material modeling assumptions and friction modeling assumptions used in finite 
       element models of slab­on­girder bridges. (4) 

       This summary proceeds logically from objectives through recommendations: 
           1.  Paragraphs 1 and 2 lay out the project’s objectives and scope; 
           2.  Paragraph 3 comprises an opening sentence followed by a description of methods; 
           3.  Paragraph 4 presents findings; 
           4.  Paragraphs 5­7 present recommendations for immediate application, for revision 
               of AASHTO specifications, and for further research. 

        Appendix D page 61 provides links to articles about writing executive summaries. 
Articles focused on writing summaries of findings are harder to locate. As the “designated 
writer” of a research report, you may find trolling the Transportation Research Board website’s 
publications archives is time well spent. To reach the TRB Publications web page, go to 
                              http://www4.trb.org/trb/onlinepubs.nsf 
From there click into TCRP and NCHRP project reports, synthesis reports, and research results 
reports. Decide for yourself which summaries pique your interest and cause you to thumb 
through the rest of their reports. 

       Prefatory summaries are the most influential components of formal reports, and the only 
components some audiences will read. Therefore, they must be comprehensive and 
comprehensible, accurate, and honest. Although no one pattern or formula works for all, many 
business and technical writing books and websites present executive summary “checklists” 
adaptable to SPR summaries of findings: 
       §  Write the summary to be read independently of the report. 
       §  Write the summary after you have completed the body of your report. 
       §  Avoid using terminology unfamiliar to your readers; if essential terms require 
          explanation, explain them early in the summary, and continue suing the terms in 
          contexts enabling readers to understand their meanings. For emphasis, italicize 
          unusual terms for emphasis the first time you use them. 
       §  Spell out all uncommon symbols and abbreviations. 
       §  Use transitional words and phrases to help the reader understand your research process 
          from objectives to recommendations. 
       §  Include only information discussed in the report. 
       §  Do not refer to figures, tables, or references contained in the report. 
       §  Test the summary’s recommendations against who, what, where, when, why, and 
          how questions. Are the recommendations clear about who is to do what?




                                                 3 
       The summary of findings on pages 2­3 is accurate, complete, readable, and concise. Like 
many such summaries, it is written in mostly passive voice—a style characteristic of much 
formal report writing in the engineering sciences. Turn to Appendix A page 45 of this Guide for 
more discussion about the passive voice and when and how to use it.




                                               4 
Chapter One 

INTRODUCTION 

Congratulations on your position as Principal Investigator (PI) of a Kentucky Transportation 
Center (KTC) research team whose proposal was awarded SPR funds to carry out the proposal’s 
stated objectives. Now that you and your colleagues have aggressively and successfully 
completed all phases of your research—collecting field, laboratory, and computer data; 
analyzing via mathematical or statistical models; determining and interpreting relationships; 
evaluating options; drawing conclusions; and shaping recommendations —you must “market” 
your “product” findings to an audience (e.g., SAC members and other Cabinet officials and 
professionals) with the ability and means to duplicate your results and put them into actual 
practice. 

         This Principle Investigator’s Guide to writing the SPR research report explains and 
illustrates how KTC report authors—principal investigators or their designated writing staffs— 
should discuss, organize, layout and document their SPR project formal reports according to 
criteria developed and required by the National Cooperative Highway Research Program 
(NCHRP) and the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP). The Guide’s purpose is to 
help KTC authors make decisions about content, writing style and organizational structure, 
documentation, format, and overall design of their formal proposals and reports to be submitted 
to SPR. So that authors can visualize strategies for presenting information and arguments in 
reader­friendly text and graphics, the Guide has been laid out like a formal business and 
technical report. The Guide is intended to provide an overview and summary of time­tested 
advice from successful professional writers well­versed in what has worked best for presentation 
to readers, whether those readers be in­house editors, academic peer reviewers, SPR proposal 
and project report award panels, publications’ boards of directors, or state and federal officials 
and decision­makers. 

1.1 Background 
To promote sharing of ideas and information across state lines, the State Planning and Research 
Program (SPR) of the United States Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) disperses funds 
for both project proposals and project reporting by state­level transportation agencies. As the 
Kentucky liaison to this nationwide program, the KTC coordinates efforts among Kentucky 
transportation administrators, professionals, and academics to conceive, plan, develop, and write 
formal proposals to be submitted for SPR consideration, selection, and funding. In addition, the 
KTC assumes responsibility for oversight of successfully funded proposals; such oversight 
extends from monitoring project finances and schedules, to ensuring adherence to project 
proposals’ stated objectives, to checking documentation of data, to editing and final assembly of 
the completed project’s report. Actual report composition is the responsibility of the Principal 
Investigator(s). 

      As a successful proposal­contracted PI, you fulfill one of the major obligations found in 
the KTC’s Annual Report 2004 statement of purpose: “We provide services to the transportation 
community through research, technology transfer and education. We create and participate in


                                                5 
partnerships to promote safe and effective transportation systems” (5). In listing research as the 
first conduit for service, the mission statement acknowledges the KTC’s primary responsibilities 
to investigate questions and problems in search of answers and solutions. Research focuses on 
timely, day­to­day responses to the immediate challenges of traffic management and 
infrastructure maintenance, but just as often KTC investigators work on behalf of the long­term 
future, designing and testing products and procedures before those innovative ideas become 
large­scale realities. 

        Yet all transportation research, whether centered on real­time problems or on visionary 
improvements, requires another step: to be of use, the research information must itself be 
transported among other thinkers and doers who can apply it. The information gathered, the 
lessons learned, must be written down and disseminated for duplication, evaluation, and 
implementation by others, in other locales, under other conditions. 

        The Guide limits its scope to information and recommendations about preparation of a 
formal business and technical document manuscript ready for review and evaluation by SPR 
funding panels. The Guide does not address the variety of requirements and options appearing in 
government agencies’ guidelines for online or non­technical public relations and general 
information brochures, booklets, magazines, newsletter, and newspapers. A reader who examines 
proposals and reports distributed by the National Cooperative Highway Research Program 
(NCHRP), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), 
the FHWA, and other national and state transportation entities will encounter a variety of 
approaches to the parts and organization, as well as to the documentation and format, of formal 
manuscripts. However, should a KTC report manuscript be deemed appropriate for later 
publication via any of these media, consistent adherence to the Guide’s instructions will result in 
a clear and plain document which editors can then reformat for inclusion in differently styled 
publications. 

        The Guide contains information, examples, and recommendations from dictionaries, 
basic writing handbooks, publishing industry style manuals, government style guides, academic 
sources such as college business and technical writing textbooks, and professional document 
design reference books, as well as actual reports from the KTC archives. In addressing issues of 
in­text citations and end­of­text references lists, the Guide bases its suggestions and examples on 
                                                                                      th 
those found in these style manuals: (1) Council of Biology Editors Style Manual, 5  edition; (2) 
United States Government Printing Office Style Manual, 2000 edition; and (3) Chicago Manual 
             th 
of Style, 15  edition. The Guide also adheres to recommendations available in PDF from the 
Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Research Council (NRC): CRP 
Publications Office Style Manual 2005 and Instructions for Preparation of Cooperative 
Research Programs Reports, updated 28 September 2001. The Guide follows the Council of 
Biology (CBE) number system for citations and references. 

        Readers and report writers should follow the Guide’s suggestions for content, 
organization, and format insofar as the suggestions prove helpful in relieving frustration or 
confusion on the part of PIs seeking to conform to traditional NCHRP/TCRP guidelines for 
report structure and guidelines. But as in most human endeavors, attempts to tailor content to 
purpose and audience reveal that no one size fits all. Report authors should not sacrifice clarity to



                                                 6 
tradition: a report may effectively depart from the standard structure as long as the author 
practices reader­based prose strategies, giving as much information as may be useful to the 
reader. Too much is usually better than too little. Common sense goes a long way in resolving 
report dilemmas. The PI author can benefit from conferences with peer reviewers and editors and 
“beta readers” whose responses and degrees of comprehension provide clues to a draft’s 
potential to accomplish its purpose: communication of the intended message leading to the 
desired outcome with the intended audience. 

       To encourage and aid report writers in reaching the primary goals of purpose and 
audience, the Guide operates on these assumptions: 
           1.  All formal writing should fulfill the “Five Cs” criteria of clarity, completeness, 
               concreteness, consistency, and correctness; 
           2.  All documentation of sources within a formal document should provide 
               information sufficient to lead readers to the original sources in their original 
               forms, whether published or unpublished, printed or electronic. When an author is 
               in doubt about how to document an unusual source, prudence calls for providing 
               too much location information rather than too little. 
           3.  Visual cues should be easy for readers to follow. White space and typeface 
               options such as italics and bolding for emphasis and headings, and illustrations in 
               tabular or figure forms, should be considered important text elements, and should 
               therefore work substantively and gracefully with surrounding paragraphs to 
               deliver the intended information. 
           4.  A well­tailored formal manuscript holds universal appeal, lending itself to 
               alterations by editors who can “translate” manuscript features from one style to 
               another while preserving the integrity of the original content and message. Thus, a 
               consistently styled manuscript may, after editorial adaptations, appear 
               sequentially or simultaneously in different media forms. 

         The Guide body text moves from its introductory section to sections explaining and 
illustrating a formal document’s parts; their order and contents; prose and visual format and 
layout; the CBE number system of citation­sequence text documentation; and major issues of 
formal English language mechanics, usage, and sentence style. All text body pages contain 
arabic numerals centered at page bottoms. 

         A References list appears at the end of this Guide and before Appendices A­D on pages 
43­44. Text citations are keyed to the numbered References list and appear at appropriate points 
as italicized numerals enclosed in parentheses. 

        Beginning with the next heading and paragraphs, the Guide will discuss content and 
organization of actual report manuscripts. Readers and report writers should follow the 
instructions for content and organization, and the examples for headings’ font sizes and spacing, 
to shape their own project reports’ content, organization, and appearance.




                                                 7 
1.2 Objectives  and Scope 
The preceding paragraphs tell readers what the Guide is and does, why the Guide is necessary, 
how the Guide is ordered and arranged; and from where the Guide draws information and 
recommendations. The paragraphs also remind readers of the Guide’s limitations and emphasize 
its role as a supplementary aid rather than as the lone workable model. Though your project 
report will discuss a specific transportation topic and issue, your report’s introduction can follow 
the same general structure and organization illustrated here in the Guide’s Introduction section. 
Simply keep in mind that your introduction’s reason for being is to provide readers general 
information necessary and sufficient to understand the detailed information in the rest of the 
report. 
       Such general information must clearly convey these four messages:
          ·  the report’s topic or problem;
          ·  the report’s purpose or objectives;
          ·  the report’s scope; and
          ·  the report’s plan of discussion (aka organizational plan, order of discussion). 
Authors often collapse topic, purpose, and scope statements into the same paragraph(s), so let’s 
first discuss the importance of those three elements. Readers must understand from your report 
introduction what issue your research addressed, why the results of your research matter and 
what the report will do—describe, examine, analyze, document, discuss, evaluate, conclude, 
recommend—with the information gathered and the lessons learned. A report’s scope description 
can prove daunting, so try repeating the language of categories you probably had to address in 
your successful project proposal—categories of personnel, money, time, labor, materials, codes, 
contract stipulations, equipment, facilities, authorizations, sources, geographic or weather or time 
or political or environmental constraints. If your research relied on particular criteria or 
definitions, or utilized ordinary words in unordinary or specialized ways, you may need to 
provide concise examples of your poetic license and to explain the meanings of these slightly 
off­key key terms. 

       The Transportation Research Board’s Instructions for Preparation of Cooperative 
Research Programs Reports contains this single paragraph, entitled “Chapter 1: Introduction and 
Research Approach,” about what goes—and does not go—into a CRP report introduction: 
       Discussions of the problem that led to the study, current knowledge that can help in 
       solving the problem, the objectives and scope of the assigned research, and the approach 
       that was used in attempting to solve the problem are presented in this section. This 
       chapter does not contain the details of any state­of­the­art survey that may have been 
       made, any forms that may have been used in soliciting information, or details regarding 
       test procedures or mathematical analyses that may have been used. All such details are 
       provided in appendixes. (3) 

        Now measure an actual paragraph excerpt—the objectives and scope subheading 
discussion from NCHRP Synthesis 337, Cooperative Agreements for Corridor Management: A



                                                   8 
Synthesis of Highway Practice—against your understanding of what a clear and effective 
objectives and scope statement should be. Does the paragraph fulfill its own purpose? 
       The objective of the synthesis is to identify the state of current practice in developing and 
       implementing cooperative agreements for corridor management, as well as elements of 
       such agreements and best practices or lessons learned. Governments and private entities 
       may enter cooperative agreements for a variety of reasons, including project funding, 
       joint exercise of services, annexation, pavement restoration, and consolidation or transfer 
       of functions. For the purpose of the synthesis, the scope was narrowed to cooperative 
       agreements between government agencies that address land use and transportation 
       linkages for the purpose of preserving arterial safety and mobility. The term “arterial” in 
       this context generally refers to major thorough fares or highways that are not limited 
       access facilities, although some information relating to limited access facilities was 
       included where appropriate. Typical subjects included access management, zoning and 
       subdivision management, right­of­way needs and preservation, and financial obligations. 
       Respondents were also asked to identify and provide examplesof public­private 
       agreements related to corridor management. (6) 
The synthesis authors have stated their report’s objective, as well as the objective of their 
proposed, and now completed, research. They have also delineated the research and report scope 
by using key terms and a series of briefly stated examples. Perhaps their work deserves an A. 

1.3 Plan of Discussion 
The plan of discussion usually appears near the end of the introduction, as one of the last—often 
the last—paragraphs and subheadings. It can be as simple as the passive construction “This 
report is divided into eight discussion sections with headings,” or the active voice statement “The 
report begins with a discussion of . . . and proceeds to . . . .” Because your front matter’s Table of 
Contents will already have displayed your report’s order of discussion, you can be brief and 
general here. Pretend you are a tour guide fast­talking your visiting clients about what to expect 
from the trek to their destination. 

       The FHWA’s Roundabouts: An Informational Guide, features a series of mini­ 
summaries, one for each of the report’s eight chapters, aligned in a sequence of short paragraphs, 
some as short as one sentence, appearing under the subheading Organization of the Guide. This 
paragraph introduces the other mini­summaries: 
       This guide has been structured to address the needs of a variety of readers including the 
       general public, policy­makers, transportation planners, operations and safety analysts, 
       conceptual and detailed designers. This chapter distinguishes roundabouts from other 
       traffic circles and defines the types of roundabouts addressed in the remainder of the 
       guide. The remaining chapters in this guide generally increase in the level of detail 
       provided (7, p. 3). 


Chapter 5’s blurb looks like this: 
      Chapter 5—Safety: This chapter discusses the expected safety performance of 
roundabouts (7, p. 4).

                                                  9 
1. 4 Optional Content and Audience Considerations 
All introductions must comprise problem, purpose, scope, and plan statements. This Guide’s 
opening paragraphs directly address an audience of Principal Investigators who may regard 
report­writing responsibilities as problematic—thus, readers understand what problem, or need, 
the rest of the Guide will address. For purposes of illustration, the Guide’s Background section 
reinforces the problem topic and the Guide’s purpose, explains something of the SPR proposal 
submission and project reporting chronology, and fast­forwards through paragraphs about the 
Guide’s content sources, limitations, and organization. As you write your report Introduction, fit 
your four required statements among one or two opening paragraphs and among subsections 
labeled Background, Objectives (or Purpose) and Scope, and Plan of Discussion (or Organization 
of the Report, etc.). Some published FHWA and NCHRP reports place their opening paragraphs 
immediately under a Background first­level heading that follows the chapter title Introduction. 
        The NCHRP and FHWA examples cited below feature these Chapter One—the 
Introduction—heading arrays in these typefaces and font sizes: 

               NCHRP                                                 FHWA 
INTRODUCTION                                1. INTRODUCTION 
   BACKGROUND                                  1.1 Two paragraphs of problem history 
   OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE                        1.2 SCOPE OF GUIDE (with objectives) 
   METHODOLOGY                                 1.3 ORGANIZATION OF GUIDE 
   TERMS AND DEFINITIONS                       1.4 DEFINING PHYSICAL FEATURES 
   USE OF AGREEMENTS                           1.5 DISTINGUISHING ROUNDABOUTS 
   SOURCES OF AUTHORITY                            FROM OTHER CIRCULAR 
                                                   INTERSECTIONS 
                                               1.6 ROUNDABOUT CATEGORIES 
                                                    1.6.1 Comparison of Roundabout 
                                                          Categories 
                                                    1.6.2 Mini­roundabouts 
                                                    1.6.3 Urban compact roundabouts 
                                                    1.6.4 Urban single­lane roundabouts 
                                                    1.6.5 Urban double­land roundabouts 
                                                    1.6.6 Rural single­lane roundabouts 
                                                    1.6.7 Rural double­lane roundabouts 

        As the lists illustrate, even the NCHRP occasionally overlooks a courtesy to its readers: the 
synthesis’s introduction contains no plan of discussion! The lists also show how PIs exercise their 
options to add other information and headings to their introductions. In addition to, or instead of, 
the headings displayed above, a report author might add a glossary, a list of symbols and 
abbreviations, or a theory or literature review. If such helpful introduction sections become long, 
refer to them in the introduction and then locate them in the appendices, or add them as first­level 
headings after the Introduction and before the Discussion. 

        What else? Always remember that your primary purpose and objective is to persuade your 
reader, even if you seek only to persuade him or her of your competence and credibility. Or you 
may want your reader to take a specific course of action—for example, to lobby for legislative

                                                10 
funding of a rural highway’s widening or relocation, or to require the Kentucky Department of 
Transportation to begin reinforcing bridge decks with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebars 
instead of the traditional steel rebars. 

        PIs also face the dilemma of whether or not to reveal their research results, conclusions, and 
recommendations in the introduction. Many report authors do just that, even including separate 
headings and sections for those revelations. A good rule of thumb is to use the direct approach for 
presenting non­controversial findings or positive, hoped­for improvements: you can even include 
such findings in a purpose statement such as “This report explains how and why glass fiber 
reinforced polymer rebar proves superior to traditional steel rebar in bridge decking reinforcement, 
and recommends that the KY DOT adopt GFRP as the sole bridge deck reinforcement material for 
state bridges built after the year 2007.” 

        For negative or complex findings, the indirect approach—with neutral language and passive 
constructions—often works better: “This report compares traditional steel rebar reinforcement of 
bridge decking to more modern options and analyzes the results of using new and different 
materials.” On the other hand, remember that your report’s executive summary has already spilled 
the beans to your readers, so there may be little point in sweating over the direct or indirect 
approach. You could just go ahead and break to your readers whatever news you can substantiate in 
the discussion chapters. 

        Whatever decisions you make about your introduction—what to divulge beyond the 
minimum reader requirements; where to place your required statements; how to set up sections or 
subsections, with or without headings and subheadings—try to visualize this first section of your 
report’s body as a funnel. Start broadly and loosely; end narrowly and tightly. That is, open your 
report’s body with interesting material that engages the reader while affording him or her a window 
onto the rest of your report. Begin with general observations about the necessity of 
bridges’endurance and assurance of travel safety, the paramount responsibilities for their 
maintenance and monitoring. 

        Then, as you slide down your funnel, pull tighter into a specific problem revealed by careful 
monitoring: the problem of bridge decking cracks. Now, sliding further down the funnel, begin to 
describe how your research homed in on one or more aspects of bridge decking cracks—their 
prevention or their treatment, or both—and where and when your research took place. Tantalize 
your reader with information pertinent to the scope of your particular research proposal and 
contract, but save most details for your later chapter discussions. If by this point your reader has a 
reasonably good understanding of the questions your research intended to explore and answer you 
will have done your job well. 

         Now tighten to purpose­objective and scope statements with lead­ins such as “The purpose 
of this report is to explain . . . ,” or “This report explains . . . .”  Then, having gathered speed from 
revealing your topic, problem, purpose­objective, and scope, decide what other reader requirements 
you should accommodate; remember that your reader must understand your research problem and 
your particular—perhaps unique—approach to it. If your reader will need explanation or 
description of methods or procedures, supply that information.  If terminology will become 
challenging, take time to supply your reader a glossary or list of symbols and abbreviations.



                                                   11 
        Finally, explain to your reader how your report will unfold. You are now at the bottom of 
the funnel, having moved from common concerns about bridges to your singular research and 
reporting of that research. Both you and your reader will now squeeze through the funnel bottom 
and—kerplop!—into your report’s next chapters, where your reader must spend more time looking 
around and listening to what you have to say about your research and its results.




                                                12 
Chapter Two 

DISCUSSION CHAPTERS 

The Instructions for Preparation of Cooperative Research Programs Reports handout 
recommends this content sequence for research reports:
          ·  Chapter 1: Introduction and Research Approach
          ·  Chapter 2: Findings
          ·  Chapter 3: Interpretation, Appraisal, and Applications
          ·  Chapter 4: Conclusions and Suggested Research (3). 
However, the handout also acknowledges that some reports may not fit tidily into this structure 
and organization; thus, CRP report writers are encouraged to confer with the appropriate 
Program Officer about how best to present and discuss completed research (3). 

        This Guide’s Chapter 2 contains information about setting up the post­Introduction 
chapters of an SPR report. Because research projects vary greatly in topic, purpose, and scope, 
project reporting is not a “one size fits all” endeavor. Report writers have a great deal of latitude 
in the number of chapters—remember that the Roundabouts report publication comprises eight 
final chapters—into which they break their reports and in how they arrange the boxcars in their 
train of information, analysis, and conclusions. Thus, the primary value of this chapter of the 
Guide to the PI reader­writer will most likely lie in the chapter’s suggestions about report 
organizational cues such as headings, subheadings, and bulleted and numbered lists, as well as 
the sorting of information into “clumps” the reader can digest one at a time. Report writers must 
supply whatever explanation, signals, or transitions their readers need to navigate mazes of data, 
logic, and argument. 

2.1 Chapter 1: Introduction and Research Approach 
The Guide’s first chapter discussed content and organization strategies for an SPR report’s 
introduction section. The chapter emphasized the introduction’s role in preparing the reader for 
the rest of the report’s detailed information, analysis, and conclusions. 


2.2 Chapter 2: Findings 
At this point the reader has entered what the renowned writing textbook The Practical Stylist 
calls the “keyhole” structure (8). That is to say, the reader has slipped from the funneled 
introduction into the report’s middle, where data come together, expanding and competing for 
the attention necessary to whip them into logical, cohesive, beneficial new ideas. Here report 
writers must be careful not to confuse findings with conclusions. This discussion should be a 
straightforward presentation of raw data that has been “analyzed” only to the extent that notes 
and numbers have been sorted into piles for depiction in tables. If in­text numerical data or 
lengthy survey responses would overwhelm the reader and interfere with comprehension, place



                                                 13 
these denser materials in an appendix and address a text reference to your reader: “See Table 5 
on page X.” 


        This chapter’s discussion is a catalogue, an indexing of materials in the forms of 
summary data, principal mathematical formulas, and other information recorded or collected 
during the first phase of the SPR project (3). Although much of the information may be tabular, 
the report writer still has an obligation to prepare his or her reader for the morass of numbers, 
rows and columns; symbols, abbreviations, and labels; or survey responses and interview 
transcripts, explaining—but not speculating or theorizing about—any gaps or irregularities in the 
quantitative or qualitative data. As you assemble your findings chapter(s), keep telling yourself, 
“The evidence may be in, but it has not yet been weighed and judged.” 

2.3 Chapter 3: Interpretation, Appraisal, and Applications 
Now let the judging begin. Chapter 2 asked “What did we find?” Now Chapter 3 inquires “What 
does it mean?”  Begin by alerting your reader to patterns or trends you detected in the numbers 
or survey responses. Point out where data compare and contrast, where dips or leaps occur, and 
where gaps arise.  In the case of information gathered from surveys, draw the reader’s attention 
to background demographics about persons or regions surveyed. 

        Chapter 2 presents, exhibits, narrates, and describes; Chapter 3 traces, groups, follows 
sequences of motion and flow, suspects and relates causes and effects, presents pros and cons, 
investigates chronologies of events, considers multiple explanations from multiple perspectives, 
draws analogies, and zeroes in on areas needing further research. For example, if a study of 
Kentucky crash data shows that counties with higher numbers of speed­related crashes also 
consistently record lower numbers of speeding ticket issuances and convictions, investigators 
and report writers will understandably suspect a cause­and­effect relationship between the 
stringency of a county’s roadway law enforcement and the likelihood of speed­related crashes. 
Chapter 3 can point out the correlation, speculate on other reasons for the correlation, and point 
to consequences arising from the correlation—for example, car insurance rates may be higher in 
those counties and regions with higher rates of speed­related car crashes. The investigative team 
may also take this opportunity to point out the limitations or shortcomings of their own research, 
to warn against its misuse, and to relate what they would do differently to improve the quality of 
their research the second time around. 

       Discuss here how you believe your data may apply to standards, specifications, policies, 
and procedures. Use what you have learned to narrow the research scope of those who take up 
where your research leaves off. This paragraph from a 2005 KTC research report illustrates how 
researchers and writers cautiously interpret data prior to reaching conclusions and issuing 
recommendations, and how they can promote more sharply defined future research: 
       The percentage of crashes involving vehicle defects increased immediately after repeal of 
       the vehicle inspection law (Table 53). It could be concluded that the repeal of that law 
       resulted in additional crashes involving vehicle defects. However, the percentage of 
       crashes involving a vehicle defect has decreased in recent years to less that that before 
       repeal of the inspection law. A study could be conducted to determine whether the


                                                14 
       defects that have contributed to crashes since repeal of the vehicle inspection law were of 
       the type that might have been detected under the previous inspection program. That study 
       could also reveal types of inspections necessary to detect defects contributing to crashes 
       for various types of vehicles. (9) 


        Evaluate how your findings contribute to understanding the problem and what economic, 
safety, convenience, and technological consequences they imply. If one of your research 
methods yielded lessons in efficiency or cost­savings, or if new equipment proved significantly 
helpful and easy to use, pass on that information in the form of design charts, spreadsheets, 
software titles, or other items that practicing engineers and others can consult and use. This 
chapter connects the dots between your original findings and actual practice in the field of 
transportation




                                               15 
16
Chapter Three 

CONCLUSIONS AND SUGGESTED RESEARCH 

You have collected data, analyzed, interpreted, and evaluated it. You have explained what it all 
means. The next question is this one: What should be done with the lessons from the research? 
                       Think again of the funnel image from page 11 and the keyhole 
               organization described on page 12. The report’s conclusions and 
               recommendations section reverses the strategy followed in the introduction. Now, 
               instead of narrowing to the report’s objectives, scope, and other essentials, the 
               conclusions section draws out logical ideas from the findings and begins to 
               expand the possibilities of these ideas, to orient them to current theories and 
               practices. If the report’s conclusions are tentative—that is, they require further 
               research—your recommendations must clearly state what type of research can 
confirm or negate the completed study’s findings. The primary goal of SPR projects is to 
improve transportation design, construction, and operation on a daily basis. Your report’s 
conclusions and recommendations section must therefore broaden to this real world context, 
explaining to readers what should happen next and how best to profit from lessons learned 
during the project’s research phase. 

       Begin by reviewing and summarizing your most convincing points about the project’s 
importance and the solution’s benefits. M. E. Guffey’s Business Communication: Process and 
Product offers these tips for writing conclusions:
       ·  Interpret and summarize the findings; tell what they mean.
       ·  Relate the conclusions to the report problem.
       ·  Limit the conclusions to the data presented; do not introduce new material.
       ·  Number the conclusions and present them in parallel form.
       ·  Be objective; avoid exaggerating or manipulating the data.
       ·  Use consistent criteria in evaluating options. (10) 

       Taking the High Road: The Environmental and Social Contributions of America’s 
Highway Programs, an AASHTO publication, vividly illustrates how to relate conclusions to 
problems, and how to stress the benefits of recommended solutions. The Atlantic Station 
Redevelopment Project of Atlanta, Georgia concludes its report with these arguments, both of 
which can apply to communities far beyond Atlanta’s city limits: 
       Reusing brownfields is particularly smart land use because of brownfields’ central 
       location and connection to existing transportation systems. Their reuse has two benefits: 
       Value: Redevelopment cleans up and reuses underused and potentially dangerous land 
       right where it’s most valuable—central to the most people, to the most businesses, and to 
       existing, paid­off infrastructure. In sum, redevelopment turns a liability into an asset. 
       Growth with less traffic: Redevelopment that’s central to people and businesses reduces 
       the traffic from new jobs and housing in two ways: first, more of these trips can be by 
       foot and by transit, placing less demand on roads. Second, for trips on roads, central

                                                17 
       location means that the trips are on average shorter, reducing demand for road space. And 
       often these trips are on roads that have been underused since the decline of the industry 
       that used to occupy the brownfield. Putting trips on those roads can be far less costly (11, 
       p. 42). 
By reminding readers of the problem’s significance and potential for harm, and by tying project 
results directly to aspects of the problem, the report’s writers manage to weave the project’s 
findings into the fabric of ordinary citizens’ lives at work and home. By describing how 
brownfield redevelopment benefits communities economically and in overall quality of life, the 
conclusions help readers understand how research led to practical, meaningful improvements that 
can be duplicated in other towns and cities. 

       In distinguishing between findings and conclusions, the CRP handout reminds report 
authors to link research to possibilities beyond the physical boundaries of its original setting: 
       The conclusions are concerned with general principles suggested in the findings of 
       Chapter 2. They differ from the findings in that they are extensions of the findings 
       beyond conditions specific to the project. If the project findings have revealed specific 
       areas where further research would be valuable, this chapter is the place to enumerate and 
       describe such areas (3, p. 5). 
In other words, conclusions and recommendations move beyond the microcosm of the completed 
research project: “Research results are of little value if not disseminated; therefore, it is the 
normal practice of the . . . [NCHRP] and the . . . [TCRP] . . . to publish and to distribute widely 
the reports submitted on each project” (3, p. 1). What happens in Kentucky­based transportation 
research does not stay in Kentucky, but will be distributed nationwide. 

        Your SPR contract pays you to conduct a study and to write a report. But more important, 
the contract pays you to draw conclusions and make recommendations. Persons who never read 
reports in their entirety usually flip to the conclusions and recommendations section, then 
perhaps back to the executive summary and introduction. The table of contents may fascinate 
them, also. Irrational and unnerving as a readers’ “skipping around” may be, you must 
accommodate your reader’s needs for clarity, completeness, and consistency. Do not surprise 
your reader with a conclusion at odds with your report’s findings, your emphasized or repeated 
points, or your lines of argument. Base conclusions only on your report’s earlier information and 
reasoning. And never—ever!—introduce new evidence or arguments in the conclusions section. 

        If you have several conclusions, consider bulleted or numbered lists—bullets for 
conclusions of equal importance, numbers for conclusions arranged in descending order (the 
order is your call). Or combine bullets and numbers with paragraphs like those in the Atlantic 
Station example on the previous page. Whatever presentation you choose, resist the urge to dump 
all your conclusions into one long paragraph. Editors call this tactic the “data dump.” Shorter 
paragraphs, each focused on one conclusion, are more reader­friendly . . . and will win more 
audience for the writer. 

       What about the negative or disappointing conclusion? Because your evidence is sufficient 
and your reasoning clear and fair, state the conclusion clearly, directly, in as neutral (but not


                                                 18 
evasive) language as possible. If you want a “buffer,” insert a factual summary before the 
conclusion. 

       Nothing is new in the recommendations. It has all been said before—in the executive 
summary, in the introduction, in the findings, in the arguments, and in the conclusions. Supply 
appropriate introductory language such as “The project’s findings and conclusions support these 
recommendations”; then list or paragraph your recommendation(s) as you did your 
conclusion(s). 

        Last of all, devise a crisp, hard­hitting clincher statement that borrows heavily from your 
report title’s language: “Wider use of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer rebars for bridge deck 
reinforcement will enhance bridge strength, lengthen bridge life, and increase the margin of 
safety for passengers traveling in Kentucky.” You will have addressed the problem, answered the 
question, and fulfilled the research objectives.




                                                19 
20
Chapter Four 

TEXT LAYOUT AND DESIGN 

Your report’s organization and format may be as important as its language: the skill with which 
you match your document to your purpose and your audience can affect reader comprehension as 
much as can your written sentences. As K. Schriver says in the preface to the singularly good 
Dynamics in Document Design, “Many documents fail because they are so ugly that no one will 
read them or so confusing that no one can understand them” (12). To prevent such reader 
animosity and confusion, this chapter discusses and illustrates layout and design principles and 
practices for attractive, orderly, clear reports. These “basics” synthesize guidelines from the style 
manuals named in the Guide’s introduction and from technical writing handbooks and textbooks. 

       These sources appear in the Guide’s references list on page 43. The References list 
provides URLs for those style books with free online access. 

        Sources differ in their recommendations for layout and design. For example, heading 
styles vary in capitalization, alignment, type face, font size, and the amount of white space above 
and below a heading. Style guides also differ in recommendations for arranging a report’s parts, 
particularly front and back matter elements. Inconsistency arises even among the Transportation 
Research Board family of guides and publications. 

       In these and other instances of seemingly conflicting advice and intent, or departure from 
an organization’s own manual of standards and practices, the Guide recommends the more 
conservative and application­versatile rules. However, because you are most familiar with the 
information that must be completely and clearly communicated, you are probably also the better 
judge of which layout and design features will hold your reader’s attention and facilitate his or 
her understanding the text. Guides and manuals themselves acknowledge these design dilemmas, 
and their advice in such cases is for the principal writer or editor to exercise good judgment and 
reasonable consistency when compelled to deviate from the standard. See the References list, 
page 43, for the CRP Style Manual 2005 online version containing names, phone numbers, and 
e­mail addresses of TRB librarians and other transportation research consultants. 

4.1 Organizing Report Parts 
The column below illustrates the variety of parts that may be called for in business and technical 
reports. Items in bold typeface denote NCHRP/TCRP­specified parts and their terms or titles. 
Though your SPR report will not require all these parts, knowledge of the array of options and 
their general placement will help you assemble other academic and professional document.




                                                 21 
                                 Formal Report Components 
 1.    Cover 
 2.    Preface 
 3.    Foreword 
 4.    Metric conversion chart 
 5.    Acknowledgment of sponsorship and disclaimer 
 6.    Title page 
 7.    Letter of transmittal or implementation 
 8.    Acknowledgments                                                               Front Matter 
 9.    DOT form 
10.    Table of contents 
11.    List of figures (including equations) 
12.    List of tables 
13.    List of abbreviations and symbols 
14.    Acknowledgments 
15.    Abstract 
16.    Summaries (executive summary) 
17.    Introduction 
18.    Data and discussion sections 
19.    Chapter 1: Introduction and research approach 
20.    Chapter 2: Findings                                                           Body 
21.    Conclusions and interpretations 
22.    Chapter 3: Interpretation, appraisal, applications 
23.    Recommendations 
24.    Chapter 4: Conclusions and suggested research 
25.    References 
26.    Bibliography 
27.    Glossary, abbreviations, symbols                                              Back Matter 
28.    Appendices 



       The required design and format of your report’s cover, sponsorship statement, 
disclaimer, title page, DOT form, table of contents (TOC), list of figures, list of tables, 
acknowledgments, abstract, and summary are illustrated in the corresponding parts of the 
Guide. See pages from cover through page 3. The cover, title page with disclaimer, and DOT 
form are standard issue KTC design and format. 

4.2 Formatting Typed Text, White Space, And Headings 
This section explains and illustrates NCHRP/TCRP and KTC typography, visual cuing, and page 
layout and design requirements. Unless clarity and logic call for deviations from these rules, 
duplicate these features in your research report. 

4.2.1 Typed Text 
Times New Roman (as used for text here) is the most popular (and preferred) typeface; Arial (as 
used for headings here) is the most commonly used sans serif style. Avoid using more than two 
typefaces in your report’s prose text; limit your exceptions to illustrations or technical equations 
requiring distinctive typefaces. Choose 12­point font unless you have good reason to do


                                                 22 
otherwise. Good reasons include headings, titles or labels within illustrations, bulleted or 
numbered lists, columns, and blocked quotations. 
        Resist the temptation to over­format your typeface—that is, to use italics, ALL 
UPPERCASE LETTERS, underlining, and bolding unnecessarily or inconsistently. One reason 
to be type style frugal is that you will need the all caps, italics, and bolding features for headings, 
words to appear in a glossary, illustrations, bullets, numbers, equations, in­text citations, and the 
References list. The Guide’s Appendices A and B on pages 40 through 50 will explain when and 
how to use these features for citing and documenting your report. 

4.2.2 White Space and Page Layout 
White space divides, frames, and unifies. It guides the reader, breaks information into digestible 
units, sharpens paragraphs, signals changes, and enhances page layout and readability. 

4.2.2.1 Margins 
Set one­inch margins around the text. Do not justify the right margin; leave it “ragged right” for 
easier reading. Occasionally the bottom margin will run shallower or deeper, as illustrated on the 
previous page. Run text on both sides of your leaves of paper, as would a book or journal. 

4.2.2.2 Line spacing 
Single­space final report text within paragraphs; double­space between paragraphs. Insert 
attractive but not excessive amounts of space above and below equations, blocked quotations, 
bulleted and numbered lists, columns, and visuals. As illustrated on the next page, headings also 
require attention to their amounts of surrounding white space. 

4.2.2.3 Paragraphs 
Align a section’s first paragraph—the paragraph directly beneath the heading–flush left with the 
heading. Use the tab key to indent the first lines of subsequent paragraphs within that section. 
Limit your paragraphs to 15 lines or fewer. 

4.2.2.4 Page numbers 
Center page numbers in page footers. Insert lowercase roman numerals on front matter pages, 
and arabic numerals beginning with the summary. 

4.2.3 Headings 
Headings reveal document organization and hierarchy. They help readers decide which sections 
to read, skim, or skip. The best headings “talk” to the reader in short but meaningful blurbs. 

        The Guide features numbered headings and subheadings. The Handbook of Technical 
Writing explains how this decimal numbering system enables writers to cross­reference more 
easily (13); the Chicago Manual of Style points out the ease of reference afforded to readers by



                                                  23 
what CMS terms the double numeration or multiple numeration system (14). NCHRP/CRP style 
guides and handouts discourage using more than four levels of chapter subheadings. 
Although no single format for headings is always correct, SPR reports should conform to these 
styles for chapter number and title and four levels of subheadings as shown on the following 
page.




                                              24 
Chapter Number                                                NCHRP/CRP Headings Style 
        <space>                                      1.  Introduce a subheading level only if you will 
CHAPTER TITLE                                            place two or more subheadings within the 
        <space>                                          higher­level section. For example, the 
Text begins here. Indent subsequent                      subheadings illustration intersperses two 
paragraphs.                                              each of third­ and fourth­level subheadings 
        <space> 
                                                         among three first­level subheadings and two 
1.1 First­Level Subheading                               second­level subheadings. Though the first­ 
Text begins here. Indent subsequent                      and second­level subheadings are not 
paragraphs.                                              consecutive, they are consistent in size, 
        <space>                                          appearance, and structure. 
1.1.1 Second­level Subheading                        2.  Use the same typography for same­level 
                                                         headings. 
Text begins here. Indent subsequent 
paragraphs.                                          3.  Use parallel grammatical structure and 
        <space>                                          capitalization for same­level headings 
1.1.2 Second­level Subheading                        4.  Set all headings flush with left margin. 
                                                     5.  Begin each chapter on a new page. 
Text begins here. Indent subsequent                  6.  Avoid stacked subheadings. Insert a mini­ 
paragraphs.                                              introduction as the first lines of text 
        <space> 
                                                         appearing below a subheading. 
1.1.2.1 Third­level Subheading                       7.  Surround a subheading with more white 
Text begins here. Indent subsequent                      space above, less below. A chapter title is 
paragraphs.                                              the sole exception. 
        <space>                                      8.  Do not use headings to replace discussion; 
1.1.2.2 Third­level Subheading                           text should read independently of the 
Text begins here. Indent subsequent                      heading. 
paragraphs.                                          9.  Do not separate subheadings from their text. 
        <space>                                          If you cannot fit two or more lines of text 
1.1.2.2.1 Fourth­level Subheading. Text                  beneath a subheading, carry subheading and 
begins here, after the heading run­in.                   text over to the next page. Deeper bottom 
        <space>                                          margins are acceptable.
1.1.2.2.2 Fourth­level Subheading. Text 
begins here, after the heading run­in. 
        <space> 
1.1.3 Second­level Subheading 
Text begins here. Indent subsequent paragraphs. 
        <space> 
1.2 First­Level Subheading 




                                                   25 
26
Chapter Five 

CREATING AND INTEGRATING VISUALS 

This chapter describes the most effectively practiced conventions for presenting information 
visually as well as verbally. Although you can customize illustrations to fit your purposes and 
audience, a few universal ground rules can prevent miscommunication of visual messages. 
Because images and information graphics dominate modern business, scientific, and technical 
communication, transportation research PIs must know how to use tools and language that insure 
their audiences’ comprehension and positive response. Thus, while you may harbor wildly 
imaginative ideas about how to present numbers and other facts, you must also know, remember, 
and practice everyday courtesies and conventions so that no reader has to work hard to 
comprehend the brilliance of your research and findings. 

5.1 Classifying and Naming Visuals 
Images comprise news photographs, conceptual photographs, lifelike or stylized drawings, 
cartoons, clip art, and advertisements; information graphics comprise tables, charts, graphs, and 
maps. KTC report writers use images such as photographs to verify their research process— 
where and how the research was visibly and tangibly carried out—but they depend primarily on 
information graphics to explain their final product findings, analyses, and conclusions. 

        Technical writers classify information graphics into two categories: table and figure. 
Tables arrange numerical information into columns and rows; this grid structure helps the reader 
locate and compare bits of information. According to The Business Writer’s Companion, tables 
“can present data, such as statistics, more concisely than text and more accurately than a graph” 
(15). Thus, if you want your reader to pay discriminating attention to numbers—dollars or cents, 
percentages or percentiles, weights or measures, rates or ratios—choose a table to communicate 
according to the five Cs of clarity, conciseness, completeness, concreteness, and correctness. 

        However, if you want your reader to see a relationship among data, a figure may 
communicate your message faster and more dramatically. Again, The Business Writer’s 
Companion clarifies the distinction between tables and figures: “Trends, movements, 
distributions, comparisons, and cycles are more readily apparent in graphs [one member of the 
figure family] than they are in tables” (15). 

        But what if you want your reader to see the forest and the trees? The Business Writer’s 
Companion authors see the problem and its solution: “However, although graphs present data in 
a more comprehensible form than tables do, they are less precise. For that reason, graphs are 
often accompanied by tables that give exact data (15). Supply both table and figure. 

       Introduce and label all your report’s informational graphics either tables or figures. But 
what should you do about images? Refer to them as figures, also. To simplify the classification 
and nomenclature of visuals, just remember that whatever is not a table is a figure.




                                                27 
5.2 Creating Visuals: Recommendations and Caveats 
This section presents steps in planning and creating tables and figures. Beware the pitfalls. 

5.2.1 Visu­rules for Visuals 
1.  Ask yourself: Is a visual necessary, relevant, and appropriate at this point in the report? 
2.  Determine whether a table or a figure is the better choice for your purpose and audience. 
3.  Follow the IDDD—Introduce, Display, Document, and Discuss—organizational plan for 
    integrating text and illustration. 
4.  Assign every visual a label—Table or Figure—and arabic numeral (for example, Table 1). 
5.  Number tables and figures separately. Thus, a report with both tables and figures will have a 
    Table 1 as well as a Figure 1, and so on. For long reports with many visuals throughout 
    chapter divisions, you may want to use a decimal numbering system similar to what this 
    Guide uses for headings. 
6.  Display an illustration as closely as possible to its narrative text, but never before the text has 
    first properly introduced the visual by the visual’s label, number, and location. An elegant 
    and smooth text introduction will also explain the visual’s primary fact—its main point—in 
    the same sentence with the label and number and location, or in one or two sentences after 
    the first text reference. Tag your visuals with signal phrases or clauses such as “As Table 1 
    [below] demonstrates . . . .” If the visual’s location is obvious, leave out location information; 
    but if a visual must be separated from its narrative for some good reason, write, “As Table 1 
    on page 12 illustrates, . . .” or “Figure 2 on the next page reveals . . . “ so that the reader loses 
    no time searching for the visual. You want your reader to examine the visual with your 
    introduction’s main point still in mind. 
7.  Compose a concise, precise descriptive table title or figure caption summarizing the 
    visual’s message. One word titles seldom work; fragments or sentences usually suffice. Place 
    a table’s label, number, and title above the table display. Insert two spaces between the 
    number and title. Place a figure’s label, number, and caption beneath the figure display. 
8.  Discuss the visual at some point after its introduction. Place the visual as closely as possible 
    to this text discussion. If the visual’s size or detail cause it to be unwieldy for inclusion in the 
    text at this point, place the visual in an appendix. Be sure to refer your reader to the visual’s 
    exact page number in the appendix; then continue your text discussion of the visual’s 
    contents and implications. Regardless of your visual’s location, use verbal cues to point to 
    key content such as unusual or unexpected data results, interesting or curious correlations or 
    inverse relationships, trends or patterns that raise questions and imply need for further 
    research. As the visual’s borrower or creator, you must clearly explain its function in your 
    research, findings, analysis, or conclusions. Do not merely repeat the visual’s content with 
    obvious statements such as “Column 1 names the types of United States registered vehicles.” 
    Instead, point to a “story” told by the numbers in relation to one another—that public 
    transportation and bus transit is almost non­existent on the national transportation scene, with 
    single­passenger vehicles such as motorcycles outnumbering them five to one. You should 
    clarify data oddities, explain what is missing and why (if you know), justify any decisions to 
    combine or separate certain data, and add details or examples not depicted in the illustration.



                                                   28 
9.  Document the visual’s source of information with a parenthetical citation placed at the end 
    of the table’s title or the figure’s caption. Your discussion of the visual should explain the 
    details of your incorporation—have you reproduced or adapted someone else’s data or 
    illustration, or have you created the visual from your research data? If you designed the 
    visual to display your own research findings and analyses, your introduction and discussion 
    should explain that you collected the data and translated it into visual form. 
   The CRP Style Manual 2005 allows parenthetical citations within figures and tables. 
   For sources you can and want to identify in detail, use traditional source lines containing the 
   author’s name (first name followed by surname), title or description of the source 
   information, place of publication, date, and page number. Whenever page numbers are 
   available, source lines should contain them. Use commas to separate these units of 
   information. Remember not to insert URLs in source lines (not www.uky.edu, but University 
   of Kentucky website); place URLs in your list of references. 

5.2.2 Common Errors in Designing and Incorporating Visuals 
In addition to advice about illustrations, pay attention to these oversights resulting in difficult­to­ 
comprehend visuals:
·  Mislabeling tables and figures as charts, graphs, diagrams, or other informal terms
·  Forgetting labels, callouts, titles, source lines, table headings, figure legends or keys
·  Forgetting headings for spreadsheet rows and columns and thus, Excel­generated visuals with 
    the word Series instead of exact descriptive labels
·  Using too much variety among one report’s visuals—inconsistent typography, format, or 
    location of labels, numbers, titles, and source lines
·  Using color unwisely—too many colors, incompatible colors, data typed over shades too 
    dark for the data to be seen, indistinguishable colors
·  Not imbedding texture in colors so as to render segments distinguishable in photocopies.
·  Misaligning numbers or decimal points in tables, or leaving off dollar signs
·  Choosing fonts too small to be easily read, or too large for a visual’s scale
·  Failing to follow the IDDD plan of organization for integrating text and visuals—thus 
    “dumping” a visual into a report without proper introduction and adequate discussion
·  Dividing a pie graph into too many wedges, or arranging the wedges in haphazard order— 
    thus losing the reader’s ability to distinguish among sections and amounts
·  Making a visual unnecessarily large in hopes of disguising its low or undeveloped content
·  Lumping all visuals together at the end of a report, separating them from their narrative texts




                                                  29 
        ·  Cluttering visuals with too many doodads, boxes, lines, shapes
        ·  Using text narrative that merely repeats numbers or names from the visual but does not 
             provide useful, interesting, informative, interpretive comment and discussion
        ·    Choosing the wrong type of visual—for example, attempting to use a pie graph to show one 
             year’s monthly percentage increases and decreases in sales rather than to determine and 
             compare each month’s contribution to one year’s overall sales picture
        ·    Tilting figures or overusing 3­D features that can cause reader difficulty
        ·    Creating pie or bar graphs with wedge or bar percentages that do not add up to 100%
        ·    Labeling the x and y axes’ intersection of a graph with a numeral other than zero
        ·    Distorting visuals by stretching them horizontally or vertically
        ·    Forgetting to label x and y axes (the category axes) within graphed figures
        ·    Placing long numbers along the y axis instead of expressing units in words—for example, 
             listing $150,000,000 on the y axis instead of labeling the axis Revenue Dollars (in millions) 

        5.2.3 Uses and Design of Tables 
        Tables employ a simple scaffold: horizontal rows present one category of information, and 
        vertical columns present another. Table 1 below illustrates how this simple array can enable a 
        reader to compare and contrast Americans’ modes of transportation in 2002. 


       Label and Number                                  Title                                      Citation 

             Table 1. Estimated Numbers of U. S. Registered Vehicles by Type, 2002 (16) 
                          Vehicle type                                                 Percent of 
             Boxhead                                    Number of Registered Vehicles    Total 
              Passenger car (convertibles, sedans,                133.6 million               59 
              station wagons) 

              Other 2­axle, 4­tire vehicles (pick­up              79.1 million                35 
              trucks, vans, sport utility vehicles) 

              Motorcycles                                          4.3 million                 2 
Stub
              Truck, single unit                                   5.9 million                 3 

              Truck, combination                                   2.1 million                 1 

              Bus                                                  0.8 million               < 1 

              Total                                               225.8 million 




                                                            30 
Table 1 on the previous page also illustrates the parts of a formal table: 

      §  A label Table (capitalize your T; other letters are lowercase), followed by 
      §  An arabic number that distinguishes this table from others in the report; 
      §  A clear and descriptive title helpful to the reader; 
      §  A boxhead of brief, descriptive column headings; 
      §  A stub, the left vertical column listing the items or categories about which the columns 
         provide numerical information; 
      §  A parenthetical citation at the end of the table’s title if the research project did not 
         generate the table’s data and illustration design. Do not cite a table created from a 
         project’s primary data. 

      If you have footnotes—content notes, not citations—place them below a table and below 
the caption for a figure. Use symbols such as  *  and  +  for footnotes, because citation numbers 
within the table could be mistaken for numerical data. Or label footnotes with lowercase letters 
so readers do not confuse the notation with the table’s numerical data. 

       When you must divide a table for continuation on another page, repeat the column 
headings in checkbook register fashion and give the table number at the head of each new page a 
continued label—“Table 1, continued” or “Table 1, continued from page X.” 

        Experiment with gridlines. Most long tables need them, but simple tables may look 
better sans gridlines. Do use rules for most tables: rules appear beneath the title, beneath the 
table body, and beneath column headings. Leave tables open at the sides. 

       To incorporate your table attractively and effectively into your text, follow IDDD: 
           1.  Introduce the table by referring to it by its proper name of Table X, and by 
               summing up its contents in a thesis­like sentence or two; 
           2.  Display your complete, clear, aligned, balanced table illustration; 
           3.  Document your table’s data source if the source is other than the research project 
               itself. 
           4.  Discuss your table’s contents, particularly what is interesting or strange or 
               unexpected. Why did you put your information into a table? The answer to that 
               question can help frame your explanations and discussion for your audience’s 
               benefit. Also explain the origin of your data. 

5.2.4 Uses and Design of Figures in Illustrated Reports 
Figures enable readers to compare quantitative data, detect patterns, understand relationships and 
proportions, trace changes over time or distance, comprehend the frequency of an occurrence, 
and even predict growth or decline.




                                                  31 
        Like tables, figures can grow in size and complexity. But, again, adherence to a few 
requirements and principles will result in complete, accurate illustrations that work with text 
narrative to communicate your intended message. 

5.2.4.1 Bar Graphs 
Bar graphs are the most commonly displayed figures in American media, perhaps because such 
figures show who or what is ahead or behind in comparison to others. As an example of a bar 
graph, Figure 1 below serves three purposes: (1) to illustrate the parts and assembly of such a 
graph, (2) to relate a story about American transportation expenses within economic groups, and 
(3) to exemplify the importance of consistency in statistical reporting. 

   Figure 1’s thesis is that household transportation expenses rise—except between the two 
lowest income groups—as household income rises. Figure 1’s purpose is to answer this question: 
How much of their income do Americans spend on transportation? And the answer seems to be 
that transportation expenses hinge on income. 
          12 
                                                                                 10.4 
          10 
                                                                        8.9 
           8 
                                                              6.0 
           6                                           5.6 
                                            4.3 
           4 
                2.5                2.8 
           2              1.8 

           0 
                 <5      5­10  10­15  15­20  20­30  30­40  40­50                 >50

Label and number                              Caption 
                                              nn 

     Figure 1. Transportation expenses by household income for 1994 (17) 

But the authors of Statistics For Dummies offer these thoughts on their website from which 
Figure 1 was lifted: 
       This particular bar graph shows how much money is spent on transportation for people in 
       varying household­income groups. It appears that as household income increases, the 
       total expenditures on transportation also increase. This probably makes sense, because 
       the more money people have, the more they have available to spend. But would the bar 
       graph change if you looked at transportation expenditures not in terms of total dollar 
       amounts, but as the percentage of household income? The households in the first group 
       make less than $5,000 a year and have to spend $2,500 on transportation per year. 
       (Notice that the table reads “2.5,” but because the units are in thousands of dollars, the 

                                                 32 
       2.5 translates into $2,500.) This $2,500 represents 50% of the annual income of those 
       who make $5,000 per year; it’s an even higher percentage of the total income for those 
       who make less than $5,000 per year. The households earning $30,000 to $40,000 per year 
       pay $6,000 per year on transportation, which is between 15% and 20% of their household 
       income. So, although the people making more money spend more dollars on 
       transportation, they don’t spend more as a percentage of their total income. Depending on 
       how you look at expenditures, the bar graph can tell two somewhat different stories. 

       This bar graph has another peculiarity. The categories for household income as shown 
       aren’t equivalent. For example, each of the first four bars represents household incomes 
       in intervals of $5,000, but the next three groups increase by $10,000 each, and the last 
       group contains every household making more than $50,000 per year, which is a large 
       percentage of households, even in 1994. Bar graphs with different category ranges, such 
       as the one shown in Figure 1, make comparison between groups more difficult. (17) 

       These Dummies authors are no dummies: they understand the importance of rendering 
research consistently and accurately. If you want your readers to draw clear conclusions, keep 
category ranges consistent. Readers want to be able to compare and contrast apples to apples, 
oranges to oranges. 

      Like tables, your figures require a parts inventory. Figure 1 on page 32 illustrates 
      §  An adequately labeled and titled x­axis (Excel calls it the category axis), also known as 
         the horizontal axis. This axis is also referred to as the time axis, because this axis is 
         usually the one for depicting months, quarters, years, and so on. For their monthly 
         reports to stockholders, stockbrokers depend on this axis to reveal a stock’s growth or 
         decline over a certain number (28­31) of days. Figure 1’s x­axis is Household Income for 
         1994. 
      §  An adequately labeled and titled y­axis (Excel calls it the value axis), also known as the 
         vertical axis and the quantitative axis. The vertical axis causes much unhappiness during 
         an economic downturn, because it records numerical highs and lows. Figure 1’s y­axis is 
         Expenditures on Transportation. 
      §  Data labels (Excel’s term for the numbers sitting atop the bars) for our data series 
         (Excel’s term for the bars themselves). These numbers render the bar graph more exact 
         in its reporting. 
      §  A figure properly labeled and numbered as Figure 1 (capitalize first letter only). The 
         label and number appear in the caption line below the figure. 
      §  A figure captioned to describe the figure’s contents—that is, a relationship between 
         Americans’ incomes and their transportation expenditures in 1994. The caption appears 
         below the figure, incorporates the label and number, and “captures” the figure’s point or 
         thesis in a clear, succinct phrase or clause. Note that, while the title of Table 1 on page 
         30 was capitalized headline style—that is, with first letters of major words capitalized— 
         the caption for Figure 1 on page 32 is set in sentence style—that is, only the first word is 
         capitalized. For figure captions, capitalize only the first word of the caption, or any 
         proper nouns that would normally be capitalized.


                                                 33 
       After checking your figures’ completeness, integrate them into your narrative text with 
the same care paid to tables. Follow IDDD for all figures, also! 

        Bar graphs enable us to compare sizes and to compare performances over time. Just like 
tables, bar graphs can take on forms more complex and comprehensive than our example in 
Figure 1. 

       But, while bar graphs are useful and effective avenue for comparing numbers, amounts, 
and percentages, you occasionally will want to emphasize who or what contributes what 
proportion of problems or solutions to an issue. Or you may need to show the parts comprised by 
the whole. In either case, choose the pie graph. 

4.2.4.2 Pie Graphs 
A pie graph is a circle divided into segments, or a pie cut into wedges. The circle or whole pie 
represents the whole amount of whatever we are discussing; each segment or wedge represents a 
proportion of the circle or pie.  When you want to emphasize relative proportions, rather than 
exact number or absolute amounts, pie graphing or charting is the way to go. 

        What is Volunteer Creek’s overall water quality as measured from samples collected at 
52 stations? Figure 2 below reveals that about four out of five samples earned fair or good 
ratings. 




                            Poor 
                            19%           Good 
                                          35%                 Poor 
                                                              Good 
                                                              Fair 
                              Fair 
                              47%




   Figure 2. Summary of water quality ratings from samples collected at 52 stations along 
   Volunteer Creek, 17 May 2004 (18). 




                                               34 
Since you are now acquainted with most of the requirements for illustrations, a shorter checklist 
will suffice for the pie graph: 
      §  Keep the number of pie wedges manageable; use no more than twelve. 
      §  Balance circle segments. Since most Westerners read left to right, and are accustomed to 
         round clock faces (before digital replaced analog time!) that also move our eyes to the 
         right, we tend to think of circles in terms of clock time. To accommodate your 
         audience’s visual bias, place your largest segment at the twelve o’clock position and 
         open it clockwise, to the right. Place your other segments around the pie in descending 
         order of size unless you have a really good reason for breaking this tradition. Perhaps 
         the Environmental Protection Agency wanted to emphasize the good news in Figure 2 on 
         the previous page. 
      §  Attach the usual labels and titles. If your data need them, insert leader lines from labels 
         to the pie segments they describe. Or, if you have room on the wedges, place category 
         title labels and percentage labels directly on them. Or insert the actual numbers (the 
         values, as Excel calls them). Whatever you decide, be consistent—place all percentages 
         or all numbers outside the pie or inside the pie, keeping your families of like numbers in 
         the same format. 
      §  Check your pie graph’s IDDD! 

5.2.4.3 Line Graphs 
By emphasizing trends and relationships over exact quantities, line graphs help readers grasp 
large bodies of information. Use line graphs to depict changes over time or space, or to show 
cause­and­effect relationships. Figure 3 below shows that, over six years of testing, Site 1 at 

               0.20 




               0.15 




               0.10 




               0.05                                                          Site #1 
                                                                             Site #2


               0.00 
                     6/91  6/92  6/93  6/94  6/95  6/96  6/97 
Figure 3. Volunteer Creek Sites 1 and 2, June phosphorus concentrations 1991­1997 (18) 


                                                 35 
Volunteer Creek consistently yielded lower phosphorus concentrations than Site 2. However, the 
last testing in 1997 showed the two sites at almost equal concentrations. This final equilibrium 
resulted from Site 1’s rather dramatic two­year decline in 1996 and 1997, while Site 2 continued 
its pattern of steady rise. 

         Line graphs present the same checkpoints as those for other figures; check captions, 
labels, readability and clarity, size appropriateness, consistency, source acknowledgement. Then 
re­read your figure and text narrative for IDDD! 

5.3 Presenting Visuals Effectively and Ethically 
In their 1999 text Contemporary Business Report Writing, business professors Shirley Kuiper 
and Gary F. Kohut acknowledge an earlier work: R. Lefferts’ 1981 How to Prepare Charts and 
Graphs for Effective Reports (20). Although Lefferts’ book pre­dates many advancements in 
graphics technology, he established four timeless criteria for graphics that effectively engage and 
educate the reader: 
   §  They are simple, with no extraneous information and no visual clutter. Think international 
      traffic symbols. 
   §  They offer contrast against the “field” of the report’s pages. They stand out. They get 
      noticed. At the same time, they achieve “inner contrast” with effective uses of white space, 
      color, shapes, shading, lines, etc. Microsoft Word and Excel put all these option literally at 
      your fingertips. 
   §  They observe unity. A unified visual is logical, with parts comfortably fitting together as 
      in a well­designed puzzle. Unity becomes an important issue with complex tables and 
      figures; as their creators, we must decide how to group columns, in what order to place pie 
      wedges, and other considerations. 
   §  They are balanced. This criterion is probably the one to which we can offer the most 
      exceptions: our discussion about pie wedges exemplifies one such argument. Balance parts 
      and print as much as possible whenever the imposition of symmetry will not visually skew 
      your data (20). 
      Thus, if we are using a column bar graph to compare seven sales associates’ records across 
      one year, we can arrange our columns from tallest to shortest, or vice versa. But if we are 
      recording one sales associate’ records for the past five years, our time variable dictates a 
      chronologically­ordered graph, and column results may look  asymmetrical . . . but they 
      will also be truthful and accurate. 

       A good way to remember these principles is to devise an acronym. The Guide’s author 
uses CUBS—Contrast, Unity, Balance, and Simplicity. 

        A final criterion to consider as you design, create, and integrate illustrations is ethics. 
Although you would not intentionally use visuals to mislead or distort information, you might 
unconsciously do so through carelessness or fatigue. Therefore, pay careful attention to scale. 
Size matters in illustrations, as do dimension and distance. If you were to compress a complex 
line graph, you could render it so tight as to make certain anomalies disappear. For example,


                                                  36 
tightening up Figure 3’s line graph on page 35 might have caused the Site 1 and Site 2 
phosphorous concentrations to seem more synchronized over time than they really are. 

        Practice ethical acknowledgment of outside sources—that is, illustrated information not 
generated from your own research data—through in­text source line citations (with your 
parenthetical references) and back matter documentation on a references list. You do not have to 
cite parenthetically your project’s original research and findings, but take great care within the 
text narrative to introduce, display, and discuss clearly and completely the primary (original) or 
secondary (outside) origins of the visual’s data. 

        Once you have credited an outside source for a visual, continue citing any subsequent 
text discussion of that research. If the reader will benefit from referring to the visual itself while 
following these later discussions, insert a text reminder (loosely termed a “callout”) with the 
visual’s name and location: “Review Table 1 on page X.”




                                                  37 
38
Chapter Six 

REFERENCES: TEXT CITATIONS AND REFERENCES LIST 

To achieve uniformity and consistency, NCHRP/TCRP online handouts of guidelines defer to 
standard reference works. These standard reference works include Chicago Manual of Style, the 
United States Government Printing Office Manual, and Words into Type—larger handbooks to 
which the report writer is referred for questions about text style and documentation. However, 
should you examine representative NCHRP/TCRP publications, you will soon discover that 
these publications often adhere to a citation and source list style quite different from any 
displayed in the style manuals named above. For example, the documentation system appearing 
in the NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice report series is the CBE citation sequence 
system. 

6.1 Council 0f Biology Editors (CBE) System Of Documentation 
Who or what is CBE? The question calls for historical background. In 1957 the National Science 
Foundation and the American Institute of Biological Sciences established the Conference of 
Biology Editors (CBE), which in 1960 published its first edition of The Style Manual for 
Biological Journals. In 1972 the renamed Council of Biology Editors came out with their third 
edition under the new title CBE Style Manual. The sixth edition appears under the title Scientific 
Style and Format: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers. That out­of­print 
edition is now undergoing major revision by the again­renamed (in 2000) Council of Science 
Editors (20). See Appendix B page 48 for electronic links to information about the CSE and their 
progress on the seventh edition of this style manual, as well as links to their new series of 
thumbnail booklets about scientific and technical writing. 

        What is CBE style? This documentation system keys in­text citations to an end­of­ 
document numbered references list. A source is numbered on the references list in the order in 
which that source makes its first appearance in the text. For an example, look on page vi of the 
Guide. The (1) citation in the last line of that page refers the reader to the number one source on 
the Guide’s References list on page 43. This source holds the number one position on the 
References list because it is the first outside source referred to in the Guide’s text. All subsequent 
text references to Arnold’s article are also followed by (1). Page 15’s reference to M. E. Guffey’s 
textbook (10) means Guffey is the tenth outside source to be added to the text, and this 
textbook’s publication details occupy the number ten position on the References list. The text’s 
(1) and (10) are keyed to the Arnold and Guffey entries on the References list. Whenever Arnold 
information appears in the Guide, the citation (1) appears after the information; whenever Guffey 
contributes ideas or wording to the Guide, a (10) appears after those contributions. 

        This system saves space within the text and is simple for both writer and reader to follow. 
However, the system does not allow for adding, deleting, or rearranging sources without 
renumbering both the citations and the References list. As you compose your SPR research 
report, have in place a system for keeping your outside sources clearly differentiated, coded, or 
keyed so that you will be able to insert, remove, or rearrange without becoming confused and 
making mistakes in your final version.


                                                 39 
         Many writers find the best way to document reports is to write author names or source 
titles into each parenthetical citation of a draft, and to match references list numbers and 
parenthetical citation numbers after revising the draft. Keep a running draft of your references 
list: each time you mention a new source in your text, develop that source’s references list entry, 
place the entry below the last entry on your references list, and assign the new entry a number 
corresponding to its order on the references list. As you revise and insert new sources into the 
text, or move old sources around, you will need to insert new entries or rearrange old ones 
among your running references list and to renumber your expanded list. When you have finished 
revising, proceed through the draft, assigning each citation the number appearing before that 
citation’s source on the References list. Double­check that every numbered citation matches its 
correctly numbered source on the References list. 

       To understand how logically CSE style can work for you, review this Guide’s 
parenthetical in­text citations and follow each one to its matched source on the References list on 
pages 43 and 44. 

6.2 Cooperative Research Programs Style Manual 2005 
The Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) Publications Office Style Manual 2005 is available 
online and in downloadable Adobe Acrobat format (20). Go to 
     http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/StyleManual.pdf. 

         This 64­page guide provides succinct instructions for citing references within the text and 
for setting up the References list. Moreover, these instructions adhere to the CBE citation­ 
sequence style. See pages 25­26 of the Cooperative Research Programs Publications Office 
Style Manual 2005 for discussion and examples of what your citations should contain and how 
they should look. 

6.2.1 CRP Style Manual In­Text Citation Guidelines 
In adapting CBE in­text citation style to use by transportation researchers and report writers, the 
Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) Publications Office has issued some general rules. Here 
are answers to the most frequently­asked questions about CRP and CBE style. 
6.2.1.1 What should be cited as a reference both in text and on my references list? 
Use in­text reference citations keyed to a numbered references list whenever you refer to 
(1) published works, (2) conference or annual meeting presentations, (3) academic theses, 
(4) electronic sources, (5) works in pre­publication or in press. 

6.2.1.2 What does not have to be cited in the references list? 
Leave legal cases, legislative acts, organizational standards, specifications, personal 
communications, and unpublished works (that are not in pre­publication or in press) off your 
References list. Do, however, cite them parenthetically in the text—for example, (KRS 350.990), 
(Kelo v. City of New London, United States Supreme Court No. 04­108), (AASHTO T99), 
(KTC­04—21/FRPDeck­1­97­1F), and so on.




                                                 40 
6.2.1.3 What does an in­text reference citation look like? 
Indicate references in text with italic numbers set in non­italic parentheses—for example, (2). 
For one citation including more than one reference, insert commas between or among reference 
numbers, and dashes between the first and last references in a series: (2, 7), (2, 7, 9), (2, 7­10). 

6.2.1.4 What determines the number placed in the citation? 
It will be the same number assigned to the citation’s source on the References list. Number your 
References list in the order of each reference’s first mention in your text. In the text, cite only the 
number assigned to that reference. Thus, a reference’s first citation in text determines the 
reference’s place on the References list—placement which in turn determines the number 
assigned to second, third, and subsequent mentions (and citations) of that reference in your text. 

6.2.1.5 Are parenthetical citations acceptable shortcuts for the names of authors and 
       works? 
No. Do not write “as documented in (16).” Write “as documented in Baker (16).” Citations do 
not replace text; they supplement text information by providing the reader a pathway to the 
References list and from there an access route to the actual source. 

         Consider your reader’s need for appropriate source introduction: upon a source’s first 
mention in your text, supply something along the lines of “S.S. Chen and his co­panelists point 
out in Effective Slab Width for Composite Steel Bridge Members that the phenomenon of shear 
lag requires wider­spread research under widely varied climatic and geophysical conditions (4).” 
Such a signal phrase or signal clause orients the reader to your outside sources and their 
connection to your research and report. The same source’s second text mention could be 
preceded by a briefer lead­in—an attributive tag—reading “as Chen and others maintain (4)” or 
“as observed by Chen et al. (4).” Provide enough text information for your reader to understand a 
first reference and to associate that first reference with later citations, and vice versa. All cited 
sentences must include at least the author’s last name as a text reference preceding the 
parenthetical number citation. 

6.2.1.6 Are direct quotations handled in the same way as other references? 
That depends. If the quotation will run five or fewer lines in your manuscript text, introduce and 
cite it as you would a paraphrase or summary: “Chen and others conclude that more research is 
needed ‘for evaluation of instrumentation used for measuring strain on rebars that are embedded 
in concrete’” (4, p. 75). Longer quotations require indented blocking: 
       Given the difficulties experienced by principal investigators assigned to the project, Chen 
and others conclude: 
       More research is needed for evaluation of instrumentation used for measuring strain on 
       rebars that are embedded in concrete. More extensive study, including evaluation of rebar 
       strains, of intentionally composite versus noncomposite slab­on­girder specimens would 
       be valuable. Ideally the specimens would be multi­girder systems. Investigations and 
       comparisons of global and local composite/noncomposite behaviors would be useful. As 
       mentioned in the literature review, AASHTO is confusing on the point of composite



                                                  41 
       behavior relating to shear stud design. It is recommended that research in this area 
       includes [include] evaluation of situations and/or loading that allow noncomposite beams 
       to be evaluated as composite. (4, p. 75) 

Note that this parenthetical citation contains a page number in addition to the reference number 
and appears after the quotation’s final punctuation. No period follows the citation. 

       CRP instructions are confusing as to requirements for inclusion of specific page numbers 
within a parenthetical citation: “When the reference in the text is to a specific page number of the 
published work, that page number should appear not in the reference list but in the text as 
follows: (12, p. 245)” (20). However, the CRP’s own example on page 26 of their online style 
manual contains a brief direct quotation followed by a citation containing only the reference 
number: “‘The percentage of those reporting difficulties rarely rises appreciably for either 
couples or individuals with incomes over the poverty line’(20).” Go figure. 

         In the absence of clear guidelines from CRP handouts or the online style manual, this 
Guide’s recommendation is that report writers supply as much specific, narrowed source 
information as they have at their command: the source’s section, chapter, or page numbers in 
addition to its References list number. Thus, this Guide’s citation reference to the CRP style 
manual would look like this: “When the reference in the text is to a specific page number of the 
published work, that page number should appear not in the reference list but in the text. . . .” (20, 
p. 26). Your report may include citations such as these: (12, pp. 16­21) for a range of pages; (12, 
Ch. 5) for a particular chapter, or (12, Figure 3, p. 27) for an illustration in a referenced source. 
Consider a source’s length and complexity, and the degree of reference to the source—in the 
case of a passing reference to another research report’s overall thesis, a simple reference number 
citation such as (7) suffices—before deciding how much detail to include in your citation. Above 
all, be consistent. 

6.2.2 CRP Style Manual References List Guidelines 
The online CRP contains general rules and examples for both content and format of entries 
appearing on a report’s References list. See the CRP Style Manual, pages 27­30, for guidance 
about types of information, punctuation, spelling, abbreviations, and other CRP­preferred details 
for composing and setting up your references list entries. The CRP’s section of dos and don’ts is 
followed by a section of examples illustrating how to set up various types of entries for the 
references list. These discussions and examples appear on pages 20­34 of the CRP Style Manual. 
Pay attention to the “special treatment” stipulated for Transportation Research Board sources 
cited in your report. 
       The Guide’s references list on the next page illustrates CRP style and format applied as 
reasonably and consistently as possible to the sources cited in this manuscript. When questions 
arose about content and format of categories of sources not addressed in the CRP, the Chicago 
Manual of Style was consulted for advice about devising reader­friendly references entries.




                                                 42 
REFERENCES 

 1.  Arnold, C. K. The Writing of Abstracts. In Strategies for Business and Technical Writing 
     (K. J. Harty, ed.), Pearson Longman, New York, 2005, pp. 195­99. 

 2.  Ramey, J. How to write a technical abstract. Ramey Technical Writing. May 1997. 
     www.technical­writing.net/articles/Abstract.html. Accessed Jan. 7, 2006. 

 3.  Instructions for Preparation of Cooperative Research Programs Reports. TRB, National 
     Research Council, Washington, D.C., Updated Sept. 28, 2001. 
     http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/ 
     CRPReportsPrep.pdf. Accessed Aug. 15, 2005. 

 4.  Chen, S. S., A. J. Aref, I.—S. Ahn, M. Chiewanichakorn, J. A. Carpenter, A. Nottis, and I. 
     Kalpadidis. NCHRP Report 543: Effective Slab Width for Composite Steel Bridge 
     Members. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D. C., 
     2005. http://trb.org/publications/nchrp/nchrp_rpt_543.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2006. 

 5.  Kentucky Transportation Center 2005 Annual Report. College of Engineering, University 
     of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., 2006. www.ktc.uky.edu/KTCAnnualReport05.pdf. Accessed 
     Jan. 6, 2005. 

 6.  Tippman, D. (ed.). NCHRP Synthesis of Highway Practice 337: Cooperative Agreements for 
     Corridor Management. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, 
     Washington, D.C., 2004. www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/ 
     www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/CRPReportsPrep.pdf. 
     Accessed Aug. 1, 2005. 

 7.  Robinson, B. W., L. Rodegerdts, W. Scarborough, and W. Kittelson. Roundabouts: An 
     Informational Guide. Report FHWA­RD­00­067, FHWA, U. S. Department of 
     Transportation, 2000. 
                                                                        th 
 8.  Baker, S., and R. E. Yarber. The Practical Stylist with Readings, 6  ed. Harper & Row, 
     Publishers, Inc., New York, 1986. 

 9.  Green, E. R., K. R. Agent, J. G. Pigman, and M. L. Barrett. Analysis of Traffic Crash Data 
     In Kentucky (2000­2004). Report KTC­05­19/KSP2­05­1F. Kentucky Transportation 
     Center, College of Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, 2005. 
                                                               th 
10.  Guffey, M. E. Business Communication: Process & Product, 5  ed. Thomson­ 
     Southwestern, Mason, Ohio, 2006. 

11.  Taking the High Road: The Environmental and Social Contributions of America’s 
     Highway Programs. AASHTO, Washington, D. C., 2001.




                                              43 
12.  Schriver, K. A. Dynamics in Document Design: Creating Texts for Readers. John Wiley & 
     Sons, Inc., New York, 1997. 
                                                                                 th 
13.  Alred, G. J., C. T. Brusaw, and W. E. Oliu. Handbook of Technical Writing, 8  ed. 
     Bedord/St. Martin’s, Boston,  Mass., 2006. 
                                th 
14.  Chicago Manual of Style, 15  ed. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Ill., 2003. 
                                                                                   rd 
15.  Alred, C. J., C. T. Brusaw, and W. E. Oliu. The Business Writer’s Companion, 3  ed. 
     Bedford /St. Martin’s, Boston, Mass., 2002. 

16.  Rodegerdts, L. A., B. R. Nevers, and B. Robinson. Signalized Intersections: Informational 
     Guide. Report FHWA­HRT­04­091, FHWA, U. S. Department of Transportation, 2000. 
     www.tfhrc.gov/safety/pubs/04091/04091.pdf. Accessed Aug. 15, 2005. 

17.  Dummies.com. Adapted from D. Rumsey, Statistics for Dummies. Raising the Bar on Bar 
     Graphs in Statistics. Sept. 2003. http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesArticle/ 
     id­2171.html. Accessed Jan. 4, 2006. 

18.  U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. Monitoring and Assessing Water Quality. 
     Volunteer Stream Monitoring: A Methods Manual, Presenting the Data, sec. 6.2. 
     http://www.epa.gov/owow/monitoring/volunteer/stream/vms62.html. Accessed January 2, 
     2006. 
                                                                         nd 
19.  Kuiper, S., and G. F. Kohut. Contemporary Business Report Writing, 2  ed. South­ 
     Western College Publishing, Mason, Ohio, 1999. 

20.  CRP Publications Office. Style Manual 2005. Transportation Research Board of the 
     National Academies, Washington, D. C., 2005. www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/ 
     boilerplate/Attachments/$file/StyleManual.pdf. Accessed July 23, 2005. 

21.  Rosenwasser, D., and J. Stephen. Writing Analytically. Harcourt Brace & Company, Fort 
     Worth, Texas, 1997. 
                                                            th 
22.  U. S. Government Printing Office. Style Manual 2000, 29  ed. Last updated Sept. 27, 
     2003. www.gpoaccess.gov/stylemanual/about.html. Accessed Aug. 15, 2005. 

23.  CBE Style Manual Committee. CBE Style Manual: A Guide for Authors, Editors, and 
                                             th 
     Publishers in the Biological Sciences, 5  ed. Council of Biology Editors, Inc., Bethesda, 
     1983.




                                              44 
APPENDIX A 

SENTENCE STYLE 

Many business and technical writing textbooks argue that modern workplace writing has settled 
into two distinct categories: formal and informal. As these columns illustrate, each writing style 
displays features appropriate for specific purposes with specific audiences: 

            Formal Writing Style                             Informal Writing Style 
Use            Theses                                        Short, routine reports 
                Research studies                             Reports for familiar audiences 
                Controversial or complex                     Noncontroversial reports 
                (especially to outsiders)                    Most reports for company insiders 
                reports 

Effect          Impression of objectivity,                   Feeling of warmth, personal 
                accuracy, professionalism,                   involvement, closeness 
                fairness 

                Distance created between 
                writer and reader 

Characteristics  Absence of first­person                     Use of first­person pronouns 
                pronouns; use of third­person                (I, we, me, my, us, our) 
                (the researcher, the writer) 

                Absence of contractions                      Use of contractions 
                (can’t,  don’t) 

                Use of passive­voice verbs (the              Emphasis on active­voice verbs 
                study was conducted)                         (I conducted the study) 
                Complex sentences, long words                Shorter sentences; familiar words 

                Absence of humor and figures                 Occasional use of humor, metaphors 
                of speech 

                Reduced use of colorful                      Occasional use of colorful speech 
                adjectives and adverbs 

                Elimination of “editorializing”              Inclusion of author’s opinions and 
                (author’s opinions, perceptions)             ideas




                                                    45 
        Keep these distinctions in mind as you write your report. At the same time, understand 
that many successful technical writers believe “good writing is good writing,” that clear and 
effective prose grows from a few sound principles and practices adaptable to formal or informal 
goals and audiences. These principles and practices adapt vocabulary and sentence structure to 
what the writer knows about the subject and the reader. 

        Because of these primary emphases on content, purpose, and audience, a good and 
successful writer will remain in the background of his or her work and product. Yet many writers 
struggle to create reader­based words, sentences, and paragraphs. The terms reader­based prose 
and writer­based prose first appeared in L. Flower’s Problem­Solving Strategies for Writing: 

            Writer­Based Prose                                     Reader­Based Prose 
                    Content                                                Content 
Details often provide seemingly pointless              Information is used to help reader reach 
information.                                           appropriate conclusion. 
                 Organization                                           Organization 
Survey structure is organized around the               Details are structured logically to support 
writer’s information.                                  major points. 
                      or                               Cues are given to guide reader and to 
A narrative organization reveals the writer’s          preview and illustrate points. 
discovery process.                                                  Style and Mechanics 
Referents and transitions are missing or are           Varied word choice and sentence structure 
inappropriate.                                         keep reader’s attention. 
             Style and Mechanics                       Grammar, punctuation, and mechanics are 
Vocabulary is repetitious; sentence structure          correct. 
is hard to follow; conventions of standard 
written English are not followed. 

        Your challenge as a report writer is to generate a manuscript that combines the best, most 
workable features of formal and informal writing styles, and of reader­ and writer­based prose. 
After all, yours is a research report, and therefore a narrative that “reveals the writer’s discovery 
process” may be fully comprehensible to a reader who will benefit from an explanation of what 
you found and how you made sense of your findings. Yet what will make your report even more 
reader­accessible is your providing “cues,” “referents,” and “transitions” to keep the reader on 
track. Your reader’s task is to absorb, over a few hours and from a sheaf of papers, what you 
have learned over months of intimate, hands­on, documented labor. 

        The purpose of Appendix A is to acquaint you with a few simple, easy­to implement 
principles and practices for easy­to­read sentences. A reader who does not have to work hard to 
understand what you are saying will be more inclined to pay attention to your arguments. Easy 
reading can be very hard to write, but these suggestions and patterns can make a difference in 
your final report’s clarity and grace.




                                                 46 
      ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VOICES 
      These twenty­four lines of text appear early in the NCHRP’s Information and Instructions for 
      Preparing Proposals in the National Cooperative Highway Research Program: 
 1           Ultimately, the specific problems to be included in the Program are referred to the 
 2           National Research Council (NRC) for acceptance. The TRB is a unit of the NRC, which 
 3           serves both the National Academy of Sciences (the National Academies) and the National 
 4           Academy of Engineering, and research projects addressing the AASHTO­selected 
 5           problems are defined by groups of experts selected by the TRB. Qualified research 
 6           agencies are selected from those that have submitted proposals according to procedures 
 7           outlined herein, and contracts between these agencies and the National Academies are 
 8           negotiated for prosecution of an approved research plan. Surveillance of the 
 9           administrative and technical matters of the contract work is carried out by the TRB staff 
10           assigned to the Program. 
11           The Transportation Research Board of the NRC, the operating arm of the National 
12           Academies of Sciences and Engineering, was requested by AASHTO to administer the 
13           research program because of the TRB’s recognized objectivity and understanding of 
14           modern research practices. The TRB is uniquely suited for this purpose: it maintains an 
15           extensive committee structure from which authorities on any transportation subject may 
16           be drawn; it possesses avenues of communication and cooperation with federal, state, and 
17           local governmental agencies, universities, and industry; its relationship to the NRC 
18           ensures objectivity; and it maintains a full­time technical activities staff of specialists in 
19           transportation matters to bring the findings of research directly to those who are in a 
20           position to use them. 
21           It is to be emphasized that the NCHRP is a program of contract research—it does not 
22           operate on a grant basis. Further, proposals can be received only in response to 
23           announced project statements because each year’s funds are earmarked in their entirety 
24           for research problems specified by the sponsor, AASHTO. 

      The underlined verb forms exemplify the passive voice, a verb construction occurring in 
      sentences where sentence subjects are passive agents, the recipients of actions performed by 
      active agents named elsewhere in the sentences, or left unnamed. A verb’s voice can affect how 
      a reader interprets relationships and emphases expressed by the sentence, and how well the 
      reader remembers the sentence’s content and meaning. 

             Take a closer look at one sentence from the NCHRP selection: 
                    The Transportation Research Board of the NRC, the operating arm of the National 
                    Academies of Sciences and Engineering, was requested by AASHTO to 
                    administer the research program because of the TRB’s recognized objectivity and 
                    understanding of modern research practices. 
      Who or what is the active agent in this sentence? Who or what is the passive agent? More 
      important, what sentence idea(s) or entities get the most word play?  What information should 
      occupy “center stage” and receive the greatest emphasis in this sentence?




                                                       47 
      Here is a quick and simple revision of the sentence’s structure, but not its meaning: 
             AASHTO asked the Transportation Research Board of the NRC, operating arm of the 
             National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, to administer the research program 
             because of the TRB’s recognized objectivity and understanding of modern research 
             practices. 
      The sentence now clearly names AASHTO as the active requesting agent, and the sentence 
      follows the subject­verb­object word order most easily understood by listeners and readers. The 
      sentence’s active agent kicks off the sentence’s facts and reasons and occupies one emphatic 
      position (a sentence’s emphases usually lie in its first and last words) at the sentence’s opening. 

              But is AASHTO the most important “actor” on this stage? Look at the sentence’s wealth 
      of information—and words—about the Transportation Research Board. Here is another revision: 
             As the operating arm of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, the NRC 
             comprises specialized boards, among them the Transportation Research Board. Because 
             the Transportation Research Board exercises objectivity and understands modern 
             research practices, AASHTO asked the TRB to administer the research program. 
      Yes, it is okay to begin a sentence—a complete sentence, not an abandoned fragment—with the 
      word because. The second revision separates out the ideas from the original sentence, which to 
      some readers might seem a confusing explanation of who oversees whom, of who is a subset of 
      what. 
               A revision of the entire NCHRP excerpt, with verbs shaded to signify verbs changed 
      from passive to active voice, might look something like these paragraphs: 
 1           Ultimately, these decision­makers refer problems for inclusion in the Program to the 
 2           National Research Council (NRC) for acceptance. As a unit of the NRC, which serves 
 3           both the National Academy of Sciences (the National Academies) and the National 
 4           Academy of Engineering, the TRB appoints groups of experts to define research projects 
 5           addressing AASHTO­selected problems. These professional teams select qualified 
 6           research agencies from those submitting proposals according to procedures explained 
 7           here. The National Academies and the selected agencies then negotiate contracts for 
 8           carrying out approved research plans. TRB staff assigned to the Program monitor 
 9           contract administrative and technical details. As the operating arm of the National 
10           Academies of Sciences and Engineering, the NRC comprises specialized boards, among 
11           them the Transportation Research Board. Because the Transportation Research Board 
12           exercises objectivity and understands modern research practices, AASHTO asked the 
13           TRB to administer the research program. Uniquely suited for this purpose, TRB 
14           maintains an extensive committee structure from which to draw authorities on any 
15           transportation subject; facilitates communication and cooperation with universities, 
16           industries, and federal, state, and local government agencies; remains objective because 
17           of its NRC affiliation; and supports a full­time technical activities staff of transportation 
18           specialists who deliver research findings to end­users capable of applying the lessons 
19           learned. The NCHRP emphasizes its role as a contract research program not operated on 
20           a grant basis. Furthermore, because the Program earmarks every year’s total funds for 




                                                       48 
21           research problems designated by the sponsor AASHTO, the Program accepts only those 
22           proposals responding to announced project statements. 

              This revision of the excerpt on page 41 illustrates one reason for avoiding the passive 
      voice when you can: it’s shorter. Our active voice revision is indeed one line shorter than the 
      original. Two other reasons to avoid the passive voice include its omission of the performer 
      responsible for the action, and the necessity of clarifying the performer with the preposition by 
      added between the passive verb and the sentence’s stated active agent: 
             The Transportation Research Board of the NRC, the operating arm of the National 
             Academies of Sciences and Engineering, was requested by  AASHTO to administer. . . . 

              On the other hand, good reasons also call for using the passive voice in certain 
      predicaments. If you want to emphasize the action’s object or recipient rather than the active 
      agent, the passive voice gives you that emphasis: thus, the sentence above stresses the role of 
      TRB (the passive agent), not that of AASHTO (the active agent). 

              The passive is also preferable when the active agent remains unknown or unidentified, or 
      when the speaker wishes to avoid assigning blame or responsibility: “Highway maintenance 
      crews were instructed to continue working past the number of hours originally stipulated in their 
      contracts.” Especially in the sciences (or historical writing in which facts and active and passive 
      agents may be impossible to ascertain), the passive voice is a standard practice. One sound 
      reason for this convention is the scientific process’s primary interest in what happens to 
      something during an experiment: “The rebar was strengthened by the addition of polymer fibers, 
      but not by the addition of steel.” Finally, the passive voice enables you to avoid pronouns such as 
      I and we (see the last section of Appendix A for pronoun discussion): instead of “We then added 
      X milliliters of liquid polymer to X liters of liquid steel,” you can write “X milliliters of liquid 
      polymer were added to X liters of liquid steel.” Of course, you could also be very specific and 
      name the party who actually added the polymers to the steel: “S.S. Chien added X milliliters of 
      liquid polymer to X liters of liquid steel.” 

              As D. Rosenwasser and J. Stephen point out in Writing Analytically, you have options for 
      managing your verbs: “On balance, consider is the operative term when you choose between 
      passive and active as you revise the syntax of your draft. What matters is that you recognize 
      there is a choice—in emphasis, in relative directness, and in economy. All things being equal, 
      and disciplinary conventions permitting, the active is usually the better choice” (21). 

      TO BE CLAUSES 
      Verbs control sentences: they drive word order and can be static or active. The sentence “The 
      TRB is objective in its management of proposals that are submitted to NCHRP” contains two 
      statics verbs: is and are, singular and plural present tense forms of to be. While the sentence’s 
      meaning is clear, the sentence is wordy—not because of its length or its complexity, but because 
      it contains unnecessary words. A revision is both shorter (by six words) and sharper: “The TRB 
      objectively manages proposals submitted to NCHRP.”




                                                      49 
              The sentence revision emerges shorter and crisper because it replaces two verbs from the 
      original: the main verb is and the subordinate clause verb are. In addition, the revision has made 
      use of two “lurkers” (Rossenwasser and Stephen’s term) from the original sentence: the abstract 
      noun management and the adjective objective. 

              This excerpt from a 2005 KTC research report, and the italicized revision following it, 
      further illustrate how simple deletions and conversions result in higher­energy sentences: 


 1           Most states have a highway or Road fund that is solely used for transportation projects. 
 2           These funds are primarily comprised of earmarked revenue sources that have been 
 3           growing slowly relative to other state revenue sources. In addition to the slow growth of 
 4           highway and Road funds—which are generally dedicated to transportation—many states 
 5           have restricted the use of general revenue for transportation expenditures because of 
 6           policymakers [sic] perception that having an earmarked revenue sources [sic] is sufficient 
 7           for highway or Road Fund needs. The problems are compounded by the broad resistance 
 8           to tax increases. As a result of these issues, state transportation officials have turned to 
 9           new and innovative methods to meet highway construction and maintenance needs. 
10           Among the financing methods that state transportation officials have turned to is the use 
11           of bond or debt financing. 
             Streamlining the underlined to be subordinate clauses yields this version: 
 1           Most states have a highway or Road fund used solely for transportation projects. These 
 2           funds primarily comprise earmarked revenue sources that are growing slower than other 
 3           state revenue sources. In addition to slow growth among highway and Road funds 
 4           generally dedicated to transportation, many states have restricted using general revenue 
 5           sources for transportation because policymakers believe earmarked revenue sources 
 6           suffice for highway or Road funds needs. Broad resistance to higher taxes compounds the 
 7           problems. As a result, state transportation officials have turned to innovative methods of 
 8           financing highway construction and maintenance. One method uses bond or debt 
 9           financing. 




                                                      50 
As the paragraphs above illustrate, eliminating forms of the weak static verb to be and 
transforming subordinate clause lurkers into main verbs or participles saves both words and 
space but loses nothing in translation. 

        This sentence from a 2003 KTC research report illustrates how mangled syntax can 
become mangled when writers overuse to be in either main or subordinate clauses: “After 
conducting the literature review, it was determined that one reasons [sic] why some prior lessons 
learned systems were not fully utilized, and even abandoned, was simply because of 
compatibility and access issues.” To revise this sentence, first convert passive verb forms to 
active forms. That change will improve sentence syntax (word order) and eliminate the static was 
and were:  “After researchers had conducted a literature review, they determined that users had 
not fully utilized—and had even abandoned—certain lessons learned systems because of 
compatibility and access problems.” Another workable revision could read: “The researchers’ 
literature review led to the conclusion that under­use, and even abandonment of, lessons learned 
systems occurred because of incompatibility and access difficulties.” Either revision also 
eliminates the dangling contraction—conducting—and clarifies that researchers conducted the 
literature review. 

        To be verbs and dangling participles often travel together, as illustrated in this KTC 
report sentence, where shading identifies the culprit: “The system is also centrally located 
making its databases easier to administer and update and is capable of accepting a wide array of 
data format, since it accepts both text and attachments through file uploads.” What makes the 
system easier to administer and update? Revise to “The system is centrally located for easier 
database administration and updating and, because it accepts both text and attachments through 
file uploads, can handle a wide array of data format.” 

       Avoid starting sentences with anticipatory expressions such as there is and there are. The 
sentence “There are highway safety problem areas (standards) identified by the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration” loses no clarity or grace in this revision: “The National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration identifies highway safety problem areas (standards).” 

      Rosenwasser and Stephen recommend these technical operations for reducing sentence 
wordiness caused by abuse of the verb to be: 
      §  Convert sentences from the passive into the active voice. “He read the book” reduces by 
         a third “The book was read by him,” and eliminating the prepositional phrase clarifies 
         the relationships within the sentence. 
      §  Replace anemic forms of to be with vigorous verbs and direct subject­verb­object 
         syntax. Often you will find such verbs lurking in the original sentence, and once you’ve 
         recognized them, conversion is easy: “The Watergate scandal was an event the effects 
         of which were felt across the nation” becomes “Watergate scandalized people across the 
         nation.” 
      §  Avoid unnecessary subordination. It is illogical to write “It is true that more 
         government services mean higher taxes.” If “it is true that,” then write “More 
         government services mean higher taxes.” Don’t muffle your meaning in a subordinate 
         that clause (21).


                                               51 
PRONOUNS 
       Use pronouns sparingly in formal research reports. As explained on page 40, appropriate 
passive voice can reduce pronoun usage, especially the tendency to I and we, which the CRP 
Style Manual 2005 strongly discourages (20). 

       You probably already know how to avoid first­person pronouns, but unclear pronoun 
references, especially those imbedded in long or complex sentences, can also cause problems for 
readers. Examine these KTC research report examples and their italicized revisions: 
      §  In the past, constructability knowledge has been transferred informally, which is 
         obviously subject to variable implementation of constructability knowledge in new 
         designs and can lead to recurring problems in construction. 
        Because new designs can vary in how they implement constructability knowledge, 
        informal transference of constructability knowledge can lead to recurring construction 
        problems. 
      § It should be noted that this data base is updated daily so the number of crashes in a given 
         calendar year will continue to change for a substantial time after the end of that year. 
         This would result in numbers in the tables in this report being less than what is 
         contained in the current CRASH data base. 
        This delay in verified state reporting causes this report’s numbers to be lower than 
        current CRASH database numbers. Supply a specific noun—in this case, the noun 
        delay—to explain any discrepancy between report numbers and CRASH numbers. The 
        word this becomes an adjective rather than a vague stand­in for the lag in officially 
        updated numbers. 
      §  However, the fatal crash rate on urban highways is only 36 percent of that for rural 
         highways. This is due to the slower travel speeds and the higher traffic volumes in urban 
         areas. 
        This significantly lower rate results from urban areas’ slower travel speeds and higher 
        traffic volumes. The pronoun this now works as an effective adjective rather than as an 
        ineffective vague reference. 
        Urban areas’ slower travel speeds and higher traffic volumes account for this 
        significantly lower rate. This revision eliminates the static verb, rearranges sentence 
        syntax, and eliminates the pronoun. 

        Write a complete draft; then revise and edit sentences and paragraphs. Resist the urge to 
polish as you draft, because the stress of going back over what you have written, searching for 
the right words, phrases, and syntax, may cause you to forget key concepts or steps you were just 
beginning to work out. Concentrate on the down draft—that is, get your draft and all its 
imperfections down on paper. A complete down draft will relieve your mind: even if the 
basement is not completely cleaned, you have at least sorted the piles and carted out items you 
never needed in the first place.




                                                52 
        Once you have a complete draft, take a break of a few hours or even a few days, if you 
have that time luxury. Then return to the important work of revising and editing to the next level, 
the up draft of well­crafted paragraphs and sentences for your report’s final version.




                                                53 
54
APPENDIX B 

NUMBERS STYLE 

This appendix explains the major considerations for a writer’s decisions to write numbers as 
words or as numerals (also called digits or figures). These guidelines come from Chicago 
Manual of Style (CMS), the CRP Publications Office Style Manual 2005 (CRP), the United 
States Government Printing Office Style Manual 2000 (USGPO), and CBE Style Manual: A 
                                                                         th 
Guide for Authors, Editors, and Publishers in the Biological Sciences, 5  ed. (CBE). For more 
detailed rules addressing complicated or unusual combinations or unique situations involving 
numbers, consult the print and electronic sources referred to throughout this discussion. See also 
Appendix D page 52 for a list of helpful URLs including those pertaining to numbers style 
conventions. 

CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE 
The primary source for numbers style, the Chicago Manual of Style, follows and recommends 
certain conventions for handling numbers. The CMS distinguishes between general contexts and 
scientific contexts such as engineering research. To decide between spelling out numbers or 
using numerals, follow these major CMS guidelines: 
       Chicago’s general rule. In nontechnical contexts, the following are spelled out: whole 
       numbers from one through one hundred, round numbers, and any number beginning a 
       sentence. 
       An alternative rule. Many publications, including those in scientific and financial 
       contexts, follow the simple rule of spelling out only single­digit numbers and using 
       numerals for all others. [Thus, spell out zero through nine; use numerals for 10 and above.] 
       Consistency and flexibility. Where many numbers occur within a paragraph or a series of 
       paragraphs, maintain consistency in the immediate context. If according to rule you must 
       use numerals for one of the numbers in a given category, use them for all in that category. 
       In the same sentence or paragraph, however, items in one category may be given as 
       numerals and items in another spelled out [example appears below]. 
           A mixture of buildings—one of 103 stories, five of more than 50, and a dozen of only 
           3 or 4—has been suggested for the area. 
       Ordinals. The general rule applies to ordinal as well as cardinal numbers [examples below]. 
           Robert stole second base in the top half of the eighth inning. 
           The restaurant on the forty­fifth floor has a splendid view of the city. 
                                    th 
           She found herself in 125  position out of 360. 
                   nd         rd 
           The 122  and 123  days of the strike were marked by renewed violence. 
           The thousandth child to be born in Mercy Hospital was named Mercy. (14) 

Access the CMS website’s frequently asked questions (FAQs) about numbers style at 
               http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/cmosfaq/




                                                55 
CRP STYLE MANUAL 
The CRP Style Manual 2005 observes most CMS conventions, but it requires numerals more 
often: For example, CRP calls for single­digit numerals if they are associated with units of 
measurement and most references to time—thus, 2 ft., 1 year, but five decades. Otherwise, spell 
out numbers between zero and nine (20). 

       In addition, CRP calls for numerals to express
            ·  All numbers with two or more digits—that is, 10 and higher;
            ·  All percentages, percentiles, amounts of money, and index values;
            ·  All numbers that come after a noun—for example, page 3, line 2;
            ·  All numbers containing a decimal point. 

       Access specific CRP numbers style guidelines on pages 18­21 of the pdf version: 
     http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/StyleManual.pdf 


USGPO STYLE MANUAL 
The USGPO Style Manual 2000 states this philosophy at the outset of its number style section: 
“Most rules for the use of numerals are based on the general principle that the reader 
comprehends numerals more readily than numerical word expressions, particularly in technical, 
scientific, or statistical matter” (22). The prevailing rules are these:
            ·  A figure is used for a single number of 10 or more with the exception of the first 
               word of the sentence.
            ·  When 2 or more numbers appear in a sentence and 1 of them is 10 or larger, 
               figures are used for each number. 
In most other instances—measurement, time, money, and so on—the USGPO adheres to the 
same rules as do CMS and CRP. 

       More USGPO numbers style guidelines appear on pages 181­89 of the electronic USGPO 
Style Manual found in both html and pdf indexed versions: 
                      http://www.gpoaccess.gov/stylemanual/browse.html 
CBE STYLE MANUAL 
Pages 146­47 of the CBE fifth edition stipulate conventions in line with CMS, CRP, and 
USGPO. Use numerals to express measurement, dates, time, page numbers, percentages, and 
decimal quantities. In general, spell out numbers one through nine, with exceptions similar to 
those outlined in the other three style manuals: in a series containing some numbers of 10 or 
more and some less than 10, use numerals for all (23). 
        The Council of Science Editors (formerly the Council of Biology Editors) will soon 
publish a seventh edition of Scientific Style and Format. Although the manual itself is out of 
print and not yet available in electronic format, these sites provide extensive examples of CBE


                                                56 
style and provide updates on peer discussions about what the new edition should contain and 
recommend: 
                      http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/library/cbe.htm#two 
                      http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite8.html 
For discussion of “modern” scientific number style, go to 
               http://www.councilscienceeditors.org/publications/ssf_numberstyle.cfm 

      Despite some variation in their guidelines, all four style manuals agree on these 
conventions: 
       1.  Never begin a sentence with a numeral. Spell out the number or, better yet, rearrange 
           your sentence syntax to move the number away from the initial position. 
       2.  Express ordinal numbers according to the same rules you follow for cardinal 
           numbers. 
       3.  Combine numerals and spelled­out numbers to express very large numbers, including 
           very large monetary amounts—for example, 1.6 million, not 1,600,000; and $7.3 
           billion, not $7,300,000,000 (note that the dollar sign eliminates the need for the word 
           dollars). 

       More important, they agree on the principle of common sense as expressed in this 
diplomatic injunction from the CMS: “In certain contexts . . . tradition and common sense clearly 
recommend the use of numerals” (14). Thus, write “a size 6 dress” or “The reading jumped to 
almost 5 volts.” But to prevent confusion, that same common sense will tell you that sending 
someone to the hardware store with a list for “10 40­watt bulbs, 6 15­watt bulbs, and 100 30 watt 
bulbs” may result in a frustrated gopher and a hodge­podge of the wrong number of each bulb. 
Instead, write “ten 40­watt bulbs, six 15­watt bulbs, and one hundred 20­watt bulbs.” 

       In deciding whether to spell out numbers, to use numerals, or to combine spelled­out 
numbers and numerals, give wide berth to your reader’s needs for clear and understandable 
information. Remember that conventions and consistency matter less than context and 
readability. As the CMS reminds its users, base decisions about number style on how the 
presentation will communicate—quickly and clearly—your purpose to your audience.




                                               57 
58
APPENDIX C 

STYLE MECHANICS 

For answers and examples addressing your questions about word usage, punctuation, and 
typeface conventions for abbreviating or emphasizing words or mathematical text, see these 
pages of the four style manuals referred to throughout the report’s text, appendices, and 
References list. This Guide follows these conventions except in cases where readability 
necessitated slight departure from a usual practice. Appendix D on page 61 provides URLs for 
easy access to indexed online versions (with tables of contents) of the complete CRP and 
USGPO, to CMS frequently asked questions, and to issues being addressed by the CBE (now 
CSE) committee for a new edition of their Scientific Style and Format. 
Page numbers in this table refer to the style manual editions documented on the References list 
pages 43 and 44. 

      Styles               CBE                    CMS                  CRP           USGPO 

Abbreviations          244­55            557­92 (Ch. 15)           5­8, 43­59       147­70 
Acronyms 
Brackets               134­35, 27        267­68                    21­22            128­29 
Capitalization         54, 118­19        290­98                    9­11             23­62 
Dashes                 133               261­65                    11­14            133­35 
Equations              28­29             523­56 (Ch. 14)           16­18            172 
Hyphens                136               261­63                    11­14            137 
Italics                95­96             290­98                    14­15, 28        177­79 
Language usage         269­78            195­237                   35, 37­38        See CMS 
Numbers                146­47            379­98                    11­12, 18­21     181­89 
Parentheses            126, 133­34       265­67                    See CMS          137­39 
Punctuation            56­64,125­38      239­75 (Ch. 6), 784­86    21­23            125­45 
Quotation Marks        126­37            270, 290­98, 453­58       24­25            142­44 
Spelling               44                277­81                    36­37            63­73 
Symbols                244­55            383­87                    59­62            171­76




                                               59 
60
APPENDIX D 

ONLINE RESOURCES 

To access the “big four” style guides and manuals relied upon by federal transportation research 
and publications agencies, follow these hyperlinks: 

CSE Scientific Style and Format (SSF) 
               http://www.councilscienceeditors.org/publications/ssf_numberstyle.cfm 
               http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite8.html 
               http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/library/cbe.htm#two 

Chicago Manual of Style 
               http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/cmosfaq/ 

CRP Publications Office Style Manual 2005 
       http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/StyleManual.pdf 

USGPO Style Manual 2000 
       http://www.gpoaccess.gov/stylemanual/browse.html 

Good sources of discussion, guidelines, and models for writing . . . 
Abstracts 
       http://www.io.com/~hcexres/tcm1603/acchtml/abstrax.html 
       http://www.uaf.edu/csem/ashsss/abstract_writing.html 
       http://fruta.enesad.fr/anglais/pdf/abstract_write.pdf 
       http://www.ece.cmu.edu/~koopman/essays/abstract.html 
       http://www.technical­writing.net/articles/Abstract.html 
       http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/pw/p_abstract.html 

Summaries 
       http://oregonstate.edu/dept/eli/buswrite/Executive_Summary.html 
       http://www.engr.udayton.edu/Special/Writing/summary/default.htm 
       http://ocw.mit.edu/NR/rdonlyres/Urban­Studies­and­Planning/11­225Argumentation­ 
       and­CommunicationFall2002/70A4F34B­D571­4352­BDED­ 
       8E09FE263728/0/Writing_Executive_Summaries.pdf



                                                61 
Conclusions and recommendations 
       http://www.cfa­international.org/ONGSWmanu.html 
       http://www.chem.toronto.edu/facilities/analest/courses/IES1410F/syllabus/scireport.html 

Good discussions and models for writing in the technical and engineering 
sciences . . . 
With less passive voice 
       http://jac.gsu.edu/jac/2/Articles/18.htm 
       http://www.uttyler.edu/biology/5340/Scientific%20Writing%20Guide.htm 

With fewer clichés and less jargon 
       http://www.stcwdc.org/avoid_jargon.shtml 

With clear and consistent style mechanics (numbers, caps, grammar, punctuation) 
       http://www.bms.bc.ca/library/Guidelines%20for%20writing%20Scientific%20papers.pdf 
       http://abacus.bates.edu/~ganderso/biology/resources/writing/HTWsections.html 
       http://www.io.com/~hcexres/tcm1603/acchtml/gram2.html 
       http://www.swarthmore.edu/NatSci/cpurrin1/writingadvice.htm 
       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_Style_(dates_and_numbers) 
       http://www.rcseng.ac.uk/publications/annals/collegestyleguide.html 
       http://www.grammartips.homestead.com/quotationmarks.html 

With good titles and headings 
       http://www.bms.bc.ca/library/Guidelines%20for%20writing%20Scientific%20papers.pdf 

Good comprehensive discussions about writing style for technical and scientific 
research reports 
       http://library.usask.ca/engin/guides/tecwrite.html    THE BEST site for engineers! 
       http://www.uttyler.edu/biology/5340/Scientific%20Writing%20Guide.htm 
       http://www.amstat.org/publications/jcgs/sci.pdf 
       http://www.scidev.net/ms/howdoi/index.cfm?pageid=60 
       http://www.bio.davidson.edu/Courses/Bio111/Bio111LabMan/Preface%20C.html 
       http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/lab_report_complete.html 
       http://www­stat.wharton.upenn.edu/~buja/sci.html 
       http://www.biochem.arizona.edu/marc/Sci­Writing.pdf


                                                   62 
Major federal government transportation research information and archives of 
successful project proposals and reports 
State Planning & Research Program 
       http://www.tfhrc.gov/services/state/stateplan.htm 

Transportation Research Board publications 
       http://www4.trb.org/trb/onlinepubs.nsf 

Federal Highway Administration abbreviations list 
       http://www.tfhrc.gov/about/03085/03085.pdf 

Federal Highway Administration Communications Reference Guide 
       http://www.tfhrc.gov/qkref/qrg.pdf 

Federal Highway Administration Publications and Printing Handbook 
       http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/legsregs/directives/orders/h17104.htm 

Bureau of Transportation Statistics publications archives 
       https://www.bts.gov/pdc/index.xml 

National Cooperative Highway Research Program instructions for research submissions 
       http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/Reference%5CAppendices/NCHRP+Overview 

       http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/ProposalPrepNC 
       HRP.pdf 

       http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/ProcedureManNC 
       HRP.pdf 

       http://www4.trb.org/trb/crp.nsf/reference/boilerplate/Attachments/$file/CRPReportsPrep. 
       pdf




                                                 63 

								
To top