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					TECHNOLOGY AND
AFTERSCHOOL
     Incorporating technology into the
     afterschool curriculum in
     meaningful and engaging ways
     for the iGeneration


      Dr. Kathleen Sohar
      Kevin Crossman

      University of Florida
      21st CCLC Leadership Team
WHY IS TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTION
IMPORTANT?




Let’s start with changing
generations. . .
1946 - 1964
   Post-war celebration activities of parents
   Migration to the suburbs in pursuit of the
    American Dream
   Booming economy
1965 - 1980
   MTV Generation
   Electronic Music / Synthesizer
   Video Games
   The Reagan years
1981 - 1994
   Hello World Wide Web
   The Clinton years
   Cell Phones
   Portable Gaming (Nintendo, Game Boy)
1995+
   Internet Integration
   Information Instantly
   iEverything
   Customized and Individualized to ME.
   Always connected
WHAT TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTION ISN’T
         An Evaluator’s Perspective
WHY IS TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTION
IMPORTANT?
   Students today learn differently than previous generations.
    Research shows that their brains have literally developed
    differently due to technological advances.
    Growing up with Internet technology can have neurological
    effects – children are developing hypertext minds. As a
    result “today’s students may not be well-suited to the more
    linear progression of learning that most educational
    systems employ” (Richardson 2006 Web Tools for
    Classrooms).

   Internet technology has created a radical shift in
    information gathering, and learning models. However,
    many classrooms have not made this transition.
DIGITAL NATIVES VS. DIGITAL
IMMIGRANTS

   Today’s students grew up with Internet (the web browser is
    less than 20 years old). They are versed in the technology
    as ―natives‖ would be fluent in a language and culture.

   Most teachers did not grow up with the Internet, they are
    digital ―immigrants‖ No matter how hard they may try to
    adopt and adapt to these tools, they still carry accents: they
    print out their e-mail, they write checks to pay their bills
    they use phone books to look up phone numbers”(Prensky in
    Richardson, 2006 Web Tools for Classrooms)
SHIFTS IN EDUCATION
 Open Content
 Many, Many Teachers and 24/7 Learning

 The Social Collaborative Construction of
  Meaningful Knowledge
 Teaching is Conversation, Not Lecture

 Know ―Where‖ Learning

 Readers are no longer just readers

 Writing is no longer limited to text

 The Web as notebook

 Mastery is the Product not the test

 Contribution, not completion is the key
                  (Richardson, 2006 Web Tools for Classrooms)
SHIFTS IN EDUCATION
   Open Content -Curriculum resources are not restricted to what
    you physically have in the classroom. Content is readily available
    online.


   Many, Many Teachers and 24/7 Learning- Tap into primary
    sources online (ex: author)


   The Social Collaborative Construction of Meaningful
    Knowledge - Classroom without walls. Students can share their
    work with others.


   Know “Where” Learning - Memorization vs. Investigation
      Memorization used to be an important focus of education
       because information was not readily accessible. Now it is
       more important to know how and where to find information.
SHIFTS IN EDUCATION
   Teaching is Conversation, Not Lecture
      Students are empowered by being able to share their content
       with an audience. ―On their own, students are learning that
       their voices matter, that people are listening and responding,
       and that their ideas count. To not embrace those feelings by
       continuing to look at curriculum-as-lecture is to fight a tide
       that we will not be able to keep back‖ (Richardson 2006, Web
       Tools for Classrooms)

   Readers are no longer just readers/ Writing is no longer
    limited to text
      Literacy is more than just reading
      Reading online is a more interactive process than the
       traditional textbook format. Students must be able to
       determine the quality of a source. They may want or need to
       respond in writing. Also, in a multimedia society writing
       spans many genres: audio, video, photographs
SHIFTS IN EDUCATION
   The Web as Notebook
      Students (and teachers) need to learn how to organize,
       store and access the vast amounts of information online.

   Mastery is the Product not the test
     In the past, mastery of a skill was usually demonstrated
      by passing a test. Today’s technology allows students to
      demonstrate mastery in multiple ways via digital content
      creation.
    SHIFTS IN EDUCATION

   Contribution, not Completion is the Ultimate Goal

       Teachers need to see themselves as connectors, not only of
        content, but of people

       Teachers must become content creators. To teach these
        technologies effectively, educators must learn to use them
        effectively. They need to become bloggers and podcasters and to
        use wikis and other social tools

       Teachers need to become collaborators – with each other, and
        their students

       Teachers need to be change agents. The new technologies may
        find resistance from the traditional system, and teachers who
        use these technologies need to help introduce these new
        paradigms.
                             (Richardson 2006, Web Tools for Classrooms)
SO WHAT CAN WE DO?


   The modern student needs to be more than a
    competent reader – she/he needs to be a
    writer/editor/collaborator.

   After school is an ideal place to incorporate these
    activities: focus on hands-on, mastery, technical
    and social skills = student empowerment!
SO WHAT SHOULD TECHNOLOGY
INSTRUCTION LOOK LIKE?
Media Literacy – teach students how to:

     use the Internet critically. What makes a good site?
      How you tell if the information is trustworthy as a
      source?

     act appropriately online to develop social skills and
      enhance collaboration

     find information

     Protect themselves online
WHAT IS MEDIA LITERACY?

   Media Literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate
    and create media in a variety of forms. (basic)

   Media Literacy is a 21st century approach to education. It
    provides a framework to access, analyze, evaluate, create
    and participate with messages in a variety of forms — from
    print to video to the Internet. Media literacy builds an
    understanding of the role of media in society as well as
    essential skills of inquiry and self-expression necessary for
    citizens of a democracy. (expanded)
 PROMISING PRACTICES IN TECHNOLOGY
 Developing Self-Expression and Creativity
 Gathering and Sharing Information

 Finding and Solving Problems

 Living and Working with Technology

 Learning in Virtual Spaces

 Building Skills and Understanding

                  from the SEDL AFTERSCHOOL TRAINING TOOLKIT
DEVELOPING SELF-EXPRESSION AND
CREATIVITY
Students use tech to work collaboratively on
  projects, products, publications, or other creative
  works. Often activities are theme-based and
  integrate knowledge and skills from multiple
  content areas.

Helps students develop self-expression and self-
 management skills. The instructor serves as a
 collaborator to facilitate the process for
 completing the project.
GATHERING AND SHARING INFORMATION

   This practice focuses on using tech to collaborate,
    communicate, and gather and exchange
    information for investigative and research
    projects in math, science literacy and the arts.
    When using these tools, students learn new skills
    as well as safe and correct uses of digital
    information. Students help with the choice and
    direction of projects.
FINDING AND SOLVING PROBLEMS
   This practice uses technology in the process of
    finding and solving problems. The instructor
    guides the students with skillful questioning to
    identify a problem that both interests them and
    draws on their prior experience and knowledge.
    The community provides and excellent source for
    identifying problems and also serves as an
    opportunity for service-learning activities.
LIVING AND WORKING WITH TECHNOLOGY

   In this practice, students learn about technology
    they will encounter in the workforce and in the
    everyday world around them to encourage them
    to consider careers requiring technology
    knowledge and skills. Students have the
    opportunity to connect with business and other
    organizations in the community.
LEARNING IN VIRTUAL SPACES

   This practice focuses on activities that use
    electronic tools such as the World Wide Web, e-
    mail, or videoconferencing to deliver virtual
    learning opportunities across geographic
    boundaries
BUILDING SKILLS AND UNDERSTANDING
   The goal of this practice is to challenge students
    through educational computer games, puzzles,
    electronic books, and other forms of programmed
    instruction such as tutorials and integrated
    learning systems. Students learn ―from‖ the
    computer program in this practice, and learning
    can vary according to content area or purpose.
    This practice can directly or indirectly support
    learning objectives in the afterschool setting for
    even the youngest students.
THINKQUEST - WWW.THINKQUEST.ORG
   ThinkQuest is a protected (safe & secure), online learning
    platform that enables teachers to integrate learning projects into
    their classroom curricula and students to develop 21st century
    skills.
   Projects - An online environment for projects: Integrate learning
    projects into your classroom curriculum. Choose a topic, assign
    students, and collaborate with schools around the world. Projects
    come to life when students create pages with text, pictures,
    multimedia, votes, brainstorms, debates, and messages.
   Competition - Compete to create the best project: Choose a topic,
    assemble a team, and build a website (media), application, or a
    narrative. Prizes may include a laptop computer and trip to San
    Francisco to participate in ThinkQuest Live.
   http://www.thinkquest.org/competition/website/tq_live.html -
    watch the video of ThinkQuest Live!
THINKQUEST, CONT.
   Library - Browse award-winning projects: contains 7000+
    projects and offers students the opportunity to have their work
    published and seen by millions.
   Professional Development - Comprehensive training for
    educators: Teachers may participate in a Project Learning
    Institute and seminars that train them to integrate technology,
    project learning, and 21st Century skills development into their
    classroom curriculum.
   Benefits - Develop 21st Century Skills: The seven 21st century
    skills applicable to the ThinkQuest environment are: cross-
    cultural understanding, critical thinking, teamwork,
    communications, creativity, technology, and self-direction.
TEACHING STUDENTS ABOUT INTERNET
SAFETY
   You need to discuss what responsible Internet
    use means with students. This includes not
    seeking out inappropriate sites, but also
    appropriate reactions if accidently found.

   Pre-plan. Advance searching and testing will
    limit inappropriate site visits for students.
       (ex: scavenger hunts)
TEACHING STUDENTS ABOUT INTERNET
SAFETY
 What  about publishing student work
  online?
 Pros: students can share their work
  outside of classroom; students can gain
  sense of pride, empowerment;
 Cons: safety
 Although safety is an issue there can be
  big motivators to publish student work
  online.
 Ideas: class art gallery, audio podcasts,
  writing examples, student videos, blogs…
PROTECTING STUDENT’S SAFETY
ONLINE
   Things to consider prior to publishing student
    work online:
     Who will see the content? Will it be limited or open
      to all?
     Don’t use student’s full name or personal
      information. You can use a psuedonym, or just a first
      name. May depend on grade level.
     Obtain parent approval if you plan to publish student
      work online.
STUDENT ―SAFE‖ SITES
 Whyville.net   and Imbee.com


  Whyville.net teaches life skills and
  requires participants to complete a ―chat
  license‖ to show that they have skills
  associated with the online environment.

  Imbee.com is another site that helps
  children develop online skills. In addition
  to teaching children to be cautious of
  online predators, the sites also talked
  about other issues like the dangers of
  online scams and identity protection.
HOW DO I CRITIQUE A SITE?
 Evaluate   URL’s.
  http://www.afterschoolflorida.hhp.ufl.edu/
  Who is the author/sponsor?
  What is the purpose of the site?
  When was the site created? Last updated?
  Where does the information come from?
  Why is the information useful?
  Resources for evaluating website
   information:
   http://www.ikeepbookmarks.com/browse.asp?fo
   lder=1014313
                 (Dr. Kara Dawson, UF online presentation)
OTHER CURRICULUM RESOURCES


   How to Build a Technology-Based
    Curriculum http://www.edutopia.org/forest-
    lake-nasa-technology-integration-how-to

   Supplemental education curriculum from the
    NIH – combining science and technology
    http://science.education.nih.gov/demos/index.htm