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					                              The History and Future of Detroit
                           Itinerary for Tour of Saturday March 6, 2004
                                          Revised 03/10/04

         This tour is organized and plan for prospective new graduate students in the
                                  Department of Sociology.




                                                                Ren Farley
                                                                University of Michigan
                                                                Population Studies Center
                                                                Department of Sociology
                                                                Institute for Social Research
                                                                426 Thompson
                                                                Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248
                                                                734-998-8698
                                                                renf@umich.edu
                                                                Detroit Website: www.Detroit1701.org



        RENAISSANCE C ENTER




This trip is long. We may not visit all sites listed. Please offer your suggestions for sites we should
certainly see and those that we might pass.

Speramus meliora, resurget cineribus
   (Uttered by the founder of the University of Michigan, Father Gabriel Richard, in June 1805
   after fire destroyed the entire city. This is the official motto of the City of Detroit)

     The social, economic and demographic trends that reshaped the United States in the 20th
century were played out much more vividly in Detroit than in other American cities. If you wish to
understand how this country changed in the last century and the challenges it faces in the 21st, there
is no better place to examine than metropolitan Detroit.

• Detroit: Fordism and the world’s first large
  industrial metropolis.
  Between 1900 and 2000, the economic base of the
  nation shifted from agriculture to manufacturing
  and then to a mix of manufacturing, information
  processing, financial and health service industries.
  Innovative engineers and entrepreneurs in Detroit
  brought this nation into the industrial age with
  their many developments, especially the creation                    FORD PIQUETTE AVENUE PLANT
  of the modern automotive industry with its
  efficient production systems. These systems were not invented in Detroit, but were applied more
  completely to heavy industrial production here, making Detroit the first quintessentially
  industrial metropolis.
• Detroit: Economic class conflict and the emergence of America’s financially secure blue-
  collar middle class
  A major economic change that reshaped this nation in the last century was the emergence of a
  prosperous and financially secure blue-collar working class. This was greatly encouraged by the
  eventual successes of Detroit unions – especially the UAW – in their forceful struggles with
  management. The blue-collar middle class was the strong backbone of the Democratic Party
  from the 1930s until the election of President Reagan in 1980.
• Detroit: The epitomy of the nation’s racial conflict and the symbol of American Apartheid
                                 Throughout the last century, this nation confronted key issues of
                                 racial discrimination and racial disparities as we gradually moved
                                 away from the Jim Crow system of white domination. Detroit was
                                 an important center for the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.
                                 Racial conflict has been frequent in Detroit and it is the only city
                                 in the USA where federal troops have been sent to the streets four
                                 times to stop blacks and whites from killing each other: twice in
                                 the 19th century and twice in the 20th.
                                 The humble sculpture shown on the left, located at the corner of
                                 Twelfth and Clairmont, marks the starting point of the 1967
       ROSA PARKS MEMORIAL       Detroit racial riot.


• Detroit: The Arsenal of Democracy
  The Allies defeated the Japanese and German dictators in World War II because of the
  innovations of Detroit’s engineer’s and the tremendous productivity of the thousands of workers
  in the factories of Detroit.
• Detroit: A Port of entry and place of assimilation
  Early in the last century, immigrants arrived in Detroit from eastern and southern Europe in great
  numbers, contributed to the nation’s development and were rapidly assimilated. Toward the end
  of the century, Mexico, Latin America, Asia and the Middle East were major countries of origin
  for immigrants. Detroit was an important center for the assimilation of immigrants. In this 21st
  century the area welcomes migrants from Mexico, the Arab countries of the Middle East and
  Asia.
• Detroit: Innovative Art, Architecture and Music
  Because of the great wealth generated in Detroit in the late 19th and early
  20th century, the city has an array of beautiful and architecturally
  significant buildings, as well as dozens of magnificent displays of public
  art. Because of the prosperity of first- and second-generation immigrants,
  the city has a startlingly beautiful number of churches and synagogues.
  Buildings in Detroit, Chicago and New York best display the creative
  architectural achievements of the nation’s designers during the pre-
  Depression era.                                                             ST. BONAVENTURE MONASTERY
                                                                                      ON MOUNT ELLIOT
• Detroit: Symbol of the Revival of the Rust Belt?
  More clearly than most other cities, Detroit illustrates the challenges that now face older cities
  when labor market restructuring dominates trends in their financial base. In Detroit, this
  challenge involves great disparities between the central city and its suburban ring, between
  African Americans and the considerably more prosperous white population and between those
  who have prospered in this era of industrial restructuring and those who have been left behind.


                                                                                                    2
     More so than other metropolises, Detroit illustrates the “Chocolate City, Vanilla Suburbs”
     demographic patters sung about on “soul music” stations three decades ago.
     Note: To provide local area information for Detroit, for several suburbs, and for selected census
     tracts, information from Census 2000 is shown. Census tracts are defined by the Census Bureau
     for enumeration purposes. In the city of Detroit, they averaged 3,019 residents in 2000.
      •   total population counted in that census tract in April, 2000 (Pop)
      •   Non-Hispanic whites as a percent of total population (White)
      •   Non-Hispanic African Americans as a percent of total population (Black)
      •   Hispanics of any race as a percent of total Population (Hispanic)
      •   The percent of residents foreign born (Foreign). If foreign nations account for 10 percent or
          more of the tract’s population, the leading birthplaces are shown.
      •   Median Household Income as reported in 2000. The amounts are in 1999 dollars (Med HH
          Inc.)
      •   Per Capita Income as reported in Census 2000. Amounts are in 1999 dollars (PCI).
      •   The percent of population living in households with incomes below the poverty line. The
          poverty line for one person in 1999 was $8,800; for a family of four, it was $17,600
          (Poverty)
      •   The median value in 1999 dollars of owner occupied homes if there were at least 100 such
          homes (Median Home)
      •   The percent of children under age 18 living in mother-only households if there were 100
          children (Mother only)

  Note: For many buildings and the public art, I have listed the architect or artist and date of
        construction. Sites described on the www.Detroit1701.org website are marked with a †

  DEPART THE FLEMING ADMINISTRATION BUILDING OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AT THE
  CORNER OF THOMPSON AND JEFFERSON IN ANN ARBOR AT 10 AM

      •   South on Thompson to Packard
      •   Left from Thompson to Packard
      •   Right from Packard to South State Street
      •   South on Ann Arbor’s State Street to I-94
      •   East on I-94 toward Detroit
      •   Exit I-94 onto Schaefer Highway in Dearborn
      •   South on Schaefer Highway in Dearborn, around a possibly confusing intersection
For Comparative Purposes: ANN ARBOR: Population: 114,024; White: 73%; Black: 9%; Hispanic:
    3%; Foreign: 17%; Med HH Inc.: $46,300; PCI: $ 26,400; Poverty: 17%; Median Home: $181,400;
    Mother only: 16%. (Note the relatively high poverty rate in Ann Arbor.)

DEARBORN: Pop: 97,775; White: 85%; Black: 1%; Hispanic: 3%; Foreign: 25%; Med HH Inc. $44,600;
   PCI: $21,488; Poverty: 16% Median Home: $129,300; Mother only: 11%. In 2000, 28% of
   Dearborn’s residents reported an Arab ancestry.




                                                                                                         3
   • Henry Ford’s original plant at this site was begun in 1916 for the production of ship engines
     and small vessels for the US Navy in World War I. An historical marker is alongside
     Schaeffer Highway. The naval vessels were launched into River Rouge.
      •   At the Schaefer Highway bridge over River Rogue, we leave the suburb of Dearborn and
          enter Detroit
      •   Left turn from Schaefer Highway onto Mellon in Detroit immediately after the bridge over
          River Rouge
      •   Left turn from Mellon onto Dix in Detroit
      •   At the bridge on Dix over the River Rogue, we leave Detroit and reenter Dearborn
      •   Left turn from Dix onto Wyoming in Dearborn
   • This is the far east side area of Dearborn that is now home to a large number of immigrants
     from Yemen.

CENSUS TRACT TO THE EAST OF WYOMING IN DEARBORN: TRACT #5735: Pop: 5,214;
   White: 70%; Black 2 %; Hispanic: 1%; Foreign: 56%; Med. HH Inc.: $19,700; PCI: $7,600; Poverty:
   36%; Med. Home: $95,100; Mother only: 22%. Note the very high percent foreign born.

      •   Left turn from Wyoming onto West Vernor Highway
      •   Almost immediate right turn from West Vernor Highway onto Ferney
   • The CSX Rougemere yard is to the left.
   • The offices of UAW Ford Local #600 – one of the last of the “leftist” locals is also here. The
     leaders of the UAW in the late 1940s and 1950s sought to purge the socialists and
     communists who still ran some locals. Local #600 was one of the most militant such locals.
      •   Left turn from Ferney unto Eagle
      •   Right turn from Eagle onto Miller after passing under the railroad
   • Examples of Ford’s industrial enterprise on both sides of Miller in Dearborn;
   • Battle of the Overpass May 26, 1937, a significant moral if bloody victory for the UAW
   • Four major UAW organizers were attacked on May 26, 1937: Robert Franksteen, Robert
     Kanter, J. J. Kennedy and Walter Reuther. J. J. Kennedy eventually died from his wounds.
     Congress passed the Wagner Act in 1935. Autoworkers conducted successful sit-down
     strikes in spring, 1937 during a brief break in the Great Depression.
   • At the intersection of Miller and Rotunda Drive, you will also see the new 1.5 billion dollar
     assembly plant that Ford is now completing to produce F-150 pick-up trucks. This is one of
     five recently constructed new vehicle plants in Michigan.
      •   Bear left from Miller onto Oakman after passing over I-94 and the Grand Trunk railroad
      •   Left turn from Oakman onto Michigan in Dearborn
   • Dearborn City Hall with its statue of Mayor Hubbard, at the intersection of Michigan and
     Schaefer †

           •   Right turn from Michigan onto Schaefer in downtown Dearborn
   • Fordson High School — English Renaissance, at the intersection of Ford Rd and Schaefer
     (Keough, 1928) †

           •   Right turn from Schaefer onto Warren in Dearborn



                                                                                                     4
              •   At the intersection of Warren and the railroad overpass, we leave the suburb of Dearborn
                  and enter the city of Detroit.
 DETROIT: Pop: 951,270; White: 11%; Black: 81%; Hispanic: 5 %; Foreign: 5%; Med. HH Inc: $29,500;
    PCI: $14,717; Poverty: 26%; Median home: $63,600; Mother only: 54%

 FIRST CENSUS TRACT IN DETROIT AT BORDER OF DEARBORN ALONG WARREN: TRACT #
    5265 Pop: 3,413; White: <1%; Black: 97%; Hispanic: 1%; Foreign; <1%; Med. HH Inc.: $25,200;
    PCI: $ 14,100; Poverty: 26%; Median home: $ 34,900; Mother only: 65%.


              •   Right turn from Warren onto Livernois in Detroit
              •   Left turn from Livernois onto I-94 (Edsel Ford Expressway)
              •   Right turn from I-94 onto Michigan #10 (Lodge Expressway)
              •   Continue on Lodge Expressway until it ends and simultaneously become West Jefferson in
                  downtown Detroit.

                            We intend to arrive at Hart Plaza about 11:25 PM.

If the weather permits, there will be an optional walk at this point. We will leave the bus at the intersection
of Jefferson and Woodward. We will walk through Hart Plaza, then back to Jefferson, south on Jefferson
to Griswold, then northwest on Griswold to Capitol Park. then over to Washington Boulevard. The bus
will meet us in the vicinity of the Book Cadillac Hotel at the intersection of Washington Boulevard and
Michigan. This walk will take about 25 minutes. If it is a cold day, we will take a much shorter optional
walk.

• IN AND AROUND THE HART PLAZA, AREA WE WILL SEE:
    • Plyon sculpture at Hart Plaza (Isamu Noguchi, 1973)
    • The Fist of Joe Louis, in the median of Jefferson at Woodward (the Mexican sculptor,
        Robert Graham, 1986) [See the attached Wall Street Journal story.]
    • Marshall Frederick’s “Spirit of Detroit" statue, at Woodward side of the Coleman Young
       Building (1958). † Frederick is Michigan’s most acclaimed sculptor.
    • The Coleman Young Municipal Building, Jefferson at Woodward (1955, Harley, Ellington
        & Day)
    • Old Mariner’s Church, 1701 East Jefferson (Otis, 1849) †
    • The Renaissance Center, East Jefferson (Portman & Associates, 1987) †
    • Henry & Edsel Ford Auditorium, Jefferson at Woodward (O’Dell, Hewlett & Lockenbach,
        1955)
    • The new statue of Antoine de Monthe Cadillac commemorating his arrival on July 24, 1701
        (Kieffer & Feeley, 2001) †
    • The new Underground Railroad monument at the waterfront (Dwight, 2001) †
    • The Hart Plaza commemorative marker for the Ford Motor Company †
    • The Horace E. Dodge & Son Fountain (Smith, Hinchman, Grylls & Noguchi, 1979)
    • The Bust of Abraham Lincoln, 151 West Jefferson (Gutzon Borglum, 1918) †
    • The Ford/UAW Building, 151 West Jefferson (Harley, Ellington & Day, 1951)


                                                                                                         5
    • Victory Eagle sculpture on the front of the UAW/Ford Building, 151 W. Jefferson
        (Fredericks, 1950).

• DEPARTING FROM THE HART PLAZA AREA WE WILL SEE:
    • Cobo Hall (Giffels & Rossetti, 1960)
    • One Woodward Plaza Building, 1 Woodward (Yamasaki, 1963) with the Passo di Danza
       (Giacomo Manzu) † [Note how similar this building is to the former World Trade Center
       in New York]
    • The Father Comidas Statue in median of Jefferson near (Tchakmaktchian, 1981) †
    • 150 West Jefferson Building (Heller & Leake, 1989)
    • Ponchatrain Hotel, Washington Boulevard at Jefferson (King & Lewis, 1965)
    • Commemorative sign at Griswold & West Jefferson marking the location of the founding
       of Ste. Anne de Detroit church, July (1701)
• AS WE WALK NORTHWEST ON GRISWOLD FROM JEFFERSON TO CAPITOL PARK, WE WILL SEE:
    • Guardian Building, 500 Griswold (Writ Rowland, 1929) † Is this the nation’s most
       innovative skyscraper?
    • Buhl Building, 535 Griswold (Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, 1925)
    • Ford Building, 615 Griswold (Burnham, 1910)
    • Penobscot Building, 645 Griswold (Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, 1928). Earlier components
       of the Penobscot Building were completed by Donaldson & Meier in 1905 and 1916)
    • Dime Building, 719 Griswold (Burnham, 1909). [There are three Burnham buildings in
       Detroit: this building, the Ford Building and the David Whitney Building.]
• IN CAPITOL PARK, WE WILL SEE:
    • David Stott Building, 1150 Griswold (Donaldson & Meier, 1929)
    • Statue of Governor Steven Mason (Weinart, 1908) †
    • Sentinel X Sculpture (Brose, 1979)
    • Finney Barn Commemorative Marker †
    • Farwell Building, 1249-1259 Griswold (Bonnah & Chaffee, 1915)
    • Griswold Building, 1214-1230 Griswold (Kahn, 1929 )
• AS WE WALK N ON WASHINGTON BUILDING TO RETURN TO THE BUS, WE WILL SEE:
    • St. Aloysous Church, 1230 Washington Boulevard (Donaldson & Meier, 1930)
    • Chancery Building, 1249 Washington Boulevard (Donaldson & Meier, 1924)
    • Book Building 1249 Washington Blvd. (Kamper, 1917)
    • Book Tower, 1249 Washington Blvd (Kamper, 1926)
    • Book-Cadillac Hotel, Washington Boulevard at Michigan (Kamper, 1924)
• AFTER REBOARDING THE BUS:
       •    Northwest on Washington Boulevard to Park at Grand Circus Park
       •    Please make a complete circle around Grand Circus Park and exit onto Woodward heading
           northwest away from downtown.




                                                                                                    6
• FROM GRAND CIRCUS PARK, WE WILL SEE:
   • Statler-Hilton Hotel, Park and Washington at Grand Circus Park (Post, 1914) †
   • Edison Memorial Fountain
   • Small monument commemorating Judge Woodward’s use of Pierre L’Efant’s plan for the
      city of Detroit
   • The Detroit People Mover; President Carter’s award to Mayor Coleman Young
   • The David Whitney Building (Burnham, 1915) †
   • The David Broderick Building, 10 Witherell (L. & P. Kramer, 1928) †
   • Mayor William Maybury statue (Weinman, 1912) †
   • Russell A. Alger Memorial Fountain (French, 1921) †
   • Detroit Opera House 1526 Broadway (Crane, 1922; Rebuilt by Kahn Assoc in 1998)
      [www.motopera.org]
   • Fyfe Shoe Building (Smith, Hinchman and Grylls, 1919) †
   • Central Woodward Methodist , Woodward at Adams (Lloyd, 1867) †
   • Women's Exchange Building, 47 E. Adams (Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, 1916) †

• HEADING NORTHWEST ON WOODWARD, WE WILL SEE:
   • Palms-State Theater, Woodward Avenue (Crane, 1925) †
   • Fox Theater Building, 2111 Woodward (Crane, 1927) †
      [www.woodwardheritage.com/historicalsites/fox.theater.html
      ][www.oympiaentertainment.com/fox/home.asp]
   • Comerica Park, Witherell, Brush, Adams and Montcalm (HOK Sports, 2000) †
   • Detroit Athletic Club, 251 Madison (Kahn, 1915) †
   • Ford Field, Brush, Adams, I-375 and Montcalm (Rosetti & Associates, 2002)
   • St. John’s Protestant Episcopal Church, Woodward at Montcalm (A. & O. Jordan,
       1863) †
   • The Donavan Building /Motown Music Building (Woodward at I-75) †
   • David Whitney Mansion, 4421 Woodward at Canfield (Lloyd, 1894)
   • Garfield Building, 4612 Woodward at Garfield (Kahn, 1908)
   • First Congregational Church, 33 East Forest at Woodward (Faxon, 1891; Kahn, 1920) †
   • Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Episcopal Cathedral for Michigan Diocese, 4800 Woodward
     at Warren (Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson, 1911) †
   • Horace H. Rackham Building of the University of Michigan, 106 Farnsworth at Woodward
     (Harley, Ellington and Day, 1941) † This is one of the University's most beautiful but least-
     used buildings.
   • Samuel L. Smith Home, 5035 Woodward (Rogers & MacFarlane, 1889) †
   • Maccabees Building, 5057 Woodward at Putnam (Kahn, 1927) †
   • Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward (Paul Phillipe (Cret, 1927) [www.dia.org]
   • The Thinker, 5200 Woodward at the Detroit Institute of Arts (Rodin, 1904)
   • Grace Hoper Sculpture, Woodward at East Kirby (Smith, 1972) †
   • Detroit Public Library, 5201 Woodward (Cass Gilbert, 1921) † [www.detroit.lib.mi.us]
   • Bust of Mikolaj Kopernik, Woodward at West Kirby (Varga, 1973) †

                                                                                                 7
    • Detroit Historical Museum, 5401 Woodward at Kirby (Kapp, 1951)
        [www.Detroithistorical.org]



If the weather and time permit, we will leave the bus at the corner of Woodward and East Ferry. We will
walk east on East Ferry to John R. then right from John R to East Warren to Woodward and then right
on Woodward to meet the bus in front of the Auguste Rodin statue at the Detroit Institute of Arts. This is a
shorter walk than the first one – about 15 minutes.
    PLANNED ARRIVAL TIME AT THE INTERSECTION OF WOODWARD AND EAST FERRY: 12:20 PM OR SO

    • Elegant late 19th century homes on East Ferry in the East Ferry Historic District that
      includes homes on both side of East Ferry between Woodward and Beaubien.
    • Charles Freer Home at 71 East Ferry (Eyre, 1890)
    • James F. Murphy Home (Lewis College) at corner of John R. and Ferry (1910) †
    • Detroit’s Cultural Center Area
    • College for Creative Studies, 245 E. Kirby between John R and Brush (Kessler &
      Associates, 1973) † [www.ccscad.edu]
    • Normanno Wedge I Sculpture (Pepper, 1983)
    • Scarab Club –John R. at 217 Farnsworth – (Sukert, 1929) †
    • Detroit’s Science Center, 5020 John R (Kessler & Associates, 1979; Smitt, 2001) †
      [www.sciencedetroit.org]
    • Kamaros Cancer Center
    • Detroit Medical Center
    • John Dingell Veteran’s Administration Hospital, John R. at Canfield (Smith, Hinchman and
      Grylls, 1996)
    • Dr. Charles Wright Museum of African-American History, 315 E. Warren (Sims & Assoc.
      1997) † Sentry Masks on outside (Bennett, 1997) [www.maah-detroit.org/]
    • St. Paul’s Protestant Episcopal Cathedral – Woodward at Hancock (Cram, Goodhue and
      Ferguson, 1911) †
    • Wayne State’s Old Main Building, Detroit’s Central High School, 4841 Cass at West
      Warren (Malcomson and Higginbotham, 1896)
    • The Warren Prentis Historic District is bounded by West Warren, Third, Prentis &
      Woodward.

         •   We will meet the bus on Woodward in front of Phillippe Cret’s Detroit Institute of
             Art directly across the street from Cass Gilbert’s Detroit Public Library.
         •   Board busses in front of the Detroit Historical Museum and continue northwest on
             Woodward toward Highland Park and Eight Mile Road




                                                                                                      8
• Colonel Frank Hecker Home, 5510 Woodward at East Ferry (Scott, Kamper & Smith,
   1890) †
• Holy Rosary Roman Catholic Church, formerly St. Paul's Episcopal, 5930 Woodward at I-
  94 (Malcolmson and Higginbotham, 1896)
        •       Right from Woodward to Piquette

• Erskine’s auto plant at Piquette and Brush where Studebaker’s were produced until the
  1920s. This is the large red building at Piquette and John R.
• State of Michigan “Smart Zone” for high-tech development
• Henry Ford’s first production plant at Piquette and Beaubien (Field, Hinchman and Smith,
  1904.) † Note that this is a fire prone mill style building [See picture on this itinerary]
• Fisher Body Building #21 at Piquette near Beaubien (Kahn, 1917). † This is the modern
  type of manufacturing building “invented” by Albert Kahn and his collaborators.

PLEASE OBSERVE THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW CONDOS AND APARTMENTS IN THIS AREA. IN THE
FALL OF 2002, SOME 60 RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS WERE UNDERWAY OR PLANNED IN
THE CITY OF DETROIT . IF ALL ARE COMPLETED 6,000 NEW RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES WILL BE
PRODUCED.

            •    Left from Piquette onto Beaubien
            •    Left from Beaubien onto East Grand Boulevard aka GM Boulevard.

• St. Philip’s Lutheran, 2882 East Grand. This congregation, dating from 1934, was the first
  African-American Lutheran congregation in the city.
• The Massive GM Building (originally the Durant Building) at the intersection of Grand
  Boulevard and Woodward – (Kahn, 1922). This is now the Cadillac Square Building
  providing office space for State of Michigan employees. This was originally known as the
  Durant Building in honor of the founder of GM.
• The Fisher Buildings is across from the GM Building at the corner of West Grand
  Boulevard and Second. It may be one of the two most beautiful officer building constructed
  in the US in the era of pre-Depression prosperity and opulence. The Chrysler Building in
  New York is its rival. (Kahn, 1929) †
• The Albert Kahn Building, Second at Lathrup (Kahn,           )
• The New Center local and national historic district is bounded by Woodward, Lathrup, the
  John Lodge Expressway and Virginia Park.

    •       Right from West Grand Boulevard onto Grand River


    •       Arrive at Steve’s Soul Food at 1 PM

                    STEVE’S SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT
                    8443 Grand River
                    Detroit, Michigan 48104
                    313-894-3464

    •       Depart from STEVE’S SOUL FOOD at about 1:50 PM.


                                                                                                9
                                        AFTER LUNCH TOUR


       •   East on Grand River from Steve’s Soul Food
       •   Left from Grand River on Martin Luther King

• Clay School, 453 Martin Luther King (Tarleton, 1888). † This is the oldest school building
  in Detroit
• Hotel Stevenson, 40 Davenport †
• Cass-Davenport Historic District

       •   Right turn from Martin Luther King on Woodward

• Orchestra Hall and Historic District – 3711 Woodward (Crane, 1919)
• Max Fisher addition to Orchestra Hall
• Temple Beth El/ Wayne State’s Bonisteel Theater –3424 Woodward (Mason & Kahn, 1903)
• First Presbyterian Church – Woodward & Edmund Place (Mason & Rice, 1889) †
• Church of Christ – Woodward & Edmund Place (Donaldson & Meier1890)
• Woodward Avenue Baptist – Woodward & Winder (1887)
• Brush Park Historic District on East Side of Woodward between Mack and I-75.
• Barry Gordy’s Motown Music Building on west side of Woodward at I-75
• Brewster Homes – Visible to the east of Woodward near the intersection of I-75 & I-375.
  This was the nation’s first federally sponsored public housing project, dating from 1935.
• Cass Tech High School – visible to west from Woodward at I-75
• Schwankowsky's House of Music (Lloyd, Smith, Hinchman and Grylls, 1891) †
• Lower Woodward Historic District, Woodward between Grand Circus Park and Campus
  Martius
• Compuware’s New Building on the site of the J. L. Hudson Department Store – Woodward
  at Campus Martius ]www.compuware.com]
• First Federal Bank Building – 1001 Woodward (Smith, Hinchman and Grylls, 1965)
• John J. Bagley Memorial Fountain (Henry Hobson Richardson, 1887). This is the only
  confirmed Richardson creation in Detroit and is now sequestered for the Campus Martius
  renovation project.
• Michigan Soldiers and Sailors Monument – Woodward at Campus Martius (Rogers, 1892)
• National Bank Building – Woodward at Cadillac Square (Kahn, 1922) †
• Cadillac Tower Building with its mural (Bonah & Chaffee, 1927)
• Vinton Building , Woodward at East Congress, Kahn, 1917

       •   Left turn from Woodward onto East Jefferson

• The statues of George Washington (De Lue, 1959) and Christopher Columbus (Rivalta,
  1910) at East Jefferson and Randolph
• Beaubien House, 553 E. Jefferson (Architect unknown, 1851) †
• Renaissance Center, East Jefferson at St. Antoine (Portman and Assoc, 1987) †

                                                                                               10
  • Sts. Peter and Paul Church, 629 E. Jefferson (Oldest church in the city) (Letourno, 1848)†
    [www.sspeterandpauljesuit.org]
  • Dowling Hall of the University of Detroit 651 E. Jefferson ( Lloyd, 1891) †
  • Christ Church at 960 East Jefferson (Lloyd, 1863) †
  • The Sibley House next to Christ Church, 976 East Jefferson (Architect unknown, 1848) †

          •   Left from East Jefferson onto Randolph

  • Breitmeyer-Tobin Building and Historic District, 1308 Broadway (Raseman & Fischer,
    1906)
  • Wayne County Building Courthouse – 600 Randolph (Scotts, 1897)
  • Water Board Building – 735 Randolph (Kamper, 1928)
          •   Right from Randolph onto Monroe

  • Second Baptist Church, 441 Monroe (Various architects since 1857) †
  • Detroit Police Headquarters, Beaubien and Macomb (Kahn, 1923) †
    [www.ci.Detroit.mi.us/police/default.htm]
  • Starting points for the racial riots of 1833 and 1863 were near intersection of Beaubien and
    Monroe
  • St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Monroe at St. Antoine (Dederichs, 1885) † [Although a
    German parish, this facility was home to the city’s first black and first Mexican parishes.]
  • Evangelismos Greek Orthodox Cathedral – 707 E Lafayette at Chrysler (1968)

      •   Right from Monroe onto the Chrysler Service Drive


  • Meeting place of Frederick Douglas and John Brown, 1859 Congress at St. Antoine
  • Holy Family Catholic Church – 641 Chrysler (Schilling, 1910) † [This is the city’s first
    Italian parish.]
      •   Left from Chrysler Service Drive onto East Larned
      •   Left from East Larned onto Rivard

  • Palms Apartments and Local Historic District, 1001 E. Jefferson at Rivard (Albert Kahn
    and Mason, 1904) †
  • Mies van der Rohe/Lafayette Park Historic District is bounded by Eat Lafayette, Rivard,
    Antietam & Orleans– a replacement for the African American community that once lined
    Hasting Street
  • Lafayette Park and its residential development
  • 1300 Lafayette Apartment Building, 1300 E. Lafayette at Rivard (Birkerts and Straub,
    1964)
  • Nellie Leland School Historic District – 1395 Antietam †

CENSUS TRACT CONTAINING MIES VAN DER ROHE HOMES #5171: Pop: 1,333; White: 12%;
   Black: 84%; Hispanic: 1%; Foreign: 1%; Med. HH Inc.: $ 38,400; PCI: $32,655; Poverty: 15 %;
   Median home value: $110,000. Fewer than 100 children under 18.

                                                                                                   11
  If time and weather permit, the bus will park at the corner of Rivard and Nocolet and we will
  walk briefy through the Mies van der homes and then reboard the bus. This will be a short but
  very informative walk – 10 minutes.
     •   Turn left from Rivard onto Antietam
     •   Turn right from Antietam onto Gratiot
     •   Turn right from Gratiot onto Vernor East

  • The New Ford Field for the Detroit Lions (Rossetti & Assoc., 2002)
  • Brewery Park, 1155 Brewery Park (Engler Assoc., 1995)
  • Eastern Market Historic District is bounded by Gratiot Riopelle, Rivard & Division †
  • Eastern Market Murals (Pollack, 1972)
  • Trinity Lutheran Church and Parish House and Historic District at 1335-1345 Gratiot near
    the intersection with Russell (Wetzel and Hunter, 1931). This is, I believe, the last gothic
    church built in Detroit.
  • St. Joseph's German Catholic Church, 1828 Jay Street (Himpler, 1873)
  • The area near the intersection of Russell and Gratiot was Detroit’s second oldest ethnic
    neighborhood – a German neighborhood dating from the 1850s. Poles arrived in the
    neighborhood in the 1870s.
     •   Turn right from Vernon East to St. Aubin

     •   Turn left from St. Aubin onto East Jefferson
  • The building on the east side of Woodward at St. Aubin was designed by Kahn in 1915 to
    serve as a Packard dealership. Note the image of automobile dealerships of that age.
  • CharlesTrowbridge House, 1380 East Jefferson (Architect unknown, 1826, oldest structure
    in Detroit)
  • Croul-Adams House, 1394 East Jefferson (Scott, 1881)
  • John Bagley House, East Jefferson and Joseph Campau (Perhaps, Henry Hobson
    Richardson, 1889)
     •   Turn right from East Jefferson onto Joseph Campau and drive toward the Detroit River

     •   Turn left from Joseph Campau onto the driveway just before the Detroit River. The
         roadway along the Detroit River is open to traffic.
  • The Parke Davis Chemical Complex from the late 19th Century and its transformation into
    an attractive modern riverfront neighborhood. This is one of this nation’s better examples
    of converting an old industrial complex into an attractive residential and entertainment
    area. (Kahn, Smith, Hinchman and Grylls, Donaldson and Meier; 1902 to 1960s) †
     •   Turn left from Riverside Driveway onto McDougal


CENSUS TRACT CONTAINING PARKE DAVIS COMPLEX #5165: Pop: 1,561; White: 24%; Black:
   69%; Hispanic: 3%; Foreign: 11%; Med. HH Inc.: $ 48,800; PCI: $33,588; Poverty: 10%; Mother
   only: 40%

     •   At the intersection of McDougal with East Jefferson, turn right onto East Jefferson


                                                                                                  12
• Alexander Chene House, 2681 East Jefferson (Architect unknown, 1850)
• The Players Club (Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, 1925)
• Battle of Bloody Run Historical Marker. This involved the loss of a substantial number of
  British troops in a battle against Chief Pontiac and his Indian tribes. July, 1763. The
  British retained control of Detroit.
• UAW-GM Center for Human Resources, 200 Walker (Giffels Assoc. and Sims-Varner, 2001
• Frederick Sterns Building, 6533 East Jefferson (Stratton and Baldwin, 1899; Laer Kahn,
  1899). † This is another example of the successful conversion of an old industrial building
  into lofts.
• The site of the former US Rubber plant at East Jefferson and Mount Elliott near Bridge to
  Belle Isle
     •   Turn right from East Jefferson onto the MacArthur Bridge leading to Belle Isle

     •   Circle Belle Isle

• Belle Isle – Frederick Law Olmstead drew up designs, but the park was completed by John
  Donaldson (1882)
• James Scott Fountain (Cass Gilbert. 1925) †
• Belle Isle Casino (Van Leyen and Schilling, 1908) †
• Nancy Brown Peace Carillon (Architect unknown, 1940)
• Belle Isle Conservatory with an impressive Marshall Frederick’s sculpture of a leaping
  gazelle (Albert Kahn, 1903) †
• Belle Isle Aquarium (Kahn, 1904)
* Dosin Great Lakes Museum †
• Statue of General Aldphus Starkey Williams (Shrady, 1921) †
* Detroit Yacht Club (Malcomson, 1923) †
• Detroit Boat Club (Chittenden, 1902) †
• Belle Isle Police Station (Mason and Rice, 1893) †
• MacArthur Bridge linking Belle Isle to the mainland
• Starting Point for the Racial Riot of 1943 (Sunday June 20, 1943; 34 decedents; 25 African-
  American and 9 white, a true racial riot.
•   Father Gabriel Richard Park at the intersection of East Jefferson and the MacArthur
    Bridge with an impressive statue of the founder of this university.†
     • Exit from Belle Isle on the MacArthur Bridge and continue on East Grand Boulevard.

• East Grand Boulevard Historic District, East Grand between East Jefferson and Mack
• Church of the Messiah, East Grand At Lafayette (Otis, 1852) † This is an impressive
  church.
     •   Turn left from East Grand Boulevard onto East Lafayette

     •   Turn right from East Lafayette onto Mt. Elliott

• Mt. Elliott Cemetery for Catholics (1841); Elmwood Cemetery for Protestants (1846) and
  the Lafayette Street Cemetery for Jews (1850s). [See picture on this itinerary.]


                                                                                                13
   • St. Bonaventure Monastery with the statue of Father Solanus Casey, 1940 Mt. Elliott
     (Dederichs, 1883) †
       •   Continue on Mt. Elliott and then right onto Heidelberg.

   If time and weather permit, we will exit from the bus at the corner of Mt. Eliott and Heidelberg
   and then reboard the bus at the corner of Heidelberg and Ellery. This will be a short walk of less
   than 10 minutes.

CENSUS TRACT CONTAINING HEIDELBERG PROJECT # 5168: Pop: 1,832; White: 2%; Black:
95%; Hispanic: 1%; Foreign: 1%; Med. HH Inc.: $ 24,000; PCI: $9,996; Poverty: 32%; Median home:
$23,000; Mother only: 65%

   • Heidelberg Project exemplifying Tyree Guyton’s folk art and attempt to vitalize depressed
     neighborhood. [www.Heidelberg.com]
       •   Turn left from Heidelberg onto Ellery
       •   Turn right from Ellery onto Mack
   • Historic Packard Automobile Plant – Mt. Elliott at East Grand (1907, Albert Kahn). Early
     buildings in this huge complex were constructed in the mill style but then Kahn effectively
     used reinforced concrete to design a new and much improved style of factories for heavy
     industries helping to explain his immense popularity in Germany and Russia. The Packard
     Plant is historically very significant.
       •   Right turn from Mack onto Iroquois

INDIAN VILLAGE CENSUS TRACT #5154 Pop: 1,627; White: 32%; Black: 63%; Hispanic: 1%;
Foreign: 4%; PCI: $ 33,344; Med. HH Inc. $ 59,600; Poverty: 12 %; Median home: $280,800; Mother
only: 32%


   • The Indian Village historic district is bounded by East Jefferson, Burns, Seminole and
     Mack. It dates from the end of the 19th century, an example of a preserved elegant urban
     neighborhood.
   • Roscoe Jackson House, 2505 Iroquois (Willeke, 1917)
   • Louis Kamper House, 2150 Iroquois (Kamper, 1917)
   • Hupp House, 1516 Iroquois (Pottle, 1911)
   • Arthur and Clara Buhl House, 1116 Iroquois (Scott, 1906)
   • Mary Edgar House, 1020 Iroquois (Chittenden and Kotting, 1913)
       •   Turn left from Iroquois onto East Jefferson

CENSUS TRACT BETWEEN JEFFERSON AND THE DETROIT RIVER NORTHWEST OF BELLE
ISLE BRIDGE INCLUDING BERRY SUBDIVISION #5157: Pop: 3,904; White: 23%; Black: 72%;
Hispanic: 2%; Foreign: 4 %; PCI: $30,546, Poverty: 17%; Median Value of the 55 homes in the Berry
Subdivision: $457,700; Mother only: 35%.

   • James Burgess Book House, E. Jefferson at Burns (Kamper, 1911)
   • Jefferson Avenue Presbyterian, 8625 E. Jefferson (Rowland, 1925)
   • Jeffersonian Apartments, 9000 E. Jefferson (Giffels and Rossetti, 1965)

                                                                                                   14
        •   Right turn from East Jefferson onto Fiske

    • The Joseph Berry of Berry Subdivision Historic District is bounded by Fiske, East Jefferson,
      Parkview and the Detroit River.
        •   Left turn from Fiske onto Dwight

    • Charles Harrah Home/Manoogian Mansion/Mayor’s Resident – Dwight at Parkview

        • Left turn from Dwight onto Parkview

    • Marvin Stanton Home/The Castle – Parkview near E. Jefferson (Kamper, 1898)

        • Right turn from Parkview onto East Jefferson

    • The East Village neighborhood is bounded by East Jefferson, Fischer, Kercheval and
      Cadillac
    • The Jefferson Village neighborhood is between East Jefferson and the Detroit River and is
      bounded by Marquette, Freud, St. Jean and East Jefferson.
    • Chauncey Hulburt Gate for the Detroit Waterworks (Brede and Mueller, 1894) †
    • Waterworks Park, 10100 East Jefferson (Field, Hinchman and Smith, 1910 to 1921)
    • Pewabic Pottery, 10125 East Jefferson (Stratton and Baldwin, 1907) †
    • Hannan Memorial YMCA, 10401 E. Jefferson (Derrick, 1927)
    • Chrysler’s new Jefferson Avenue Plant producing Jeep Cherokees and supplier plants,
      especially the large Budd plant and Chrysler’s Viper plant. This was formerly the site of
      Hudson and previous Chrysler plants
    • Vanity Ballroom, 1024 Newport at Jefferson (Agree, 1929) †

 LAST CENSUS TRACT IN DETROIT BEFORE GROSSE POINTE PARK TO THE NORTH OF
    JEFFERSON # 5129: Pop: 2,998; White: 7%; Black: 89%; Hispanic: 2%; Foreign: 1 %;
    Med. HH Inc.: $ 16,500; PCI: $9,067; Poverty: 46%; Median home: $ 28,300; Mother only: 75%

        •   Right turn from East Jefferson onto Newport

        •   Right turn from Newport onto Kercheval

At the intersection of Mark and Alter Road, we leave the city of Detroit and enter the suburb of Grosse
Pointe Park.


 GROSSE POINTE PARK: Population: 12,443; White: 91%; Black: 3%; Hispanic: 2%; Med. HH Inc.:
    $80,500; PC I: $42,051; Poverty: 4%; Median Home: $331,200; Mother only: 9%

    • Darryl Finken House, 15114 Kercheval (Swanson & Swanson, 1994)

        •   Left turn from Kercheval onto Balfour in Grosse Pointe Park

        •   Right turn from Balfour onto East Jefferson


                                                                                                     15
GROSSE POINTE: Pop: 5,670; White 99%; Black: 1%; Hispanic: <1%; Foreign: 5%; Med HH Inc. $
   81,100; PCI: $53,942; Poverty: 2%; Median Home: $288,400; Mother only: 13%
At the intersection of East Jefferson and Cadieux, we leave Grosse Pointe Park and enter Grosse Pointe


GROSSE POINTE FARMS: Pop: 9.764; White: 99%; Black: <1%; Hispanic: <1%; Foreign: 5%; Med.
   HH Inc.: $ 100,200; PCI: $54,846; Poverty: 2%; Median Home: $295,200; Mother only: 4%

   • Bon Secours Hospital, Cadieux and East Jefferson (Rosetti, 1976)

       •   Continue on East Jefferson through Grosse Pointe Park and through Grosse Pointe.

       •   At the Grosse Pointe/Grosse Pointe Farms border, East Jefferson becomes Lakeshore Drive

   • Grosse Pointe Memorial Church, 16 Lake Shore Drive (Hunter, 1927)
   • Russell and Marion Alger Home, 32 Lake Shore Drive (Platt, 1912)
   • St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church, 157 Lakeshore Drive (Rill, 1899)
   • Grosse Point Academy, 171 Lake Shore Drive (Schickel, Maginnis and Walsh, 1928)
       •   Turn left from Lake Shore Drive onto Moross in Grosse Pointe Farms

   • Grosse Pointe Farms Water Filtration Plant, 29 Morass (Derrick, 1921)

       •   At the intersection of Moross and Mack, we leave the suburb of Grosse Pointe Farms and
           reenter the city of Detroit


CENSUS TRACT IN DETROIT AT THE CITY’S BORDER WITH GROSSE POINTE FARMS,
   #5017: Pop: 2,840; White: 55%; Black 39%; Hispanic: 2%; Foreign %; Med. HH Inc.: $ 28,800;
   PCI: $ 13, 898; Poverty: 26%; Median Home: $ 56,000. Mother only: 56%

   • St. John's Hospital

       •   At the intersection of Moross and the I-94 Edsel Ford Expressway, please turn onto I-94
           heading toward downtown Detroit.

       •   Left from I-94 Edsel Ford Expressway onto northbound I-75 Chrysler Expressway

   Note: We need to return to arrive back in Ann Arbor by 6 PM. If this tour is running
         late, we can continue directly on I-94 to Ann Arbor.
       •   Exit I-75 Chrysler Expressway onto southbound Holbrook
       •   Continue on Holbrook across Woodward. At Woodward Holbrook becomes
           Hazelwood
       •   Left from Hazelwood onto 2nd.
   • The impressive home of Henry and Clara Ford is at the corner of 2 nd and Edison
     (Malcomson, Higginbotham and Clements, 1908) †

                                                                                                     16
        •   Left turn from 2nd onto Boston

    • This is the Boston Edison Historic district with its elegant homes. This is an example of an
      elegant inner city neighborhood that has been preserved. This historic district is bounded
      by Woodward, Linwood, Boston and Edison.
    • Charles T. Fisher Home, 670 West Boston (Mason, 1915)
    • W. C. Briggs Home, 700 West Boston (Chittenden & Cotting, 1915)
    • Nels Michelson/Leonard Young/Barry Gordy Home, 918 West Boston (1917)
        •       U-turn in West Boston Boulevard at Hamilton


    • Benjamin Siegel Home, 150 West Boston (Kahn, 1915)

    • S. S. Kresge Home, 70 West Boston at Woodward (Meade & Hamilton, 1914)

 CENSUS TRACT CONTAINING BOSTON-EDISON NEIGHBORHOOD # 5323: Pop: 1,349;
    White: 13%; Black: 83%; Hispanic: 2%; Foreign: 3%; Med. HH Inc.: $ 41,100; PCI: $ 18,669;
    Poverty: 11%; Median home: $148,000; Mother only: 21%
        •   Left turn from West Boston Boulevard onto Woodward

    • Across Woodward from the intersection of West Boston and Woodward is the Boston-
      Arden neighborhood bounded by Woodward, Boston, Arden Park and Oakland.
    • Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament 9844 to 9854 Woodward – The cathedral for the
      Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit (Diehl and Walsh, 1913) †

At the corner of Woodward and Webb, we leave the city of Detroit and enter Highland Park


 HIGHLAND PARK: Population:16,746; 4%; White: 4%; Black: 93%; Hispanic 1%; Foreign: Med. HH
    Inc.: $17,700;PCI: $12,121; Poverty: 38%; Median Home: $49,800; Mother only: 68%

    • The McGregor Public Library in Highland Park (Tilton & Githens, 1926) †
    • The Highland Park –Stevens Historical District
    • Trinity United Methodist Church, 13100 Woodward (Mason, 1923)
    • Woodward intersects the Davison Expressway in Highland Park. Davison was the nation’s
      first freeway, opened in 1942 to make it easier for person who lived on the east side of
      Detroit to get to defense plants on the west side.
    • Highland Park Theater/Fancy Pants Lounge (13863 Woodward) and the McDonald where
      Vincent Chin was killed on June 19, 1982 – viewed by many Chinese activists as an example
      of racial hatred and the unwillingness of courts to take seriously vicious attacks upon racial
      minorities. †
    • Ford Motor Company, Highland Park Plant, 15050 Woodward (Albert Kahn, 1909-1920)
        •   Left from Woodward onto Ferris in Highland Park

    • The planned Medbury-Grove Lawn residential area from the early 1920s is on the opposite
      side of Woodward at this intersection – 270 architecturally interesting homes on Eason,
      Moss and Puritan between Woodward and Hamilton in Highland Park

                                                                                                  17
           •   Right turn from Ferris onto Oakland in Highland Park

       • The massive Highland Park Ford assembly Plant, dating from 1909, is visible to the right
         from Ferris.
       • The former headquarters and production facilities of Chrysler are on the north side close to
         the intersection of Ferris and Oakland. Note that all the old Chrysler production and office
         buildings were torn down in an effort to attract new employment in this area.

       At the intersection of Oakland and Tennyson, we leave Highland Park and reenter the city of Detroit
       If it is approaching 5 PM at this point in the tour, we will enter the Davison Expressway from
       Oakland, continue south on Davison to I-96 and return to Ann Arbor.
           •   Left turn from Oakland onto Caniff. At the intersection of Caniff and the Grand Trunk
               Railroad we leave Detroit and enter Hamtramck.

HAMTRAMCK: Population: 22,976; White: 60%; Black: 15%; Hispanic: 1%; Foreign: 41%; Med HH Inc.:
   $26,600; PCI: $12,691; Poverty: 27%; Median Home: $71,200; Mother only: 26%
   [www.hamtramckhistory.org/]

           •   Right turn from Caniff onto Joseph Campau in Hamtramck

       • Hamtramck illustrates a contemporary immigrant neighborhood with a thriving but very
         diverse shopping area along Joseph Campau
           •       Right turn onto Poland from Campau in Hamtramck

       • The housing in this area was developed in the 1920s for workers in the huge Dodge Main
         plant. It now represents a seemingly prosperous neighborhood of Immigrants from Eastern
         Europe, the Mideast, the Indian subcontinent and Latin America. This is the St. Florian
         Historical District.
           •       Left turn from Poland onto Lumpkin

       • Modern Chevrolet and American Axle plants. The current prosperity of American Axle
         reminds us of the continuing importance of manufacturing in Detroit and the jobs being
         created for skilled craftspeople, engineers and scientists.
           •   Right turn from Lumpkin onto Florian

       • St. Florian Church erected in the 1920s by the Polish population (Cram, 1928) †
         [www.saintflorian.com]
           •   Right turn from Lumpkin onto Joseph Campau
           •   Left turn onto Hamtramck Drive just in front of the new Cadillac Plant. At this intersection,
               we leave Hamtramck and enter Detroit
       • The present site of the new Cadillac plant was a center for the sit down strikes of the first
         quarter of 1937 – strikes that greatly aided the union movement in the USA
       • The new Cadillac plant that replaced the old Dodge Main in the 1980s after Ralph Nader
         challenged GM and Mayor Young who removed the rather poor and elderly population
         that lived in these neighborhoods of Detroit
           •   Left turn from Hamtramck Drive onto Conant

                                                                                                         18
CENSUS TRACT TO THE EAST OF CONANT IN HAMTRAMCK: TRACT # 5524 Pop.: 2,687; White: 36%;
   Black: 28%; Hispanic: 3 %; Foreign: 36%; Med. HH Inc. $27,100; PCI: $10,500; Poverty: 17%; Med Home:
   $77,000; Mother only: 36%.

       At the intersection of Conant and Casmere, the city of Detroit will be on the right, Hamtramck on
       the left. After the intersection of Conant with Carpenter, we will reenter Detroit.
            •   Continue on Conant to its intersection with 7 Mile.

       •   Conant, Seven Mile, Nevada and Ryan bound the Conant Gardens neighborhood.
       • Conant Garden Historical Marker at intersection of Conant and Nevada †

CONANT GARDEN CENSUS TRACT # 5070; Pop: 3,310; White: <1%; Black: 97%; Hispanic: <1%;
   Foreign: <1 %; Med. HH Inc.: $ 23,400;PCI: $ 13,920; Poverty: 25 %; Median home: $63,300; Mother only:
   67%

       • Evidence of a substantial immigrant population of Chaldeans from Iraq on 7 mile between
         John R. and Woodward.
       • Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church. (Saddam Hussein paid the mortgage on this
         Chaldean church and built a recreation building after Mayor Coleman Young gave him
         keys to the city of Detroit.)
       • Palmer Park is at the southwest corner of 7 Mile and Woodward
       • The mile of Woodward between West McNichols and 7 Mile was the first mile of highway to
         be paved with concrete in the United States, 1909
            •   Turn right onto Burlington from 7-Mile just after crossing Woodward

            •   Right from 7 Mile onto Burlington

    PALMER WOODS-SHERWOOD FOREST CENSUS TRACT # 5283: Pop: 2,180; White: 13%; Black:
       85%; Hispanic: <1%; Foreign: <1 %; Med. HH Inc.: $110,700; PCI: $41,992; Poverty: 6%; Median
       home: $315,100; Mother only: 15%

       •   The Palmer Woods Historic District is bounded by 7 Mile, Woodward and Strathcona.
           Palmer Woods with homes constructed after 1915; is among the finest neighborhood in the
           city of Detroit and, perhaps, the most attractive neighborhood in the metropolis
            •   Right turn from Burlington onto Strathcona in Palmer Woods

       • John A. Kunsky House, 1630 Wellesley, between Suffolk and Gloucester (Crane, 1924)
       • William and Lora Fisher House, 1791 Wellesley (Richard Marr, 1925)
       • Former Residence of the Bishop/Cardinal of the Archdiocese of Detroit, 1880 Wellesley at
         Lucerne (Maginnis and Walsh, 1926) † This is the largest home in the city of Detroit.
       • Turkel-Benbow House (1956), 2760 7 Mile. † This is the only Frank Lloyd Wright home in
         Detroit.
            •   Right turn from Strathcona onto Woodward as we exit Palmer Woods
            •   Right turn from Woodward onto Seven Mile at Palmer Park



                                                                                                      19
 UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS NEIGHBORHOOD CENSUS TRACT # 5384. Pop: 3,952; White 11%;
    Black 87%; Hispanic <1%; Foreign: 4%; Med. HH Inc.: $ 80,461; PCI: $ 28,986; Poverty: 4%;
    Median home: $215,900; Mother only: 17%

    • To the right is the Sherwood Forest Historic District which is bounded by Pembroke,
      7 Mile, and the Palmer Woods Historic District
    • To the left is the University Heights neighborhood that is bounded by West McNichols,
      7 Mile, Fairway and Livernois.
    • Congregation Beth Abraham, 7 Mile and Greenlawn

In 1940, to satisfy the requirements of the Home Owners Loan Corporation and the Federal Housing
Administration, a developer who wished to build homes for middle class whites erected a wall six feet high
and one-half mile in length to separate his “white” development from a contiguous neighborhood where
blacks had lived since the 1920s. So far as I know, this is the only instance in the USA where federal
regulations called for a physical wall to separate whites from blacks. The wall is visible from the Alfonso
Wells playground.


 CENSUS TRACT NEAR WYOMING AND 8 MILE CONTAINING WALL SEPARATING BLACKS
    AND WHITES, # 5391, Pop: 2,199; White <1%; Black: 97%; Hispanic: <1%; Foreign: <1%; Med.
    HH Inc.: $30,900; PCI: $14,759; Poverty: 18%; Median Home: $55,400; Mother only: 67%

    • This is the Eight Mile-Wyoming neighborhood bounded by Eight Mile, Pembroke, Santa
      Barbara and Birwood.
        •   Left turn from 7 Mile onto Outer Drive.

    As we leave Detroit, we pass through four distinct neighborhoods:

    • The College Park neighborhood is bounded by West McNichols, the Southfield Expressway,
      Greenfield and 7 Mile.
    • The North Rosedale Park Neighborhood – the most affluent of the four – is bounded by the
      Southfield Expressway, West Grand River, West McNichols and Evergreen.
    • The Rosedale Park Neighborhood is bounded by Lyndon, the Southfield Expressway, West
      Outer Drive, Evergreen and West Grand River.
    • The Brightmor neighborhood – the least affluent of the four – is bounded by Telegraph,
      Puritan, Evergreen and the CSX Railroad tracks.

 CENSUS TRACT CONTAINING MUCH OF THE COLLEGE PARK NEIGHBORHOOD, ##5404:
    Pop. 3,414; White: 3%; Black: 95%; Hispanic: <1%; Foreign: 2%; Med. HH Inc.: $ 44,700; PCI:
    $16,494; Poverty: 24%; Median Home: $ 71,600; Mother only: 54%

    • Renaissance High School
    • Detroit Medical Center/Sinai Hospital
    • The Mercy College Campus of the University of Detroit Mercy

 CENSUS TRACT CONTAINING MUCH OF NORTH ROSEDALE PARK, #5430: Pop: 2,222; White:
    16%; Black 81%; Hispanic: <1%; Foreign <1%; Med. HH Inc.: $ 88,900; PCI: $28,755; Poverty: 4%;
    Median Home: $172,700; Mother only: 27%


                                                                                                     20
CENSUS TRACT CONTAINING MUCH OF ROSEDALE PARK, #5429: Pop: 3,884; White: 10%;
   Black: 87%; Hispanic: 1%; Foreign: 1%; Med. HH Inc.: $64,100; PCI: $25,750; Poverty: 6%;
   Median Home: $136,400; Mother only: 26%

BRIGHTMOR NEIGHBORHOOD CENSUS TRACT AT INTERSECTION OF OUTER DRIVE AND
   I-96, #5438: Pop: 2,152; White: 20%; Black: 74%; Hispanic: 2%; Foreign: 1%;
   Med. HH Inc.: $ 24,300; PCI: $10,293; Poverty: 33%; Median home: $33,300; Mother only: 72%
      •   At the intersection of Outer Drive and I-96, please turn right from Outer Drive to I-96



      RETURN TO ANN ARBOR. ARRIVAL AT FLEMING ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AT 6 PM.

                                          Driver: Jon Tarolli
                                            Getaway Tours
                                         2310 South Industrial
                                         Ann Arbor, Michigan
                                          734-994-6666
                                         www.getawaytours.net




                                                                                                    21
                                          8 Mile The Movie

                  This movie portrays the creativity of Detroit rap artists and features:

                                      Eminem as Jimmy or Rabbit
                                    Kim Basinger as Jimmy’s mother
                           Brittany Murphy as Jimmy’s sometimes close friend

                           This information is provided for a tour of Detroit

                                                 Ren Farley
                                        Population Studies Center
                                       Institute for Social Research
    University of Michigan
                                       Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109
                                            Renf@umich.edu

         Listed below is information about locations appearing in the movie.

Movie Set:      8 Mile Mobile Court
Real Life:     This is not located in the city of Detroit. This is Continental Mobile Village located at 20,785
               Schultes in Warren just north of Eight Mile Road between Ryan and Dequindre. This is on
               the suburban (Macomb County) side of the Eight Mile Road divide.

Movie Set:     Shelter where the opening and closing rap sequences take place
Real Life:     Shelter was a performance space located in the basement of St. Andrew’s Hall at 431 East
               Congress. For the movie, a set was constructed to look similar to the Shelter.

Movie Set:     Bathroom at the Shelter
Real Life:     This was filmed in a former Rite Aid store at 1120 Griswold at Lafayette

Movie Set: Exterior of the Shelter
Real Life: This was constructed as part of the set for the film and was affixed to a building on Griswold.

Movie Set:      Stamping plant where Jimmy helps produce auto parts.
Real Life:     This is a currently operating plant located at 950 East Milwaukee at Hastings in the heart of
               the original center of the auto industry. Albert Kahn designed the building. Until 1989, GM
               operated it. The factory was closed for two years but then reopened in 1991 as New Center
               Stamping. Note the excellent examples of the cold stamping process in this movie. Kahn’s
               inventive use of reinforced concrete helped develop the auto industry since cold stamping was
               integral to producing auto parts. A passionate scene featuring Eminen and Brittany Murphy
               was filmed in this Kahn factory. In this scene, do these actors comply with all current OSHA
               regulations?

Movie Set:     Intermezzo Restaurant – Brittany Murphy’s employer
Real Life:     Intermezzo Restaurant is in Harmonie Park in downtown Detroit at 1435 Randolph.

Movie Set:     The location of radio station WJLB
Real Life:     The shots of the lobby were filmed in the Penobscot Building at 633-645 Griswold.
               The actual studios for station WJLB were a set design for this movie and built in the
               Book Building at 1249 Washington Boulevard.

Movie Set:      Chin-Tiki Restaurant
Real Life:   Chin-Tiki Restaurant at 2121 Cass. This restaurant opened in 1967 but closed in
             1982. The owner hoped – and still hopes – to reopen the establishment so he changed
             almost nothing after 1982.

Movie Set:   Indoor parking garage
Real Life:   This is the beautiful United Theater Building at 200 Bagley. This magnificent theater
              closed and, in 1977, was turned into an indoor garage. Many preservationists see
              this as an important building to restore to its 1926 glory.

Movie Set:   Residence that is burned
Real Life:   122 Beresford in Highland Park. The producers of this movie originally wished to
             burn down a home in Detroit but the city refused their request fearing it would
             portray a negative image of Detroit. Facing immense financial problems, Highland
             Park agreed to the burning of one home if the producers would also destroy a second
             home. The home at 122 Beresford was consumed in just 12 minutes. Four
             crewmembers suffered first-degree burns.

Movie Set:   Cheddar Bob’s home
Real Life:   1250 McClellan

Movie Set:   Location where Brittany Murphy exits from a car for a photo shoot
Real Life:   Near the corner of Gratiot and Russell.

Movie Set:   Sites where Jimmy and his friends shoot paint at various objects including a cow’s
             head and a police car.
Real Life:   On Mack and East Jefferson

Movie Set:   Cow’s head
Real Life:   Mack and Lennox with lots of special effects for the movie

Movie Set:   Intersection where Jimmy’s car dies and they avoid police detection
Real Life:   Newport off East Jefferson in front of the Vanity Ballroom.

Movie Set:   Bus stop where Jimmy boarded bus
Real Life:   Eight Mile road

Movie Set:   Blighted neighborhoods contemplated by Jimmy as he rides a bus to his job
Real Life:   These shots were taken along Chene.




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posted:10/23/2010
language:English
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