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					Unpacking Standards
   What does it all mean?
 Explain what students would
  need to know and be able to
 do to demonstrate mastery of
      the standard below.

 SS 4.9 Understands the concepts
 of equality, justice, liberty and
 privacy.
     Ideas For Unpacking Standards
1.    Benchmarking State and National Standards.
2.    Dissecting a Standard.
3.    Questions as Outcomes.
4.    Determining What Proficiency Looks Like.
                Balanced Instructional Model

Direct Instruction




Application (performance task, simulation, and real-life)
        Benchmarking State and National
                 Standards
SCIENCE
   http://www.nap.edu/books/0309053269/.html
   www.project2061.org/default_flash.htm
SOCIAL STUDIES
   Civics http://www.civiced.org/stds.html
   Economics http://www.ncee.net/ea/program.php?pid=19
   Geography http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/standards/matrix.html
   Social Studies Standards http://www.ncss.org/standards/ - Can't be viewed online but you can
   order a book here.
   US History and World History standard links http://w3.iac.net/~pfilio/hstst.htm
   National History Standards http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs/standards
MATHEMATICS
   http://standards.nctm.org/
READING AND WRITING
   http://www.ncte.org/standards/standards.shtml

TEXTBOOKS
        Benchmarking State and National
                 Standards
SS 5.18 Compares and contrasts Native American and European cultural, economic, and
    political systems.

Standard 1D
The student understands the differences and similarities among Africans, Europeans, and Native
    Americans who converged in the western hemisphere after 1492.
Grade Level 5-12
Therefore, the student is able to
5-12 Compare political systems, including concepts of political authority, civic values, and the
    organization and practice of government. [Compare and contrast different political
    systems]
5-12 Compare social organizations, including population levels, urbanization, family structure,
    and modes of communication. [Compare and contrast different social organizations]
5-12 Compare economic systems, including systems of labor, trade, concepts of property, and
    exploitation of natural resources. [Compare and contrast different economic institutions]
5-12 Compare dominant ideas and values including religious belief and practice, gender roles, and
    attitudes toward nature. [Compare and contrast the influence of ideas]
        Benchmarking State and National
                 Standards
SS 5.18 Compares and contrasts Native American and European cultural, economic, and
    political systems.

Standard 1D
The student understands the differences and similarities among Africans, Europeans, and Native
    Americans who converged in the western hemisphere after 1492.
Grade Level 5-12
Therefore, the student is able to
5-12 Compare political systems, including concepts of political authority, civic values, and
    the organization and practice of government. [Compare and contrast different political
    systems]
5-12 Compare social organizations, including population levels, urbanization, family structure,
    and modes of communication. [Compare and contrast different social organizations]
5-12 Compare economic systems, including systems of labor, trade, concepts of property, and
    exploitation of natural resources. [Compare and contrast different economic institutions]
5-12 Compare dominant ideas and values including religious belief and practice, gender roles, and
    attitudes toward nature. [Compare and contrast the influence of ideas]
     Determining the Rigor or Depth of a
                 Standard
SS 5.18 Compares and contrasts Native American and European cultural, economic, and
    political systems.

Standard 1D
The student understands the differences and similarities among Africans, Europeans, and Native
    Americans who converged in the western hemisphere after 1492.
Grade Level 5-12
Therefore, the student is able to
5-12 Compare political systems, including concepts of political authority, civic values, and the
    organization and practice of government. [Compare and contrast different political
    systems]
5-12 Compare social organizations, including population levels, urbanization, family structure,
    and modes of communication. [Compare and contrast different social organizations]
5-12 Compare economic systems, including systems of labor, trade, concepts of property,
    and exploitation of natural resources. [Compare and contrast different economic
    institutions]
5-12 Compare dominant ideas and values including religious belief and practice, gender roles, and
    attitudes toward nature. [Compare and contrast the influence of ideas]
        Benchmarking State and National
                 Standards
SS 5.18 Compares and contrasts Native American and European cultural, economic, and
    political systems.

Standard 1D
The student understands the differences and similarities among Africans, Europeans, and Native
    Americans who converged in the western hemisphere after 1492.
Grade Level 5-12
Therefore, the student is able to
5-12 Compare political systems, including concepts of political authority, civic values, and the
    organization and practice of government. [Compare and contrast different political
    systems]
5-12 Compare social organizations, including population levels, urbanization, family
    structure, and modes of communication. [Compare and contrast different social
    organizations]
5-12 Compare economic systems, including systems of labor, trade, concepts of property, and
    exploitation of natural resources. [Compare and contrast different economic institutions]
5-12 Compare dominant ideas and values including religious belief and practice, gender
    roles, and attitudes toward nature. [Compare and contrast the influence of ideas]
                  Benchmarking Textbooks
SS 5.17 Understands the impact of European exploration on Native African and Native American peoples.

Silver-Burdett Our Country 1993

Chapter 3: The First Americans
                Learning About the First Americans
                The Indians of North America
                The Indians of Middle and South America

Chapter 4: Europeans Come to America
               Viking Explores
               The Lure of Asia
               Christopher Columbus Makes a Great Voyage

Chapter 5: Spanish Exploration and Conquest
                Spain Takes the Lead
                Pizarro and the Incas

Chapter 6: European Settlements in North America
               England Turns to the New World
               The Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony
                  Balanced Instructional Model

Direct Instruction
 illicit prior knowledge
 introduce concepts ,definitions, dates

 introduce important historical figures




Application (performance task, simulation, and real-life)





           Dissecting a Standard
   Define what the standard is actually asking the
    students to know or accomplish.
   Students may rewrite the standard based on their
    definitions.
   Work with students to define the depth and rigor of
    the standard.
   Brainstorm activities or thematic units with students
    based on the definition and rigor of the standard.
SC 4.2
Formulates multiple hypothesis based on
investigations and questions
formulates- prepare, plan, make, create
multiple- many, several, a lot
hypothesis- guess, theory
investigations- studies, research

SC 4.2
Makes several guesses about a topic or idea based on
  research and ask questions to learn more about it.
Combining Process & Content

Combine a process standard (unpacked
using the dissecting method) with a
content standard (unpacked using
benchmarking method) to help organize
your activities in the Balanced Instructional
Model.
         SC 3/4.9 Structure of the earth system
National Science Education Standard
   Land forms are the result of a combination of constructive and destructive
    forces. Constructive forces include crustal deformation, volcanic eruption,
    and deposition of sediment, while destructive forces include weathering
    and erosion.
   Some changes in the solid earth can be described as the "rock cycle." Old
    rocks at the earth's surface weather, forming sediments that are buried, then
    compacted, heated, and often recrystallized into new rock. Eventually,
    those new rocks may be brought to the surface by the forces that drive plate
    motions, and the rock cycle continues.
   Water, which covers the majority of the earth's surface, circulates through
    the crust, oceans, and atmosphere in what is known as the "water cycle."
    Water evaporates from the earth's surface, rises and cools as it moves to
    higher elevations, condenses as rain or snow, and falls to the surface where
    it collects in lakes, oceans, soil, and in rocks underground.
                Balanced Instructional Model

Direct Instruction




Application (performance task, simulation, and real-life)
 Using Questions with Standards
Ask questions to determine what the students should
  know and be able to do in the mastery of a standard.
Ask questions to establish relevancy for learning.
Use questions to determine the outcomes of the activity,
  performance task, or thematic unit.
Use questions to help students understand the standard.
Use questions to create rubrics or scoring guides.
                    Task (General)

Students will work in groups to design a campaign for
  an individual running for the mayor of their village,
  governor of Alaska, or President of the United States.
  They will either make a campaign for an existing
  official or invent a fictitious official to run against the
  current official. They will identify their party
  affiliation, include present day issues and identify
  party-line stances on such issues, and also identify
  what effects their successful election or re-election
  may have on the community, state, or nation.
                Questioning
SS 3.10
Recognizes leadership positions in the city, state,
  and nation (mayor/chief, governor, president)
SS 4.6
Notes cause and effect relationships
SS 4.8
Recognizes and understands an increasing
  number of social science terms
 SS 3.10
Recognizes leadership positions in the city, state,
and nation (mayor/chief, governor, president)
   Can the students describe the three most important
    responsibilities of the mayor, governor, and president?
   Can the students identify the person who is currently acting as
    mayor, governor, and president?
   Can the students describe how a person is chosen to be mayor,
    governor, and president?
   Do the students know how long a person can be mayor,
    governor, and president?
SS 4.6
Notes cause and effect relationships
   Do students know how people participate in government?
   Do students know why it is important to participate in
    government?
   Do students know why people vote for candidates?
   Do students know how someone wins an election?
   How are laws, taxes, and/or civil rights impacted by election
    results?
   Do students know how their personal lives/right have been
    effected by recent elections?
    SS 4.8
    Recognizes and understands an increasing
    number of social science terms
   power                   vote
   authority               election
   branch                  participate
   executive               platform
   president               campaign
   governor
   mayor
                Balanced Instructional Model

Direct Instruction




Application (performance task, simulation, and real-life)
Determining what Proficiency
        Looks Like
  Level
  Summary

  Keywords

  Identify standards

  Task description (general)

  Tasks (specific)

  Tasks Assessment (effective scoring guides) pg. 179

  Make a scoring guide
                    Task (General)

Students will work in groups to design a campaign for
  an individual running for the mayor of their village,
  governor of Alaska, or President of the United States.
  They will either make a campaign for an existing
  official or invent a fictitious official to run against the
  current official. They will identify their party
  affiliation, include present day issues and identify
  party-line stances on such issues, and also identify
  what effects their successful election or re-election
  may have on the community, state, or nation.
                 Task #1 (specific)


   SS 5.11 Identifies the role of political parties and
    campaigns in elections.

   SS 5.8     Keeps informed on issues that affect
    society.
                    Task (General)

Students will work in groups to design a campaign for
  an individual running for the mayor of their village,
  governor of Alaska, or President of the United States.
  They will either make a campaign for an existing
  official or invent a fictitious official to run against the
  current official. They will identify their party
  affiliation, include present day issues and identify
  party-line stances on such issues, and also identify
  what effects their successful election or re-election
  may have on the community, state, or nation.
                    Task (General)

Students will work in groups to design a campaign for
  an individual running for the mayor of their village,
  governor of Alaska, or President of the United States.
  They will either make a campaign for an existing
  official or invent a fictitious official to run against the
  current official. They will identify their party
  affiliation, include present day issues and identify
  party-line stances on such issues, and also identify
  what effects their successful election or re-election
  may have on the community, state, or nation.
                    Task (General)

Students will work in groups to design a campaign for
  an individual running for the mayor of their village,
  governor of Alaska, or President of the United States.
  They will either make a campaign for an existing
  official or invent a fictitious official to run against the
  current official. They will identify their party
  affiliation, include present day issues and identify
  party-line stances on such issues, and also identify
  what effects their successful election or re-election
  may have on the community, state, or nation.
                Task #1 (specific)
Students will choose an election party and find
  three current issues from either the local, state,
  or national level. The students must
  investigate their party-line stance and explain
  their position on each issue.

   SS 5.11 Identifies the role of political parties and
    campaigns in elections.
   SS 5.8   Keeps informed on issues that affect
    society.
                              Rubric Task #1
Standard   Advanced                       Proficient                     Developing                     Emerging
Target
SS 5.11     Student can explain the       Student clearly identifies    Student clearly identifies    Student identifies party
           opposing political view on     party affiliation.             party affiliation.             affiliation.
           each issue.                     Identifies and                Identifies three              Identifies less than three
                                          summarizes three               campaign issues from the       campaign issues from the
                                          campaign issues from the       party-line stance.             party-line stance
                                          party-line stance.



SS 5.8      Student tracks a current      Student identifies three      Student identifies three      Student identifies less
           issue and archives sources     current political issues.      current political issues.      than three current political
           documenting current             Student cites the two         Student cites the one        issues.
           updates.                       sources for each issue.        sources for each issue.         Student cites some
            Student can explain how       Student clearly explains      Student attempts to          sources for the issues.
           the position of the party is   the position of their party    explain the position of         Student is unable to
           changing or staying the        affiliation on each issue.     their party affiliation on     explain the position of
           same.                                                         each issue.                    their party affiliation on
                                                                                                        each issue.
                Balanced Instructional Model

Direct Instruction




Application (performance task, simulation, and real-life)
                               Activity
   Work independently or form small groups or partnerships
    based on similar levels or content areas.
   Choose a standard(s) that you are or may likely work
    with and unpack them using on of the processes
    described.
   Use any recording method you’d like (performance task
    template, Balanced Instructional Model worksheet, your
    own template).
   Be prepared to share the following:
           The process used
           The unpacked standard
           Parts of the Balanced Instructional Model
           Assessment

				
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