Introduction to Comparative Poli by wuyunyi

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									             Introduction to Comparative Politics (PSC 001) Spring 2010
                 Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:10-noon (CRN 34116)
                               1957 E Street, Room 113
                             Professor Kimberly Morgan
                         Office: Hall of Government, Rm. 418
                   Phone: 994-2809 Email: kjmorgan@gwu.edu
                  Office Hours: Thursdays, 1-3 (or by appointment)

SUMMARY
This class is an introduction to the study of comparative politics. You will learn not only
about politics in a select group of countries, but also about some of the major concepts
used in the study of comparative politics. The course will cover a wide range of issues,
including the formation of the nation-state, democratization, authoritarianism, the role of
religion in politics, political institutions, and strategies of economic development. We
also will discuss some debates in comparative politics that have been important in the
policy-making community in recent years, such as the “clash of civilizations,” the
concept of social capital, and the effort to promote democracy in the world.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
In this class, you will:
     Learn basic concepts in political science and comparative politics;
     Apply these concepts in a wide array of countries;
     Compare countries so as to better understand why they differ in their political and
         economic trajectories;
     Demonstrate your knowledge through several short assignment and two exams.

READING
There are two required texts for this class that you can purchase at the GWU bookstore.

Patrick O’Neil et al., Essentials of Comparative Politics, 3rd edition (2009).

Patrick O’Neil et al., Cases in Comparative Politics, 3rd edition (2009).

NOTE: You may purchase these books for as much as 50% less as e-books through the
Norton website. This may be especially cost-effective for the Cases book, which we will
not be reading in its entirety.

The other required readings (marked with an *) are available as pdf files through e-
reserves on the Blackboard system – you can either read them on-line or print them out.

BLACKBOARD
In addition to the required reading, you will find other useful information on Blackboard,
such as a copy of the syllabus, information about exams, and your grades. I also will post
any tables, graphs, or maps shown in lecture.




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To access Blackboard, you must have a Colonial e-mail account and be registered for this
course. To log in, go to http://blackboard.gwu.edu and type in your NetID and email
password. If you have problems or questions, try going to http://helpdesk.gwu.edu.
Please try to access Blackboard as soon as possible, to make sure that you are in the
system and that you understand its various features.

NOTE: you may have trouble accessing the articles posted on blackboard if you are not
using a university-networked computer. In that instance, you should download the
articles on a university-networked computer and print or save them to read at home.

TECHNOLOGY
Laptop computers are not allowed in lectures or discussions. During exams, students
may not use any electronic devices, such as cell phones, PDAs, I-pods, dictionaries, or
any other electronic equipment. Students found using any such device will fail the exam.

CURRENT EVENTS
One goal of the class is to make you a more sophisticated consumer of news. To keep up
with current events, I strongly suggest you regularly read one of the major national
newspapers (The New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal) or international
newspapers (Financial Times {www.ft.com}, International Herald Tribune
{www.iht.com}). Some useful magazines and journals that are available through Gelman
include The Economist, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and Journal of Democracy.

REQUIREMENTS
Your grade will be based on the following:

Two short papers: during the semester there will be two short writing assignments. These
will give you an opportunity to demonstrate both your comprehension of the readings and
your ability to develop an argument.

Midterm/Final: Both exams will consist of identifications and essays. The first exam, on
March 11, will cover the first half of the course (everything through March 2). The final
will cover the entire class and will be given during exam week.

Discussion sections: the weekly discussion sections are extremely important for this
class, as it is at these sessions that you will have a chance to discuss the reading and
themes of the course. Attendance is mandatory, and you will be evaluated on your
contributions to the discussion. This means you must do the assigned reading for each
week prior to the discussion section meeting.

You will be allowed to miss one discussion section, no questions asked, and this will not
affect your grade. Any further, unexcused absences will count against your participation
grade.

GRADING
Short papers: 30% (15% each)



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Class participation (discussion section): 15%
Midterm exam: 25%
Final exam: 30%

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
According to the GW Code of Academic Integrity, “Academic dishonesty is defined as
cheating of any kind, including misrepresenting one's own work, taking credit for the
work of others without crediting them and without appropriate authorization, and the
fabrication of information.” For the remainder of the code, see:
http://www.gwu.edu/~ntegrity/code.html

SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES (DSS)
Any student who may need an accommodation based on the potential impact of a
disability should contact the Disability Support Services office at 202-994-8250 in the
Marvin Center, Suite 242, to establish eligibility and to coordinate reasonable
accommodations. For additional information please refer to: http://gwired.gwu.edu/dss/

Please speak with me in the first week of class to discuss what kinds of accommodations
can be made for you.

OTHER CLASS POLICIES
University Policy on Religious Holidays:
Students should notify me during the first week of the semester of their intention to be
absent from class on their day(s) of religious observance.


              INTRODUCTION & THE COMPARATIVE METHOD

January 12: Introduction; Thinking about Politics Comparatively

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 1, “Introduction,” pp. 1-20.

January 14: NO CLASS.

                              STATES AND SOCIETIES

January 19: The concept of the state.

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 2 “States,” pp. 21-46.
       * Francis Fukuyama, “The Imperative of State-Building.”

January 21: Formation and collapse of states.

       * Jeffrey Herbst, “War and the State in Africa.”
       * Robert Rothberg, “The New Nature of Nation-State Failure.”



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January 26: Nationalism, creator and destroyer of states.

       ** Guest Lecture: Lisel Hintz

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 3 “Nations and Society,” pp. 47-57.
       * Muller, “Us and Them.”
       * Mayall, “Irredentist and Seccesionist Challenges.”

January 28: Civil society

       * Robert Putnam, “Bowling Alone.”
       * Michael Foley and Bob Edwards, “The Paradox of Civil Society.”

                              POLITICAL ECONOMY

February 2: Early Industrializers

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 4, “Political Economy,” pp. 77-108.
       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 7, “Advanced Democracies,” pp. 167-76, 186-95.

February 4: Less Developed/Newly Industrializing Countries

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 9, “Less Developed and Newly Industrializing
       Countries,” pp. 230-60.
       * Daron Acemoglu, “Root Causes.”
       * Ross, “Blood Barrels.”

February 9: Globalization

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 11, “Globalization,” pp. 291-317.
       * Friedman, “It’s a Flat World After All.”
       * Florida, “The World is Spiky.”
       * Naim, “Globalization.”


FIRST WRITING ASSIGNMENT DUE

                                       REGIMES

February 11: Democracy and Democratization

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 5, “Democratic Regimes” pp. 109-118.
       * Sen, “Democracy as a Universal Value.”
       * Carbone, “Consequences of Democratization.”
       * Fukuyama and McFaul, “Should Democracy Be Promoted or Demoted?”




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February 16: Democratic institutions

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 5, “Democratic Regimes,” pp. 118-40.
       * Lijphart, “Constitutional Design for Divided Societies.”

February 18: Authoritarianism

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 6, “Non-Democratic Regimes,” pp. 141-66.
       * Larry Diamond, “Democratic Rollback.”

                   POLITICAL IDENTITIES AND CONFLICTS

February 23: Religion and Culture.

       * Huntington, “Clash of Civilizations.”
       * Juergensmeyer, “Terror in the Name of God.”
       * Nasr, “Rise of Muslim Democracy.”
       * Bynes, “European Politics Gets Old-Time Religion.”

February 25: Political violence and genocide.

       ** Guest lecture: Lee Ann Fujii

       O’Neil, Essentials, chp. 10, “Political Violence,” pp. 261-90.

March 2: Ethnicity/race and gender.

       * Htun, “Is Gender Like Ethnicity?”
       * Norris and Inglehart, “Cultural Obstacles to Equal Representation.”

       HOW DOES DEMOCRACY WORK? FRANCE VERSUS THE UK

March 4: Democratic Institutions and Politics in the United Kingdom.

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “United Kingdom,” pp. 31-71.

March 9: Democratic Institutions and Politics in France; review for midterm.

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “France,” pp. 115-56.
       * Levy and Skach, “The Return to a Strong Presidency.”

March 11: MIDTERM.

SPRING BREAK MARCH 15-20




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                    COMMUNISM AND POST-COMMUNISM

March 23: What was/is communism?

       O’Neil, Essentials, “Communism and Post-Communism,” 197-228.

March 25: Russia: Return to Authoritarianism

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “Russia” pp. 245-84.
       * McFaul and Stoner-Weiss, “Myth of the Authoritarian Model.”
       * Stoner-Weiss, “It Is Still Putin’s Russia.”

March 30: China: A Booming Economy under Dictatorship

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “China,” pp. 286-324.
       * Pei, “How China is Ruled.”
       * Dickson “Beijing’s Ambivalent Reformers.”

            POLITICS AND ECONOMICS IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH

April 1: Puzzles of Indian Democracy

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “India.” pp. 327-66
       * Ganguly, “Six Decades of Independence.”
       * Vanaik, “The Paradoxes of Indian Politics.”

April 6: Brazil: Economic Reform and Its Consequences

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “Brazil,” pp. 451-85.
       Weyland, “Neoliberalism and Democracy in Latin America.”
       Anderson, “Gangland: A Reporter at Large.”

April 8: Mexico: A Fragile Democratic System in Crisis

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “Mexico,” pp. 408-44.
       * O’Neil, “The Real War in Mexico,” pp. 63-77.

April 13: Nigeria: Oil, Religion, and Corruption

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “Nigeria,” pp. 531-65.
       * Joseph and Kew, “Nigeria Confronts Obasanjo’s Legacy.”
       * Bratton, “Vote buying and violence in Nigerian election campaigns.”

SECOND WRITING ASSIGNMENT DUE

                                THE MIDDLE EAST



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April 15 Islam and Politics in the Middle East

       * Marina Ottaway and Thomas Carothers, “Middle East Democracy.”
       * Bellin, “The Robustness of Authoritarianism in the Middle East”

April 20 Iran: Revolutionary Regime versus a Revolutionary Movement?

       O’Neil, Cases in Comparative Politics, “Iran,” pp. 370-404.
       * Takeyh, “Iran’s Leaders Are at an Impasse,” (2009).
       * Other articles TBA (posted on Blackboard)



                                     SUMMARY

April 22: Summing it all up; review for the final.




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