Sustainable Development Report Table of Contents Introduction Key Findings

Document Sample
Sustainable Development Report Table of Contents Introduction Key Findings Powered By Docstoc
					Sustainable Development Report 2006-2007
Table of Contents

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1
Key Findings and Goals and Targets 2007-2008 ............................................................................ 2
Economic Dimension ...................................................................................................................... 3
   EC1. Direct economic value generated and distributed ............................................................. 4
Environmental Dimension .............................................................................................................. 7
   EN1. Materials used by weight and volume (proxy indicator: office paper use) ..................... 10
   EN3. Direct energy use by primary source ............................................................................... 11
Social Dimension .......................................................................................................................... 15
   LA1. Employment..................................................................................................................... 16
   LA4. Labour - Management Relations ..................................................................................... 17
   LA6. Health and Safety............................................................................................................. 17
   LA9. Education and Training ................................................................................................... 17
   LA11. Workplace Diversity and Opportunity .......................................................................... 18
Report Scope and Profile .............................................................................................................. 22
Organizational Structure for Reporting ........................................................................................ 22
IISD at a Glance ............................................................................................................................ 22
Appendix A: Staff included in data collection:............................................................................. 24
Appendix B: The Global Reporting Initiative Incremental Approach.......................................... 24


Tables
Table   1:    Innovation / year ............................................................................................................... 4
Table   2:   Carbon emission calculation ............................................................................................... 13
Table   3:   Workforce by employee category........................................................................................ 16
Table   4:   Workforce by employment contract type ............................................................................. 16
Table   5:   Staff retention / employee category & % researchers ........................................................... 16
Table   6:   Requests to Training & Development Fund / employee category ........................................... 17
Table   7:   Amount of money disbursed / employee category (CAD$) .................................................... 17
Table   8:   Number of nationalities* represented among staff & associates ............................................ 18
Table   9:   Diversity of academic degrees among staff & associates based on highest degree obtained..... 18



Figures
Figure   1:   Direct economic value generated & distributed ..................................................................... 4
Figure   2:   Paper use / staff/ year & total expenses ............................................................................. 10
Figure   3:   Natural gas consumption Winnipeg Office .......................................................................... 11
Figure   4:   Electricity consumption Winnipeg office.............................................................................. 11
Figure   5:   Carbon emissions / year & total expenses .......................................................................... 12
Figure   6:   Carbon emissions / source / year....................................................................................... 12




ii
Introduction
Twenty years have passed since the Brundtland Commission published ‘Our Common Future’
and seventeen since IISD opened its doors in Winnipeg. Since then IISD has opened three more
offices in Ottawa, New York and Geneva and has developed a network of first-class researchers,
ENB reporters and operations staff from and working in various locations around the globe.

Our work is done on globally distributed and multi-cultural teams, which more often than not
include external partners. While diversity is an important part of our signature, we are linked by
shared work and vision for a more sustainable world that includes concern for the environment
and well-being of others. IISD is more than a group of people with common values and
aspirations, though. We continuously connect in the way we work. Researchers often share their
expertise across disciplinary boundaries and participate on numerous teams. Library, information
technology, fund development, administration and accounting staff work across all the programs
and projects facilitating smooth operations. And we stay connected by communications
technology. Our other offices in Geneva, Ottawa and New York, most being situated in larger
buildings, make every effort to operate sustainably through green procurement practices,
recycling, reducing energy use and so on. Furthermore Associates working from other locations
are keen to know about and be part of the organization that shares these common values while
seeking diversity.


Undoubtedly IISD is a unique organization and this year’s sustainable development report
appraises how well IISD operates within this distinct culture of diversity and connection while
considering its economic, environmental and social impacts.


We would like to hear from you.
IISD’s Internal Sustainable Development Assessment and Reporting Team for 2006-2007
Stephan Barg
Janice Gair
Jason Manaigre
Catherine Muir
Marlene Roy
Marcella Rojo
Darren Swanson
Henry Venema


1
Key Findings and Goals and Targets 2007-2008

Key findings
       While IISD has had a robust Climate Change policy research program in place for some
       time we have not yet assessed the impact of climate change on our own operations
       We need to fine-tune our criteria for evaluating carbon offset projects and find a project
       in a developing country which meets these criteria
       The number of researchers using the Training and Development Fund is very low.
       After having slightly more female than male researchers last year, this situation has
       reversed this year.

Goals and Targets for 2007-2008
1. Determine IISD’s level of risk to operations from climate change
       a. Target: Assess level of risk to operations from climate change by holding 1 meeting
           with operations and a few members of the climate change staff
2. Publish Green Travel Guidelines
       a. Target: Green travel guidelines are publicly available on the IISD internet
3. Post criteria for purchasing carbon offsets on Intranet
4. Purchase carbon offsets from a project located in a developing country
       a. Target: Evaluate developing country projects
       b. Target: Purchase 2006-2007 carbon offsets from a suitable project
5. Improve utilization of the Training and Development Fund by researchers
       a. Meet with focus group of researchers to determine the reasons for low utilization and
           act on information
       b. Analyze use of the Training & Development Fund by researchers compared to
           utilization rate (chargeable hours to projects).
6. A better understanding of needs of female researchers
       a. Meet with focus group of female researchers to determine if they have workplace
           needs that are not being met. Use information gathered from the employee survey to
           be commissioned in Fall 2007.
       b. Scan exit interview of female researchers that have left in the past two years and
           determine if IISD can make any changes.




2
Economic Dimension

All people work to ensure their survival and well-being, which is sustained by ecosystem goods
and services. When people thrive communities and countries also benefit. As a not for profit
organization IISD helps governments and people make decisions that include concern for the
common good of society and economic well-being of people. From among our many projects
two serve as examples. In one, we investigated how climate change is expected to impact
livelihoods in vulnerable areas and developed tools to help people decide how to reduce their
risk. Another project looked at increasingly volatile commodity prices and how they complicate
fiscal and environmental planning and undermine the livelihoods of millions of producers in the
developing world.

When assessing our operational decisions, we are interested in knowing about our impact on the
economic conditions of our stakeholders and whether our decisions contribute positively to their
well-being. As an organization, IISD employs and contracts with over 100 people world wide
who hold the knowledge and experience needed to achieve IISD’s mission of championing
innovation enabling societies to live sustainably.. We pay fairly for their work by continuously
checking employment standards, assessing and valuing competencies and providing a package of
employment benefits.

    Indicators


EC1. Direct economic value generated and distributed
      EC1.1. Innovation
EC2. Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s
     activities due to climate change
EC9. Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the
     extent of impacts.




3
Progress 2006 – 2007

EC1. Direct economic value generated and distributed
As IISD is a non-profit, our revenues flow back out to internal and external stakeholders through
our programs and projects. Total expenses increased by over $500,000 from $11.8 million in
2005-2006 to 12.3 million in 2006-2007.


Figure 1: Direct economic value generated & distributed
                                   Total expenses


     12,500,000

     12,000,000

     11,500,000

     11,000,000

     10,500,000
                       2001-2002


                                     2002-2003


                                                    2003-2004


                                                                           2004-2005


                                                                                       2005-2006


                                                                                                   2006-2007




     10,000,000

      9,500,000
                                                                   1
                                                                Ye a r s




EC1.1. Innovation
Revenues and total expenses represent more than an economic impact, though. Our level of
funding indicates our degree of success in contributing to sustainable development, a societal
goal. Moreover, to achieve this goal, IISD believes innovation is necessary and in recognition of
this has nurtured an innovation culture. Furthermore, we invest in innovation and have developed
performance indicators based on an ‘innovation pipeline’ with indicators on idea generation,
proposals to our innovation fund and value of innovation grants.
Table 1: Innovation / year
                                                 2001-2002                             2002-2003               2003-         2004-         2005-2006     2006 - 2007
                                                                                                               2004          2005
 No. of new ideas                                2                                     <1                      <1            <1             1            >1
 generated per RRS staff                         (44 ideas /                           (25 ideas /             (57 ideas /   (56 ideas /   (44 ideas /   (40 ideas /
 memeber*                                        23 RRS)                               34 RRS)                 41 RRS)       40 RRS)       44 RRS)       46 RRS )
 No. of proposals to                                                                                                         11            8             9
 Innovation Fund**                               n/a                                   n/a                     n/a
 No. of Innovation Fund                                                                                                       5            5             4
 grants & their $ value                          n/a                                   n/a                     n/a           ($73,000)     ($95,000)     ($101,000)
*RRS: Research & Reporting Services staff
** Innovation Fund started in 2004-2005




4
In addition, several organizational practices support and help build an innovation culture
including a Training and Development Fund, Research Library with up-to-date databases,
journals and other research materials, sophisticated information technology allowing virtual
connections to extensive networks and information sources and a partnership structure that
encourages interaction with external organizations and researchers.


EC2. Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s
     activities due to climate change

IISD has long recognized the profound risks and opportunities of climate change and in response
initiated an on-going program of policy research on climate change and energy in the mid-1990s.
This program looks for ways to meet global energy needs and development aspirations while
reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to current and future climatic changes.
(http://www.iisd.org/climate/ ). We wanted to do more, however, and by 2000 were considering
how to reduce carbon emissions from our activities. Consequently IISD developed an internal
carbon tracking system with carbon neutrality as a goal. We have been purchasing carbon offsets
in the voluntary market since then.


A climate change risk assessment of our operations and activities has not yet been done, though.
We anticipate looking at implications for our operations, research and reporting services. For
example, IISD staff travel world wide and climate change could potentially change travel options
and in some cases increase risk.



EC9. Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the
     extent of impacts. http://www.iisd.org/economics/

Each IISD program includes economic as well as environmental and social inquiry, hence our
reach and impact is broad. Our research and recommendations to stakeholders centre on three
linked themes which impact livelihoods and economic systems: values and valuation of nature;
policy instruments; and poverty and environment. Currently we are investigating how to better
capture economic values of nature that are not represented in markets and also include other
notions of value. Such values are used by governments to guide policy, programs and budgets
using a variety of instruments such as mandated regulations and economic instruments and ways


5
to design these instruments so that they re-align market signals and promote environmentally
responsible behaviour is another area of research for IISD. Also of primary importance to
sustainable development is the need for poverty reduction and human development. IISD is
applying concepts, methods and tools from across its programs to find ways to improve the lives
of impoverished people without further degrading ecosystems. This work is being led by the
Working Group on Poverty and Environment.

EC13. Indirect Economic Impacts: innovation inputs, which was measured in previous
reports has been discontinued, a decision based on the new GRI guidelines (version 3.0).

Targets for 2006-2007                                               Status
Further development of innovation measurement.                      No progress
   Target: Indicators to track innovation outputs developed
   Target: Indicators for innovation outcomes developed

Assessment
Economic policy and principles are important to all of IISD’s projects and on-going work. This
reality was made more explicit this year through the development of an integrated module on
economics and sustainable development on our website ( http://www.iisd.org/economics ) and
the formation of a cross-program working group on Poverty and Environment. These two efforts
connected a diverse range of skills and abilities from across IISD programs to advance our work.


As yet, we have not explored the level of risk from climate change. This new indicator raises
relevant questions about IISD’s operational sustainability as we operate in several countries.


Goals and Targets for 2007-2008
    1. Determine level of risk to operations from climate change
          a. Assess level of risk to operations from climate change by holding 1 meeting with
             operations and climate change staff to explore the level of risk.




6
Environmental Dimension
Conservation of nature and ecological goods and services is paramount. IISD continually
confronts the many implications of environmental degradation in our projects and make
recommendations for positive change. The reader is invited to read about IISD’s work at our
websites at: http://www.iisd.org and http://www.iisd.ca.


Even though we are immersed in environmental protection on a daily basis, this report provides
an opportunity for us to reflect on how we are operating and whether we need to make any
changes. As an international policy research and communications organization, IISD personnel
travel extensively to meet with their counterparts and to report on sustainable development
meetings and conferences being held in various parts of the world. Research and
communications activities also require material inputs and outputs such as office space,
equipment and supplies, furniture, computers, software and paper and printers. Unlike primary
industries or manufacturing our environmental impact is mainly measured by a few indicators.


Indicators
EN1. Materials used by weight and volume
      * Proxy indictor: paper used in operations
EN2. Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials
EN3. Direct energy consumption by primary source
      * Natural gas consumption (Winnipeg office)
      * Electricity consumption (Winnipeg office)
EN16. Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight
      *Carbon emissions from travel and office energy use




7
Focus on Geneva and Winnipeg Offices
Even though our indicators measure operations for all IISD offices, staffs, associates and
Reporting Services consultants (for carbon emissions only), other activities take place which
deserve recognition.

    IISD European office in Geneva

    The IISD European Office is relatively small, with 13 staff members occupying 8
    offices.

    The following measures have been taken to operate sustainably:
       • Offices are equipped with bins for recycling paper
       • Each floor has bins for recycling aluminum containers, PET plastic containers
          and glass
       • The printer/scanner/fax takes recycled ink cartridges that we are careful to send
          back each time
       • Whenever possible we use recycled, non-bleached, paper for the
          printer/scanner/fax and the photocopier machine
       • Whenever possible we choose office supplies that are environmentally-friendly.
       • Some staff members avoid leaving appliances/computers/etc switched on, or
          using the standby function of office machines – it is planned to encourage
          others to do so as well
       • Some staff members try hard to print as little as possible, or to avoid wasting
          paper and ink. Administrative staff have been thinking of creative ways to
          encourage this but nothing has been implemented yet.
       • We have grown in size this year and in doing so have tended to add more desks
          per office rather than rent more offices.

          The building where the Geneva office is located has several energy saving
          features:
          • The lighting system in the building is automatic. Lighting goes on when the
             office or corridor reaches a certain level of darkness and when the sensors
             detect movement.
          • The Southern side of the building is equipped with shades that automatically
             close in the evening, keeping the warmth in during the winter and keeping
             the building cool in the summer.
          • There is no air-conditioning as such, but a ventilation system that circulates
             cool air.




8
    IISD Winnipeg Office

    The building where IISD’s Winnipeg Office is located met the required industry
    standards to achieve the ‘Building Owners and Managers’ Go Green program
    certification.

           Designed for buildings of all sizes, BOMA Go Green touches on all aspects
           of building management and operation, including:
               • Resource Consumption
               • Waste Reduction & Recycling
               • Building Materials
               • Interior Environment
               • Tenant Awareness
           The Go Green program comprises two elements in which buildings and firms
           can choose to participate. While Go Green is a “best practices” model, Go
           Green Plus adds a more in-depth benchmarking tool, for firms and buildings
           requiring or desiring this type of program. Certification is valid for three
           years and Go Green recognition materials are provided for display at the
           building. (from BOMA website)
           http://www.bomagogreen.com/gg.html

    Made-in-Manitoba GHG emissions calculator

    IISD Winnipeg office staff partnered with Resource Conservation Manitoba in the
    development of a ‘made-in-Manitoba’ GHG emissions calculator. We participated in
    test surveys to evaluate the effectiveness of various approaches to calculating GHG
    emissions from commuting to work and to refine the survey mechanism. TerrES, a
    Winnipeg-based company, evaluated the approaches, prepared the GHG emission
    calculation formulas, and produced summary reports.
    A case study written by Resources Conservation Manitoba is in Appendix B.

    Commuter Challenge June 2007
    Winnipeg staff participated in the annual commuter challenge and placed second in
    their workplace category.




9
Progress 2006-2007

EN1. Materials used by weight and volume (proxy indicator: office paper use in Winnipeg and
Geneva offices)

Figure 2: Paper use / staff/ year & total expenses

                                   Paper Use / Staff / Year & Total Expenses
     No. sheets paper used /




                               12000                 12,500,000




                                                                  IISD total expenses
         staff & associate




                               10000                 12,000,000
                                8000                 11,500,000
                                                                                        sheets paper / staff
                               6000                  11,000,000
                                                                                        Total expenses
                               4000                  10,500,000
                               2000                  10,000,000
                                  0                  9,500,000
                               20 -2 2
                               20 3-2 03
                               20 4-2 04
                               20 -2 5
                                    -2 6
                                        7
                                  02 00



                                  05 00
                                  06 00
                                      00
                                  0 0
                                  0 0
                               20 1-2
                                  0
                               20




This year the number of sheets of paper used per staff & associate declined by almost 500 sheets
each even though total expenses increased by over $500,000.

IISD Print Publication Standard
IISD publishes extensively in electronic and print formats. Those print publications produced by
our in-house Publishing and Communications department are usually ordered in low quantities,
and then reprinted if the need arises for more copies, thus only producing what is needed. This
year we are looking at outsourcing single copy sales through a print-on-demand supplier in an
effort to further reduce initial print runs and achieve better e-commerce efficiencies. Currently,
we use 100 per cent post-consumer waste paper for all one colour publications and vegetable-
based inks for all of these publications. This year, we will be exploring the environmental
friendliness of post-consumer waste paper, as there is some anecdotal evidence that the process
may produce more undesirable waste than we are comfortable with as an organization. We will
be exploring the feasibility of using Forest Stewardship Council-accredited printers. FSC
certification ensures best forest management practices. Through active research, and ongoing
tweaks to our operating practices, we strive to keep publishing as green as possible.




10
EN3. Direct energy use by primary source

Figure 3: Natural gas consumption Winnipeg Office
              N at ur al G as C o nsump t i o n W i nni p eg O f f i ce


     60000




     50000




     40000




     30000




     20000




     10000




          0

                                        f i scal year




Figure 4: Electricity consumption Winnipeg office
              Electricity Consum ption Winnipeg Office


     500000




     450000




     400000




     350000




     300000




     250000




     200000




     150000




     100000




     50000




         0
                                                 1

                                           f i scal year




While natural gas consumption declined, electricity consumption increased. As IISD leases 1.5
floors of an eight story office building and does not have separately metered offices, we cannot
determine if this increase was from operations or that of others tenants in the building.



11
EN16. Carbon emissions

Figure 5: Carbon emissions / year & total expenses

                             Carbon emissions / Year & Total expenses

  1150                                                       12400000

                                                             12200000
  1100
                                                             12000000
  1050                                                       11800000            cabon emissions
                                                             11600000            Total expenses
  1000
                                                             11400000
     950
                                                             11200000

     900                                                     11000000
                       2003-2004        2005-2006
                                2004-2005        2006-2007




Figure 6: Carbon emissions / source / year

                                Carbon emissions / source / year

                       500                              800
                                                        700
     Winnipeg office




                                                               Business travel




                       400
                                                        600
                       300                              500
                                                                                 Winnipeg office
                                                        400
                       200                              300                      Business travel
                                                        200
                       100
                                                        100
                        0                               0
                             2003- 2004- 2005- 2006-
                             2004 2005 2006 2007




Since last year our carbon emissions increased 97 metric tons due to higher electricity
consumption in the Winnipeg Office generally, and from business travel. As previously noted
IISD’s office space in Winnipeg is not separately metered and we have no way of knowing if this
carbon emission increase was solely from our operations. Carbon emissions from business travel
rose in proportion to increases in our total expenses.




12
Table 2: Carbon emission calculation (measured in metric carbon tonnes equivalent)
 Year        Natural Gas     Electricity          Business travel       Winnipeg              Total carbon
             (Winnipeg       (Winnipeg                                  office                emissions
             office)         Office)                                    commuting             (metric tons)

 2002-2003                                            375 (employees &       n/a              375
              n/a              n/a                    associates)

 2003-2004    78               95 (Canadian           527 (employees,                         980
                               average)               associates & ENB
                               375 (Marginal          consultants)
                               calculation)*
 2004-2005    92               83 (Canadian           680                                     1105
                               average)               (employees,
                               333 (Marginal          associates & ENB
                               calculation)*          consultants)

 2005-2006    54               72 (Canadian           679.5 (employees,      11.5             1031
                               average)               associates & ENB
                               286 (Marginal          consultants)
                               calculation)*

 2006-2007    51                 82 (Canadian            752 (employees,         n/a            1128
                                 average)                associates & ENB
                                 325 (Marginal           consultants)
                                 calculation)*
* The emissions from electricity use can be calculated using one of two methods. The first uses Canadian average
emissions, from electricity generated from all fuel types, a method recommended by the WBCSD - WRI protocol.
The second method is based on a marginal calculation, and assumes that any electricity conserved by IISD will
displace electricity generation from fossil fuels emissions in the Mid-Area Power Pool (MAPP) region of the US,
which is where Manitoba Hydro sends electricity that is surplus to Manitoba demand. This gives a higher level
value to savings, but also a higher emission calculation for the emissions that we do cause.

Carbon Offset purchase 2004-2005 and 2005-2006
Carbon emissions from the two previous years of operation were offset by purchasing audited
carbon offset credits from the Community Ecosystem Restoration Initiative (CERI) in Maple
Ridge, B.C. These offsets are ISO 14064-2 certified and audited by Det Norske Veritas. The
CERI project involves transforming scrubland into forest by planting Douglas Fir, Sitka Spruce,
Western Red Cedar, Western Hemlock, and Cottonwood. Over its operational life the project
will plant up to 300,000 trees and it is expected to offset 1,000,000 tonnes of CO2.


Prior to this purchase several international projects were evaluated. During this process IISD
developed and tested a draft set of guidelines for making carbon offset purchases, a necessary
first step before buying offsets in the international voluntary market, which is unregulated and
has few checks and balances.


13
Targets for 2006-2007                                                    Status
Work with Reporting Services (RS) to develop ‘green travel               Progress made
guidelines’ for RS writers
  Target: Green travel guidelines being used by RS writers

Source two other like-minded organizations with which to                 Progress made
pool our carbon offset purchases
  Target: Preliminary agreement in place with two
  organizations to pool carbon offset purchases
Refine criteria for selecting carbon offset purchases                    Progress made
Target: Criteria for selecting carbon offset purchases are
finalized and posted on Intranet

Assessment
To the extent possible we have reduced materials and energy consumption at our offices. The increase in
electricity consumption at the Winnipeg office and associated carbon emissions needs tracking over the
next few years to determine if this is an upward trend. We are not yet able to track energy consumption at
any of our other offices. The increase in carbon emissions from business travel is related to the volume of
activities we undertook, which are a necessary part of achieving our mission.


In recognition of the fact that we need to travel to achieve our mission we decided to write a set of green
travel guidelines to help up reduced our carbon footprint when we are ‘on the ground’ at various meetings
and other venues. We have made some progress on this and aim to finish them this year.


We were also able to meet our goal of being carbon neutral by purchasing carbon offset credits. And we
made some progress on establishing a set of criteria for making carbon offset purchases in the voluntary
market and pooling our carbon emissions with two other non-government organizations. We were not
successful; however, in finding a suitable project in a developing country from which to buy carbon
offsets, something we think is important as we are a global institute.


Goals and Targets for 2007-2008
     1. Publish Green Travel Guidelines
            a. Target: Green travel guidelines are publicly available on the IISD internet
     2. Post criteria for purchasing carbon offsets
     3. Purchase carbon offsets from a project located in a developing country
            a. Evaluate developing country projects
            b. Purchase 2006-2007 carbon offsets from a suitable project




14
Social Dimension
The social dimension of sustainable development encompasses an array of institutional
arrangements around which people organize their everyday lives and around which organizations
structure their work. The Global Reporting Initiative guidelines focus on both internal and
external impacts of the organization. Externally, through our programs, we focus on positive
policy change, which inevitably impacts social arrangements and systems. Specifically, IISD
does work on such policy areas as environment and security, community indicators and
investment treaties, for example.


When we use an internal lens, we can assess how well we are doing as an organization in
providing a decent, respectful, diverse and connected work environment. Specifically we are
concerned with employee well-being, training and education opportunities and diversity and
equal opportunity.

Indicators
LA1. Employment: Total workforce by employment type, contract and region
       * Workforce by employee category
       * Workforce by employment contract type
LA2. Employment: Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender
        and region
       * Staff retention / employee category
       * Critical mass of researchers
LA6. Health and safety: description of formal joint health and safety committees
LA10 Education and training: Average hours of training per year per employee by
        employee category
       * Requests for education & training / employee category
       * Amount money disbursed / employee category
LA12. Education and training: Percentage of employees receiving regular performance
        and career development reviews.
LA13. Diversity and equal opportunity: composition of governance bodies and breakdown
       of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group
       membership and other indicators of diversity
       * Cultural diversity: Number of nationalities represented
       * Knowledge diversity: Academic degrees represented by number of staff and associates
         holding them
       * Gender equality: female / male ratio by employee category and senior levels




15
Acronyms used in this section are:

Administration, Accounting and Technical staff: AAT
Research & Reporting Services staff: RRS
      - Includes Associates working for the IISD more than 30% of their
        time during the 2006-2007 fiscal year. Associates are researchers who
        have been appointed by the President of IISD who are an essential part of the
        research base of the IISD and benefit from having a formal institutional
        identity.
Corporate Management and Program Directors: CMD

Progress 2001-2007

LA1. Employment

Table 3: Workforce by employee category
 Employee Category                                                    2003-     2004-         2005-           2006-
                                                                      2004      2005          2006            2007
 Administration, Accounting and Technical (AAT]                         24        26            27              31
 Researchers & Reporting Services (RRS)                                 35        33            37              40
 (does not include Reporting Services consultants OR
 CMD)
 Corporate Management and Program Directors (CMD)                        10           11           11              11
 Totals                                                                  69           70           75              82
 CMD also doing research                                                  6            7            7               6
 CMD also doing administration, accounting & fund                         2            2            2               3
 development


Table 4: Workforce by employment contract type
 Type Employment No. contract type      No. contract type               No. contract type          No. contract type
 Contract            2003-2004          2004-2005                       2005-2006                  2006-2007
 Employees                  49                  52                              57                         64
 Associates*                      17                      18                    18                            18
 Total                            69                      70                    75                            82
*Only Associates working for IISD more than 30% of their time are included

Table 5: Staff retention / employee category & % researchers
 Employee category                                  2001- 2002-               2003-        2004-     2005-         2006-
                                                    2002   2003               2004         2005      2006          2007
 RRS retained             % retained from previous   96%     85%               98%          92%       89%           92%
                          year
 AAT retained             % retained from previous   96%     74%               92%         79%          92%         70%
                          year
 Critical mass of         % of total staff that are   --      --               55%         53%          52%         50%
 researchers*             researchers


16
*Does not include Reporting Services staff (n=5)

Total number of staff and associates increased by seven this year; AAT group increased by four
and RRS by three. The ‘percentage of total staff’ that are researchers changed slightly due to the
departure of one program director.

LA4. Labour - Management Relations: no changes
LA6. Health and Safety: no changes

LA9. Education and Training

Report from the Training and Development Committee

The Training and Development Fund received 30 requests for assistance during 2006-2007 with
all receiving full or partial support. $26900 was disbursed. Out of the 30 requests, 6 (20%) were
from our program/research staff and 24 (80%) were from administration/
publishing/accounting/information centre/information technology groups. Of the $26,900
disbursed, 6% of the dollars supported requests from the research/program staff and the
remaining 94% supported the other requests.


Table 6: Requests to Training & Development Fund / employee category
 Employee      Requests          Requests       Requests         Requests
 Category      2003-2004         2004-2005      2005-2006        2006-2007

 AAT                     57%                  59%      67%          80%
 RRS                     43%                  41%      33%          20%
 Total no.                12                   27       15            30
 requests


Table 7: Amount of money disbursed / employee category (CAD$)
 Employee     Amount          Amount             Amount           Amount
 Category     disbursed       disbursed          disbursed        disbursed
              2003-2004       2004-2005          2005-2006        2006-2007

 AAT                                      20,190.00   7,974.00       25,286.00
 RRS                                      6,730.00    9,361.00        1,614.00
 Total                 9,388              26,920.00   17,335.00      26,900.00




17
Of the financial support granted for the administration/publishing/accounting/information
centre/information technology group ($4,477.41) (18%) supported training and orientation for
administrative staff located in Geneva and Ottawa. Part of the increase in the number of
requests for the administration group was as a result of the efforts to identify training goals
within each performance evaluation and strongly encourage advanced learning among this group.
In addition, the training and development policy has been enhanced to include the opportunity to
provide support for our finance and accounting staff in pursuing their accreditation. This was in
response to a competitive recruitment market for personnel with this skill set. An aggregate
maximum tuition support of $2,000 CAD per individual per year may be considered by the
committee for those pursuing this formal education.


In addition to the personal requests received from staff the following institutional activities took
place:
        - the Information Centre hosted 10 lunch hour video’s focused on thematic areas of
            sustainable development
        - brown bag lunch sessions were held where staff could share their knowledge and
            experiences to enhance internal capacity building. These include items such as the
            World Urban Forum presentation (Carissa Wieler) and a presentation from David
            Pankratz, Director of the Institute for Community Peacebuilding (MCIC).

From the Training and Development Committee: Janice Gair (Director of Human Resources, Bill
Glanville (Vice President), Ian R. Seymour, (Chief Financial Officer) and Jo-Ellen Parry
(Manager, Climate Change & Energy).

LA11. Workplace Diversity and Opportunity

Table 8: Number of nationalities* represented among staff & associates
2006-2007: fourteen different nationalities: 72% are Canadian
2005-2006: fifteen different nationalities: 68% are Canadian
2004-2005: thirteen different nationalities: 71% are Canadian
2003-2004: fourteen different nationalities: 68% are Canadian
2002-2003: nine different nationalities: 73% are Canadian
*Nationality = country of birth

Table 9: Diversity of academic degrees among staff & associates based on highest degree obtained
2006-2007: 21 different academic degrees
2005-2006: 25 different academic degrees
2004-2005: 25 different academic degrees
2003-2004: 20 different academic degrees
2002-2003: 15 different academic degrees




18
Figure 7: Gender equality
             Female / male ratios all staff, associates &                       Female / male ratios corporate
                        board of directors                                     management & program directors

  60                                                                   90
  50                                                                   80
                                                                       70
  40                                                                   60
                                                          % Female                                                    % Female
  30                                                                   50
                                                          % Male       40                                             % Male
  20                                                                   30
  10                                                                   20
                                                                       10
     0                                                                  0
             Overall Overall Overall Overall Overall                        CMD     CMD CMD CMD           CMD
             02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07                                  02-03   03-04 04-05 05-06     06-07

06-07: females (n=44); males (n=57)                                  06-07: females (n=3); males (n=8)


                   Female / male ratio accounting,                            Female / male ratio Board of Directors
                   administration & technical staff
                                                                       80
  100                                                                  70
     80                                                                60
                                                                       50                                               % Female
     60                                                  % Female      40
                                                                       30                                               % Male
     40                                                  % Male
                                                                       20
     20                                                                10
                                                                        0
         0
               AAT     AAT     AAT     AAT     AAT                          Board 03- Board 04- Board 05- Board 06-
              02-03   03-04   04-05   05-06   06-07                            04        05        06        07


06-07: females (n=19); males (n=12)                                  06-07: females (n=6); males (n=13)


               Female / male ratios research &
                  reporting services staff

  70
  60
  50
  40                                                   % Female
  30                                                   % Male
  20
  10
     0
             RRS RRS RRS RRS RRS
             02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07



06-07: females (n=16); males (n=24)



19
Targets for 2006-2007                                                 Status

Clarify selection criteria for RRS applications to the Training and   No progress
Development Fund
        Target: Selection criteria is posted on the Intranet

Participate in Wellness Committee development of Code of              Code of Conduct Achieved
Conduct to ensure that sustainability values and behaviours are
included.
        Target: Sustainability values are in the Code of Conduct



Assessment
There is some good news and some not-so-good news. The good news is that the number of staff
and associates is increasing along with annual total expenses, though not at the same rate, and we
are maintaining a reasonable level of diversity. And the closing gender gap between female and
male AAT staff is particularly noteworthy.


The not-so-good news is that there is the low utilization of the training and development fund by
research staff and second is the relative decrease in the number of female researchers. Both of
these indicators require further investigation.


Goals and Targets for 2007-2008
  1. Improve utilization of the Training and Development Fund by researchers
          a. Meet with focus group of researchers to determine the reasons for low utilization
             and act on information
          b. Analyze use of the Training & Development Fund by researchers compared to
             utilization rate (chargeable hours to projects).
  2. A better understanding of needs of female researchers
          a. Meet with focus group of female researchers to determine if they have workplace
             needs that are not being met. Use information gathered from the employee survey
             to be commissioned in Fall 2007.
          b. Scan exit interview of female researchers that have left in the past two years and
             determine if IISD can make any changes.




21
Report Scope and Profile
This sixth annual IISD Sustainable Development Report continues to demonstrate IISD’s on-
going commitment to sustainable development at IISD’s operational level. It covers the fiscal
year from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007 and all of IISD’s operations worldwide. As with the
previous reports it does not include program or project level outcomes and impacts.

This report follows version 3.0 of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Guidelines. Initially we
adopted the GRI Guidelines incremental approach, a decision that was based on our size,
resources available for reporting and our status as a non-profit organization. Within these
constraints and realities, we have continued to develop our reporting procedures and add
indicators as it has become feasible. While we are still not reporting on all the GRI indicators,
we are now able to provide trend data for those indicators we have been tracking since our first
report.


Organizational Structure for Reporting
The IISD Sustainable Development report is compiled and written by the Internal Sustainable
Development Assessment and Reporting (ISDAR) Team, comprised of individuals from across
the functional and programme areas of the organization. This Team works under the direction of
and reports to the Corporate Management Team, the highest level of management below the
Board of Directors level. The report goes through two rounds of reviews: first by the ISDAR
Team and second by the Corporate Management Team, comprised of the President , Vice
President, Chief Financial Officer and Director, Human Resources and Administration.

Members of the 2006-2007 ISDAR Team were:
  • Stephan Barg: Senior Corporate Advisor
  • Janice Gair: Director, HR and Administration
  • Jason Manaigre: Web Site Development Co-ordinator
  • Catherine Muir: Accounting Supervisor
  • Marcela Rojo: ENB Team representative
  • Marlene Roy: Team Leader, Sustainable Development Reporting and Research and
    Learning Resources
  • Darren Swanson: Project Manager, Measurement & Indicators
  • Henry Venema: Director, Sustainable Natural Resources Management


IISD at a Glance


Vision: Better living for all--sustainably
Mission: to champion innovation enabling societies to live sustainably

IISD is dedicated to understanding how people can realize a better quality of life, something that
can only be achieved when ecosystems are vital and intact. Specifically, IISD works with
government, business and non-governmental organizations on devising better policy. To this end,


22
IISD develops and implements programs of on-going work on sustainable development with
detailed goals, objectives and outcomes and the reader is invited to learn more about them in the
2005-2006 IISD Annual Report.

Stakeholders
Information on external stakeholders and how we work with them is outlined in more detail in
the Annual Report and at our website at: http://www.iisd.org. Our internal stakeholders include
staff at IISD offices in Winnipeg, Ottawa, Geneva and New York, as well as a worldwide
network of Associates, Senior Fellows and Consultants that work on our projects.

Both IISD Reporting Services and IISD’s programs do extensive international work. These
activities are described in detail at the Linkage Website (Earth Negotiations Bulletin and
Sustainable Developments http://www.iisd.ca) and at the IISD programme website (
http://www.iisd.org/ ). Policy research was undertaken in climate change & energy; trade &
investment, poverty & ecosystem services, knowledge networks, sustainable natural resource
management and measurement & assessment.


Overarching policies and management systems
IISD is committed to promoting a global transition to sustainable development. In doing so, we
follow operating policies which conserve and protect resources needed for the survival of future
generations. We endeavour to exceed, wherever possible, environmental, health, safety and
employment regulations. We set specific goals consistent with our sustainable development
objectives and annually monitor and report on our progress in attaining these goals through our
Internal Sustainable Development Assessment and Reporting team.




23
Appendix A: Staff included in data collection:

Aaron Cosbey ~ Adam Stetski ~ Adil Najam ~ Alanna Mitchell ~ Alec Crawford ~ Anne
Hammill ~ Bill Glanville ~ Bryan Oborne ~ Carissa Wieler ~ Carolee Buckler ~ Catherine Muir
~ Chris Spence ~ Christina Moffat ~ Christopher Charles ~ Cindy Filliettaz ~ Clarita Martinet-
Fay ~ Dale Rothman ~ Damon Vis-Dunbar ~ Darren Swanson ~ David Boyer ~ David Runnalls
~ Deborah Murphy ~ Diane Conolly ~ Diego Noguera ~ Dimple Roy ~ Donna Huffam ~
Frederic Gagnon-Lebrun ~ Hank Venema ~ Heather Creech ~ Howard Mann ~ Ian Seymour ~
Isabelle Gowry ~ Jackie Pilon ~ Janice Gair ~ Jason Potts ~ Jason Macki ~ Jason Manaigre ~
Javed Ahmad ~ Jean Nolet ~ Jennifer Hirschfeld ~ Jo- Ellen Parry ~ Joe Nyangon ~ John
Drexhage ~ John van Ham ~ Juan Calaguian ~ Karen Goulding ~ Kimo Goree ~ Kristen
Manaigre ~ Lael Dyck ~ Laszlo Pinter ~ Lori Beattie ~ Maja Andjelkovic ~ Marcela Rojo ~
Mark Anielski ~ Mark Halle ~ Marlene Roy ~ Mary Jessen ~ Matthew McCandless ~ Michelle
McLaren ~ Michelle Wowchuk ~ Mongi Gadhoum ~ Nancy Folliott ~ Noelle DePape ~ Oli
Browne ~ Pam Chasek ~ Peter Dickey ~ Peter Hardi ~ Richard Grosshans ~ Rob Jones ~ Rod
Araneda ~ Ron Steenblik ~ Rozanne Haddad ~ Sabrina Shaw ~ Shannon Wentz ~ Simon Upton
~ Socorro Estrada ~ Stacy Matwick ~ Stephan Barg ~ Stu Slayen ~ Sue Barkman ~ Tim Verry
~ Vivek Voora ~ Wanhua Yang ~ Warren Bell

Note: Reporting Services writers are included in the carbon emission calculation only

Appendix B: The Global Reporting Initiative Incremental Approach

Organizations can use an informal approach to reporting consistent with their capacity. Instead,
they may base their reports on the GRI framework and incrementally improve report content
coverage, transparency and structure over time.

The GRI Guidelines provide four simple models on how to structure reports over time using the
incremental approach. In the first model all indicators are for the environmental dimension and
are for those organizations already producing an environmental report; the second model is for
reporting organizations with some systems in place for gathering data on all three dimensions,
but lacks integration across the three themes and full performance data; the third model is for
reporting organizations that have just begun to report and with a limited but approximately equal
amounts of economic, environmental and social information; while the fourth model illustrates
full adoption of the GRI Guidelines.

The reader is invited to review the GRI Guidelines on-line at:
http://www.globalreporting.org/guidelines/2002.asp




24