2005-2006 Student Progress Monitoring- Midyear Report by bigmekahlo

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									       PACE Center for Girls, Inc.
              Leon County
     School Improvement Plan: 07-08
       Progress Monitoring Report



________________________   Marcella Torres, Executive Director

________________________   Amy Warman, Academic Manager
                          PACE Center for Girls, Inc.
                                 PROGRESS MONITORING

                       School Improvement Plan Midyear Report
        Student Progress Monitoring- Reading, Writing, Mathematics, and Science

For each of the four curriculum goals, (A) provide baseline data, (B) provide comparable data,
(C) describe the student performance trends by group, and (D) state whether there is improved or
decreased performance.
NOTE: Schools are not required to address each strategy- address the four curriculum goals.

                                           READING

ALL STUDENTS
  1. During the MAZE administration #1 (fall 2007) PACE Center for Girls assessed a total of
     fifty-six students: five 6th graders, ten 7th graders, eleven 8th graders, and thirty 9th-12th
     graders. Of the fifty-six students tested—twenty-five scored in the low risk category:
     three 6th graders, seven 7th graders, four 8th graders, and eleven 9th-12th graders. Twenty-
     six scored in the moderate risk category: two 6th graders, two 7th graders, seven 8th
     graders, and fifteen 9th-12th graders. Five scored in the high risk category: zero 6th
     graders, one 7th graders, zero 8th graders, and four 9th-12th graders.
  2. During the MAZE administration #2 (winter 2008) PACE Center for Girls assessed a
     total of fifty-five students. Six 6th graders, eight 7th graders, ten 8th graders, and thirty-
     one 9th-12th graders. Of the fifty-five tested thirteen scored in the low-risk category: zero
     6th graders, two 7th graders, three 8th graders, and eight 9th-12th graders. Thirty-five
     students scored in the moderate risk category: six 6th graders, five 7th graders, six 8th
     graders, and eighteen 9th-12th graders. Seven students scored in the high-risk category:
     zero 6th graders, one 7th grader, one 8th grader, and five 9th-12th graders.
  3. Of the fifty-five students assessed during the 2nd MAZE administration, thirty-nine
     students were present and assessed during the 1st administration. Four of the thirty-nine
     had promoted to the next assessment grade level prior to the 2nd MAZE administration:
     three of the four students (one from 6th, 7th and 8th grades) increased their reading at-risk
     category—two moving from low-risk to moderate and one moving from moderate to
     high. One student decreased her reading at-risk category by moving from moderate to
     low. Among 6th graders, three were present for both the 1st and 2nd administrations, two
     students increased their reading at-risk category moving from low to moderate risk, and
     one student maintained their moderate category rating but improved her score by 4
     points. Among 7th graders, five students were present for both the 1st and 2nd
     administrations, one student increased her reading at-risk category moving from low to
     moderate, and four students maintained their category rating with three of those four
     improving their scores. Among 8th graders, seven students were present for both the 1st
     and 2nd administrations, two students increased their reading at-risk category moving
     from low to moderate risk, three maintained their risk category with all three students
     improving their scores, and one student decreased her reading at-risk category moving
     from moderate to low risk. Among 9th-12th graders, twenty students were present for
     both the 1st and 2nd administrations, four students increased their reading at-risk category
     (three moving from low to moderate and one moving from moderate to high), thirteen
      students maintained their risk category with twelve of the thirteen improving their scores,
      and three students decreased their reading at-risk categories (with one moving from
      moderate to low, and two moving from high to moderate risk).
   4. Of the thirty-nine PACE Center for Girls students present for both the 1st and 2nd MAZE
      administrations, twenty-four (62%) students showed improvement in their reading ability
      by earning a promotion, improving their scores and maintaining their at-risk category or
      by improving their scores and moving from a higher risk category to a lower risk
      category.

STUDENTS READING BELOW GRADE LEVEL
  5. Of the thirty-nine PACE Center for Girls students present for both the 1st and 2nd MAZE
     administrations, twelve students read below grade level (but are not in the lowest 25%)
     and are served in a regular 50 minute Reading class: zero 6th graders, two 7th graders,
     three 8th graders, and seven 9th-12th graders.
  6. Nine (75%) of the twelve students reading below grade level showed improvement in
     their reading ability by earning a promotion, improving their scores and maintaining their
     at-risk category or by improving their scores and moving from a higher risk category to a
     lower risk category.

STUDENTS IN THE LOWEST 25%
  7. Of the thirty-nine PACE Center for Girls students present for both the 1st and 2nd MAZE
     administrations, twenty-six students read far below grade level and represent the lowest
     25% of the population in reading ability: four 6th graders, six 7th graders, five 8th graders,
     eleven 9th-12th graders.
  8. Ten (39%) of the twenty-six students reading below grade level showed improvement in
     their reading ability by earning a promotion, improving their scores and maintaining their
     at-risk category or by improving their scores and moving from a higher risk category to a
     lower risk category. This does not reflect our projected goal.

                                       MATHEMATICS

ALL STUDENTS
  1. During the fall semester 2007, PACE Center for Girls awarded eight half credits in math
     courses to high school students. During the fall semester 2007, PACE Center for Girls
     had 20 high school students enrolled for the entire semester. The sixteen half credits
     were earned by six students (only five of which were enrolled for the entire semester),
     some earning a full credit in a course.
  2. Twenty-five percent (25%) of the high school students enrolled during the fall semester
     2007 earned one hundred percent (100%) of the credits awarded in Science.
  3. During the fall semester 2006, PACE Center for Girls awarded eighteen half credits in
     math to high school students. The eighteen credits awards were earned by a total of
     fourteen students, some earning a full credit in a course. Thirty-one (31%) of the high
     school students enrolled during the fall semester 2006 earned one hundred percent
     (100%) of the credits awarded in Science.
  4. PACE Center for Girls experienced a significant shift in its population with a
     significantly higher percentage of the population being middle school students during the
     fall semester 2007 versus 2006. This is reflected in the data as middle school students do
     not earn half credits and the relative small percentage shift of high school student earning
     credits and the total number of high school students enrolled (31% in 2006 to 25% in
     2007).
STUDENTS IN THE LOWEST 25%
  5. Of the high school students enrolled in intensive math during the fall semester, only one
     student was enrolled prior to or on the first day of the fall semester and remained enrolled
     during the entire semester.
  6. Of the one enrolled for the entirety of the fall semester one (100%) high school student
     earned a half credit in intensive math. This reflects a definite progression for this
     particular student, but does not provide significant data to validate an overall center-wide
     trend.

                                WRITING (ALL STUDENTS)

   1. PACE Center for Girls tested fifty students during the 1st administration of Writes Upon
      Request during the Fall Semester of 2007. Of the 50 taking the test, nineteen students
      earned a passing score of 3.5 or better, three students earned a 4.0 and two students
      earned a 4.5 (no students earned a 5.0).
   2. PACE Center for Girls tested forty-eight students during the 2nd administration of Writes
      Upon Request during the Fall Semester of 2007. Of the 48 taking the test, twelve
      students earned a passing score of 3.5 or better, five earned a 4.0, 3 students earned a 4.5
      and one student earned a 5.0.
   3. Of the fifty students taking the 1st administration of the WUR, thirty-nine students took
      the 2nd administration of the WUR. Of those thirty-nine students, twenty-one (54%) of
      them either kept the same score or increased their scores. Of the eighteen students who
      earned scores during the 2nd administration that were lower than those of the 1st
      administration, nine (50%) already earned passing scores during the 1st administration.
   4. Greater than 50% of students taking both administrations increased or maintained their
      scores. Additionally, of the overall students earning the required 3.5 or greater, a higher
      percentage earned scores over the minimum passing scores (4.0 or greater) during the 2nd
      administration, representing a significant increase in the quality of the writing
      performance. The number of students who pass the WUR and then drop their scores on
      subsequent tests represents a challenge to PACE Center for Girls as we continue to teach
      students that every administration of WUR is an opportunity for exhibiting excellence in
      writing even if the student has already ‘passed’ it for the school year.

                                SCIENCE (ALL STUDENTS)

   1. During the fall semester 2007, PACE Center for Girls awarded sixteen half credits in
      science courses to high school students. During the fall semester 2007, PACE Center for
      Girls had 20 high school students enrolled for the entire semester. The sixteen half
      credits were earned by ten students, some earning a full credit in a course.
   2. Fifty percent (50%) of the high school students enrolled during the fall semester 2007
      earned one hundred percent (100%) of the credits awarded in Science.
   3. During the fall semester 2006, PACE Center for Girls awarded thirty-one half credits in
      science to high school students. The thirty-one credits awards were earned by a total of
      seventeen students, many earning a full credit in a course. Fifty-six percent (56%) of the
      high school students enrolled during the fall semester 2006 earned one hundred percent
      (100%) of the credits awarded in Science.
4. Although the data reflects a decrease in the number of science credits awarded during the
   first semester of the academic year, PACE Center for Girls’ science program experienced
   two dramatic changes between the two years. During the spring semester of 2007, PACE
   Center for Girls lost its experienced science teacher and a new teacher was hired on
   August 21, 2007 and began teaching in the classroom September 5, 2007 after the
   semester had already begun. Although enthusiastic and motivated, the new science
   teacher is a beginning ‘cross-over’ teacher—meaning she earned her Bachelor’s degree in
   the sciences but not from a college of education. Additionally, PACE Center for Girls
   experienced a significant shift in its population with a significantly higher percentage of
   the population being middle school students during the fall semester 2007 versus 2006.
   This is reflected in the data as middle school students do not earn half credits and the
   relative small percentage shift of high school student earning credits and the total number
   of high school students enrolled (56% in 2006 to 50% in 2007).

								
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