ND-MASSfinal

Document Sample
ND-MASSfinal Powered By Docstoc
					  ND-MASS
North Dakota’s Manual for Accountability
          & State Standards


      ADULT EDUCATION
AND FAMILY LITERACY PROGRAMS

                     Prepared by
  ND Department of Public Instruction
     Wayne G. Sanstead, State Superintendent

   G. David Massey, Assistant State Superintendent

           Valerie Fischer, State Director




                  January 2004
             Revised September 2008
                             STATE STAFF
                  ND Adult Education and Literacy Programs

                                    G. David Massey
                              Assistant State Superintendent
                                Telephone 701-328-3600
                                    Fax 701-328-4770
                                Email: dmassey@nd.gov

                                       Valerie Fischer
                                        State Director
                                   Telephone 701-328-4138
                                   Email: vfischer@nd.gov

                                      Jolli Marcellais
                                  Administrative Assistant
                                  Telephone 701-328-2393
                                     Fax 701-328-4770
                                 Email: jmarcellais@nd.gov

                                 Laurel Kaae
                     ND Lifelong Learning Resource Center
                           Telephone 701-572-5886
                              Fax 701- 774-4275
                          Email: lkaae@hotmail.com
                    www.lifelonglearningresourcecenter.com


  It is the policy of the ND Department of Public Instruction that activities, employment practices, programs, and
          services are offered without regards to race, color, national origin, sex, religion, disability and age.

“This publication is developed by the Department of Public Instruction under the WIA Title II grant from USOE and
                      does not represent any official policy of USOE unless specifically stated.”
                                                                  PREFACE

This manual is a product of the State Leadership activities to provide guidance and
assist local Center sites in the program improvement process. The funds provided
for the leadership program come from Section 223 of the Adult Education and
Family Literacy Act, Title II of the Workforce Investment Act; PL 105-220. The
Department of Public Instruction is committed to providing strong leadership to the
local programs to enhance policy, practice and the continuous program
improvement process.




                               Acknowledgements

Any publication of this nature draws on the collective wisdom and advice of many
individuals. Special appreciation is given to all Adult Learning Centers staff;
specifically, Vicky Campbell, Minot, Gaylene Massey, Mandan, and Laurel Kaae,
Williston.

We acknowledge and recognize portions of this manual drawn and/or patterned
from the Ohio Literacy Resource Center Manual for adult education and the
American Institute for Research material presented at multiple state director
professional development conferences.

Updating the ND-MASS manual were Bonny Norton, Grafton, Wendy Lunski,
Grand Forks, Randy Eider, Fargo, Laurel Kaae, Williston, and Vicky Campbell,
Minot.
                                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.   INTRODUCTION                                            1
     a. Manual Purpose
     b. What is ND-MASS?
     c. What is the Student Learning Experience Model

2.   ORIENTATION                                             5
     a. What is Orientation?
     b. Required Orientation Activities

3.   REGISTRATION AND ENROLLMENT                             7
     a.   Who is Eligible?
     b.   Non-Immigrant Foreign Students
     c.   What is Registration?
     d.   What is Enrollment?

4.   ASSESSMENT                                              10
     a. What is Assessment?
     b. Assessment Policy Guidelines

5.   GOAL SETTING & LEAP RESOURCES                           14
     a.   What is a Goal?
     b.   What is Goal Setting?
     c.   What is the Goal Setting Form?
     d.   What is a LEAP?
     d.   ABSE Student Goal Setting Form
     e.   Learning Education Action Plan (LEAP)
     f.   LEAP and Documentation Log

6.   GATHERING AND REPORTING STUDENT DATA                    21
     a. Why Collect and Report Data?
     b. What Data are Collected?

7.   MONITORING STUDENT PERFORMANCE                          23
     a. How to Monitor Student Performance

8.   USING DATA FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT                      24
     a. Why Use Data for Making Decisions?
     b. What Data Tells us?
      c. Presenting Data

9.    EXITING STUDENTS AND FOLLOW-UP                        27
      a. What is Follow-up?
      b. Collecting Student Follow-up Information

10.   RECORD KEEPING                                        29
      a. Student Records

11.   GLOSSARY                                              30
12.   APPENDICES                                            34
      A. STUDENT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FORM
      B. ASSESSMENT AND SERVICES INFORMATION
      B1. EDUCATIONAL FUNCTIONING LEVELS – ASSESSMENT FOR
         PLACEMENT, PROGRESS AND POST-TESTING
      C. STUDENT ATTENDANCE FORM
      D. CALLING LOG
      E. OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST (EMPLOYMENT)
      F. OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST (POST SECONDARY/TRAINING)
      G. OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST (HS DIPLOMA/GED)
      H. SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE (EMPLOYMENT)
      I. SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE (POST SECONDARY/TRAINING)
      J. LOCAL PROGRAM SURVEY
      K. STUDENT SEPARATION RECORD
      L. STUDENT FOLLOW-UP
      M. STANDARDS & COMPETENCIES
                                                               INTRODUCTION

MANUAL PURPOSE

The purpose of the North Dakota Manual of Accountability and State Standards (ND-MASS) is
to serve as a resource guide regarding the implementation of the Adult Basic and Secondary
Education (ABSE) programs in North Dakota.

Manual Language
   Most sections begin with “What is…” offering a definition and/or brief introduction to
     the topic area.
   Information titled “Features” is provided as a “snapshot” of the requirements and
     highlights for the topic area.
   Manual references apply to all students in ABSE unless otherwise indicated.
   The ND-MASS manual is available online at
     www.ndlifelonglearningresourcecenter.com.


Icons and Text Boxes
The following text boxes appear throughout the manual.

                            Clarification provides further information either explaining a topic
                            in more detail or highlighting an important definition.



                            To Do highlights required procedures and „best practice”
                            recommendations.



                            Suggestion Box offers considerations when conducting an activity,
                            ideas from the field and additional resources.



                            ABSELINK highlights information required in the SIMS database
                            and the procedures for entering information.




                                               1
WHAT IS ND-MASS?

The North Dakota Manual of Accountability and State Standards (ND-MASS) is the North
Dakota Department of Public Instruction‟s Adult and Basic Secondary Education‟s response to
the federally legislated National Reporting System for Adult Education (NRS). The NRS was
created at the national level to develop accountability requirements for federally-funded adult
education programs in response to the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998.

The WIA requires adult education programs to report Core Indicators of Performance (CIP) to
receive federal funding. NRS aligns the Core Indicators with outcome measures.

          Core Indicators of Performance                     Outcome Measures
                Required by WIA                              Designated by NRS*

    Improvements in literacy skill levels in           Educational gains (achieve skills to
    reading, writing and speaking the English           advance one or more Educational
    language, numeracy, problem-solving,                Functioning Levels as defined in the
    English language acquisition, other                 Glossary of Terms)
    literacy skills.

    Placement in, retention in, or completion          Entered employment
    of, post-secondary education, training,            Retained employment
    unsubsidized employment or career                  Placement in postsecondary
    advancement.                                        education or training

    Receipt of a secondary school diploma or           Receipt of a secondary school
    its recognized equivalent.                          diploma or pass GED tests
    These outcome measures become primary and/or secondary goals as chosen by each student.

Along with the outcome measures, North Dakota is required to report:
    Descriptive Measures – student demographics, reasons for attending, student status; and
    Participation Measures – contact hours, program enrollment type (e.g., family literacy or
      workplace literacy).

For further information refer to:
WIA website: http://www.wia-workforceinvestmentact.net/
NRS website: http://www.nrsweb.org




                                                2
WHAT IS THE STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCE MODEL?

Educational retention is crucial to student success; therefore, it is imperative that programs
incorporate structure, strategies, and practices taken from research that encourage student
motivation, persistence, and achievement.

The Student Learning Experience Model is a framework designed to help local programs serve
Adult Basic Secondary Education (ABSE) students to:
    Promote development of systematic processes, procedures, and program components that
       enhance the quality of literacy services and increase student retention; and
    Assist local programs meet the benchmarks and accountability requirements of ND-
       MASS.

Student Learning Experience Model Features
    The Student Learning Experience Model represents good practices employed by ABSE
      programs.
    It estimates the sequence of events that a student encounters as he/she goes through the
      educational process.
    A graphic of the required elements of the Student Learning Experience Model can be
      viewed on the following page.



                   Clarification/Definition
                   The diagram of the Student Experience Model on the following page
                   shows the elements of the model as separate and distinct. However,
                   based on the diversity of student needs and available services in ABSE
                   programs, these elements may frequently overlap.




                                              3
     STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCE MODEL
                                         Orientation
            Rapport and Support Building               Pre-assessment
            Program and Student Information            Goal-Setting/Individualized Learning
             Sharing                                     Plan (ILP)
            Learning Style Inventory                   Student Registration Form Completed
                                                         (SIMS data added)




            Instruction


                                         Monitor Student Performance
                                      Assessment and Evaluation of Student Performance
                                      Regular Review of Progress
                                      Adjustment of Goals and/or ILP (as needed)
                                      Student Progress Form Completed (SIMS data added)




                                            Reach
                                        Primary and/or
                                       Secondary Goal?



                                  NO                       YES
  Revise ILP and                                                            Choose New Goal and
Continue Instruction                                                           Repeat Process
                                        Exit Program
                                   Student Exit Form Completed




                                           Follow-up

                                                 4
                                                                   ORIENTATION

WHAT IS ORIENTATION?

Orientation introduces prospective students to available services in an ABSE program. As a
number of individuals have been away from the educational process for some time, orientation is
a reintroduction of the learning process and available programs. The purpose of orientation is to
ensure all prospective students are provided with information and assistance to make informed
decisions.

Orientation Features
    Orientation is required for all persons interested in enrolling at an Adult Learning Center.
    All programs implement a formal, separate student orientation that includes the
      “Required Orientation Activities” detailed below.
    Orientation is to be facilitated by qualified, knowledgeable ABSE staff.
    Orientation is to be offered at regularly scheduled intervals.
    The length of orientation is to be determined by individual programs.


                        It is important to introduce assessment during orientation so that the
                        student is aware of the varying ways in which learning will be
                        assessed and documented. It may be best to include this introduction
                        as a part of information sharing.

Required Orientation Activities
Given the diversity of ABSE programs, the order of required orientation activities is to be
determined by individual programs; however the following are required activities.
     Rapport and Support Building Activities: help the student build confidence, feel
       comfortable, establish relationships, identify support systems, and increase trust and
       motivation.
     Program and Student Information Sharing: process in which program staff and the
       student exchange information so that the student can make an informed decision about
       program participation.
        Student Information: Student contact information such as name, address, phone
           number and other personal data is recorded on the Student Information Management
           System (SIMS) form.
        Program Information: Oral and written information about the program‟s goals,
           services, structure, delivery, organization, policies, procedures, schedules, referral
           and support services, the instructor‟s role, and the program‟s expectation of the
           students.
     Learning Style Inventory: identifies the student‟s preferred style of processing
       information. Note: for special populations such as English for Speakers of Other
       Languages (ESOL) students, it may be more appropriate to administer the inventory at a
       time other than during orientation.

                                               5
      Initial Goal-Setting Instruction: Basic instruction in how to set goals. (See Goal-Setting
       for further information.)
      Locator/Initial Appraisal Assessment: determining the student‟s estimated skill level
       and appropriate diagnostic testing using a standardized locator/initial appraisal
       instrument. (See the ND ABSE Assessment Policy).



              The North Dakota Lifelong Learning Resource Center (NDLLRC) offers program
              assistance in developing orientation activities and can be found at:
              www.ndlifelonglearningresourcecenter.com

Based on the objective, focus, program structure, student demographics, and other factors,
programs may choose to expand orientation by adding additional topics or activities to include:
     Needs Assessments                       Aptitude Tests
     GED Testing Information                 Problem-Solving Strategies
     Learning Styles                         Reading Comprehension Strategies
     Language Acquisition Principles         Skills and Interest Inventories
     Identifying Learning Disabilities       Skills/Traits Employers Want
     Listening Skills Strategies             Study/Test Taking Strategies
     Multiple Intelligence Surveys           Time Management Techniques




                                                6
                        REGISTRATION AND ENROLLMENT

WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR SERVICE?

Under the Workforce Investment Act Title II, Adult Education programs may serve adults who
   A. are at least 16 years of age;
   B. are not enrolled or required to be enrolled in a secondary school under State Law; and
   C. who
       1) lack sufficient mastery of basic educational skills to enable the individuals to function
          effectively in society;
       2) do not have a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, and have not
          achieved an equivalent level of education; or
       3) are unable to speak, read, or write the English language.

Services to Non-Immigrant Foreign Students
The United States Department of Education has issued guidance regarding the effect of section
625 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigration Responsibility Act of 1996. This Act
may be found in the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriation Act, 1997, Public Law 104-208,
enacted on September 30, 1996. Section 625 affects the procedures for granting F-1 visas to
foreign students desiring to study in the United States public schools.

Under the amended Immigration and Nationality Act, an alien may not be accorded this F-1
status as a non-immigrant (under section 101a(15)F(1) of the Act) in order to pursue a course of
study in the United States at a public school or in a publicly funded adult education program.
Furthermore, an alien may not be accorded this status to pursue a course of study at a public
school unless two conditions are met:
    1) the aggregate period of this status at the school may not exceed twelve months with
        respect to an alien.
    2) the alien must demonstrate that the alien has reimbursed the local educational agency that
        administers the school in question “for the full, unsubsidized per capita cost of providing
        education at such for the period of alien‟s attendance.”

Section 625 does not affect most foreign students. It only relates to the conditions for granting an
F-1 visa to the very limited number of non-immigrant students.

For further guidance on services to non-immigrant students contact the Department of Public
Instruction at 701-328-2393.




                                                 7
WHAT IS REGISTRATION?

A student is registered once he/she has made an informed decision to participate in an Adult
Learning Center program and the Student Information Management System form is completed.
Page one of the Student Information System Management form is included below for reference.

Registration Features
    Programs may choose to separate registration from the orientation process or include
       registration as the last orientation activity.
    All participating students must have a completed Student Information Management
       System (SIMS) form.
    The SIMS form must include required testing and student goals.
    At the time of registration, students must be informed of follow-up procedures including
       possible use of Social Security numbers to determine attainment of employment,
       secondary school diploma or GED, and/or postsecondary education.

WHAT IS ENROLLMENT?
Enrollment is attained when a student has received 12 hours of instruction in an ABSE program.
Until an individual has received 12 hours, he/she is considered a participant not an enrolled
student. Only enrolled students are counted on the Annual Performance Report (APR).




                  All information collected on the Student Information Management System
                   form must be entered into online SIMS.
                  As a program collects additional information about a participant or
                   enrolled student, the information must be entered into online SIMS.
                  The online SIMS section lists the fields required for reporting purposes.
                  The student must be enrolled in SIMS after completion of 12 hours at the
                   Adult Learning Centers.
                  The online SIMS is located at:
                   http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/adulted/index.shtm




                                              8
      North Dakota Student Information Management System (SIMS)
                                                                                        Updated: August 2008

1.       Check if the student is a United States Citizen or legal Immigrant.

2.    Program Year: 2008-2009

3.    Social Security Number or ID Number
      ** SSN‟s are used only for ND Adult Basic and Secondary Education filing purposes and are not released
      to any other person, business, agency, etc.

4.    Enrollment Date:          (Date of First Attendance)
                                     Month/Day/Year

5.    Have you been enrolled at another Adult Learning Center during this past year?    Yes        No

6.    Student Name: Last:                          First:                                     MI


7.    Maiden Name:

8.    Street Address or PO Box:

      City:                                        State:            Zip+4:

9.    Date of Birth:                                         ___________        Male      Female
                            Month/Day/Year                       Age

      Student Phone Number: (      )

10.   Emergency Contact: Name:
      Phone: (  )

11.      Rural Area (Population of 1 to 49,999)
         Urban Area (Population of 50,000 +)

12.   Race: (Check One)
         American Indian or Alaskan Native
         Asian
         Black or African American
         Hispanic or Latino
         Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
         White

13.   Marital Status: (At the time of enrollment - Check One)
        Single/Never Married
        Married
        Widowed
        Divorced
        Separated


              The entire SIMS form is located in the Appendices

                                                       9
                                                                      ASSESSMENT

WHAT IS ASSESSMENT?

Assessment is the ongoing process of gathering, describing, or quantifying information about
performance or learning.

Assessment Features
    Assessment begins at the student‟s initial point of contact with the ABSE program and
      continues throughout the student‟s involvement with the program.
    Assessment involves both formal and informal evaluation of student progress and
      mastery of content.
    Assessment allows for both the student and staff to determine the best decisions.

Placement, progress, and level advancement assessment results for the area in which the student
is being monitored must be recorded on the Student Information Management System (SIMS)
every 90 calendar days from the date of registration.



                Actions for Selecting Assessments
                 Offer a variety of assessment options to ensure accommodation of varied
                    skills, goals, and learning styles.
                 Select appropriate assessments for the population being served.
   Administer assessments properly and consistently.
   Choose assessments that determine appropriate instruction for individual needs.


After each student has received 60 hours of instruction, a progress/post-test should be given to
assess academic gains. However, there are valid situations where testing prior to completion of
60 hours of instruction is warranted. The circumstances should be logged in the student file for
documented reference. Consider the following factors when administering standardized
assessment for progress and level advancement.
          number of hours the student has attended;
          number of hours of instruction;
          number of standards and competencies the student has completed since the last
           standardized assessment; and,
          number of standards and competencies the student still needs for level
           advancement.




                                               10
                     North Dakota Adult Education Assessment Policy
                                  General Guidelines
A. All ABSE programs must employ proper test administration practices.

1) All programs must have staff trained in proper test administration practices of standardized
   tests and the North Dakota Portfolio System.
2) All programs must administer a locator/initial appraisal unless the specific test chosen has no
   accompanying locator/initial appraisal. The TABE locator should only be used to determine
   the appropriate level(s) of the TABE level assessment to be used. The locator should not be
   used for placement, progress and post-testing.
3) The same standardized assessment used for placement must also be used for post-testing (i.e.,
   BEST/BEST and/or TABE/TABE)
4) The student work in the portfolio should be used to demonstrate level advancement only if a
   standardized post-test administration is not possible.

B. Standardized assessments must be used for placement of students into Educational
   Functioning Levels and for post-testing.

1) All programs must adopt a standardized assessment from the State ABSE approved test list.
   They must also be used to demonstrate progress or level advancement. The State approved
   tests include the TABE 9 & 10.
2) If a program uses a full battery for placement testing, then the alternate battery must be used
   for post-testing. (TABE 9 and 10)
3) The TABE Word List may be used for the locator/initial appraisal assessment for students
   functioning, at the Beginning ABE Literacy level.
4) Programs must retain copies of student records for one year after the student exits the
   program.

C. Standardized assessments must be used for placement of ESOL (English for Speakers
   of Other Languages) students into Educational Functioning Levels and for post-testing.
   They may also be used to demonstrate progress or level advancement.

1) All ABSE programs serving ESOL students must adopt a standardized assessment from the
   State ABSE approved list.
2) ESOL students who are tested in all basic skills areas must be placed in and tracked in the
   lower level. ESOL students may now be tracked in EITHER Listening/Speaking OR
   Reading/Writing whichever is lower.
3) If a student has a specific goal, then the student may be tracked for that goal using the
   appropriate Documentation Log. However, programs are encouraged to track both areas.
4) If the BEST Literacy Test or BEST Plus Oral English Proficiency Test is used, as the
   standardized assessment, follow proper testing protocol.




                                               11
     Goals to Improve          Listening/            Reading/
                                Speaking             Writing                 Both
                           BEST Plus Oral        BEST Literacy         BEST Plus O.E.P.T.
            Tests          English               Form B, C, or D       BEST Literacy Test
                           Proficiency Test
                           Based on results of   Based on results of Based on results of
         Placement         BEST Plus Oral        BEST Literacy       BEST Plus O.E.P.T.
                           English               Test                or the BEST
                           Proficiency Test                          Literacy Test using
                                                                     whichever is lower.
       Note: Use alternative forms for the pre-test and post-test. For example, if you use
       form B BEST Literacy for the Reading/Writing pre-testing, then use form C for
       Reading/Writing post-testing.

D. All ABSE programs must test students in at least the students’ primary academic area
   (and may test in other areas).

1) Students who are tested in all basic skills areas must be placed and tracked in their lowest
   score area. For example, if a student takes a full assessment and his/her lowest score is in
   math, he/she is placed at the appropriate level for that area. Progress, level advancement, and
   post-testing are also tracked in the math skill area. However, the program is encouraged to
   keep documentation showing progress in the other skills areas that have been targeted for
   instruction as well.
2) At least every 90-calendar days from the date of registration, a student‟s portfolio must be
   reviewed and updated. Programs may choose to administer a standardized test in the
   student‟s basic skill area if it is determined to be appropriate and beneficial. This information
   must be entered on the SIMS.
3) Programs must maintain and update student progress data for enrolled students using the
   SIMS student record system at least every 90-calendar days starting from the date of
   registration.

E. All ABSE programs must utilize the North Dakota Portfolio System.

1) Each student must have a portfolio that includes the following five required elements:
   a) Standardized Test Scores
   b) Goal Form
   c) Learning Styles Inventory
   d) Learning Experience Action Plan (LEAP)
   e) Student Work
2) Student work may not be used for placement into any of the six Educational Functioning
   Levels for ABSE and ESOL.
3) Documentation of student progress must be by the standardized test scores and/or student
   work.
4) The student portfolio should contain student work.


                                                 12
Students with Disabilities
Students served through local programs who have been self-identified as having a disability are
subject to standardized testing requirements as referenced in the General Guidelines.
Accommodations are provided to students with disabilities when administering the standardized
tests.

Students served by the North Dakota Department of Corrections and Vocational Rehabilitation
are subject to standardized testing requirements as referenced in the General Guidelines.

GED
ABSE programs serving students with a primary or secondary goal of earning a GED or
secondary school diploma are subject to the standardized testing requirements as referenced in
the General Guidelines. The Official GED Practice Test is no longer permitted for student
placement, progress, and advancement, nor to ESOL students.

Students who identify a GED as a primary/secondary goal can take the Official GED Practice
Test without benefit of a complete orientation, any additional testing, or enrollment in the
program. Arrangements for taking the Official GED Practice Test would be subject to the local
program‟s testing plan. If a student enters the program and successfully completes the GED, no
post test is necessary.

Students who do not take a standardized assessment and do not receive twelve or more hours of
service can not be counted in the federal report.

All ABSE programs with a Family Literacy component are subject to the standardized testing
requirements as referenced in the General Guidelines. All Family Literacy students must be
placed in an Educational Functioning Level using the TABE 9 & 10 or BEST/BEST Plus.

                      REFER TO APPENDICES (M)
                FOR EDUCATIONAL FUNCTIONING LEVELS




                                              13
                                               GOAL-SETTING & LEAP
                                                        RESOURCES

WHAT IS A GOAL?
   A goal is an outcome or end result that a person wants to learn, do, have, or be.
   Defining goals helps a person take action.

Supports and Barriers to Goal Achievement
    A support network (e.g., family, friends, work and business contacts, support groups, and
      professional counselors) may help students achieve goals. Students need to identify their
      support networks and recognize how support can help them overcome barriers.
    Certain life factors may hinder the achievement of goals. Students need to identify those
      factors in their lives that are potential barriers to goal achievement and to prepare
      themselves to deal with those factors.

What are the types of goals?
Goals can be divided into long-term, short-term, and immediate goals. It is important to break
goals into smaller goals that can be achieved in shorter periods of time.
    Long-Term Goal
         Long-term goals are major, far-reaching goals.
         Long-term goals provide a general target to aim toward.
         Long-term goals may extend beyond the program year (1 to 5 years).
    Short-Term Goal
         Short-term goals are smaller and support the long-term goal.
         Several short-term goals may be needed to achieve the long-term goal.
         Short-term goals may be achieved in a short period of time (1 to 3 months).
    Immediate Goal
         Immediate goals have a more narrow focus than short-term goals.
         Immediate goals may have a combination of actions and identify specific activities.
         Several immediate goals may be needed to achieve the short-term goal.
         Immediate goals may be frequently monitored to determine progress or level
            advancement.
         Immediate goals may be achieved in a short period of time (3 to 4 weeks).


                     It is important for students to:
                           Identify goals that are meaningful to them
                           Keep goals attainable
                           Organize and prioritize goals
                           Write positive goal statements

                                A goal is a dream with a deadline



                                              14
15
Setting Effective Goals
The following criteria can be used to help students set goals

   S = Specific           Goal is defined as clearly as possible
   M = Measurable         Goal can be measured
   A = Achievable         Goal is within a student‟s grasp but not so far that it is not attainable
   R = Realistic          Goal is based on a clear understanding of what the student is trying
                           to achieve and the skills and the knowledge to be mastered in the
                           process
   T = Time-bound         Goal is set with a specific time-line and dates identified for
                          checking progress toward goal achievement

The following example demonstrates how to help a student break down their goal into smaller
goals and strategies:

   Obtain GED                                                      Long-term Goal
   Improve basic skills …                                           Primary Goal
   Pass the GED Practice Tests in Math and
   Writing.
      Math skills = improve basic skills
      Writing skills = improve basic skills
   Solve math word problems using fractions                        Short-term Goal
   and decimals.
      Review fraction computations.                            Immediate Strategies
      Review decimal operations.
      Learn fraction and decimal
         equivalents.

WHAT IS GOAL-SETTING?

Goal-setting is one of the most important on-going processes of any learning experience and
begins during orientation, extends into developing the student‟s Learning Experience Action
Plan (LEAP), and continues in the classroom and throughout instruction.

Student Implications
    If students have a clear vision of where they are going and the steps to get there, they will
      be motivated to stay in the program and work towards their goals.
    Goals give long-term vision and short-term motivation by helping students‟ measure
      progress/level advancement and taking pride in their achievements.
Program Implications
    Program performance is assessed by comparing students‟ outcomes to their stated
      primary and, if applicable, secondary goals. (For example, in examining employment
      measures, a rate or percentage is computed by dividing the number of students who
      obtained a job by the number of students who designated obtaining a job as a primary or
      secondary goal.)


                                                 16
      Success in meeting program objectives, including reporting level advancement and goal
       attainment, may be increased by helping students set realistic goals, achievable within the
       program year.

Initial Goal Setting Instructions
Initial goal-setting instruction helps prospective students begin the process of setting goals and
making informed decisions about participation in an ABSE program.

Initial Goal-Setting Instruction Features
     Initial goal-setting instruction must take place during orientation.
     This instruction explains the benefits of goal-setting and the basic principles,
        components, and action steps involved.
     It may be appropriate to offer initial goal-setting instruction in a group setting.
     Goal-setting involves defining and prioritizing choices and planning how to get from the
        beginning to the end result.
     Student benefits of goal-setting include: achievement, improved performance, enhanced
        self-confidence and self-esteem, increased motivation, and persistence.

Identifying Student’s Personal Goals and Program Tracking Goals
The opportunity to help students translate their personal goals into program tracking goals
(primary/secondary goals) that can be achieved through ABSE services can be done as follows:
     Determine Students’ Long Term Goals: Based on the initial goal-setting instruction on
       long-term goals, program staff are to help students determine their major, overarching
       goals.
     Explain Program Services: Program staff are to inform students of available services
       and discuss how the services may help the students reach their long term goals.
     Establish Students’ Primary and/or Secondary Goals: Program staff are to help the
       students identify primary and, if applicable, secondary goals and explain how these are
       program tracking goals and the students‟ progress and level advancement in these goals
       will be measured and documented.
        All students are required to identify a primary goal which can be achieved within the
           program year from those listed questions on the SIMS form.
        If a student has identified a secondary goal which can be achieved within the program
           year, it may be entered onto the SIMS form.
        The student‟s primary goal and, if applicable, secondary goal are recorded on the
           SIMS form after the completion of diagnostic testing.

What is the Goal Setting Form?
The goal setting form is used to record the student‟s long term, short-term, primary and
secondary goals.

Goal Setting Form Features
   Each student must have a goal setting form.
   Each Center may develop its own form



                                               17
          The form must contain: student name, program name, program site, date, long-term goal,
           short-term goal, primary and secondary goal.
          Complete the goal form in a one-on-one setting.

WHAT IS A LEARNING EDUCATION ACTION PLAN (LEAP)?
A LEAP is a road map for the student and instructor to help the student reach his/her educational
goals during the learning process. It reflects the immediate strategies, steps, and activities the
student will employ to reach his/her goals. Each student must have a LEAP. Each Center may
develop its own LEAP form.

The LEAP Process
In creating a LEAP, the instructor and student will:
     Discuss the importance of the LEAP process (i.e., planning, implementation, and
        monitoring progress/level advancement).
     Discuss the roles of the instructor and student in the LEAP process.
     Designate the time frame in which to review goal progress and achievement.
     Record the LEAP information, using assessment results.

What does a LEAP look like?
Because the design of the LEAP is a local decision, the depth of the information on the form may
vary from program to program. However, at a minimum, the LEAP must contain:
    Identifying Information – Student name, instructor name, date of LEAP, ABSE site
    Instructional Information – Steps and activities to accomplish the student‟s goals, time
        frame for meeting immediate goal, comment (e.g., indication of whether goal is met,
        explanation of why goal is not met, date of reviews and/or revisions)

                    Depending on program need, other items may be useful to add to the
                    LEAP, such as:
                     Curriculum and material choices
                     Evaluation and assessment choices (e.g., diagnostic testing scores,
                        student‟s preferred learning style)
           General plan for each Educational Functioning Level in each subject with
            specifics being added by the instructor
           Space to record deviations from the original plan
           Student self-assessment


Program Benefits of the LEAP
    Tied directly to what happens in the learning process
    Provides positive direction for goals
    Improves program consistency across ABSE programs
    Encourages frequent monitoring of progress toward goals
    Written and understandable by student and instructor to meet unique and diverse needs



                                                  18
                                  STUDENT’S GOAL-SETTING FORM
Today’s Date: ___________   Participant’s Name: ___________________________       ABSE Site: ___________________________

Long-term Goal: (1 to 5 years)




Primary and Secondary Goals – Completed Before June 30, 20___(within program year)
Primary Goal                                                 Secondary Goal (optional)
   To improve basic skills        To improve basic skills to    To improve basic skills          To increase involvement in
   To improve English Language    increase involvement in       To improve English Language      children‟s education
   skills (ESOL)                  children‟s education          skills (ESOL)                    To increase involvement in
   To obtain a job                To improve basic skills to    To obtain a job                  children‟s literacy related
   To retain current job           increase involvement in      To retain current job             activities
   To earn GED or secondary        children‟s literacy          To earn GED or secondary         To decrease public assistance
   school diploma                 related activities            school diploma                   To obtain citizenship skills
   To enter postsecondary                                       To enter postsecondary           To register to vote or to vote
   education or training                                        education or training             for the first time
                                                                Other: (specify)_________________________________________
Short-term Goal: (1 to 3 months)




                                                            19
                         LEARNING EDUCATION ACTION PLAN (LEAP)
Student’s Name:_________________________________         Date:__________________________________

Instructor’s Name:_______________________________        ABSE Site:_____________________________

      Immediate Goals                        Strategies to Meet                   Comments
                                             Immediate Goals




Time Frame_______ to _______




Time Frame_______ to _______




Time Frame_______ to _______



                                                    20
                                   LEAP & DOCUMENTATION LOG
Student’s Name:___________________________________               Date:__________________________________

Instructor’s Name:_________________________________              ABSE Site:_____________________________

 Competencies & Skills    Tasks/Activities Materials   Mastery Evidence               Comments               Time-
                                                                                                             Line




Other Skills:




Student Completion and Instructor Initials:____________________________________ Minimum Performance Level:______(75%)


                                                          21
                                    GATHERING AND REPORTING
                                               STUDENT DATA

WHY COLLECT AND REPORT DATA?

Data is collected for many reasons. The State and Federal programs require that certain
information be collected by each program and reported to the State Office of Adult Education.
In North Dakota we use the Student Information Management System (SIMS) to accomplish this
mandate of data collection. SIMS is web-based software which allows each local program to
collect data and enter the data directly. The SIMS program can be accessed through the DPI
website (http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/adulted/index.shtm).

Accountability is one of the reasons for collecting this information. The major reason for the
data collection should be for program improvement. Using data to make decisions for the
student and the program can help improve many aspects of each program. (More on using data
later in this manual.)

Verification and Reliability of Data
All data collected from the student prior to enrollment or after graduation must be verified by
appropriate records backup (e.g., social security card, school records, etc.) Secondly, the data
collection methods and procedures are standardized and staff should receive training in the
practice. Lastly, each center should perform periodic checks to make sure that procedures are
fully followed and the data collected is valid.

WHAT DATA IS COLLECTED?
The Student Data Collection tool (SIMS) is divided into seven (7) sections:
    Demographic Information
    Program Classification Information
    Assessment and Services Information
    Total Instructional and Contact Hours Information
    Separation Information
    Achievement Information
    Follow-up Information

This data is collected to maintain student record and also document student progress.

Financial Data Collection is done at the local level and all local financial procedures are used to
maintain such data. Local programs are required to submit expenditure reports on a quarterly
basis to the State. This quarterly report and form also serves as a request for funds. Forms can be
found at: http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/adulted/index.shtm (See Financial Section for more details.)




                                                22
General Guidelines in Reporting Data
    Each Adult Learning Center is required to use the Student Information Management
      System. Access to SIMS is found at: http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/adulted/index.shtm
    Each Center is expected to collect appropriate information on each student. The data to
      be collected is outlined above.
    If a student does not exceed 12 hours of instruction, that student should NOT be added to
      the SIMS data.
    Each Center is expected to update their data on a daily basis; all data must be complete at
      the end of each quarter.
    The State Office will run periodic checks on the data provided by local programs and
      send feedback to the local program if irregularities are found.
    If such irregularities exist each Center is expected to correct those within 7 days from
      the receipt of such information from the State Office.




                                              23
              MONITORING STUDENT PERFORMANCE

HOW TO MONITOR STUDENT PERFORMANCE

To ensure student success, educators need to monitor student performance. Monitoring student
performance tells the educator if the instructional strategies are helping the student meet his/her
primary and secondary goals. Monitoring student performance also gives the student ownership
of meeting the goals that they chose. The following illustration offers suggestions for monitoring
and reviewing student goals and educational functioning levels.



   Tools                                  Protocol                                  Responsible
 Pre / Post      Use formal and informal methods of evaluating student goals.        Instructor
  TABE                                                                                Student
  BEST           If the student is progressing on the same short-term goals,         Instructor
                 he/she should continue working on the goals.                         Student
   GED           If the short-term goals have been met, new goals can be             Instructor
 Predictor       identified and recorded.                                             Student
   Tests
   GED           If the review reveals that the student had met his/her long-         Instructor
Completion       term goal and is ready to exit the program, complete an exit
                 form.
Employment       If the student wishes to choose another long-term goal, revisit      Instructor
                 the goal-setting process and complete a new goal form and             Student
                 LEAP
 Retaining       If the student has identified the GED, getting a job, or             Instructor
Employment       retaining a job as a primary or secondary goal, complete the
     &           follow-up procedure.
 Follow-up




                                                24
            DATA FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT

                     “Quality means using data to make decisions.”
            “Quality is determined by systemic values, beliefs, and attitudes.”
                           “Quality is a journey with an end.”

WHY USE DATA FOR MAKING DECISIONS?

Wise and reasoned decision-making about education issues is based upon careful analysis
of a wide range of data. Data helps responsible educators to understand students and
organizational needs, and plan for student‟s academic achievement and successful
delivery of services.

Data driven decision-making takes place at every level of the education system, from
individual teachers looking at the test results for their students, a team of teachers looking
across the program level and up through the organizational level.

The major reason for collecting, analyzing and using the data is to enhance student
services and academic performance. To use data, it is critical to have good data. Good
data is reliable, verifiable, and accurate. The data can be used to highlight, clarify, and
explain program activities and program gaps.

WHAT DATA TELLS US?
The SIMS data collected by each program can tell the following:
   a) Where you have been;
   b) Where you are;
   c) Where you are going, and
   d) How to get there.

Data can have many uses to guide improvement of instruction.
   a) Measure program success and effectiveness.
   b) Identify improvement.
   c) Assess program results.
   d) Identify specific issues, such as student retention.
   e) Sell the program outcomes to school board, funding sources, and community.

The source data can tell:
   a) Student attendance/enrollment numbers and patterns.
   b) Student learning gains.
   c) Student drop-out completion rates.
   d) Student demographics.
   e) Student classifications/enrollment in other programs.




                                             25
To effectively use data, an identified model for program management and improvement
is highlighted:

Steps to Data Analysis
   1) Identify issues or topics;
   2) Develop questions to address the selected issues/topics;
   3) Plan analysis; and
   4) Analyze and interpret the data.

Steps to Program Improvement
   1) Develop a plan for initiating change;
   2) Implement the plan; and
   3) Evaluate whether the change has made a difference.

To fully analyze the collected data, it is important to ask pointed questions by using
inputs and outputs:
Input (what you contribute)
   a. Hours of instruction per week
   b. Teacher education, experience, full-time/part-time
   c. Instructional curriculum
Output (outcomes, results)
   a. Improved test scores
   b. Advances to the next educational level
   c. Earned GED credentials
   d. Improved attendance

Developing a Data Analysis Plan
To develop a viable plan for data analysis, the following questions may guide the
process:
    Will the current SIMS data I have answer these questions?
    What additional data, if any, may be necessary to secure?
    Where can this additional data be obtained?
    What timeframe is necessary to establish?

Analyzing and Interpreting Data
Review data with the following in mind:
    Look for patterns and differences.
    Use appropriate data and statistics.
    Completely disaggregate the data.
    Draw appropriate conclusion(s).
    Keep an open mind – be open to the unexpected.




                                           26
PRESENTING THE DATA
Collecting and analyzing data is important. Of equal importance, is the presentation of
data for a variety of audiences. There are several ways you can present your data.

Frequency Tables
    Show numbers and percentages by category, such as ethnicity, gender, and age.
    Simple frequency tables versus a two-way table or cross tabulation, e.g., ethnicity
      by age.

Graphs and Charts
   Bar Chart
    Categories displayed as bars; enrollees by age.
   Pie Chart
    Show a slice of the pie in proportion to the whole, e.g., various ethnicities of total
       enrolled students.
   Line Chart
    Data forms a continuous measure (not categories), e.g., pre-test and post-test
       scores.

Communication Strategies
   An article in your local newspaper
   Public meeting or news conference presented by your organization sponsor
   Newsletters
   Special events, e.g., open house, civic groups
   Web sites
   Reports to the State, Federal or your governing board




                                            27
                         EXITING STUDENTS & FOLLOW-UP

WHAT IS FOLLOW-UP?

To comply with the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and National Reporting System (NRS),
North Dakota is required to collect information relative to the core indicators of performance
(students‟ primary and, if applicable, secondary goals) after students exit ABSE and Literacy
programs. Programs must be consistent in their methods of collection to ensure the
comparability, reliability, and validity of information. To provide flexibility there are a number
of ways for programs to collect follow-up information.

Methods of Collection
   Data Matching: Whenever possible the State uses data matching. The GED data is
     located at the Department of Public Instruction and is used for confirming GED
     completion.
   Agreements with Postsecondary Institutions: Programs may establish agreements with
     the admissions offices of postsecondary institutions to collect information on students
     who enroll in postsecondary education.
   Follow-Up Surveys: Programs may use the follow-up surveys included in the manual to
     collect information on goal attainment. (See appendix for follow-up forms.)

Exiting in the final Quarter
To capture and account for additional follow-up data acquired during the subsequent program
year, programs may enter follow-up data into the SIMS until notified by the State Office.



                Exit quarter is the quarter when one or more of the following occurs:
                 Instruction ends.
                 Student has not received instruction for 60 calendar days and is not
                   scheduled to receive further instruction.




                Program staff should inform students that their social security numbers
                may be used to complete follow-up procedures for primary and
                secondary goals related to employment and the GED.




                                               28
                COLLECTING STUDENT FOLLOW-UP INFORMATION

       CORE                      WHEN TO DO                              HOW TO
   OUTCOMES                      FOLLOW-UP                             FOLLOW-UP
 Obtain a job*         First quarter after exit quarter       Data matching

                       During enrollment if job is            Follow-up survey
                       obtained while enrolled
 Retain current job*   Third quarter after exit quarter       Data matching

                       Third quarter after job is obtained,   Follow-up survey
                       if job is obtained while enrolled

                       Not measured for students exiting
                       the last two quarters of program
                       year
 Earn GED or           Any time during program year           Data matching
 secondary school                                             Obtain data from the State GED
 diploma                                                      database
 Enter                 Any time during program year           Agreements with postsecondary
 postsecondary                                                institutions‟ admissions offices
 education or
 training                                                     Follow-up survey
* Student is unemployed at program entry, indicates “obtain a job” as a goal.
** Student is unemployed at program entry, indicates “obtain a job” as goal, and obtains a job
   during the first quarter after exit, or student is employed at program entry and indicates
   “retain current job” as a goal.

                           Plan for Collecting Follow-up Survey Information
                  Every 90 calendar days attendance is reviewed, and SIMS queries are run
                 to determine which students have not attended class during the past 90
                 calendar days.
                  The primary and secondary goals of identified absent students are
                 reviewed to determine if the goals require follow-up.
        Program staff make three phone attempts to obtain follow-up survey information.
        After three attempts, if the student has not been contacted by phone, a written survey
         is mailed to his/her last known address.
        If the survey is not returned within two weeks, one phone call is made to the student‟s
         “emergency” contact person to confirm the student‟s address or obtain a current
         address.
        Program staff document all follow-up attempts, noting whether or not attempts were
         successful.
        Follow-up information is recorded in SIMS, and supporting documentation is filed in
         individual student records.




                                                29
                                                            RECORD KEEPING

STUDENT RECORDS

Student records are considered permanent records and therefore, they should be treated as such
and stored according to the program/agency policies. Based on our current practices, permanent
records include:
     Attendance;
     IEP‟s;
     Special needs; and
     Accommodations

It is not necessary to keep the entire IEP file, but signify a notation of when the student attended
the ABSE program, what the accommodations were, or any special needs or any reference where
the IEP was obtained (example Williston High School, Vocational Rehabilitation). Records can
be kept as a paper copy or an electronic copy.

Program Records
Program records are those records that were generated during the implementation of the program
year. These records may include the following, but is not limited to the following:
    Program proposal for the program year.
    Any correspondence related to the program.
    All fiscal records related to the program.
    Minutes of Advisory Committee, etc.
    Pertinent data collected and reports.

Financial Records
Financial records include all fiscal records for the program year to include receipt of revenue and
receipt of all expenditures related to the Adult Education programs. It is the responsibility of the
sponsoring agency to have an annual audit of all financial records; a copy of which must be
maintained by the local program. Should there be exceptions to any of the items in the audit,
they must be reported to the State Office.

Where to Store Records and For How Long
Records are subject to audit and should be secured in a safe place. Program records should be
retained and accessible for five (5) years, including the program year.




                                                30
                                                                         GLOSSARY

Alignment              Process of linking standards to assessment, instruction, and learning in
                       classrooms.
Advancement            Student advances from one Educational Functioning Level to the next,
                       based on performance.
Assessment             Ongoing process of gathering, describing, or quantifying information
                       about performance or learning.
Competency             Set of broad-based skills which can be taught. Knowledge or skill
                       required for task performance.
Core Indicators of     Federal performance standards which include the following:
Performance (CIP)        Improvements in literacy skill levels in reading, writing, and speaking
                          the English language, numeracy, problem-solving, English language
                          acquisition, other literacy skills
                         Placement in, retention in, or completion of, postsecondary training,
                          unsubsidized employment or career advancement.
                         Receipt of a secondary school diploma or its recognized
                          equivalent.
Diagnostic Testing     Standardized assessment administered to determine the student‟s
                       Educational Functional Level.
Educational            Federally-mandated levels of performance in basic reading, writing,
Functioning Levels     numeracy, and functional and workplace skills; six for ABE and six
                       for ESOL.
Enrollment             Enrollment means that a student has received 12 hours of service in an
                       ABSE program.
Exit Quarter           Instruction ends, or student has not received instruction for 90 calendar days
                       and is not scheduled to receive further instruction.
Follow-Up              Process of collecting information relative to the core indicators of
                       performance (students‟ primary and, if applicable, secondary goals)
                       after students exit ABSE programs.
Goal                   Statement of what a student (or program) desires to have (input), to be
                       (processes), or to produce (outcomes) at a specific time in the future.
Goal Form              Form utilized to record the student‟s long-term, short-term, primary,
                       and if applicable, secondary goals.
Initial Goal-Setting   Basic instruction in how to set goals. This instruction is to take place
Instruction            during orientation.
Instruction            Activities designed to achieve outcomes.
Learning Education     A road map for the student and instructor to help the student reach
Action Plan (LEAP)     his/her educational goals during the learning process. It reflects the
                       immediate goals and the steps and activities the student will employ
                       to reach his/her goals.
Learning Style         Assessment administered to identify a student‟s preferred style of
Inventory              learning and processing information. The assessment is to take place
                       during orientation.



                                             31
Monitoring Student  Process of gathering evidence of what a student can do and using that
Performance         evidence to make decisions influencing the learning experience.
National Reporting  System created at the national level to develop accountability
System for Adult    requirements for federally-funded adult education programs in
Education (NRS)     response to the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998.
ND-MASS             North Dakota DPI/Adult Basic and Literacy Education‟s response to
                    the federally legislated National Reporting System for Adult
                    Education.
Orientation         Introduction of services available in an ABSE program to prospective
                    students, including rapport and support building, program and student
                    information sharing, learning style assessment, goal-setting/LEAP,
                    and diagnostic testing.
Participant         An individual who has received less than 12 hours of service is
                    considered a participant rather than an enrolled student.
Participation       Reporting measures that include contact hours received (total hours
Measures            attended) and program enrollment type.
Placement           Student placement in an Educational Functioning Level determined by
                    a standardized test.
Portfolio           Assessment that involves collecting and analyzing student work in
Assessment          order to make decisions about student progress and advancement.
Post-test           Test administered to a student at regular intervals during a program.
                    Usually used to measure advancement in the program.
Postsecondary       Institution of higher education that provides not less than a two-year
Educational         program of instruction that is acceptable for credit toward a
Institution         bachelor‟s degree. A tribally-controlled community college. A non-
                    profit educational institution offering certificate or apprenticeship
                    programs at the postsecondary level.
Program and         Process in which program staff and the student exchange information
Student Information so that the student can make an informed decision about participation.
Sharing             This activity is to take place during orientation.
Progress            Student progresses within one (or same) Educational Functioning
                    Level.
Rapport and         Activities that help the student build confidence, feel comfortable,
Support Building    establish relationships, identify support systems, and increase level of
                    trust and motivation. This activity is to take place during orientation.
Registration        A student is registered once he/she has made an informed decision to
                    participate in an ABSE program and the Student Registration Form is
                    completed.
SIMS                North Dakota‟s database system for keeping track of student
                    attendance, registration information, achievement, and outcomes.
Standardized Test   Test administered, scored, and interpreted consistently by qualified
                    ABSE staff.
Standards           Broadly stated expectations of what students should know and be able
                    to do.
Student Experience Framework developed to assist local programs in serving ABSE
Model               students.



                                            32
 Uniform Portfolio      North Dakota‟s system of portfolio assessment, involving the
 System (ND-UPS)        collecting and analyzing of student work in order to make consistent
                        decisions about student progress and advancement.
 Workplace              Education services offered in collaboration with business, industry,
 Education              government, and/or labor for the purpose of improving the
                        productivity of the workforce through improvement of literacy skills.


Primary/Secondary Goals
 Earn a GED or        Student obtains certification of attaining passing score on the GED
 Secondary School     tests, or obtains a diploma, or state-recognized equivalent,
 Diploma              documenting satisfactory completion of secondary studies (high
                      school or adult high school diploma).
 Enter                Student enrolls in a postsecondary educational or occupational skills
 Postsecondary        training program that does not duplicate other services or training
 Education or         received, regardless of where the prior services or training were
 Training             completed.
 Improve Basic Skills Improve overall basic literacy skills. Student completes or advances
                      one or more Educational Functioning Level(s) from starting level
                      measured on entry into the program.
 Obtain a Job         Student obtains a job before the end of the first quarter after the
                      program exit quarter.
 Retain Current Job Student remains employed in the third quarter after exit quarter.


Family Literacy Goals
 Increase               Student increases help given with children‟s school work, contact
 Involvement in         with teachers to discuss children‟s education, and involvement in
 Children’s             children‟s school.
 Education
 Increase               Student increases the amount of time reading to children, visiting
 Involvement in         libraries, and acquiring books or magazines for children.
 Children’s Literacy
 Related Activities


Descriptive and Participation Measures
 Contact Hours          Hours of instruction or participation in instructional activity.
                        Instructional activity includes any program-sponsored activity designed
                        to promote student learning in the program curriculum such as
                        orientation, registration, assessment, and classroom instruction.

 Disabled               Student has a record of, or is regarded as having, any type of physical
                        or mental impairment, including a learning disability, that substantially
                        limits or restricts one or more major life activities, including walking,
                        seeing, hearing, speaking, learning, and working.



                                              33
Dislocated Worker      Student who received an individual notice of pending or actual layoff
                       from a job, or a student who received a publicly announced notice of
                       pending or actual layoff.
Displaced              Displaced homemaker" means an individual who:
Homemaker              a. has worked in the individual's home providing unpaid services for
                       household members;
                       b. has been or is unemployed or underemployed;
                       c. has had or will have difficulty finding employment; and
                       d. is widowed, divorced, separated, or abandoned; or because of the
                       disability of the individual's spouse, is displaced from the individual's
                       former economically dependent role.
Employed               Student works as paid employee, works in his/her own business or
                       farm, or works 15 hours or more per week as unpaid worker or in a
                       business operated by a member of the family. Also included are
                       students who are not currently working, but have jobs or businesses
                       from which they are temporarily absent.
Ethnicity              Student‟s ethnic category to which the student self-identifies, appears
                       to belong to, or is regarded in the community as belonging, to include:
                       American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American,
                       Hispanic or Latino, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and
                       White.
Homeless               Lacking a fixed, regular nighttime residence or have a temporary
                       residence.
Migrant Farm           Student is employed in agricultural employment of a seasonal or other
Worker                 temporary nature and is required to be absent overnight from his/her
                       permanent place of residence.
Not in the Labor       Student is not employed and is not seeking employment.
Force
Public Assistance      Student is receiving financial assistance from Federal, State, or local
Status                 government agencies, including Temporary Assistance for Needy
                       Families (TANF), food stamps, refugee cash assistance, old-age
                       assistance, general assistance, and aid to the blind or totally disabled.
Rural Resident         Student resides in a place with a population 1 to 49,999 and outside an
                       urbanized area.
Single Parent Status   Has sole custodial support of one or more dependent children.
Unemployed             Student is not working but is seeking employment, has made specific
                       efforts to find a job, and is available for work.
Urbanized Area         Includes a population of 50,000 or more in a city and adjacent areas of
                       high density.




                                             34
              ND – MASS
             APPENDICES


A. STUDENT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
    FORM
B. ASSESSMENT AND SERVICES INFORMATION
B1. EDUCATIONAL FUNCTIONING LEVELS –
    ASSESSMENT FOR
    PLACEMENT, PROGRESS AND POST-TESTING
C. STUDENT ATTENDANCE FORM
D. CALLING LOG
E. OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST (EMPLOYMENT)
F. OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST (POST
    SECONDARY/TRAINING)
G. OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST (HS DIPLOMA/GED)
H. SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE (EMPLOYMENT)
I. SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE (POST
    SECONDARY/TRAINING)
J. LOCAL PROGRAM SURVEY
K. STUDENT SEPARATION RECORD
L. STUDENT FOLLOW-UP
M. STANDARDS & COMPETENCIES




                    35
                                           APPENDICES A
                            North Dakota Adult Learning Center
          Student Information Management System (SIMS)
                                                                                            Updated: August 2008
1.    Site Name:

2.       Check if the student is a United States Citizen or legal Immigrant.

3.    Program Year: 2008-2009

4.    Social Security Number or ID Number:
      ** SSN‟s are used only for ND Adult Basic and Secondary Education filing purposes and are not released
      to any other person, business, agency, etc.

5.    Enrollment Date:          (Date of First Attendance)
                                    Month/Day/Year

6.    Have you been enrolled at another Adult Learning Center during this past year?        Yes        No

7.    Student Name: Last:                          First:                              MI


8.    Maiden Name:

9.    Street Address or PO Box:

      City:                       State:             Zip+4:

10.   Date of Birth:                                          __________        Male          Female
                            Month/Day/Year                        Age

      Student Phone Number: (       )

11.   Emergency Contact: Name:
      Phone: (  )

12.      Rural Area (Population of 1 to 49,999)
         Urban Area (Population of 50,000 +)

13.   Race: (Check One)
         American Indian or Alaskan Native
         Asian
         Black or African American
         Hispanic or Latino
         Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
         White

14.   Marital Status: (At the time of enrollment - Check One)
        Single/Never Married
        Married
        Widowed
        Divorced
        Separated




                                                       36
15.   Last Grade Completed:             School Name/City/State/Zip:

16.   Is the student currently: (Check One)
          Employed
          Unemployed
          Not in the labor force (not employed and not seeking employment)

17.   Is the student receiving any public assistance?         Yes                 No

18.   Does the student have a disability?               Yes   No      If yes, specify:

19.   How did the student hear about the Adult Learning Center? (Check only the one answer that fits best.)
        Referred by WIA
        Referred by a vocational education program
        Referred by vocational rehabilitation program
        Friend or family member told me about the program
        Referred by/required to attend by welfare-work/JOBS program/Worker‟s Compensation
        Referred by other agency (Specify):
        Radio or TV advertisement
        Newspaper or magazine advertisement
        Literacy hotline
        Pamphlet or brochure
        High school or college staff
        Employer
        Former Student
        Other (Specify):

20.   At the time of enrollment, is the student:
          Check if the student is in a correctional facility.
          Check if student is in a community center corrections program.
          Check if student is in any other institution.
          Check if not applicable.

21.   Program Classification
         Adult Basic and Literacy Program
         EL Civic
         WIA Incentive Program
         Displaced Homemaker
         Family Literacy Program
         Workplace Literacy Program
         Evenstart

22.   Primary goal to be achieved this program year:
         Improve Educational Functioning Level
         Obtain GED
         Enter Employment
         Retain Employment
         Postsecondary Education/Training

23.   Secondary goal to be achieved this program year:
         Improve Educational Functioning Level
         Obtain GED
         Enter Employment
         Retain Employment
         Postsecondary Education/Training




                                                        37
                                   APPENDICES B
        ASSESSMENT AND SERVICES INFORMATION
TABE:        Pre Form:   _________________________________________
             Post Form: _________________________________________
Date Tested _________________________      Date Tested ________________________

     TABE             TABE                                    TABE GED
                                              TABE                            Gain/
                                                               Converted
    Pre-Test       Scaled Score              Post-Test                        Loss
                                                              Scaled Scores
 Reading                                Reading
 Math                                   Math

BEST:        Pre Form:   __________________________________________
             Post Form: __________________________________________
Date Tested ________________________       Date Tested _________________________

     BEST             BEST                    BEST               BEST         Gain/
    Pre-Test       Scaled Score              Post-Test        Scaled Score    Loss
 Oral                                   Oral
 Written                                Written
 TOTAL                                  TOTAL

Education Functioning Level: _________________________________
Current/Final Educational Functioning at the Time of Enrollment
(Check One – Update as Necessary)
  ADULT BASIC EDUCATION LEVELS                ADULT BASIC EDUCATION LEVELS
   ABE Beginning Literacy                     ABE Beginning Literacy
   ABE Beginning Basic Education              ABE Beginning Basic Education
   ABE Low Intermediate                       ABE Low Intermediate
   ABE High Intermediate                      ABE High Intermediate
   ASE Low                                    ASE Low
   ASE High                                   ASE High
  ENGLISH-AS-A-SECOND LANGUAGE               ENGLISH-AS-A-SECOND LANGUAGE
   ESL Beginning Literacy                     ESL Beginning Literacy
   ESL Beginning                              ESL Beginning
   ESL Low Intermediate                       ESL Low Intermediate
   ESL High Intermediate                      ESL High Intermediate
   ESL Low Advanced                           ESL Low Advanced
    ESL High Advanced                         ESL High Advanced

                                        38
                                    APPENDICES B1
 Educational Functioning Levels – ABE Assessment for Placement, Progress and Post-testing

        1                   2                   3                         4                    5                  6
 Beginning ABE       Beginning Basic    Low Intermediate         High Intermediate       Low Adult          High Adult
    Literacy            Education        Basic Education          Basic Education        Secondary           Secondary
  0 - 1.9 grade        2 -3.9 grade        4 -5.9 grade             6 - 8.9 grade        Education           Education
                                                                                        9 - 10.9 grade     11 - 12.9 grade

                                                TEST BENCHMARKS
  TABE (9 & 10)       TABE (9 & 10)       TABE (9 & 10)        TABE (9 & 10)           TABE (9 & 10)       TABE (9 & 10)
Scale Score:        Scale Score:        Scale Score:         Scale Score:            Scale Score:        Scale Score:
Reading: 367 and    Reading: 368-460    Reading: 461-517     Reading: 518-566        Reading: 567-595    Reading: 596 and
below               Total Math: 314-    Total Math: 442-     Total Math: 506-        Total Math: 566-    above
Total Math: 313     441                 505                  565                     594                 Total Math: 595 and
and below           Language: 390-490   Language: 491-523    Language: 524-559       Language: 560-585   above
Language: 389 and                                                                                        Language 586 and
below                                                                                                    above

EDUCATIONAL FUNCTIONING LEVELS – ESOL Assessments for Placement, Progress, and Post-testing
        1                   2                   3                       4                     5                  6
 Beginning ESOL      Low Beginning       High Beginning          Low Intermediate    High Intermediate    Advanced ESOL
     Literacy           ESOL                 ESOL                     ESOL                 ESOL

                                                TEST BENCHMARKS
   BEST Plus           BEST Plus            BEST Plus               BEST Plus            BEST Plus           BEST Plus
  400 and below         401-417              418-438                 439-472              473-506             507-540




                                                            39
REVISED SCALE SCORES FOR BEST LITERACY
The table below includes the current scale score ranges, the revised scale score ranges, and specific advice from CAL on adult learners
at the Advanced ESL level.


                                      NRS Levels                Current Scale Score          New Scale Score Ranges
                                                                       Ranges                 Effective July 1, 2008
                                                               Valid through June 30,
                                                                        2008
                              Beginning ESL Literacy                      0-7                           0-20
                              Low Beginning ESL                          8-35                          21-52
                              High Beginning ESL                        36-46                          53-63
                              Low Intermediate ESL                      47-53                          64-67
                              High Intermediate ESL                     54-65                          68-75
                              Advance ESL                              66-78*                         76-78*

* If an examinee pretests into SPL 8 with a scale score of 78, or into the NRS Advanced ESL level with a scale score of 76-78, use
a different ESL assessment that measures higher reading and writing skills to more accurately measure and examinee’s language
ability. Any student that falls into this category should be re-tested with another assessment at the time of pre-testing.




                                                                  40
Effective July 1, 2008 the TABE CLAS-E can be used to measure and report educational gain in the National Reporting System.

TABE CLAS-E          Forms A and B
                                 Scale Scores for NRS ESL Educational Functioning Levels


                                                                                                              Total
   ESL Educational Reading              Writing       Total Reading       Listening        Speaking
                                                                                                          Listening and       SPL
 Functioning Level Scale Scores       Scale Scores    and Writing        Scale Scores     Scale Scores
                                                                                                            Speaking
                                                       Scale Scores
                                                                                                          Scale Scores

  Beginning ESL         250-392          200-396          225-394          230-389          231- 425         230- 407         0-1
     Literacy


  Low Beginning         393-436          397-445          395-441          390-437          426-460          408-449           2
      ESL


  High Beginning        437-476          446-488          442-482          438-468          461-501          450-485           3
       ESL

 Low Intermediate       477-508          489-520          483-514          469-514          502-536          486-525           4
       ESL

       High             509-557          521-555          515-556          515-549          537-567          526-558           5
 Intermediate ESL

  Advanced ESL          558-588          556-612          557-600          550-607          568-594          559-600           6




                                                               41
                           ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENTS UTILIZATION CHART

                           PROGRAM TYPE        FUNCTIONING LEVEL            INSTRUMENT USE
BEST Literacy Skills   ESOL                 Levels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5      Placement, Post
                       Family Literacy
BEST Plus              ESOL                 All Levels                Placement, Post
                       Family Literacy
Official GED Test      Basic Literacy       Not Applicable            Not Applicable
                       GED Preparation      Level 6                   Post
                       Family Literacy      Level 6                   Post
TABE 9 & 10            ABE/GED              All Levels                Placement, Post
                       Workplace Literacy   All Levels                Placement, Post
                       Family Literacy      All Levels                Placement, Post




                                                42
                                APPENDICES C
                       STUDENT ATTENDANCE

Total Instructional/Contact Hours by Level
        Primary Instructor: _________________________________

      ADULT BASIC EDUCATION LEVELS
      Other Instructor: ___________________________________

                   ABE Beginning Literacy
                   ABE Beginning Basic Education
                   ABE Low Intermediate
                   ABE High Intermediate
                   ASE Low
                   ASE High


      ENGLISH-AS-A-SECOND LANGUAGE LEVELS

                   ESL Beginning Literacy
                   ESL Low Beginning
                   ESL High Beginning
                   ESL Low Intermediate
                   ESL High Intermediate
                   ESL Advanced

                   TOTAL NUMBER OF INSTRUCTIONAL HOURS




                                            43
                     APPENDICES D
                     CALLING LOG

Interviewer: _____________________________________

 Date                    Contact who     Status (interview complete
  &        Student       left messages       or will call again)
 Time




                           44
                           APPENDICES E
                OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST
                     EMPLOYMENT

Program: __________________________________________

 Student Name      Date     Date Left     Date        Date       Date
                 Entered    Program      Student    Employer    Retained
                 Program                Contacted   Contacted   Employ




                                 45
                          APPENDICES F
          OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST
    POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION / TRAINING

Program: _________________________________________

 Student Name     Date     Date Left      Date        Name of      Enrolled
                Entered    Program     Institution   Institution   Yes or No
                Program                Contacted




                                46
                     APPENDICES G
          OUTCOME FOLLOW-UP LIST
     RECEIVED HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA/GED

Program: ________________________________________

     Student    Date Entered        Date Left   Date State     Student
      Name       Program            Program      Office      Credentialed
                                                Contacted      Yes/No




                               47
                                      APPENDICES H
                                Survey Questionnaire
                                  (EMPLOYMENT)

Student Name: ___________________________________

1. When you first enrolled in ALC, were you: (read choices)
        Employed at a paying job (Proceed to Question #3)
        Not employed at a paying job and looking for a job
        Not employed and not looking for a job (Proceed to Question #4)
        Refused to answer (end interview)

2. While you were enrolled at ALC did you get a paying job?
      No
      Yes
      What is the name of your employer? (Go to Question #4)
   __________________________________________________________________

3. Do you have the same job now or a different job?
       The same job
       Different job
       What is the name of your employer? _________________________________
       Lost the job – unemployed
       Refused to answer

4. Is there anything else you would like to share that I didn‟t ask?




CLOSING REMARKS
Thank you very much for visiting with me. The information you shared will be most helpful in
improving our program. If your experience at the ALC was helpful, please tell your friends and
others who may need some assistance.




                                                48
                                      APPENDICES I
                 Survey Questionnaire
     (POST SECONDARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING)

Student Name: ________________________________________

1. Since you left the ALC program, have you enrolled in any other educational or training
   program?
        YES               NO
   If yes, where are you enrolled?
   _____________________________________________________________________

2. In what type of classes are you now enrolled? (Do not read choices, check all that apply)
        English Language Skills
        Vocational, Job Training
        Community-State College, University
        Other (explain):
        Refused (end interview)

3. Is there anything else you would like to share that I didn‟t ask?




CLOSING REMARKS
Thank you very much for visiting with me. The information you shared will be most helpful in
improving our program. If your experience at the ALC was helpful, please tell your friends and
others who may need some assistance.




                                                49
                           APPENDICES J
                LOCAL PROGRAM SURVEY
                    REPORT FORM

                Total       Total            Total     Number     Response
 Outcome      eligible   number of        number of   achieving     Rate
 Measure      students    students         students    outcome
             with main    surveyed           who
                goal                      responded


  Entered
Employment




 Retained
Employment



  Earned
Secondary
Diploma or
   GED


 Entered
College or
  other
 Training




                                     50
                                   APPENDICES K
                  STUDENT SEPARATION RECORD

1.   Date student separated from program:               _________/_______/__________
                                                              (Month/Day/Year)


2.        Check if student completed identified goals


3.   Indicate progress: Answer only A or B
     A.         Check if student completed the EFL and left the program or reached specific
             goal and left the program.
                Check if 3A is checked and student moved to a higher EFL before leaving the
             program.

             OR

     B.          Check if student left the program before completing the EFL or before
             reaching specific goal.
     If relevant, identify any partial successes while at the ALC
             ____________________________________________________________


4.   Indicate Reason for Separation prior to completing program: (Check only ONE)
        Illness/Incapacity
        Lack of Dependent Child Care Resources
        Lack of Transportation Resources
        Family Problems
        Time and/or Location of Services not Feasible
        Lack of Interest, Instruction Not Helpful to Participant
        Moved
        Entered Employment
        Other Known Reasons (Specify) ____________________________________
        Cannot Locate or Contact




                                              51
                                   APPENDICES L
                          STUDENT FOLLOW-UP

1.        Check if student was unemployed at the time of entry, had a goal of obtaining
           employment, AND successfully obtained employment.
1A.       Check if student remained employed in the third quarter after the exit quarter.


2.        Check if student was employed at entry, had a goal of retaining employment, AND
           successfully completed this goal.


3.        Check if student had a specific goal of placement in postsecondary
           education/training, AND successfully completed this goal.


4.        Check if student had a specific goal of obtaining their GED diploma or secondary
           school diploma, AND successfully completed this goal.


5.    Not as a primary goal, but check if student achieved any of the following:
          Obtained GED
          Entered Postsecondary Education or training
          Entered Employment
          Retained Employment
          Improved Educational Functioning skills




                                              52
                                    APPENDICES M
This Appendices section contains the standards and competencies for math, reading, writing, and
ESOL. Designing instructional strategies and curriculum to include standards and competencies
helps instructors monitor and track student achievement. (Refer to the Glossary for definitions of
standards and competencies.)
                                   *********************
BEGINNING LITERACY MATH STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 1)
TABE Score: Math – 313 and below
1.     Recognize numbers and numerals.
   1.1    Identify and write the numerals 1-9.
   1.2    Count recognizing correct number sequence up to 100.
   1.3    Identify place value.
2.     Demonstrate basic computation skills.
   2.1    Identify when addition or subtraction is needed to solve simple mathematical
          problems.
   2.2    Add and subtract whole numbers involving simple borrowing.
   2.3    Add and subtract using a calculator.
3.     Apply numbers in consumer settings.
   3.1    Identify names and values of common coins and currency.
   3.2    Recognize symbols for currency, such as ($) and (.).
   3.3    Use currency and coins to make change.
   3.4    Read and write time, both analog and digital.
   3.5    Read and write dates.
   3.6    Use numbers in daily situations (i.e., price tags, checkbooks, receipts).
4.     Understand basic mathematics concepts.
   4.1    Count by 2‟s, 5‟s and 10‟s.
   4.2    Recognize simple shapes (i.e., squares, rectangles, circles, and triangles).
   4.3    Identify and continue simple patterns and sequences.
   4.4    Identify, present, and write simple fractions.

BEGINNING MATH STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 2)
TABE Score: Math 314-441
1.     Compute using whole numbers and identify simple fractions.
   1.1   Identify and write the numerals from 1 – 100.
   1.2   Add and subtract whole numbers involving extensive borrowing and carrying.
   1.3   Multiply and divide whole numbers with regrouping and remainders.
   1.4   Identify when multiplication or division is needed to solve simple mathematical
         problems.
   1.5   Recognize and use basic multiplication and division facts to complete mathematical
         problems.
   1.6   Write simple fractions from pictorial illustrations.
   1.7   Apply calculator skills in multiplying and dividing of whole numbers.
   1.8   Count and recognize correct number sequence to 1,000.
   1.9   Identify and continue moderately complex patterns and sequences.

                                               53
2.       Apply numbers in consumer settings.
     2.1   Interpret meanings of dates, times, and temperatures.
     2.2   Calculate solutions to simple problems involving dates, times, and temperatures.
     2.3   Use numbers in daily situations (i.e., travel and appointment schedules, recipes, etc).

LOW INTERMEDIATE MATH STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 3)
TABE Score: Math 442-505
1.     Compute using whole numbers and fractions.
   1.1    Average whole numbers.
   1.2    Round whole numbers.
   1.3    Add and subtract fractions with common denominators.
2.     Solve simple word problems.
   2.1    Demonstrate problem solving steps.
   2.2    Identify key words and determine which operations are required to solve simple word
          problems.
   2.3    Solve simple word problems.
3.     Use common mathematical documents.
   3.1    Interpret basic charts, graphs, schedules, tables, and/or diagrams.
   3.2    Construct basic charts, graphs, schedules, tables, and/or diagrams.
4.     Understand basic algebraic terms and functions.
   4.1    Identify, classify, and write numeric symbols as numbers and as words.
   4.2    Identify basic algebraic functions and patterns.
5.     Measure.
    5.1 Recognize, use, and measure linear dimensions.
    5.2 Recognize, use, and measure basic geometric shapes and angles.
    5.3 Recognize, use, and measure weight.
    5.4 Select, use, and interpret basic problem-solving tools (i.e., calculators, mathematical
          tables, rulers, scales, gauges, and dials).
    5.5 Calculate solutions to simple problems involving distance and weight.
    5.6 Interpret typical uses of numbers in documents and in consumer settings (i.e., maps,
          nutritional information, recipes, etc).

HIGH INTERMEDIATE MATH STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 4)
TABE Score: Math 506-565
1.     Recognize numbers and demonstrate moderately complex computation skills.
   1.1    Identify information needed to solve a moderately complex mathematical problem.
   1.2    Recognize moderately complex mathematical concepts (i.e., decimals, number lines,
          sequences, percents ratios, comparisons).
   1.3    Identify missing elements in simple numeric and word problems.
2.     Compute using fractions, decimals, and percents.
   2.1    Compute (add, subtract, multiply, and divide) fractions with and without common
          denominators.
   2.2    Identify and calculate equivalent fractions.
   2.3    Compute (add, subtract, multiply, and divide) decimals.
   2.4    Convert decimal fractions to common fractions and percents.


                                                 54
   2.5    Solve word problems involving fractions and decimals.
3.     Measure.
   3.1    Recognize, use, and measure moderately complex geometric shapes and angles.
   3.2    Recognize, use, and measure area and volume.
   3.3    Calculate solutions to moderately complex problems involving distance weight, and
          volume.
   3.4    Interpret uses of numbers in documents and in various settings.
4.     Solve moderately complex word problems.
   4.1    Solve moderately complex word problems.
5.     Estimate.
   5.1    Estimate arithmetic results without a calculator prior to calculations (i.e., estimate
          sales tax or tip on service).
   5.2    Use estimation to check the reasonableness of results.
   5.3    Compare and round decimals.

LOW ADULT SECONDARY MATH STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 5)
TABE Score: Math 566-594
1.     Demonstrate complex computation skills.
   1.1    Recognize and use complex mathematical concepts (i.e., percentages, sequences,
          ratios, and proportions).
   1.2    Identify information needed to solve complex mathematical problems requiring
          several logical steps and multiple computations.
   1.3    Identify and use complex geometric and algebraic functions, patterns, and formulas.
   1.4    Solve complex word problems.
2.     Use common mathematical documents.
   2.1    Interpret moderately complex schedules, tables, charts, and diagrams.
   2.2    Construct moderately complex schedules, tables, charts, and diagrams.
3.     Estimate.
   3.1    Estimate arithmetic results for complex computation problems without a calculator
          prior to calculations.
   3.2    Use estimation to check reasonableness of results.

HIGH ADULT SECONDARY MATH STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 6)
TABE Score: Math 595 and above
1.     Apply knowledge of mathematical concepts to understand and compute using
       mathematical information.
   1.1    Interpret, organize, and analyze data using basic statistical conventions (i.e., mean,
          median, mode, percentiles).
   1.2    Identify key words and determine which operations are required to solve word
          problems involving fractions, decimals, percentages, and geometric or algebraic
          functions.
   1.3    Locate missing information and identify misleading or unnecessary information to
          complete task.
   1.4    Generalize, interpret, and apply methods and results over a variety of mathematical
          contexts.


                                              55
BEGINNING LITERACY READING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 1)
TABE Score: Reading 367 and below
1.     Use word recognition skills to decode, pronounce, and comprehend the meaning of
       familiar words and of new words introduced through instruction.
   1.1    Recognize selected words by sight (sight vocabulary).
   1.2    Apply basic symbol/sound correspondences for the letters of the alphabet to
          pronounce and identify words (phonics skills).
   1.3    Apply basic word/language patterns (i.e., syllables, common affixes) to pronounce
          and identify words.
   1.4    Use context clues to identify unfamiliar words.
   1.5    Apply pictures clues to identify unfamiliar words.
   1.6    Use simple reference tools (i.e., picture dictionary, word lists, and electronic spellers)
          as source of information about unfamiliar words in text.
   1.7    Display an understanding of the concepts of print (i.e., left to right, return to sweep,
          and top to bottom).
   1.8    Read and comprehend simple sentences.
   1.9    Apply simple punctuation knowledge to interpret meaning.
2.     Demonstrate knowledge of principles of alphabetization.
   2.1    Write and say alphabet in correct order.
   2.2    Distinguish upper and lower case letters of the alphabet.
   2.3    Apply knowledge to arrange selected words in alphabetic order.
3.   Apply reading skills to functional and information texts.
   3.1    Recognize common symbols (i.e., $, %, &).
   3.2    Identify common functional and survival signs (i.e., stop, restroom, and fire).
4.   Apply basic comprehension-monitoring (meta-cognitive) strategies.
   4.1    Use pre-reading strategies (i.e., prediction, questioning, and prior knowledge).
   4.2    Use comprehension checking strategies (i.e., re-reading, self-questioning).

BEGINNING READING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 2)
TABE Score: Reading 368-460
1.     Demonstrate knowledge of vocabulary in selected instructional contents.
   1.1    Identify and comprehend the meaning of basic functional (i.e., life skills),
          occupational, and content-specific (i.e., academic) vocabulary.
   1.2    Use context clues and the meaning of common affixes to select or infer the meaning
          of unfamiliar words.
   1.3    Use context clues to distinguish meanings of synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms.
   1.4    Apply vocabulary knowledge to comprehend text on familiar topics introduced
          through instruction.
2.     Read and interpret common signs, symbols, and abbreviations.
   2.1    Identify and interpret basic social and survival signs (i.e., classified ads, clothing
          labels, road signs, and alpha-numeric codes, such as aisle numbers).
   2.2    Identify and interpret common safety codes and symbols.
   2.3    Identify and interpret commonly-used abbreviations (i.e., weights, measures, and
          sizes).
   2.4    Apply knowledge of signs, symbols, and abbreviations to comprehend and perform
          simple tasks (i.e., recipes, prescriptions, public signs, laundering labels).

                                                56
3.       Apply skills to read and interpret simple functional and informational documents
         (i.e. tables, schedules, chart, graphs, maps & forms).
     3.1      Locate information in simple documents and common reference sources (i.e.,
              telephone directory, encyclopedia).
     3.2      Follow directions for completing common documents (i.e., forms, schedules).
     3.3      Interpret abbreviations commonly used in documents.
     3.4      Apply knowledge of simple documents to perform basic tasks.

 LOW INTERMEDIATE READING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 3)
 TABE Score: Reading 461-517
1.      Select and apply appropriate word recognition skills to pronounce and comprehend
        the meaning of familiar words and to estimate the pronunciation of unfamiliar
        words.
    1.1     Recognize increasing number of words by sight (sight vocabulary).
    1.2     Apply knowledge of language patterns (i.e., syllables, common affixes) to pronounce
            and predict the meaning of unfamiliar words.
    1.3     Use context clues to approximate the pronunciation of unfamiliar words.
    1.4     Identify and use references to pronounce and identify the meanings of unfamiliar
            words in text.
 2.     Demonstrate knowledge of vocabulary in varied instructional contexts.
    2.1     Recognize and comprehend the meaning of moderately complex occupational,
            technical, and content-specific vocabulary.
    2.2     Apply knowledge of context clues to predict the meaning of unfamiliar words and to
            distinguish meanings of homographs and words with multiple meanings.
    2.3     Use context clues to infer appropriate meaning of moderately complex passages.
    2.4     Use the meaning of affixes and roots to build vocabulary in specific contexts.
    2.5     Apply knowledge of synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, homographs, and words with
            multiple definitions to determine meanings of unfamiliar words.
 3.     Read and interpret signs, symbols, abbreviations, and common acronyms
    3.1     Identify and interpret codes and symbols found in various contexts (i.e., specific
            home, work, or community environments).
    3.2     Apply knowledge of signs, symbols, abbreviations, and common acronyms to
            comprehend and apply to moderately complex tasks.
    3.3     Interpret simple dials and scales.
 4.     Apply reading skills to interpret functional and informational texts (i.e., consumer
        information, newspapers, and civic documents).
    4.1     Identify and summarize main idea and critical details and relate them to other topics.
    4.2     Identify author‟s point of view and relate it to other sources, real live experiences,
            different genre, and related topics.
    4.3     Makes inferences and draw conclusions from author‟s purpose and point of view.
    4.4     Distinguish facts from opinions.

HIGH INTERMEDIATE READING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 4)
TABE Score: Reading 518-566
1.   Demonstrate literal and inferential comprehension of simply written materials.


                                                57
   1.1   Identify directly stated main ideas.
   1.2   Identify inferred main ideas.
   1.3   Locate directly stated details (i.e., examples, facts, descriptions, reasons) that
         contribute to understanding the main idea.
   1.4   Paraphrase and summarize (i.e., retell, recall, or explain) information in simple texts.
   1.5   Draw conclusions based on details in the text.
   1.6   Identify and interpret basic figurative language (i.e., similes, metaphors, idioms).
2.     Demonstrate knowledge of paragraph structure and document organization.
   2.1   Identify basic organizational patterns (i.e., cause-effect, sequence, chronology,
         compare-contrast) for different types of reading material or documents.
   2.2   Use syntactic clues (i.e., sequence pattern: first, second, then) that guide the reader
         through selected text organization patterns.
   2.3   Summarize information according to organizational pattern of materials.
3.     Demonstrate skill in varying reading rate for specific purposes.
   3.1   Read carefully to learn new information.
   3.2   Skim to determine main idea.
   3.3   Scan to locate a specific detail

LOW ADULT SECONDARY READING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 5)
TABE Score: Reading 567-595
1.     Demonstrate knowledge of vocabulary in varied instructional contexts.
   1.1    Use word structures (i.e., affixes, synonyms, multiple meanings) to expand
          vocabulary in specific contexts.
   1.2    Recognize and comprehend the meaning of complex occupational, technical, and
          content-specific (academic) vocabulary.
   1.3    Use context clues and knowledge of word structures to predict meaning of unfamiliar
          words and to infer appropriate meaning of complex passages.
2.     Demonstrate literal and inferential comprehension of moderately complex
       materials.
   2.1    Identify directly stated main ideas.
   2.2    Identify inferred main ideas.
   2.3    Demonstrate understanding of abstract themes.
   2.4    Distinguish a conclusion from a supporting statement or detail.
   2.5    Locate directly stated details (i.e., examples, facts, descriptions, reasons) that
          contribute to understanding the main idea.
   2.6    Paraphrase and summarize (i.e., retell, recall, or explain) information in moderately
          complex texts.
   2.7    Draw conclusions based on details in the text.
   2.8    Identify and interpret common figurative language found in texts.
   2.9    Apply knowledge and skills to interpret and analyze information in various contexts
          (i.e., health, parenting, community agencies).
3.     Read and interpret moderately complex documents (i.e., tables, schedules, charts,
       graphs, maps, forms, diagrams).
   3.1    Locate several pieces of information in moderately complex documents.
   3.2    Follow directions for completing moderately complex documents.
   3.3    Summarize information located in moderately complex documents.

                                               58
   3.4   Identify relationships between similar documents (i.e., charge slip and invoice) and
         compare information.
   3.5   Apply prior knowledge to comprehend signs, symbols, abbreviations and acronyms.
4.     Demonstrate knowledge of paragraph structure and document organization.
   4.1   Apply knowledge of organizational patterns to improve comprehension and organize
         summary of text.
   4.2   Integrate information from charts, graphs, and tables to improve comprehension of
         text.
   4.3   Use resources such as bibliographies and foot notes to gather additional information.

HIGH ADULT SECONDARY READING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level
6)
TABE Score: Reading 596 and above
1.     Demonstrate literal and inferential comprehension of complex materials.
   1.1    Identify directly stated and inferred main ideas.
   1.2    Identify implied details and unstated assumptions that contribute to understanding the
          main idea.
   1.3    Recognize and understand complex instructions or directions that include
          conditionals and multiple steps.
   1.4    Identify and interpret figurative language found in texts.
   1.5    Apply knowledge and skills to interpret, analyze, draw conclusions, and generalize
          from written information.
   1.6    Identify opinions, propaganda, bias, and sources to evaluate written materials.
   1.7    Apply information and ideas to new contexts or situations.
   1.8    Analyze a variety of genre (non-fiction and fiction).
2.     Read and interpret complex documents (i.e., tables, schedules, charts, graphs, maps,
       and forms, diagrams).
   2.1    Follow directions for completing complex documents.
   2.2    Summarize and compare information in complex documents.
   2.3    Draw conclusions from information presented in documents.
   2.4    Analyze information in documents to predict or make decision




                                              59
BEGINNING LITERACY WRITING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 1)
TABE Score: Language 389 and below
1.     Demonstrate basic eye-hand coordination.
   1.1   Use a common (standard) writing instrument.
   1.2   Trace simple shapes and lines.
   1.3   Copy simple shapes and lines.
   1.4   Write left to right and top to bottom on a page.
2.     Demonstrate basic knowledge of the alphabet.
   2.1   Identify upper and lower case letters of the alphabet in the printed form.
   2.2   Write upper and lower case letters of the alphabet from print.
   2.3   Write upper and lower case letters of the alphabet from memory.
   2.4   Write letters that correspond to sounds.
   2.5   Write basic words spelled orally.
   2.6   Spell familiar words as pronounced.
   2.7   Spell phonemically words as pronounced.
   2.8   Understand basic word and letter patterns.
3.     Apply the writing process to complete basic writing tasks.
   3.1   Write words and/or phrases in sequence as pronounced.
   3.2   Write words to form phrases as pronounced.
   3.3   Write words to form simple sentences as pronounced.
   3.4   Write words to form simple messages as pronounced.
   3.5   Compose simple phrases.
   3.6   Compose simple sentences.
   3.7   Compose simple messages.
   3.8   Complete simple forms using name, address, phone number, and social security
         number.

BEGINNING WRITING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 2)
TABE Score: Language 390-490
1.     Apply basic principles of language mechanics in written work.
   1.1   Spell correctly familiar and unfamiliar words that are pronounced.
   1.2   Apply knowledge of spelling rules and exceptions.
   1.3   Apply knowledge of spelling rules and exceptions to correct errors.
   1.4   Write an accurate paragraph using spelling conventions.
2.     Complete basic writing tasks.
   2.1   Use correct capitalization in all written work.
   2.2   Use correct punctuation in all written work.
   2.3   Recognize basic parts of speech.
   2.4   Apply standard English in all formal writing.
3.     Demonstrate knowledge of basic writing concept.
   3.1   Write a variety of complete, simple and compound sentences.
   3.2   Write simple paragraphs using directly stated and inferred main ideas and supportive
         details.
   3.3   Analyze audience and purpose for writing.
   3.4   Choose appropriate format and language for audience and/or purpose.
   3.5   Write accurate notes and messages to different audiences.

                                             60
   3.6    Understand and apply the basic organization and structure of written information.
   3.7    Complete moderately complex forms and documents legibly and with accurate
          content.
   3.8    Write a simple business or personal letter using appropriate format and content for a
          specific audience.

LOW INTERMEDIATE ABLE WRITING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level
3)
TABE Score: Language 491-523
1.     Demonstrate knowledge of spelling conventions.
   1.1   Spell correctly familiar and unfamiliar words that are pronounced.
   1.2   Apply knowledge of spelling rules and exceptions.
   1.3   Apply knowledge of spelling rules and exceptions to correct errors.
   1.4   Write an accurate paragraph using spelling conventions.
2.     Apply basic language mechanics principles in written work.
   2.1   Use correct capitalization in all written work.
   2.2   Use correct punctuation in all written work.
   2.3   Recognize basic parts of speech.
   2.4   Apply standard English in all formal writing.
3.     Demonstrate knowledge of writing concepts.
   3.1   Write a variety of complete, simple and compound sentences.
   3.2   Write simple paragraphs using directly stated and inferred main ideas and supportive
         details.
   3.3   Analyze audience and purpose for writing.
   3.4   Choose appropriate format and language for audience and/or purpose.
   3.5   Write accurate notes and messages to different audiences.
   3.6   Understand and apply the basic organization and structure of written information.
   3.7   Complete moderately complex forms and documents legibly and with accurate
         content.
   3.8   Write a simple business or personal letter using appropriate format and content for a
         specific audience.
4.     Demonstrate appropriate use of dictionaries and reference materials.
   4.1   Locate words in the dictionary using alphabetizing knowledge.
   4.2   Use dictionary to divide words into syllables.
   4.3   Use dictionary diacritical marks for pronunciation guide.
   4.4   Use dictionary to understand word origin, use, and tenses

HIGH INTERMEDIATE WRITING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 4)
TABE Score: Language 524-559
1.     Apply spelling conventions and language mechanics principles in written work.
   1.1   Write words correctly.
   1.2   Write using correct capitalization.
   1.3   Write using correct punctuation.
   1.4   Write using correct grammar.



                                             61
2.     Use basic proofreading skills to correct errors in capitalization, punctuation,
       grammar, and spelling.
   2.1    Recognize and correct common errors in specific language conventions (i.e., subject-
          verb agreement).
   2.2    Recognize and correct simple errors in grammar, syntax, punctuation, and spelling.
   2.3    Seek feedback to correct errors in grammar, syntax, punctuation, and spelling
   2.4    Revise material to be direct, concise, clear, consistent, and accurate.
3.     Apply writing concepts consistently in all written work.
   3.1    Write a variety of complete and descriptive sentences to convey shades of meaning.
   3.2    Incorporate technical vocabulary in writing, as appropriate.
   3.3    Write paragraphs including directly stated and inferred main ideas and supportive
          details to clearly convey messages.
   3.4    Apply organizational and structural writing concepts to write clearly and logically.
   3.5    Analyze audience and purpose for writing and apply to written work.
   3.6    Complete complex forms, documents, or simple resumes accurately.
   3.7    Compose a formal letter using correct punctuation and format.
   3.8    Complete a multi-paragraph paper on material read or observed.

LOW ADULT SECONDARY WRITING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level 5)
TABE Score: Language 560-585
1.     Use more sophisticated sentence structure to express ideas and thoughts.
   1.1    Create and/or combine sentences using coordination and subordination.
   1.2    Recognize and use parallel structure.
   1.3    Recognize and use active and passive voice to create emphasis and variety.
   1.4    Use semicolons and other punctuation accurately.
2.     Apply language mechanics principles correctly in all written work.
   2.1    Use verb tense accurately.
   2.2    Use subject-verb agreement accurately.
   2.3    Identify and use appropriate adjective and adverb forms.
   2.4    Use correct pronoun references.
   2.5    Correctly capitalize words.
   2.6    Correctly punctuate sentences.
   2.7    Use all parts of speech accurately.
   2.8    Select words whose denotations and connotations match your meaning.
3.     Compose a report or summary on material read or observed
   3.1    Develop an outline using correct organizational structures.
   3.2    Complete a first draft of a document containing several paragraphs.
   3.3    Incorporate organizational structures (headings, references, quotations) in writing.
   3.4    Use all language conventions appropriately.
   3.5    Proofread, revise, and edit the first draft.
   3.6    Complete a final draft.
   3.7    Write accurate synthesis of oral instructions or facts.
   3.8    Write a synopsis of material read or observed.
4.     Refine proofreading and dictionary reference skills.
   4.1    Use dictionary efficiently and effectively.
   4.2    Use thesaurus and other reference sources.

                                             62
   4.3    Use compensatory methods for spelling and editing.
   4.4    Revise writing to be more direct, clear, concise, consistent, and accurate.

HIGH ADULT SECONDARY WRITING STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES (Level
6)
TABE Score: Language 586 and above
1.     Compose appropriate written documents.
   1.1    Compose draft documents as required.
   1.2    Review and understand various writing styles.
   1.3    Review and understand various document styles.
   1.4    Revise and edit draft documents to complete a final draft.
2.     Use writing as a tool for professional or personal communication.
   2.1    Write an application letter and resume for employment.
   2.2    Write an opinion letter to be mailed to an elected official, newspaper, or group.
   2.3    Write a formal letter to a business, agency, or institution.
   2.4    Write a short story, poem, or essay based on personal experience




                                               63
ESOL STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES BEGINNING LITERACY (Level 1)
CULTURAL AND SOCIAL
Has basic knowledge of:
C.1.1 Basic nonverbal communication
C.1.2 American money
C.1.3 Government / public symbols/ signs
C.1.4 Family relationships / roles
Learning Strategies
LL.1.1 Listening & Speaking – Express ability/inability to understand
LL.1.2 Reading & Writing – Classify
LL.1.3 Planning to Learn – Lower anxiety level
LL.1.4 Life-long Learning – Identify learning needs
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Listening (Receptive)
Comprehends:
L.1.1 Simple words including basic emergency and survival words
L.1.2 Simple one step directions with modeling
L.1.3 Simple learned questions (yes/no, personal information)
L.1.4 Simple learned social conversations
L.1.5 Common beginning and final consonant sounds
Speaking (Productive)
Produces:
S.1.1 Simple words including basic, emergency and survival words
S.1.2 Simple one step directions with modeling
S.1.3 Simple learned questions (yes/no, personal information)
S.1.4 Simple learned social conversations
S.1.5 Common beginning and final consonant sounds
READING AND WRITING
Reading (Receptive)
Comprehends:
R.1.1 Upper and lower case letters, numerals and basic words
R.1.2 Simple one-step directions
R.1.3 Sound/symbol relationships and sight words
R.1.4 Main idea of simple text
R.1.5 Simple one/two word text (lists, labels, common forms)
Writing (Productive)
Produces:
W.1.1 Upper and lower case letters, numerals and basic words
W.1.2 Simple present tense (be verbs)
W.1.3 Word/sentence boundaries
W.1.4 Personal information on forms
W.1.5 Lists, personal dictionaries


                                              64
ESOL STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES BEGINNING LITERACY (Level 2)
CULTURAL AND SOCIAL
Has basic knowledge of:
C.2.1 Nonverbal facial/body cues
C.2.2 Simple financial systems
C.2.3 Basic laws/rules
C.2.4 Dress and personal appearance
Learning Strategies
LL.2.1 Listening & Speaking – Ask for clarification/repetition
LL.2.2 Reading & Writing – Skim for information
LL.2.3 Planning to Learn – Take risks with language use
LL.2.4 Life-long Learning – Identify resources for learning (libraries, computers, etc.)
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Listening (Receptive)
Comprehends:
L.2.1 Simple phrases with familiar vocabulary
L.2.2 Simple one step directions without modeling
L.2.3 Limited simple informational questions
L.2.4 Simple routine social conversations spoken slowly with frequent repetition
L.2.5 Major vowels, consonants and stress patterns
Speaking (Productive)
Produces:
S.2.1 Extended personal information and basic survival needs/wants
S.2.2 Simple one step directions without modeling
S.2.3 Limited simple informational questions
S.2.4 Simple routine social conversations spoken slowly with frequent repetitions
S.2.5 Major vowels, consonants and stress patterns
READING AND WRITING
Reading (Receptive)
Comprehends:
R.2.1 Simple sentences with familiar vocabulary
R.2.2 Simple two to three step directions
R.2.3 Word families (mop, hop, top)
R.2.4 Sequence of events
R.2.5 Basic life skills print and simple informational text
Writing (Productive)
Produces:
W.2.1 Simple sentences with familiar vocabulary
W.2.2 Present progressive and simple past tenses
W.2.3 Capitals and periods
W.2.4 Information on simple forms involving familiar content
W.2.5 Basic life skills print and simple formatted (notes, schedules, etc.)


                                                65
ESOL STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES LOW INTERMEDIATE (Level 3)
CULTURAL AND SOCIAL
Has basic knowledge of:
C.3.1 Personal space/touching/body position
C.3.2 Personal financial transactions
C.3.3 Simple American rights
C.3.4 Holidays and rituals
Learning Strategies
LL.3.1 Listening & Speaking – Observe and model others
LL.3.2 Reading & Writing – Scan for main ideas
LL.3.3 Planning to Learn – Apply previous knowledge
LL.3.4 Life-long Learning – Extend and apply knowledge to real life applications
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Listening (Receptive)
Comprehends:
L.3.1 Simple sentences on familiar topics
L.3.2 Two to three step directions on familiar topics
L.3.3 Simple questions on a variety of topics
L.3.4 Simple limited work, school and social conversations
L.3.5 Differences in targeted sounds; reduced speech
Speaking (Productive)
Produces:
S.3.1 Simple sentences on familiar topics
S.3.2 Two to three step directions on familiar topics
READING AND WRITING
Reading (Receptive)
Comprehends:
R.3.1 Simple paragraphs on familiar topics
R.3.2 Short directions on familiar topics
R.3.3 Word semantics/syllabification
R.3.4 Descriptive paragraphs
R.3.5 Daily living text (phone books, applications)
Writing (Productive)
Produces:
W.3.1 Simple paragraphs on familiar topics
W.3.2 Future, irregular past tenses; subject/verb agreement
W.3.3 Commas, subject/verb agreement
W.3.4 Information on a variety of forms on familiar topics
W.3.5 Simple informational communications




                                               66
ESOL STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES HIGH INTERMEDIATE (Level 4)
CULTURAL AND SOCIAL
Has basic knowledge of:
C.4.1 Behaviors in social setting
C.4.2 Simple money management
C.4.3 Simple American government structure
C.4.4 Education and work attitudes
Learning Strategies
LL.4.1 Listening & Speaking – Apply compensation strategies (guessing, circumlocution)
LL.4.2 Reading & Writing – Use other resources (newspaper, reference materials, Internet)
LL.4.3 Planning to Learn – Manage learning (plan when, where and how to learn)
LL.4.4 Life-long Learning – Identify strengths and weaknesses as a learner
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Listening (Receptive)
Comprehends:
L.4.1 Simple information on an abstract topic
L.4.2 Multiple step directions on familiar topics
L.4.3 Questions on a variety of topics with control of basic grammar
L.4.4 Conversations on everyday topics with some repetition or rewording
L.4.5 Rhythm, stress patterns and intonation
Speaking (Productive)
Produces:
S.4.1 Simple information on abstract topics
S.4.2 Multiple step directions on familiar topics
S.4.3 Questions on a variety of topics with control of basic grammar
S.4.4 Conversations on everyday topics with some repetition or rewording
S.4.5 Rhythm, stress patterns, intonation
READING AND WRITING
Reading (Receptive)
Comprehends:
R.4.1 Information on familiar topics with unfamiliar vocabulary
R.4.2 Multi-step directions on familiar topics
R.4.3 Word structure (affixes, roots)
R.4.4 Compare/contrast paragraphs
R.4.5 Simple charts graphics, references
Writing (Productive)
Produces:
W.4.1 Simple paragraphs on unfamiliar topics
W.4.2 Perfect tenses, models (should, might)
W.4.3 Phrases and transitions
W.4.4 Information on medium complexity forms involving familiar content
W.4.5 Personal expressive communications (letters, journals learning logs)


                                             67
ESOL STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES LOW ADULT SECONDARY (Level 5)
CULTURAL AND SOCIAL
Has basic knowledge of:
C.5.1 Behaviors in formal settings
C.5.2 Complex financial interactions
C.5.3 Basic principles of democracy and citizenship
C.5.4 History of immigration and multiculturalism
Learning Strategies
LL.5.1 Listening & Speaking – Plan and practice language for different settings
LL.5.2 Reading & Writing – Take notes
LL.5.3 Planning to Learn – Identify, monitors and anticipates problems
LL.5.4 Life-long Learning – Develop a vision of future for self and family
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Listening (Receptive)
Comprehends:
L.5.1 Information on familiar topics from various sources
L.5.2 Complex directions on familiar topics
L.5.3 Questions from various sources (telephone, video)
L.5.4 Conversations on everyday subjects at normal speed
L.5.5 Common colloquial language idioms and slang
Speaking (Productive)
Produces:
S.5.1 Extended information on familiar topics
S.5.2 Directions to complete a complex process
S.5.3 Questions from various sources (telephone, answering machine)
S.5.4 Conversations on everyday topics at normal speed
S.5.5 Common colloquial language, idioms, and slang
READING AND WRITING
Reading (Receptive)
Comprehends:
R.5.1 Information on unfamiliar topics
R.5.2 Complex directions on familiar topics
R.5.3 Word forms (interest/interested/interesting)
R.5.4 Cause/effect or problem/solution paragraphs
R.5.5 Specialized charts, graphs, tables and forms
Writing (Productive)
Produces:
W.5.1 Extended paragraphs on familiar topics
W.5.2 Passive voice clauses, transitive and intransitive verbs
W.5.3 Organized, well-developed paragraphs
W.5.4 Information on complex forms involving familiar content
W.5.5 Business and social correspondence


                                              68
ESOL STANDARDS AND COMPETENCIES HIGH ADULT SECONDARY (Level 6)
CULTURAL AND SOCIAL
Has basic knowledge of:
C.6.1 Contextual clues (anger, humor, and sarcasm)
C.6.2 Planning for the future (insurance, retirement, social security)
C.6.3 Citizenships responsibilities
C.6.4 American aspirations and expectations
Learning Strategies
LL.6.1 Listening & Speaking – Apply self-monitoring and self-corrective strategies
LL.6.2 Reading & Writing – Infer and interpret meaning
LL.6.3 Planning to Learn – Reflect and evaluate
LL.6.4 Life-long Learning – Monitor life-long learning plan
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Listening (Receptive)
Comprehends:
L.6.1 Information from various sources on unfamiliar topics
L.6.2 Complex directions on unfamiliar topics
L.6.3 Questions to clarify and accomplish
L.6.4 Extended conversations on familiar topics
L.6.5 Spoken language variations (slang, accent and register)
Speaking (Productive)
Produces:
S.6.1 Extended information on unfamiliar topics
S.6.2 Complex directions on technical and non-technical tasks
S.6.3 Complex questions to clarify and accomplish
S.6.4 Extended conversations on familiar topics
S.6.5 Spoken language variations (slang, register)
READING AND WRITING
Reading (Receptive)
Comprehends:
R.6.1 Complex information on unfamiliar topics
R.6.2 Complex directions on unfamiliar topics
R.6.3 Word origin/sentence patterns
R.6.4 Reads critically beyond literal statements
R.6.5 Complex formats on a variety of topics (warranties, financial forms)
Writing (Productive)
Produces:
W.6.1 Extended paragraphs on unfamiliar topics
W.6.2 Conditional (If I were)
W.6.3 Organized, well-developed extended writing
W.6.4 Information on complex forms involving unfamiliar content
W.6.5 Accurate writing for a variety of purposes and audiences


                                              69

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:14
posted:10/11/2010
language:English
pages:74