THE MONTANA BIRDING _ NATURE TRA by fjwuxn

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									BITTERROOT BIRDING AND
     NATURE TRAIL
    What is the Bitterroot “Trail”?
   The Trail will be a
network of about 25
great places to see
birds and other wildlife-
-from Lost Trail to Lolo
Pass.
Made possible by a matching
       grant from:
             With thanks to
• Bitter Root Resource and Conservation
  Development Area--fiscal agent

• Travel Montana--contributor of grant
  matching funds

• Many in-kind partners like the Bitterroot and
  Lolo National Forests..the list is growing!
Pilot Project of the Montana
  Birding and Nature Trail

              A multi-partner
              nature tourism
                project


              Bruce Lyon photo
Montana Birding & Nature Trail
Steering Committee
   •   American Bird Conservancy
   •   Bitter Root RC&D Area
   •   Blackfoot Challenge
   •   Bureau of Land Management
   •   Bureau of Reclamation
   •   Montana Arts Council
   •   Montana Audubon
   •   Montana Department of Commerce
   •   Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks

   Continued….
     Montana Birding & Nature
     Trail Steering Committee
•   Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation
•   Montana Department of Transportation
•   Montana Governor's Office
•   Montana Heritage Preservation & Development Commission
•   Montana Historical Society
•   Montana Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commission
•   Montana Outfitters and Guides
•   Montana Partners in Flight
•   Montana State University Extension
•   Montana Tourism Recreation Initiative
•   Montana Tribal Tourism Alliance
        • Continued…
    Montana Birding & Nature
    Trail Steering Committee
•   National Forest Foundation
•   National Park Service
•   Trail of the Great Bear
•   Travel Montana
•   Tourism Advisory Council
•   University of Montana - Institute for Tourism & Recreation
    Research
•   University of Montana – Avian Science Center - Division of
    Biological Sciences
•   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
•   USDA Forest Service--Northern Region, Lolo and Bitterroot
    National Forests
•   US Fish and Wildlife Service
Bitterroot Trail Proposed
Theme --
Discover the Nature
of Lewis & Clark
Lewis’s Woodpecker
         • Named for
           Meriwether Lewis

         An unusual
          woodpecker that
          flycatches and
          migrates
Clark’s Nutcracker
         • Named for William
           Clark

         The bird with a
          superior memory
A Trail that blends Nature and
           Culture….
               • Bitterroot history
                 connected to its
                 landscape and
                 wildlife--known
                 longest by the
                 people before Lewis
                 and Clark-
Take a look: Bitterroot Natural
          Treasures
                Great Gray Owl

                Largest owl in North
                  America
Take a Look: Bitterroot
  Natural Treasures
            Red-naped
            Sapsucker
            --so that’s who drilled
               those holes in a line in
               the aspen..

            Kristi Dubois photo
Black-backed woodpecker
            • Bird of the burned
              forests
Bitterroot Natural Treasures
              • American Bittern

                Elusive bird stalking
                 in the wetlands


              Kristi Dubois photo
Marsh Wren


        Sings 200
        songs, can
        you?

     Kristi Dubois photo
More than Birds…
         Painted Turtles

        A favorite of children
         and the young at
         heart

        Kristi Dubois photo
Bighorn Sheep
           FWP file photo
And More Charismatic
     Critters..
          • Elk summer in the
            mountains and
            spend the winter
            within valley view.




          FWP file photo
     Who’s watching?

Mountain
 lion


      FWP file photo
Bitterroot Natural Treasures
              • Sunsets and
                Sunrises over the
                mountains

              • Dark skies at night



              Kristi Dubois photo
Planning the Trail--What could
       a site look like?
               • A Hike to the Top of
                 a Peak--
               • Home to Golden
                 Eagles, Rosy
                 Finches, and
                 Butterflies..
Or along the river corridor
             It’s Your Trail

• Shaped by the
  people who
  know and care
  about the
  Bitterroot--You!
       We can build upon a
        successful model
• Birding Trails are
  spreading across
  the country and
  proving their
  worth.
Montana Wildlife Viewing Guide-
-our starting point

 • Familiarity of
   binocular sign
How Will We Mark This Trail?
• Highway signs
  bearing the logo
  of the trail will
  direct visitors to
  sites.
     What are the tangible
          Products?
• A full-color, fold-
  out brochure with
  maps and
  directions to the
  sites.
       On the Internet:
http://biology.umt.edu/landbird/birdtrail/
    Who Will Take Our Trail?
• 511,000 non-
  residents & 341,000
  residents actively
  participated in
  wildlife watching in
  Montana in 2001.
            Birdwatchers
• Birdwatching grew                             Change in number of Americans who
                                                       participate in birding
  by 232 % from 1983                      100
                                                            (In millions)


  to 2001.                                 80
                                                                                     70.3




                       Number of People
• In 2001 USFWS                            60                       54.1


                                           40

  survey, 70 million                       20
                                                  21.2



  people considered                         0
                                                 1982-83          1994-95           2000-01

  themselves bird-                                                 Years
                                                              Source: NSRE 2001


  watchers.
        Visitors to Montana…
• Wildlife viewing is
  the number ONE
  reason people visit
  Montana
• One of the top
  activities is visiting
  state & national
  parks
What about Montanans?
           • Wildlife viewing is
             the third most
             popular outdoor
             recreation activity
             among Montana
             households--52
             percent of the
             state’s population
             participates.
      Montanans Love Birds
• U.S. Fish and Wildlife
  Survey in 2001 found
  that 44% of Montana
  residents watched
  birds.
• On average, 22% of the
  nation, 46 million
  watched birds and they
  spent $32 billion in
  2001 and supported
  more than 836,000        3rd grader
  jobs.
      What are the Benefits ?


•   Economic
•   Conservation
•   Education
•   Social
        Economic Benefits

• Economic benefit
  of wildlife watching
  in Montana is
  about $207 million
  per year.
Economic Benefits:
What can we expect?

Birders on the Great
   Texas Coastal Birding
   Trail spend an average
   of $78 per day in
   communities.

Think of the potential for
  Bitterroot towns like
  Darby!
     Eat and Watch Wildlife
• For example…

• Broad Axe
  Restaurant
     Stay and Watch Wildlife
• Watch bighorn
  sheep from your
  room!

• Broad Axe Cabins,
East Fork Bitterroot
      Conservation Benefits
• People conserve
  what they know,
  understand and care
  for
    Conservation Benefits
                      • 61% say their travel
                        experience is better
                        when the destination
                        preserves natural,
                        historic, and cultural
                        sites and attractions.

Mt Jumbo Open Space
Education Benefits

         Sites will cultivate
         understanding of
         natural processes
         such as fire &
         flooding
              Social Benefits

•Builds pride in the
Place we call home.

•Strengthens family and
Community relationships
Let’s Make It Happen…
           • Sustainable
             economies
           • Conserve nature
           • Build relationships
Making it Happen
 --the right way!
         • Community
           involvement so we
           make the best
           decisions about
           sites and locations
         2004 Trail Calendar
•   March: Community Meetings
•   March-April: Nominate sites
•   May: Review nominations
•   June-August: Evaluate sites in field
•   September: Draft Trail for review
•   October-November: Design and layout
    brochure and website
            Next step?

• We need YOUR
  ideas and
  participation
             Nominate a Site
• Birding And Nature

• Sites from Lolo to Lost
  Trail Pass

• Public and private
  lands--with permission
     Become a Trail Sponsor
• Please consider
  supporting the Trail
  with a tax-deductible
  donation-- matched
  1:1 by the National
  Forest Foundation
         For More Information
• Visit the Montana Birding & Nature Trail
  Website:
http://biology.umt.edu/landbird/birdtrail

• Contact the coordinator:
  Deborah Richie Oberbillig
  721-6609
  debrichi@montana.com
Thanks for Coming!

								
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