Latest Articles August - December 2006

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Latest Articles August - December 2006 Powered By Docstoc
					Latest Articles: August – December 2006
Below is a list new articles added to the SeaFIC Information Centre database in the months
shown. The list excludes articles appearing in Seafood New Zealand magazine.

Articles can be requested at no charge to levy payers and $15 per item to non levy-payers.
To order any of these articles please contact the Information Centre: ph. (04) 385 4005, fax
(04) 385 2727, or email info@seafood.co.nz quoting the article number.

Headings used in this bulletin:

Aquaculture ● Bycatch and Mitigation ● Culinary ● Economics & Trade ● Environment &
Biosecurity ● Fisheries Management ● Fisheries Science ● Fishing Industry ● Fishing
Technology ● Food safety ● Law & Legislation Marine Biotechnology ● Marketing &
Retailing ● Miscellaneous ● Processing & Packaging ● Seafood for Health




Aquaculture

 1. 300,000 TONNES BY 2010
 Wray, Tom
FISH FARMING INTERNATIONAL (V. 33 NO. 8) p. 16
Chile's production of farmed mussels has expanded rapidly in recent years and is set to
rise to even greater heights.


 2. ABALONE DISEASE RESPONSE
R & D NEWS (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 22
Comments on how a recent outbreak of ganglioneuritis in Victorian abalone (paua) farms
points to a need for proactive aquatic animal health research.


 3. ABALONE FARM REAPS COST-SAVING EFFICIENCIES FROM FOCUS ON R&D
 Mosig, John
 AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 8-13
Describes the operations of Great Southern Waters, one of the largest abalone farms in
Australia, where Research and Development is a big focus. GSW has a genetics program
in place, carries out mussel breeding in autumn when the hatchery facilities are not fully
utilised, uses manufactured feed and has a culling program.



 4. AMA OPPORTUNITIES IN THE BAY OF PLENTY
NEW ZEALAND AQUACULTURE (NO. 13) p. 8-9
Describes the Environment Bay of Plenty's AMA project which is an offshore science
project to locate the best aquaculture management areas.


 5. AQUACULTURE : A STRATEGY FOR GROWTH
 Ryan, Christopher
 BRIGHT (NO. 18) p. 13-15
The New Zealand Aquaculture Strategy was launched on July 31. It is an industry-led plan
for growing sales from the industry from $300 milion today to $1 billion by 2025. New
Zealand Aquaculture Ltd is a new professional organisation leading the implementation of
the strategy.


 6. AUSSIE ABALONE ON THE MENU IN ASIA
 AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 14
Outlines the operations of Kangaroo Island Abalone, Australia's largest abalone farm,
which sells most of its product to the Asian market. The company is dedicated to
innovation, best-practice and export market development.


 7. BARRA SUCCESSES CONSOLIDATED WITH OTHER SPECIES AT GLADSTONE HATCHERY
 Rudge, Emma
 AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 27-33
The Gladstone Water Board Barramundi Hatchery started in February 1996 to stock the
town's water supply, Lake Awoonga. Since that time the hatchery has surpassed all goals
achieving full commercial status producing quality fingerlings for a national and overseas
market.



 8. BILLION DOLLAR GOAL FOR AQUACULTURE
NEW ZEALAND AQUACULTURE (NO. 13) p. 11
Describes the New Zealand Aquaculture Strategy that is the foundation for growing the
sector to a $1 billion industry.


9. BOOLARRA GOLDFISH FARM CLOCKS UP FIFTY YEARS OF SUCCESS
Mosig, John
AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 22-26
Describes Australia's largest goldfish farm, Boolarra Fish Farm, which is one of Australia's
most successful aquaculture operations.


 10. CREATING THE RIGHT CONDITIONS FOR PAUA
 Heath, Phil
 WATER & ATMOSPHERE (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 12-13
Investigates NIWA's newly developed system for farming paua (NZ abalone) that produces
higher growth rates than conventional systems. Phil Heath is working closely with the
aquaculture industry to find the right conditions for this potentially valuable shellfish.


 11. DANISH TECHNOLOGY BEHIND KINGFISH FARM FAILURE
 Ingram, Keith
 NEW ZEALAND AQUACULTURE (NO. 13) p. 12-13
Describes the closure of the Parengarenga fish farm that led to the Kingfish Go Wild
consortium. The closure was a result of some chronic design faults by the Danish company
IAA. Aquaculture consultant Barry Torkington advises on configuration of the site.



 12. ECONOMICS OF AQUACULTURE AND INVASIVE AQUATIC SPECIES : AN OVERVIEW
Lee, Donna J.
AQUACULTURE, ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT (V. 10 NO. 2) p. 83-96
University of Florida paper giving an overview of the invasive species around the world that
are linked to aquaculture.
 13. FINE-TUNING TUNA RETURNS
 R & D NEWS (V. 14 NO.3) p. 8, 9
Further expansion of Southern bluefin tuna aquaculture in Australia will only come from
improving the growth and quality of the limited number of fish available. Researchers are
looking at the metabolic processes the tuna use to swim, feed & grow, in order to
determinine optimum feed & other requirements to formulate feeding strategies.



 14. HARTLAND YABBIES THRIVES ON HOME-GROWN SIMPLICITY
Mosig, John
AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 20-21
Describes a farm where financial returns are maximised through integrated agri-
aquaculture. Yabbies are harvested from dams which are part of the farm's on-going stock
water conservation.


 15. HAWKESBURY PHOENIX RISES
Moxham, Rob
R & D NEWS (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 18
Outlines a 21st century oyster industry emerging on the Hawkesbury River, north of
Sydney, replacing a 19th century industry devastated two years ago by QX disease. The
oysters being farmed are triploid Pacifics.


 16. KAIPARA AQUACULTURE AREAS WITHDRAWN
FOREST & BIRD (NO. 321) p. 50
Describes why Forest & Bird is satisfied with Auckland Regional Councils withdrawal of a
proposal to allow marine farming in the southern Kaipara Harbour.


 17. LOBSTER TRIALS SHOW BENEFITS OF BIO-MOS
 FISH FARMING INTERNATIONAL (V. 33 NO. 8) p. 26-27
Reports on the result of a recent trial of Carbohydrate Mannan oligosaccharide marketed
under the name Bio-Mos that improves the growth and survival of cultured European
lobster.



 18. LONGLINES OF BASKETS AND CYLINDERS FOR CROOKHAVEN OYSTER FARM
 O'Sullivan, Dos
 AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 35-40
Describes an innovative oyster farm located at Greenwell Point, south coast of NSW. The
farm uses two types of longline systems and two types of culture units. They are also
using a mixture of wild caught and hatchery bred single seed to produce high quality
oysters.


 19. MYCOBACTERIOSIS AND EFFICACY OF COMMON DISINFECTANTS IN AQUACULTURE
Harper, Claudia
AQUACULTURE MAGAZINE (V. 32 NO. 4) p. 40-45
Describes mycobacteriosis, the transmission of bacteria between farmed fishes and how to
disinfect.
 20. NATURAL ADVANTAGES
NEW ZEALAND MARINE FARMING ASSOCIATION INC NEWSLETTER
(OCTOBER) p. 13-14
Highlights that Chile is on course to become a world leader in mussel farming. Outlines the
environmental monitoring services provided by Plancton Andino, a company in Chile.


21. NEW AQUACULTURE SPECIES: ADDING REAL ALUE TO NEW ZEALAND SEAOOD
Bruce, Michael
WATER & ATMOSPHERE (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 10-11
Discusses utilising higher value aquaculture species as a good way to add value to New
Zealand's seafood industry. Kingfish is used as an example.


 22. NEW ZEALAND TARGETS SEA SQUIRT COLONIES
FISH FARMING INTERNATIONAL (V. 33 NO. 9) p. 7
NZ$150,000 of the New Zealand biosecurity budget has been diverted to kill colonies of a
native sea squirt (Didemnum vexillum) seen as a threat tho mussel farms in the
Marlborough Sounds.


 23. ORGANIC BOOM REACHES METEORIC PROPORTIONS
 Holmyard, Nicki
 SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL (V. 21 NO. 8) p. 36-39
Growing consumer awareness of sustainable issues looks set to guarantee a very healthy
future for organic fish production.


 24. PAUA RESEEDING : THE BUSINESS BENEATH THE SURFACE
Watts, Ellie
NEW ZEALAND AQUACULTURE (NO. 13) p. 6-7
Describes a project by Cawthron Institute were paua has been reseeded to enhance the
paua fishery.



 25. PERFORMANCE OF A ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR IN A TILAPIA
 RECIRCULATING AQUACULTURE SYSTEM
Brazil, Brian L.
AQUACULTURE MAGAZINE (V. 32 NO. 3) p. 52-59
Reports on the rotating biological contactor system in a recirculating tilapia culture system
and the TAN and carbon dioxide removal efficiency.


 26. THE REPRODUCTION OF BLUEFIN TUNA IN CAPTIVITY : PROMISING FIRST RESULTS
FISHERIES NEWSLETTER (NO. 116) p. 24-25
Reports on how eggs from captive bluefin tuna were successfully fertilised and how this
could have important consequences for aquaculture.
 27. RIGHT DATA LEADS TO BETTER MUSSELS
 Bonardelli, John
 FISH FARMING INTERNATIONAL (V. 33 NO. 8) p. 18-19
Reports on a dataset on meat yield for mussels at Huken farm in Norway that are obtained
to improve harvesting strategy to maximise their mussel revenue.



 28. THE ROLE FOR RECIRCULATING AQUACULTURE SYSTEMS (RAS) PART 1
 Timmons, Michael B.
 AQUACULTURE MAGAZINE (V. 32 NO. 3) p. 26-31
Discusses that recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) technology is the key technology
that will allow the world aquaculture community to supply the world per capita needs in
seafood over the next decade and compete with the meat products.


29. SALMON FARM INTRODUCES NEW TECHNIQUES
Isaac, Peter
FOOD TECHNOLOGY (V. 41 NO. 9) p. 10
Describes Isaac Salmon Farm Ltd and the differences in salmon being farmed in New
Zealand.


 30. SEANEST SUCCESS ON SEA URCHINS : TRIPLE GONAD GROWTH IN EIGHT WEEKS
 CLAIMED FOR NEW SYSTEM
Mitrovich, Velo
FISH FARMING INTERNATIONAL (V. 33 NO. 8) p. 32-33
Reports on the 15-month trial of the SeaNest, a sea urchin on-growing system, that has
shown great potential.


31. A SEMINAL OYSTER MOMENT
Clarke, John
GRILL (V. 1 NO. 6) p. 64-65
Describes Clevedon Coast Oysters and the health benefits of oysters.


 32. SILVER PERCH HATCHERY 'ROAD TESTS' ITS BREEDING PROGRAM
 Mosig, John
 AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 15-19
Describes the operation at Sunrise Fish Farm, where Alan Hambly looks very hard at the
family line of fish he breeds to ensure his customers get the best possible seedstock.


 33. STILL EVOLVING: GLOBAL SHRIMP FARMING CONTINUES TO SET A COURSE IN
 PURSUIT OF SUSTAINABILITY
 Lutz, C. Greg
 AQUACULTURE MAGAZINE (V. 32 NO. 3) p. 21-25
From a shrimp farming example in Vietnam this article reports on the document "The
International Principles for Responsible Shrimp Farming".
 34. STUDY MEASURES THE IMPACT OF OPEN-OCEAN FISH FARMING SITES
DiPietro, Ben
INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO.10) p. 6
Two Hawaii - based aquaculture companies are participating in a research project to
scientifically quantify the impacts their open-ocean growing systems are having on wild fish
populations and the environment.


 35. TILAPIA HATCHERIES RANGE FROM BASIC TO HIGH-TECH - AND EVERYTHING IN
 BETWEEN
 Roderick, Eric
 HATCHERY INTERNATIONAL (V. 7 NO. 5) p. 14-17
Describes the farming of tilapia, a diverse tropical species, now farmed throughout the
world. Hatchery technology is diverse, ranging from the most basic systems to artificial
incubation of the eggs.


 36. TRANSITION TO NZ AQUACULTURE - PROGRESS REPORT
Clarkson, Rebecca
NEW ZEALAND MARINE FARMING ASSOCIATION INC NEWSLETTER
(OCTOBER) p. 4-5
Reports on the "New Zealand Aquaculture Strategy" released at the industrys AGM
conference in Nelson in July 2006. The strategy is a 10 point plan towards the industry's
goal of achieving $1 billion value by 2025. The plan includes establishing a new sector
organisation.




Bycatch & Mitigation

 37. CUNNING CONTRAPTION KEEPS BIRDS AT BAY
FISHING NEWS INTERNATIONAL (V. 45 NO. 8) p. 36
New Zealander Chris Carey has won the WWF Smart Gear prize for his Carefree's
Cunning Contraption. He discusses his bird scarer device that has proven to be highly
successful in reducing seabird mortality and manage offal discharge.



 38. GIANT FLEXIBLE GRID FOR PELAGIC TRAWLS : FILTERS 95% OF BY-CATCH
FISHING NEWS INTERNATIONAL (V. 45 NO. 8) p. 36-37
Describes a new grid made with plastic pipes that are more flexible in order to prevent by-
catch.


39. MAKING A KILLING?
Hansford, Dave
FOREST AND BIRD (NO. 321) p. 15-17
New Zealand sea lions, that are rarer than minke whales, are dying in the NZ fisheries.
Culinary

40. OYSTER HEAVEN : PACIFICS RATE TOPS WITH TASTE TEAM.
GRILL (V. 1 NO. 6) p. 62-63
Brings the results of a panel tasting of this seasons oysters. Hauraki Gulf Pacific Oysters
were voted top oyster.




Economics & Trade

 41. FISH MEAL PRICES DRIVE CHANGES IN FISH FEED FORMULATIONS
 Hardy, Ronald
 AQUACULTURE MAGAZINE (V. 32 NO. 4) p. 29-31
In July 2006, fish meal prices reached an all-time high of over $1600 per metric ton in
Norway. In July 2005 prices were hovering in the $600-$700 range. What does this mean
for the aquaculture industry?


 42. KIWIS CALL FOR BAN ON KOREAN OYSTERS
 Andrae, Dominic
 SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL (V. 21 NO. 8) p. 6
New Zealand's seafood industry wants the food safety authorities to consider banning
imports of South Korean oysters after norovirus has been present. Also reports on Matt
Lint's plan of a chain of nationwide mussel-theme restaurants.



 43. NEW PROCESSOR ENTERS BILLION DOLLAR SEAWEED INDUSTRY
 SEAFOOD PROCESSOR (3 NO.19)
Scientists from IRL in Lower Hutt are working with farmers, processors and retailers to
build a commercial market for New Zealand seaweed. Ruth Falshaw, the scientist leading
the project, predicts it would be worth up to $4 million a year in export earnings as a value
added product for the manufacture of additives for the food & pharmaceutical industries.



 44. POLAND : RAPID GROWTH IN SEAFOOD EXPORTS TO THE EU
Kulikowski, Tomasz
EUROFISH (NO. 4) p. 24 - 27
Polish fish processing plants are enjoying significant increases in turnover caused by the
growth in exports of fish products to EU markets. Article compares statistics on Polish fish
production from 2001 - 2005.



 45. SMOKED SALMON CONTINUES TO RULE THE MARKETPLACE
 Kennedy, Bob
 FISHUPDATE (NO. 8) p. 26
Outlines sales of smoked fish products in the UK with smoked salmon proving the most
popular. The UK Sea Fish Industry Authority has long been commited to promoting smoked
fish.
 46. THE US FISH INDUSTRY : STABLE FISHERY, VARIED AQUACULTURE, GROWING
 DEMAND.
EUROFISH (NO. 4) p. 36 - 39
Provides statistics on the US fishing industry, which despite a substantial domestic
production has a demand for seafood that can only be satisfied by imports. Average per
capita consumption of seafood reached a record level of 7.5 kg in 2004, with the most
popular species being shrimp, tuna and salmon.




Environment & Biosecurity
 47. BID TO CUT HOKI'S "SUSTAINABLE" TAG
FOREST & BIRD (NO. 321) p. 50
Forest & Bird explains why they have appealed against the certification of hoki as a
sustainable fishery.


 48. EFFECTS OF BEACH EROSION ON ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOHEROA
 (PAPHIES VENTRICOSA) AT BLUECLIFFS BEACH, SOUTHLAND, NEW ZEALAND
Beentjes, Michael P.
NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH
(V. 40 NO. 3) p. 439-453
Toheroa have declined and the results of the research indicates that distribution and
abundance is related to the erosion of sand on the beach.


 49. FUELS GOLD
 Pearce, Fred
 NEW SCIENTIST (23 SEPTEMBER) p. 36-41
Discusses the arguments for and against using "biofuels". "Biofuels" being all fuels derived
from organic matter.


 50. GENETIC MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR CAPTIVE PROPAGATION OF FRESHWATER
 MUSSELS (UNIONOIDEA)
 Jones, Jess W.
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 5) p. 527-535
Describes 10 guidelines to help maintain the genetic resources of cultured and wild
populations of freshwater mussels when juvenile mussels are released into the wild to
restore and augment populations to prevent additional species losses.


 51. KINGFISH GO WILD
 Ingram, Keith
 PROFESSIONAL SKIPPER (NO. 53) p. 72-73
Describes the process of Kingfish Go Wild that released 20 tonnes of kingfish into the wild
from the closed Parengarenga farm. Both the recreational and the commercial fishing
industry was involved along with NIWA and MFISH.
 52. MARINE FARM DECISION DISAPPOINTS
FOREST & BIRD (NO. 321) p. 51
Describes why Forest & Bird is disappointed with the Ministry of Fisheries' decision to grant
preliminary approval to marine farm on the South Island West Coast.


53. MARINE PROTECTION PROPOSAL FOUND WANTING
FOREST & BIRD (NO. 321) p. 51
Describes the concerns Forest & Bird has about the Benthic Protected Area proposal.


 54. A REVIEW OF ROTENONE USE FOR THE CONTROL OF NON-INDIGENOUS FISH IN
 AUSTRALIAN FRESH WATERS, AND AN ATTEMPTED ERADICATION OF THE NOXIOUS FISH,
 PHALLOCEROS CAUDIMACULATUS
 Rayner, Thomas
NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH
(V. 40 NO. 3) p. 477-485
Reviews all available documentation relating to rotenone use in Australia, before
discussing some planning and application issues that may be faced by those considering
rotenone use. A case study of a recent attempt to eradicate a population of noxious
poediliid fish is included. Recommends that the current legislative arrangements for
rotenone use in Australia are reviewed, to encourage the proper documentation of
eradication events.


 55. SOMETHING IN THE WATER
 Gopakumar, Kumara
 SEAFOOD PROCESSOR (V. 3 NO. 18) p. 16-17
Describes how the quantities of water used in seafood processing have to conform to the
quality standards applied to drinking water, but these vary from market to market. Includes
tables of major water contaminants, infectious agents potentially present in drinking water
contaminated by sewage, chemical parameters, indicator parameters, microbiological
parameters and difference between WHO and EU standards.


 56. STRIKING A BALANCE
 Wills, Carly
 WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO. 9) p. 10-11
Interview of Dr Simon Cripps, Director of WWF's Global Marine Programme on the
organisation's most important issues, such as cooperation with the fishing industry,
whether nations will be able to cooperate on the issue of over-fishing, what can be done to
combat illegal fishing and the threat of global warming.



Fisheries Management
 57. BE PARTICIPATORY AND CONSULTATIVE
SAMUDRA (NO. 44) p. 42-43
Outlines a statement on ecosystem-based management presented to the seventh meeting
of the United Nations Open-ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and the Law
of the Sea (UNICPOLOS).
58. CATCH-QUOTA BALANCING IN MULTISPECIES INDIVDUAL FISHING QUOTAS
Sanchirico, James
MARINE POLICY (V. 30 NO. 6) p. 767-785
Discusses the effectivness of IFQ's as fishery management tools in multispecies fisheries.




 59. CONSERVING TUNA IN TAIWAN
 Shih-Chin, Chou
 SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL (V. 21 NO. 8) p. 30-31
Taiwan is an important supplier of tuna to international markets. Describes how the tuna
fishery in Taiwan is being regulated to preserve its future.


 60. DISTRIBUTIONAL EFFECTS OF PROPERTY RIGHTS: TRANSITIONS IN THE ATLANTIC
 HERRING FISHERY
 Brandt, Sylvia
 MARINE POLICY (V. 30 NO.6) p. 659-670
Investigates the distribution of costs and benefits by ITQ's in the Atlantic Herring fishery.



 61. AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ILLEGAL, UNREPORTED AND UNREGULATED (IUU)
 FISHING : KEY DRIVERS AND POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
 Le Gallic, Bertrand
MARINE POLICY (V. 30 NO.6) p. 689-695
Presents the analytical framework of a paper developed by the OECD Committee for
Fisheries that discusses the economic dimensions of illegal, unreported and unregulated
(IUU) fishing activities.


 62. FECUNDITY OF BANDED WRASSE (NOTOLABRUS FUCICOLA) FROM OTAGO,
 SOUTHERN NEW ZEALAND
Harwood, Nicholas
NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH
(V. 40 NO. 3) p. 467-475
Reports on an investigation of fecundity of banded wrasse (Notolabrus fucicola) from
Otago, over a 12-month period from January 2004 to January 2005. These fecundity
estimates provide a guideline for the management of banded wrasse.



 63. FLEXIBLE MANAGEMENT OF FISHING RIGHTS AND A SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES
 INDUSTRY IN EUROPE
Hentrich, Steffen
MARINE POLICY (V. 30 NO. 6) p. 712-720
Discusses overexploitation of fishing stocks in European waters, and the EU's failed
attempts to implement sustainable fisheries management.


 64. GLOBAL SCOPE AND ECONOMICS OF ILLEGAL FISHING
 Sumaila, U. R.
 MARINE POLICY (V. 30 NO. 6) p. 696-705
Presents a conceptual model for the analysis of costs and benefits or the risk inherent in
illegal, unreported, and unregulated activity.
 65. HOW TO CO-MANAGE A FISHERY
Ben-Yami, Menakhem
WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO. 9) p. 6
Review of two books. The first, 'Fishery Co-Management: A Practical Handbook', is based
on the practice and experience of IDRC and designated for use by initiators and facilitators
of co-management. The second book, 'How to Manage a Fishery', is a simple, rather
mechanical step-by-step buide to writing a fishery management plan, aimed at government
managers.



 66. LAST OF THE BLUFF OYSTERS?
 Tipa, Rob
 TE KARAKA (SPRING) p. 11-16
Describes the Bluff oyster fishery and its problems. Looks at the history of the disease
bonamia, the poor management with over-fishing and the social concerns for the
fishermen.



 67. MINISTRY TACKLED ON FISHERIES 'OVER-CATCH'
 Donoghue, Tim
THE INDEPENDENT (1 NOVEMBER) p. 4
Reports on the findings that the NZ fishery ministry's management system has allowed
"chronic over-catch" in some fish stocks. Allegations are made that the ministry may be
acting illegally in the porcess of setting the total allowable commercial catch (TACC).
Mention is made of a submission to the ministry on the findings of a "deemed values" joint
working group.



68. PARTY POLITICS
MacLeod, Marcia
SEAFOOD PROCESSOR (V. 3 NO.19) p. 22-23
Outlines the reasons for outsourcing logistics and the criteria involved.


 69. SHELLFISH STANDARD UPDATE
 FOOD FOCUS (AUGUST 2006) p. 11
Describes the shellfish standard update and that New Zealand probably has the most up-
to-date shellfish standard in the world.


 70. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES IN FISHERIES MANAGEMENT
 Utne, Ingrid Bouwer
 MARINE POLICY (V. 30 NO. 6) p. 624-634
Discusses the application of systems engineering principles and integration of technology
into fisheries management.


 71. TAGGING A VALUABLE TOOL FOR MANAGING FISHERIES
Thomas, Geoff
NZ FISHING WORLD (NO. 34) p. 24-28
Describes the practice of tagging of game fish in New Zealand waters. The tagging
programme gives useful data such as whether the species travel and the distance involved.
72. TRENDS IN MAINE SOFTSHELL CLAM LANDINGS
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 475-480
Describes the landings of softshell clams, the diminished clam popuation and that recovery
will require reestablishment of breeding stocks.




Fisheries Science

 73. ACOUSTIC DETERRENTS DO NOT REDUCE BLACK DRUM PREDATION ON OYSTERS
 JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 537-541
Describes the effectiveness of acoustic deterrents in limiting predation on Louisiana oysters
leases by black drum Pogonias cromis. Concludes that acoustic deterrents are not practical
to control losses of oysters.



74. ANTI-CANCER SPONGE : THE RACE IS ON FOR AQUACULTURE SUPPLY
Handley, Sean

WATER & ATMOSPHERE (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 14-15
Describes research by a consortium of science and industry players and their attempts to
culture native New Zealand ea sponge to supply a potentially valuable anti-cancer drug.


 75. DEVELOPING NATURAL SOLUTIONS FOR A 'FOUL' PROBLEM
Depree, Craig
WATER & ATMOSPHERE (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 20-21
Explains how NIWA is working with industry partners to solve the problem of fouling by sea
creatures growing on man-made structures.



 76. DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION OF BIOCHEMICAL FOOD COMPONENTS BY THE SCALLOP
 ARGOPECTEN PURPURATUS EXPOSED TO DIFFERENT SALINITIES AND FOOD
 CONCENTRATIONS
 Navarro, J.
 NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH
 (V. 40 NO. 3) p. 455-465
Reports the results of a study determining some key acute and acclimated responses of
the scallop Argopecten purpuratus under a range of salinity and food conditions. The
scallop A. purpuratus is naturally distributed between central Chile and northern Peru.
Values of absorption at high food levels were significantly lower than those obtianed by A.
purpuratus at low food levels at the same salinities.



 77. THE EAST ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA FISHERIES : STOCK COLLAPSE OR RECOVERY?
Bjoerndal, Trond
MARINE RESOURCE ECONOMICS (V. 21 NO. 2) p. 193-210
Describes a bio-economic model for the East Atlantic bluefin tuna fisheries and the optimal
stock levels for various scenarios. Calls for Draconian measures for rebuilding the stock or
possibly a more gradual approach to stady state given by a Total Allowable Catch.
 78. EFFECTS OF TIDAL RESTRICTIONS AND POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF TIDAL
 RESTORATION ON FECAL COLIFORM AND SHELLFISH-WATER QUALITY.
 Portnoy, John
 JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 609-617
The relationship between artificial tidal restrictions and shellfish-water quality was studied
within the estuaries on Cape Cod. Combines observations of current spatial and temporal
(tidal) patterns of water column contamination with recent hydrodynamic modelling to
predict the effects of proposed tidal restoration on shellfish-water quality. Concludes that
there is a direct relationship between the degree of tidal restriction and surface-water FC.


 79. ENERGY BUDGET OF CULTURED FEMALE ABALONE HALIOTIS TUBERCULATA (L.)
Lopez, Lus M.
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25. NO. 1) p. 385-389
Reports on a study of the effect of three different diets, fishmeal, commercial abalone diet
or seaweed, at three different temperatures on the energy budget for abalone. The results
shows that diet and temperature are factors that combined to influence growth rates and
gonad development.


 80. ESTIMATING SPATIAL SCALE OF POST-SETTLEMENT TRANSPORT POTENTIAL OF
 MACOMONA LILIANA ON AN INTERTIDAL SANDFLAT
 Petuha, Erin T.
NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH
(V. 40 NO. 3) p. 487-502
Describes juvenile transport distance of Macomona liliana. Results indicate a range of likely
distances for post-settlement transport of juvenile bivalves, important for predicting
recolonisation of disturbed areas and restoration of shellfish beds.


 81. GENOTYPE-DEPENDENT SURVIVAL, GROWTH AND PRODUCTION IN CULTURED BLUE
 MUSSELS, MYTILUS SPP. : RESULTS OF A RECIPROCAL SEED TRANSFER EXPERIMENT.
Penney, R. W.
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 515-525
Describes the results of a reciprocal mussel transfer experiment. It concludes that growth is
genotype-dependent in rope-cultured mussel populations and that these differences in
weight growth favoring M. edulis are maintained when such stocks are transferred to other
sites. Concludes also that M. edulis and hybrids have intrinsically greater rates of weight
growth, but not necessarily length growth, than does M. trossulus.


82. GREENSHELL MUSSELS: SOLVING THE CASE OF THE DISAPPEARING SPAT
Sim-Smith, Carina
WATER & ATMOSPHERE (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 16-17
Explains NIWA research into the problem of spat retention. Focuses on New Zealand's
Greenshell mussell aquaculture industry.


83. GROWTH AND MORPHOMETRICS IN THE NEW ZEALAND SEA URCHIN PSEUDECHINUS
HUTTONI (ECHINOIDEA: TEMNOPLEURIDAE)
Kirby, Selena
NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH
(V. 40 NO. 3) p. 413 - 428
The authors looked at somatic growth in the New Zealand sea urchin (kina). This species
normally inhabits the continental shelf but in New Zealand is found at shallower depths,
providing an opportunity to use chemical tag recapture techniques to quantify growth.



84. HIGH HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE AND HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON
PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ALBACORE TUNA (THUNNUS ALALUNGA)
MINCED MUSCLE.
Ramirez-Suarez, Juan C.
JOURNAL OF AQUATIC FOOD PRODUCT TECHNOLOGY (V. 15 NO. 1) p.
5-17
High Pressure Processing and heat treatments were applied to minced albacore muscle.
Effects on protein solubility, thermal stability, total sulfhydryls and fluid retention were
measured.


 85. HOKI PARTNERSHIPS LEAD TO TIMELY UPTAKE OF RESEARCH
CROP & FOOD RESEARCH (NO. 54) p. 6
Discusses harvesting and handling techniques in New Zealand for Hoki, and reports on
related current scientific investigation underway.


 86. IMPROVED GENETICS THE KEY TO FUTURE OF SEA BASS / BREAM IN
 MEDITERRANEAN
 Thomaz, Diogo
 HATCHERY INTERNATIONAL (V. 7 NO. 5) p. 26, 27
Looks at a privately run genetics selection programme for sea-bass and sea-bream. Notes
that selection takes time to show results - for the brnefits of 2 generations of selection it
takes 6 - 8 years.


 87. INFERRING SHRIMP (PANDALUS BOREALIS) GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS FROM LIFE
 HISTORY STAGE STRUCTURE ANALYSIS.
Koeller, Peter A.
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 595-608
An age-based population model was used to simulate shrimp age and stage structures at
different growth rates and the results compared with stage structures of populations with
known growth rates. Discusses length, age, sex change and ecosystem change.



 88. INITIAL RECRUITMENT AND GROWTH OF SURFCLAMS (SPISULA SOLIDISSIMA
 DILLWYN) ON THE INNER CONTINENTAL SHELF OF NEW JERSEY
 Ma, Hongguang
 JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 481-489
Describes the surfclam larval growth and provides further evidence of the relationship
between upwelling/downwelling events and surfclam larval supply and initial recruitment on
the inner continental shelf.



 89. MOLLUSC TEAM AT BRIBIE KICK GOALS FOR COMMERCIAL BEGINNING
Rudge, Emma
AUSTASIA AQUACULTURE (V. 20 NO. 4) p. 47-49
The QDPI Bribie Island mollusc team headed by Dr Liz O'Brien is thrilled with recent
achievements in saucer scallop and tropical abalone research that have forged a solid
beginning for a promising commercial harvest in a few years time.
 90. NEW DRUGS FROM NATURE : THE TERRAMARINE PHARMACEUTICALS PARTNERSHIP
Proffitt, Fiona
WATER & ATMOSPHERE (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 18-19
Discusses TerraMarine's hunt for new anti-inflammatory drugs among New Zealand's
unique terrestrial and marine biota.



 91. A NEW IN SITU METHOD FOR MEASURING SESTON UPTAKE BY SUSPENSION-FEEDING
 BIVALVE MOLLUSCS.
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 643-649
Describes a new method based on in situ fluorometry that provides much more rapid
quantitative assessments and may provide more accurate estimates of seston removal
rates.


 92. PARENT-EGG-PROGENY RELATIONSHIPS IN TELEOST FISHES : AN ENERGETICS
 PERSPECTIVE
Kamler, Ewa
REVIEWS IN FISH BIOLOGY AND FISHERIES (V. 15 NO. 4) p. 399-421
Describes which female teleost fish attributes affect egg properties, factors that determine
offspring viability and what makes a yolk-dependent larva large.


 93. RECRUITMENT PATTERNS AND PRECAUTIONARY EXPLOITATION RATES FOR
 GEODUCK (PANOPEA ABRUPTA) POPULATIONS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Zhang, Zane
JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 1) p. 445-453
An age-structured projection model was used to study the impacts of alternative
exploitation intensities on geoduck populations. Recommendation is an exploitation rate of
1.2% and 1.8% of estimated current biomass.



 94. RESOLVING THE DISCARD PROBLEM : A CASE STUDY OF THE ENGLISH NEPHROPS
 FISHERY
 Catchpole, T. L.
 MARINE POLICY (V. 30 NO. 6) p. 821-831
Discusses on a technical level the phenomenon of discarding ,and how it may be reduced
in trawling practice.



95. SCHOOLING KRILL A REAL THRILL
King, Rob
R & D NEWS (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 20
Outlines research being done on krill by the Australian Antarctic Division's headquarters,
which have finally got krill schooling in purpose-built, zero-degree tanks.


 96. SEA SNAILS A NEW RESOURCE?
R & D NEWS (V. 14 NO.3) p. 19
Predatory sea snails - whelks (Muricidae) could be the basis of a new Australian fishery.
They are a good source of protein, with high omega-3 concentrations, and are the source
of a natural purple dye and homepathic remedy.
 97. SEAMOUNTS AND PELAGIC FISHERIES INTERACTIONS UNDER STUDY
Allain, Valerie
FISHERIES NEWSLETTER (NO. 116) p. 33-35
Describes the topics from the workshop with the Pacific Islands Oceanic Fisheries
Management Project. The project's goal is to obtain an enhanced understanding of the
ecology of seamounts, their influence on the aggregation and movement of pelagic fish
species and the impact of fisheries on seamount ecosystems.



 98. SUBSPECIES CHARACTERIZATION OF UREASE-POSITIVE THERMOPHILIC
 CAMPYLOBACTER (UPTC) ISOLATED FROM SHELLFISH EMPLOYING MODIFIED FLAGELLIN
 (FLAA) RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM (RFLP) TYPING.
 JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25, NO. 2) p. 625-629
Describes a modified PCR-RFLP genotyping assay, employing polymorphisms within the
flagellin gene of UPTC organisms, which would allow the successful amplification and
typing of previously nontypable UPTC isolates obtained from natural marine environments.
Describes a PCR-RFLP method, based on modified primers from UPTC flaA gene
sequences that may be successfully applied to examine subspecies relatedness of UPTC
organisms from natural environments, including shellfish.



 99. TIMING AND SEASONALITY OF THE TERMINAL MOLT AND MATING MIGRATION IN THE
 SPIDER CRAB, MAJA BRACHYDACTYLA : EVIDENCE OF ALTERNATIVE MATING
 STRATEGIES
 Corgos, Antonio
 JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH (V. 25 NO. 2) p. 577-587
Timing and synchronisation at individual and population levels of the processes related to
the terminal moult, gonad maturation, accumulation of energy reserves and migration in the
spider crab Maja brachydactyla are analysed. Results show that males carry out the
terminal moult before females and that variability within populations and between sexes is
related to the different reproductive strategies and not to a physiological limitation.




Fishing Industry

 100. A BETTER LIFE WITH SEAFOOD
 EUROFISH (NO. 4) p. 16-19
Outlines the third open SEAFOODplus Conference held in Tromso, Norway. Topics
covered included what consumers know about seafood, how seafood can improve quality
of life and health, improving sustainability and animal welfare in aquaculture and possible
losses of nutritional substances during industrial processing or household preparation.



101. HURRICANES, SALMON QUESTIONS AND HUGE VOLUMES OF POLLOCK.
WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO.7) p. 12-13
Describes the North American fishing industry with export statistics of products and value.



102. MASIVE WORLD RESTRICTIONS HIT FISHING : NEW UN MARINE IMPACTS REPORT
FISHING NEWS INTERNATIONAL (V. 45 NO. 9) p. 4-5
An increasing number of fishing countries are adopting and enforcing precautionary and
ecosystem approaches to fisheries management, according to a new United Nations report
"The Inpacts of Fishing on vulnerable Marine Ecosystems".
http://www.un.org/depts/los/general_assembly/documents/impact_of_fishing.pdf



 103. REPORT SHOWS FISHERIES IN GOOD SHAPE, SAYS MINISTER
 QUEENSLAND FISHERMAN (V. 24 NO. 7) p. 8-10
Queensland Fisheries Minister Tim Mulhering concludes after reading Queensland
Fisheries Annual Status Report 2005 recently released by the Deparment of Primary
Industries and Fisheries (DPIF), that the Queensland State's fisheries are in a healthy
state. Includes a 2004 review and a fisheries status overview.



 104. REVERSING LONG TERM DECLINE.
 WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO. 7) p. 10-11
Interview with Isamu Abe from Japan's Fisheries Association describing Japan's fishing
industry and their challenges. Includes statistics about the Japanese seafood industry.



 05. SKYSAILS GIVE BOATS A TOW!
 FISHING NEWS INTERNATIONAL (V. 45 NO.9) p. 26 - 27
A number of related articles looking at fuel saving on boats, including: use of kites to tow
fishing vessels, and use of biodiesel


 106. TWENTY YEARS OF THE QMS
 THE BITE (SEPTEMBER) p. 4 - 6
An interview with Ministry of Fisheries Deputy Chief Executive Stan Crothers about the
changes he has seen as a result of the Quota Management System, and his predictions for
the future. Regards the QMS as an outstanding succes, and coments on the commercial
fishing industry taking the environmental impacts of fishing seriously.




Fishing Technology

 107. CAN A SEAFOOD SUPPLY-CHAIN TRACEABILITY SYSTEM BE BUILT?
Olsen, Knut Eirik
INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO. 9) p. 24
Discusses the availability and viability of a complete and effective traceability system for
seafood products.



 108. CAN THIS MAN CUT YOUR FUEL BILLS? : BURNING BIOFUELS START OF FIGHTBACK
 AGAINS HIGH FUEL PRICES
 Wray, Tom
 FISHING NEWS INTERNATIONAL (V. 45 NO. 9) p. 1, 24-25
In the first ever trials of their kind, two British fishing vessels are testing biofuel and
vegetable oil as their main engine fuel. If successful, this could help solve fishermens
profits crisis following fuel prices rises.
 109. COMPASS FUTURES - ARE THERE CHOICES?
 Anschütz, Raytheon
 WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO. 7) p. 8
Discusses the future of the gyro compass. Research and development has led to new
techniques like the GPS for determining a ship's heading.



 110. DATA, DATA EVERYWHERE AND NOT A BYTE TO PLEASE
O'Neill, Peter
WORLD FISHING (55 NO.8) p. 18
Looks at the cost of accessing the internet, and ways to keep costs down, for European
seafarers.



 111. ESTIMATING VESSEL EFFICIENCY USING A BOOTSTRAPPED DATA ENVELOPMENT
 ANALYISIS MODEL
 Walden, John B.
 MARINE RESOURCE ECONOMICS (V. 21 NO. 2) p. 181-192
Describes a method for examining the underlying statistical structure of data envelopment
analysis models using bootstrap methods and readily available software. The approach is
then applied to a case study of the United States mid-Atlantic sea scallop dredge fleet.


 112. FUEL IS STILL MAKING THE GOING TOUGH
 FISHUPDATE (NO. 8) p. 15
Outlines the concern to the fishing industry of the high price of fuel. Fishing vessel engine
manufacturers have to provide a combination of both fuel and engine efficiency to remain in
the market place. The rising costs of fuel are likely to impact heavily on certain fishing
methods that have low fuel:fish efficiency ratios.


113. GETTING THE WORDS OUT
Crowley, Michael
NATIONAL FISHERMAN (V. 87 NO. 5) p. 40-41
Discusses the developments in VHF, satelite and cellular communications. Including Icon,
Furuno, Simrad, KVH Industries, Inmarsat and Globalstar.


 114. KEEPING IT COOL
Mutter, Rachel
SEAFOOD PROCESSOR (V. 3 NO. 19) p. 24-28
Discusses refrigeration equipment and chilling options available for keeping seafood in top
condition. Refrigeration, freezing and ice machines must be corrosion-resistant, easy to
maintain and, increasingly, environmentally friendly.


 115. OTHER WAYS OF FISHING
 Gorez, Beatrice
 SAMUDRA (NO. 44) p. 40-41
Outlines the revival in tuna fishing which has resulted from the EU ban on driftnets. Points
to the way forward for European fisheries. This article was based on an interview with a
retired small-scale fisherman.
116. SMART WAYS TO CATCH FISH
WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO. 8) p. 20-21
Discusses the new BJ5000 fish jigging machine eveloped by she Sweedish family
Neuendorf.



117. THIN IS IN
Collier, Ev
NATIONAL FISHERMAN (V. 87 NO. 5) p. 30-31
Discusses the new thin, flat-panel display screens.



118. WHAT RESEARCH IS HAPPENING ON CUTTING FUEL COSTS IN TRAWLING?
Sterling, David
THE QUEENSLAND FISHERMAN (V. 24 NO. 8) p. 10-11
Discusses some of the current research into ways of saving on fuel use in trawling.




Food Safety

  119. HOW COLD IS THE FISH IN YOUR FRIDGE?
 James, Stephen
 INFOFISH INTERNATIONAL (4/2006) p. 37 - 40
Refrigerator temperature is critical for safe storage of chilled fish. Many refrigerators
throughout the world are running at higher than reccomended temperatures. The impact of
temperature and cleanliness on consumer health needs to be more fully assessed.


 120. WAGING WAR ON LISTERIA
Wray, Tom
SEAFOOD PROCESSOR (V. 3 NO. 18) p. 20-21
Reports on the development of means of combating Listeria monocytogenes. This
pathogenic (disease-causing) bacterium has become an increasing focus of attention in the
seafood industry which is keen to rid itself of this hard-to-eradicate bacteria. Discusses
whether equipment design can play a part in the war.




Marine Biotechnology

 121. GENETIC INFLUENCES OVER DISEASE RESISTANCE
Lutz, C. Greg
AQUACULTURE MAGAZINE (V. 32 NO. 4) p. 35-38
Discusses the question of genetic improvement of resistance to diseases for a variety of
aquatic species and the research been done.
Marketing & Retailing

  122. HALF OF U.S. HOMES BUY FROZEN FISH
 Dipietro, Ben
 INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO. 8) p. 30
Almost 50 percent of the nearly 110 million households in the United States consume
frozen, prepared seafood, according to a new report on the frozen foods industry.



123. RAMPING UP GLOBAL PENETRATION
Holmyard, Nicki
SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL (V. 21 NO. 9) p. 24-25
Profiles Wilbo, a polish producer of canned, frozen, fresh and smoked fish, and its label
Neptune.


 124. A SUCCESSFUL LAUNCH MEETS EVERYONE'S NEEDS
Kramer, Lauren
SEAFOOD BUSINESS (V. 25 NO. 8) p. 30
Describes that success of a new seafood product depends on more than flavour and
packaging.


125. SUGGESTIVE SELLING KEY TO SPARKING IMPULSE BUYS
Duchene, Lisa
SEAFOOD BUSINESS (V. 25 NO. 8) p. 34
Describes how shoppers' unplanned purchases drive business in the seafood department.
Suggests ways of getting more consumers to buy seafood.



 126. WAL-MART ROLLS OUT FIRST ECO-LABEL SEAFOOD ITEMS
INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO. 9) p. 12
Reports that Wal-Mart has launched 10 fish products bearing the Marine Stewardship
Council's eco-label.




Miscellaneous

127. FROZEN SECTOR BOOMS AS BUYING HABITS SWITCH
Tournay, Bernadette
SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL (V. 21 NO. 9) p. 33-34
Discusses Spain's booming seafood consumer demand and industry.
128. IT'S IN THE CAN
Urch, Mike
SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL (V. 3 NO. 19) p. 33-35
Reports on the range of tuna processing equipment on show at Tuna 2006, the 9th World
Tuna Trade Conference and Exhibition



 129. MOTHER-OF-PEARL ON ICE : NEW CERAMICS MIGHT SERVE IN BONES AND
 MACHINES
FISHERIES NEWSLETTER (NO. 116) p. 19
Describes how scientists have come up with a way to replicate pearls' microstructure of
natural ceramics in human-made substances. This can serve in new bone growth or
machines.



 130. NOR-FISHING CATCHES OPTIMISTIC MOOD
WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO. 8) p. 26
Reports on the Nor-Fishing 2006 conference, including the challenges facing the fishing
communities along the Norwegian coast in particular enviromental preservation and fish
stock management.


 131. SCIENCE, NOT SENTIMENT, IS KEY TO LIVE-LOBSTER SALES
 Hedlund, Steven
 SEAFOOD BUSINESS (V. 25 NO. 8) p. 28
Whole Foods Market have decided to stop selling live lobsters and four questions are
answered: Do lobsters feel pain? Why do lobsters twitch and hiss when cooked alive? Is it
uncomfortable for lobsters to live in a tank? Is Whole Foods alone in making the sale of live
lobsters an ethical issue?


 132. SEAFOOD IS HOT IN THE U.K.
Evans, John
INTRAFISH (V. 9 NO. 4) p. 26
Discusses trends in British consumer cooking habits, including increased seafood
consumption.



133. THE SEAMAN WITH MANA : PART 1
Pascoe, Baden
PROFESSIONAL SKIPPER (NO. 53) p. 32-33
Obituary of Tom Pook 1913-2006



 134. A SURPRISING USE OF FISH WASTE
Proffitt, Fiona
WATER & ATMOSPHERE (V. 14 NO. 3) p. 22-23
Details NIWA's project to develop natural skincare products from waste products of the
seafood industry, in conjunction with Ngai Tahu Seafood.
135. TRUSTED FRIEND MOVES ON
Ingram, Keith
PROFESSIONAL SKIPPER (NO. 53) p. 23
Obituary for Maxwell John Hetherington, May 19, 1946 - July 18, 2006


 136. WATCH WHAT YOU EAT
Rogers, Lesley
INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO. 9) p. 16-17
Discusses television channel Food Network, and ts impact on advertising and exposure of
seafood products.




Processing & Packaging

 137. FREEZING MUST BE FAST!
Neubacher, Herby
SEAFOOD PROCESSOR (V. 3 NO. 18) p. 36-37
Reports on the various methods of freezing, ice-packing and adding value that follow
second stage processing.


 138. NEW PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY CHASES CHEAP LABOR
Evans, John
INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO. 8) p. 24
Seafood processing equipment makers believe the trend of shipping products to China and
other lower-wage countries for processing could come to an end with advances in
equipment.



 139. PRINCE EDWARD AQUA FARMS DEEPCHILLS.
WORLD FISHING (V. 55 NO.7) p. 16
Describes how satisfied Prince Edward Aqua Farms Inc. are with Sunwell Deepchills, that
cools their mussels and other products better than other types of ice.




 140. TURNING UP THE HEAT
 Holmyard, Nicki
 SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL p. 40-41
Investigates the trend of increased demand for smoked seafood products across many of
the OECD countries. Provides statistical information too.
Seafood for Health

 141. ARE OMEGA-3 PRODUCTS REALLY THE GOOD OIL?
FOOD TECHNOLOGY IN NEW ZEALAND (V. 41 NO. 8) p. 30
Discusses research by two scientists from Crop & Food Research's Seafoods & Marine
Extracts Group that claim reported omega-3 fatty acids benefits may not be all the are
cracked up to be.


 142. CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR AQUACULTURE PRODUCERS
 Billy, Thomas
 EUROFISH (NO. 4) p. 12-13
Summarises the Seafood and Health '05 conference. Presenters and attendees alike
agreed that the benefits of seafood consumption far outweighs the risks. World demand
for sseafood is increasing significantly and even well-managed commercial fisheries cannot
keep up. Improved coordination between scientists, governments, and seafood porducers
can lead to a more healthy future for both aquaculture and consumers.



 143. NAVIGATING THE MINEFIELD
 Neubacher, Herby
SEAFOOD PROCESSOR (V. 3 NO. 19) p. 38
Looks at producing safe seafood products, following more stringent food processing
regulations.


 144. OMEGA-3 INDUSTRY KEEPS GROWING
Muri, Per Anders
INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO. 10) p. 35
Greater consumer awareness of the beneficial effects of fish oils is pushing omega-3-
based products to the front of health food and supermarket shelves.


145. OPTING FOR A HEALTHIER DIET
Wray, Tom
SEAFOOD INTERNATIONAL (V. 21 NO. 9) p. 52-53
Discusses health benefits and consumer preferences following the third Open
SEAFOODplus conference in Tromso, Norway.


 146. UK BRAIN RESEARCHER LINKS DECREASING SEAFOOD CONSUMPTION WITH
 INCREASING HEALTH PROBLEMS
 QUEENSLAND FISHERMAN (V. 24 NO. 7) p. 12-15
One of the world's most eminent researchers into brain function, Michael Crawford,
recently told an Australian radio audience that a decline in seafood consumption has
caused a wide range of health problems and that the change in diet away from fish and
toward cereals has caused a huge increase in brain disorders.


 147. WHAT DO CONSUMERS WANT?
INTRAFISH (V. 4 NO.10) p. 18-20
Five trends boosting seafood consumption - ethnic (eg sushi), organic, health sector (fish
oil), sustainability, ready meals for time-poor shoppers.