Make Way for L.A.'s Writer's Day!

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					Kite Tales
Spring 2008 Volume 19 Number 2

Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators ~ Los Angeles

MakeWayforL.A.’sWriter’sDay!
Saturday, April 12, 2008
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Clairbourn School, San Gabriel, CA

Speakers:
Vice-President & Editor-at-large Patricia Lee Gauch, Philomel Books Fantasy author Gail Carson Levine Biographer Elizabeth Partridge Easy reader author Erica Silverman

Professional Forum
& Main Session speaker Mary Flower, a New York attorney specializing in children’s publishing, on Contract Negotiation

New Authors Panel:
Cecil Castellucci, Queen of Cool, Caroline Hatton, The Night Olympic Team, Sally Jones Rogan, The Daring Adventures of Penhaligon Brush

6 Sue Alexander Service & Encouragement Award 6 Scholarship Contest winner announcement 6 Contests 6 And much, much more! Member $80 Non-Member $90 Join SCBWI today $155 ($75 membership plus $80 Writer’s Day) Lunch included. Look for registration form and details at www.scbwisocal.org

In This Issue
SCBWI-L.A. Regional News ...............................................................................2 Orange/Long Beach/Riverside/San Bernardino Regional News .......3 Ventura/Santa Barbara Regional News .......................................................4 ILLuStRAtOR’S PERSPECtIVE Report From the New York Conference ...........................................6 Networking Is Schmoozing ............................................................................. 8 VOLuNtEER IN tHE SPOtLIGHt Greg Pincus ................................................................................................. 9 Got A New Book Coming Out?.....................................................................12

Who’s Who in SCBWI-Los Angeles
Regional Advisors:
Claudia Harrington, Edie Pagliasotti You can reach us at: 310/573-7318 & or mail us at: SCBWI-LA P.O. Box 1728, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 E-mail Claudia at Claudiascbwi@earthlink.net Edie at ediescbwi@sbcglobal.net Conference Coordinators: Illustrator’s Day: Jaime Zollars Writer’s Day: Claudia Harrington & Edie Pagliasotti Working Writer’s Retreat: Judy Enderle & Stephanie Gordon Down the Rabbit Hole Sunday Field trip, Critiquenic: Dawne Knobbe and Svetlana Strickland Half-Day Writer’s Workshop: Sally Jones Rogan Small Events: Dawne Knobbe and Anne McGee Scholarship Contest: Jennifer De Costa Schmooze Organizers: Gay toltl Kinman (Schmooze Advocate) Greg Pincus & Sara Wilson Etienne (Westside) Joan Charles & Jane Smith (Westside Illustrators) Jennifer Swain (San Fernando Valley Illustrators) Dorothy Raymond (West San Gabriel Valley) Mimi Greenfield Kaplan (East San Gabriel Valley) Suzanne Gibson (South Bay) Advisory Board: Lisze Bechtold, Stephanie Jacob Gordon, Claudia Harrington, Caroline Hatton, Dawne Knobbe, Sarah Laurenson, Marilyn Morton, Edie Pagliasotti, Mary Peterson, Svetlana Strickland, & Jaime Zollars Emeritus: Judy Enderle, Julie Williams www.scbwisocal.org, webmistress Sarah Laurenson

SCBWI-L.A. Regional News
Dear SCBWI-Los Angeles, Spring has sprung! And, with a new season comes a new burst of energy, a new perspective, and a new excitement to dig in on those works-in-progress, or even to start a new book, or begin a fresh piece of artwork. We kicked off 2008 with a bang! Award-winning author Elaine Marie Alphin presented a fantastic Half-Day Writer’s Workshop on February 23rd. Her program, “Worse for Your Characters…Better for Your Plot” involved in-depth plotting and character development techniques. Elaine paced the day with several handouts that served as excellent tools in “getting under the skin” of your story, its characters, and its theme. through several writing exercises, participants discovered some “inner truths” about the stories they want to tell and the characters that inhabit that world. the day posed many questions for us hard-working participants such as: what does your main character “really” want (both internally and externally), what’s at stake not only for your protagonist, but for those secondary characters, as well, why conflict plays such an integral role in your story—and how to ratchet up that tension, and why a writer should take as much care in knowing their villain as well as they know their protagonist, and how all those story threads and subplots are woven together in a seamless, logical way. In the afternoon, Elaine took the group through the “Hero’s Journey” and how that journey can work in their own storytelling. Some participants felt they had walked away from Elaine’s workshop with a new story outline. Others felt their stories had come together in unexpected ways. there were many “aha” moments. All of us certainly left inspired and with a firm resolve to make our stories even better and stronger than they were before. We have great programs lined up this year! try not to miss Writer’s Day on April 12th. On May 18th comes the very fun and illuminating field trip, Down the Rabbit Hole. On June 21st, come have your manuscript/portfolio reviewed by like-minded writers/illustrators at Critiquenic—it’s free! this year, the Working Writers Retreat (September 19-21) will present Charlesbridge editor Yolanda LeRoy and poet/novelist Julie Williams. Another editor will soon be announced. And to all our illustrators: make note—Illustrator’s Day is baaack! You can find details on all our events at scbwisocal.org. We can never thank our hard-working, diligent, never-say-die volunteers for all they do to make the L.A. region the best it can be in bringing exciting and informative programs to our members. A HuGE tHANK YOu!!! Edie & Claudia

SCBWI International
Executive (International) Office: Steve Mooser/Lin Oliver For general info, membership, and other national SCBWI business. 8271 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90048 323/782-1010, membership@scbwi.org www.scbwi.org Regional Advisor Chairperson: Cheryl Zach RA Chair Assistant: Pat Wolfe International Regional Advisor Chair: Erzsi Deak Illustrator Coordinator: Priscilla Burris E-mail: burrisdraw@sbcglobal.net

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Who’s Who at Kite Tales
KItE tALES is a newsletter published by the L.A. Chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. Information published in KItE tALES does not constitute an endorsement by SCBWI and/or SCBWI-LA. KITE TALES Editors Caroline Hatton, Kitetales2@aol.com Vicki Arkoff, and Bonnie Ferron, SCBWI-LA Editors Alexis O’Neill, V/SB Editor, 805/581-1906 or AlexisinCA@aol.com Francesca Rusackas and Q.L. Pearce, Orange/Long Beach/ San B Editors, ZFRANCESCA@aol.com or qlpearce@earthlink.net KItE tALES Layout & Production Mary Peterson, mary@marypeterson.com KItE tALES Subscriptions Mary Peterson, mary@marypeterson.com KItE tALES Ads Bonnie Ferron, bonnieferron@earthlink.net KItE tALES Mailing Crew, Anne McGee. Submission Deadlines... Spring: Feb. 15 for Apr. 1 issue Summer: May 15 for Jul. 1 issue Fall: Aug. 15 for Oct. 1 issue Winter: Nov. 15 for Jan. 1 issue Kite Tales is free at scbwisocal.org. Snail mail subscriptions cost $18/year (4 issues). Send comments, articles, great news, questions, etc. to Caroline Hatton at Kitetales2@aol.com (or KItE tALES, P.O. Box 4795, Culver City, CA 90231-4795) Toot Your Horn: Follow instructions in this issue. Critique Connections: Contact Mary Ann Dames at critiqueconnect@yahoo.com or if no web access, leave message “For Mary Ann, about Critique Connections” at (310) 573-7318. Ads: use form in this issue. Regular Features Who’s Who.......................................................................................................... 2 toot Your Horn ............................................................................................. 10 Featured SCBWI-L.A. Illustrator ......................................................... 11 News From the Net .................................................................................. 12 to Market, to Market ................................................................................ 13 Critique Connections .............................................................................. 19 Bulletin Board ............................................................................................... 20

Orange / Long Beach / Riverside / San Bernardino Regional News
Greetings from Francesca,
the earth is getting ready to spring forth with its hidden treasures and so are we! You are invited to join us for a unique opportunity on Saturday, May 3, 2008 for our Second Annual SCBWI-OC Agent’s Day. We will gather harbor side in the beautiful hidden oasis of Newport Beach at the Newport Sea Base. Our five guest agents will be Paula Allen from Screenland Literary Associates, Jamie Weiss Chilton from Andrea Brown Literary, Alyssa Eisner Henkin from trident Media Group, Lindsay Davis from Writer’s House (West Coast), and Rachel Orr from Prospect Agency. For your comfort and enjoyment, we will be in a large meeting room overlooking the tranquil harbor. this year we will be able to accommodate a larger group, but parking will still be VERY limited, so carpooling is encouraged! Check out scbwisocal.org for additional details. this popular event sells out quickly, so please sign up as soon as possible, especially if you would like your manuscript critiqued. We are thrilled and offer kudos to members of our talented group for their recent successes from the contacts they made at an SCBWI event! Marlene Perez met Scholastic/Point editor Abby McAden at our 2006 OC Editor’s Day; Marlene’s teen novel Love in the Corner Pocket was bought by Point and it comes out this spring. Ev Stanton and Marilyn Scott-Waters met the delightful new literary agent Jamie Weiss Chilton at our 2007 SCBWI OC Graphic Novel Day and we are happy to report that Jamie signed them both up with the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. the paperengineered board book that Marilyn shared with us at our 2007 SCBWI OC Editor’s Day just came out with Piggy toes Press. A huge Whoo hoo! to Kathryn Fitzmaurice who signed a two-book deal with HarperCollins imprint Bowen Press. Her novel, The Year the Swallows Came Early, was the middle grade first place winner in the “Win and You’re In” contest at our 2005 SCBWI OC Editor’s Day. Andrew Mitchell has good news from the 2008 SCBWI Winter Conference: he came home with a tomie dePaola award for his art portfolio! Read more kudos on our chapter’s website. I hope to see you at the 2008 SCBWI OC Agent’s Day. Give your career the attention it deserves. Come on out and join us! Cheers, Francesca Rusackas Regional Advisor Orange County/Riverside/San Bernardino Chapter

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Ventura/Santa Barbara Regional News
Upcoming Ventura County Events APRIL 26, 2007. Writing Workshop. Santa Barbara County. “Getting Serious About Series.” Speakers: Bruce Hale, Author of the “Chet Gecko” series and Andrea Welch, Editor, Harcourt Children’s Books. 1:00–4:30 p.m. Santa Barbara County Education Office Auditorium, 4400 Cathedral Oaks Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93160. Cost: $40 members / $50 non-members. Printable registration form at scbwisocal.org. For information, contact Val Hobbs at valhobbs@cox.net or call (805) 966-4292. MAY 10, 2008. Critiquenic. Santa Barbara County. Location & time tBA. Bring up to five manuscript pages for critique. Free to members; $5.00 non-members. to register, contact Val Hobbs at valhobbs@cox.net or call (805) 966-4292. MAY 17, 2008. Critiquenic. San Luis Obispo County. San Luis Obispo Art Center, 1010 Broad St. at Monterey, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406. Bring up to five manuscript pages for critique. Free to members; $5.00 non-members. to register, contact Sidonie Wiedenkeller at doniew@aol. com or (805) 528-3944. JUNE 8, 2008. Critiquenic. Ventura County. 1:00–4:00 p.m. Adventures for Kids, 3457 telegraph Road, Ventura, CA 93003. Bring up to five manuscript pages for critique. We’ll provide snacks and beverages. Free to members; $5.00, non-members. to register, contact: Jody Fickes Shapiro at jpshap@ roadrunner.com or call (805) 642-7554. Alexis O’Neill, SCBWI Regional Advisor (805) 581-1906 AlexisInCA@aol.com

Retreat Report
A Deeper Look: Shaping Your Works-in-Progress
Forty writers gathered at Mission Santa Barbara in January to examine works-inprogress from multiple points of view. In addition to peer critiques, participants had a chance to hear feedback from three editors: Stacy Cantor, Associate Editor, Walker Books for Young Readers; Alexandra Cooper, Associate Editor, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; and Kristin Daly, Editor, HarperCollins Children’s Books. Participants reported that there were two big benefits of having three editors in residence: 1) writers learned how subjective the process of manuscript review can be, since what pleased one editor didn’t always touch another; 2) writers shaved up to two years off the submission process, because, let’s face it, editors take about 6-8 months to respond in today’s market and—boom!—feedback was immediate over the weekend. Special thanks to Gwen Dandridge for being registrar, baker, and all-around righthand person; Fred Borchers for donating, via SBCOE, books for libraries as well as book covers that were used in an art project; and Rebecca Langston-George for her wild and wooly games of skill and chance.

JOIN Our Region’s SCBWI CCAL-ONElist Listserv www.onelist.com/subscribe/SCBWI-Ccal for industry and member news Questions? Contact Gwen Dandridge at gwenhlt@yahoo.com
Photography by Judy Lucas.

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...VENTURA/SANTA BARBARA REGIONAL NEWS

Conference Grant Contest Open To Writers
the Ventura/Santa Barbara Region of SCBWI is offering a full tuition grant to either the SCBWI Summer Conference in L.A. 2008 or the SCBWI Winter Conference in New York City 2009. this opportunity, worth $500, is open to any SCBWI member or associate member who resides in the counties of Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo or Kern. Here’s the challenge:

CONTEST CHALLENGE
Choose a character from children’s literature to run for the office of the American president. Write his/her stump speech, where he/she explains what he/she will do for writers, how he/she will change their lives and the children’s publishing industry.

CONTEST RULES
1. You must be a current member or associate member of the SCBWI-Ventura/SB/SLO/ Kern region. (Past recipients of conference grants are not eligible.) 2. Requirements: 250 words or less 1 page single-spaced 1” margins 12-point font 1 entry limit 3. Submission rules: Do NOt put your name on your essay (if you do, you’ll be disqualified). DO fill out the entry form and staple your essay and the entry form together. Mail your essay and entry form to: V/SB-SCBWI 2008 Grant c/o terry Pierce BOOK TALKS 1216 Jennifer Ct. Ridgecrest, CA 93555 Book talk is a monthly book discussion group taking place on the Ventura/Santa Barbara/San 4. Submissions not in compliance with the rules will Luis Obispo/Kern SCBWI listserv. Discussions begin be disqualified. Entries will be judged on the basis of on the first of each month. Readers may join in originality and writing skill. anytime during the month with comments or questions about the featured book. Book talk is 5. Deadline: ENTRIES MUST BE POSTMARKED open to all members of Southern California SCBWI BY APRIL 30, 2008. who are signed up for the regional listserv. to become a member of the listserv, go to: http:// the winner will be announced on May 20, 2008. the groups.yahoo.com/group/SCBWI-CCal/ winning entry is not transferable nor is it applicable beyond the Winter SCBWI NYC Conference in 2009. the $500 grant covers the conference tuition with additional funds for a manuscript or portfolio critique. All other expenses (i.e., travel, hotel, food) are the responsibility of the recipient. APRIL: Wonderful Words, selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins and Illustrated by Karen Barbour, and Marvelous Math, selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins and illustrated by Karen Barbour MAY: The Star of Kazan, by Eva Ibbotson, illustrated by Kevin Hawkes JUNE: Feed, by M. t. Anderson JULY: Babymouse: Queen of the World, by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm —Lynn Becker, Facilitator

QUESTIONS?
Call terry Pierce at (760) 375-3217 or e-mail mntpierce@mchsi.com.

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ILLuStRAtOR’S PERSPECtIVE

Report From The New York Conference By Andrew Mitchell

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...Report From The New York Conference

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Contact Dr. Gay toltl Kinman, Schmooze Advocate, at gtkinman@juno.com

Start a Schmooze!

Networking Is Schmoozing!!
If you don’t think networking is important in this profession, then you’re not thinking professionally. One way to network is to attend Schmoozes. Check www.scbwisocal.org Not one in your area?--then start one yourself, or partner with another person. HOW TO START A SCHMOOZE: 1. Decide if the Schmooze is going to be for writers, for illustrators, or for both. 2. Find a location--church, library, bookstore, home. 3. Pick a day of the month--third Monday of the month, first Saturday. 4. Determine how often the group is going to meet 5. Choose a topic for the first Schmooze. TOPICS: Check out the topics on the website. Schmoozes are get-togethers to talk about writing for children and young adults. Schmoozes are not critique groups. However two Schmoozes can be critiques. Doing this just before the summer Critiquenic and Conference is very helpful. Schmoozes are not to host speakers each time, but you can have at least two speakers during the year. HOW TO PUBLICIZE YOUR SCHMOOZE: 1.Your Schmooze, location and time will be listed on the website under Schmoozes. the date and topic will be in the Calendar separate. 2. Post on the SCBWI listserv. 3. Develop an e-mail list. 4. SCBWI will provide mailing labels of members in the ZIP codes in your area. use these to send out a notice / flyer the first time. HELP IN STARTING A SCHMOOZE: Other Schmooze Coordinators and Assistants will help with advice, as will the Schmooze Advocate, so you’re not alone out there. $15 per session is provided for refreshments. Refreshments are important!!!! THE REAL SKINNY FROM SCHMOOZE COORDINATORS: “’To Schmooze’ really means to gather together for conversation. Our SCBWI Schmoozes allow creative people to gather to discuss and share writing experiences.” East San Gabriel Valley Writers. “I’ve discovered that the support, sharing of information and encouragement among the attendees are very important. Several have left the Schmooze, only to come back because they missed the sharing and encouragement the members share.” from Antelope Valley Writers. “...a lot of positives of running a Schmooze: the fact that you learn a lot by digging into topics; the satisfaction you get from helping (and learning); the ability to pick speakers who interest you as well as others; the perks in the second year; the connections you make and how that makes going to local conferences more fun (and, for me, more informative, as I compare notes with friends.) I’d also note that running the Schmooze is more about making sure you show up, than it is about putting in tons and tons of hours of prep time!” Westside Writers. “Personally, I do the Schmooze cuz of the refreshments, but that seemed to be underselling!” Westside Writers. “As for me, I enjoy the sense of community that comes from running a Schmooze, the connections both professional and personal that I’ve developed, and the satisfaction from helping others as well as the learning.” Westside Illustrators. SCHMOOZES!! FOR WRITERS AND ILLUSTRATORS SOUTH BAY--Katy Geissert torrance Civic Center Library, 3301 torrance Blvd. torrance CA 90503. Library: 310-739-5978, on the fourth Saturday from 10 am to 12:30. (Bring a sack lunch and mingle in the garden after the Schmooze). Contact Suzanne Gibson gibsonandgibson@socal.rr.com FOR WRITERS: ANTELOPE VALLEY--Barnes and Noble Bookstore, 39228 10th St. West, Palmdale, on the second Wednesday of each month from 7 to 8 p.m. Contact Marilyn Dalrymple marilyn160@verizon.net EAST SAN GABRIEL VALLEY--Walnut Public Library, 21155 La Puente Road in Walnut CA 91789. 909-595-0757, on the first Saturday of odd-numbered months from 10a.m.-12 noon. Contact Mimi Greenfield Kaplan at mimijk@verizon.net WEST SAN GABRIEL VALLEY--Community Room of the Hastings Branch, Pasadena Public Library, 3325 East Orange Grove Boulevard, Pasadena CA 91107 (corner of Orange Grove and Sierra Madre Villa) Library: 626-744-7262, on the first Saturday of even-numbered months. Contact Dorothy Raymond dorray@earthlink. net WESTSIDE--Fairview Branch, Santa Monica Library, 2101 Ocean Park Blvd., Santa Monica, on the second Wednesday from 7-8:45 p.m. Contact Sara Wilson Etienne or Greg Pincus at WestsideSchmooze@hotmail. com FOR ILLUSTRATORS: SAN FERNANDO VALLEY--Roger Barkley Community Center of La Canada, 4469 Chevy Chase Drive, La Canada Flintridge, on the third thursday from 7 to 9 pm. Co-ordinator Jennifer Swain swainjennifer@hotmail.com WESTSIDE ILLUSTRATORS--New meeting time and location to be announced. Coordinators: Joan Charles charlesren@aol.com (put “Schmooze” in the subject line) and Jane Smith. www.scbwisocal.org/schmoozes/ west_illus.htm

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VOLuNtEER IN tHE SPOtLIGHt

Greg Pincus
I’d like to get two things straight right up front: I was NOt born a writer or bearded. In fact, both of those came later in life, and only one of them came naturally. I’ve had to work pretty hard at the whole writing thang, and volunteering for SCBWI (as a Schmooze coordinator) has been a big positive on that journey. Plus, at least once a month, I now have reason to shave. “But why is it a positive? And why volunteer?” I hear you ask. Well, I’d always gotten a lot out of attending the Westside Schmooze, just like I’d gotten a lot out of attending local SCBWI conferences. Also, I’d been amazed and gratified by the tremendous generosity of spirit of the SCBWI folks I’d met, many of whom had patiently answered my questions, pointed me towards resources, and occasionally given me cookies. this was a sharp contrast to my years as a screenwriter in Hollywood where I’d met many nice folks, but generosity wasn’t exactly the watchword, and cookies came with a price.* So, when I was asked if I’d become a Jr. Schmooze Coordinator, I said “Are you kidding??? Commit to Schmoozing every month??? Guess again.” In truth, that was just a negotiating ploy to get a better salary, and the fact was that I knew it was time for me to pay back that generosity I’d admired. In the end, I agreed to volunteer, particularly when I discovered there was something wicked cool about the position: coordinators get a small monthly Schmooze budget that can be spent to provide dessert items OF tHEIR CHOICE! What I didn’t expect (besides the pressure of picking the right sweet) was how much I’d gain through volunteering. Preparing for each Schmooze makes me dig into a topic deeply, which is both fun and instructive. Plus, getting to hear so much conversation from so many smart folks always helps me learn even more. then there’s the intangible good feeling you get from hanging out with so many people passionate about the same thing you’re passionate about, as well as the bonus of knowing so many folks when I go to conferences. And corny though it sounds, it’s really satisfying to be able to share what I’ve learned and every now and then help folks the way I was (and am still) helped by others. Need more? I’d started my trip as a children’s author sure I was gonna write picture books and poetry. But to my surprise, I’ve ended up writing a middle grade novel for Arthur A. Levine books—a contract that I don’t think ever would’ve happened without all the various SCBWI connections and help over the years. And yes… because of Schmoozing and volunteering, I know a lot more about middle grade than I ever would’ve, had I just been on my own. All in all, I have to say volunteering’s great… even if you don’t need a reason to shave. 2 Gregory K. Pincus has written for the big screen (Little Big League), the small screen (the Disney Channel’s Alley Cats Strike and many other movies), and the computer screen (blogging at gottabook.blogspot.com). Greg is thrilled to have his first novel, the 14 Fabulous Fibs of Gregory K., coming out soon from Arthur A. Levine Books. In the meantime, please join him at his blog as he posts an original poem a day during April in celebration of National Poetry Month.

*$3.25 at most commissaries.

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Toot Your Horn
Compiled by Bonnie Ferron n The Adventures of Lauren Macphearson, Gay Toltl Kinman, ages 8 and up, Hilliard and Harris n Antigua and Barbuda (Cultures of the World series), Sara Louise Kras, Marshall-Cavendish, ISBN 978-0761425700 n Botswana (The Enchantment of the World series), Sara Louise Kras, Marshall-Cavendish, ISBN 978-0516248745 n Fowl Language and Fine-Feathered Four-Eyes (Supernatural Rubber Chicken series) D.L. Garfinkle, ill. Ethan Long, ages 6-10, Mirrorstone. dlgarfinkle.com n Gideon’s Dream – A Tale of New Beginnings by Ken Dychtwald, Maddy Dychtwald, Dave Zaboski and Grace Zaboski (age 7), ill. Dave Zaboski, picture book, ages 4 and up, HarperCollins, ISBN 978-0061434976 n Gilly’s Divorce and Manual Gay Toltl Kinman, ages 10 and up, Hilliard and Harris n The Night Olympic Team – Fighting to Keep Drugs Out of the Games, Caroline Hatton, nonfiction, ages 12 and up, Boyds Mills Press, ISBN-10: 1-59078-566-5 - ISBN-13: 978-1-59078-566-9 carolinehatton.com n Pop & Sniff Fruit, Paper Engineering by Marilyn Scott-Waters, Piggy toes Press, ISBN 978-1581176766 n The Pout-Pout Fish, Deborah Diesen, ill. Dan Hanna, picture book, ages 3-6, Farrar, Straus and Giroux. deborahdiesen.com n Rogelia’s House of Magic, Jamie Martinez Wood, Young Adult Novel, ages 11 and up, Delacorte Press, ISBN 978-0385734776 jamiemartinezwood.com n The Shark That Taught Me English, Michelle Markel, Ill. Bo Young Kim, picture book, ages 4 and up, Lectura Books n Tell Me a Story 2: Animal Magic, Amy Friedman, music by Laura Hall, ill. Jillian Gilliland, Audiobook CD, ages 5 and up, Friedman & Danziger (Fall 2007), ISBN 978-0979086717 mythsandtales.com

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ILLuStRAtOR’S PERSPECtIVE

A Gallery of Illustration From SCBWI-L.A. Illustrator Carmel O’Mara
If you visited Carmel O’Mara in her Los Angeles studio, you would find yourself surrounded by pictures of all kinds, shelves full of books, and toys. Some of the books she illustrated, wrote, or designed herself. Ever since she was a child, Carmel wanted to be a children’s book illustrator. After studying at California State university Long Beach and earning a degree in illustration, she found SCBWI and attended her first of many conferences. there, she met her first mentor, uri Shulevitz. As a student of his, she discovered that she could express her visions not only in art, but also in words. A short time later (that is, in picture book editing time) she published her first book, Good Morning/Good Night. A few sequels have followed. Now she hopes to branch out into pop-up books. When she’s not managing school activities and functions for her son, Julian, and keeping her menagerie of animals in check or assisting her husband, Charles, in his busy real estate career, Carmel keeps working on new books and attending conferences. If you would like to learn more about Carmel’s work, please visit her web site, carmelomara.com. P.S. If you are an illustrator interested in writing, Carmel recommends that you read uri Shulevitz’s book, Writing with Pictures.

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News From The Internet
by Narda Lacey Fargotstein Inspiration in Your Own Backyard A couple of weeks ago, while in my backyard checking up on my fig tree—which had fallen this summer under the weight of its overabundance of fruit—I saw, under a fallen branch, mushrooms pushing up out of the ground. this got me musing about how they sprouted without me planting them and how little I knew about mushrooms, except for some sense that they have been growing on this earth for centuries. According to the hieroglyphics of 4,600 years ago, the Ancient Egyptians believed that mushrooms were the plant of immortality. these and other facts about mushrooms are found at the Mushroom Council. You may live near a mushroom festival and not even know it. Mushroom festivals span from the West Coast at Morgan Hill, California, Mushroom MardiGras to Kennet Square, Pennsylvania’s Mushroom Festival. this made me look around my backyard, at my navel orange tree. Southern California, I mused, was once filled with miles of orange groves. Who would have thought that a navel orange tree is on the list of California historical landmarks? Most of us have seen these markers along roads and highways, but may not have taken the time to stop, read, and learn about these historical sites. One man has not only visited these sites, but he has photographed them and displayed them on the web at www.donaldlaird.com/landmarks/counties/000-099/020.html A single mutation in 1820 in an orange orchard at a monastery in Brazil yielded the navel orange, also known as the Washington, Riverside, or Bahia navel. the mutation caused a second orange to develop at the base of the original fruit, opposite the stem. the second orange grows as a conjoined twin, undeveloped, smaller. From the outside, it looks somewhat like a human navel. the ancestors of the navel orange tree in my backyard still live in Riverside, CA, where they were propagated from trees imported from Brazil in 1870 and given to Eliza tibbets via William Saunders, a horticulturist at the Department of Agriculture. It’s amazing how the mushrooms in my backyard were actually part of a global thread, taking me to ancient Egypt, through Morgan Hill, CA, Kennet Square, PA, and winding its way to Brazil. try it! “think locally, act globally.” Start from a local item, event or person, and stretch the canvas to the global stage. Highlight the geographical and human connections, and invite your readers to ponder the significance of the concepts within. Expand their minds by helping them envision the big picture and figure out the big idea. Narda Lacey Fargotstein is working on making the leap from nonfiction to children’s books. She is author of the Whole Computer Catalog and Articles on Women Writers, Vol I and II. Her article on the Dodo bird in Alice in Wonderland was recently cited in the More Annotated Alice. Narda is always looking for new websites and suggestions for future columns. E-mail nfargotstein@yahoo.com. We do our best to provide current information, but we do not guarantee its accuracy. the fact that information is provided at SCBWI websites or in Kite Tales in no way implies endorsement by SCBWI or SCBWI-L.A.

Got A New Book Coming Out?
tell your publisher’s publicity person which state awards it’s eligible for. Go to the Central Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL) downtown, to the Children’s Literature Department, ask the librarian to help you pull up Awards and Prizes from the Children’s Book Council, and check out all the state awards. LAPL will maintain the subscription only if it’s used. It’s the only resource of its kind. to look up each state award individually, you would have to know the name of the award or sponsoring agency.

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TO MARKET TO MARKET
Edited by Vicki Arkoff

Books

BOYDS MILLS PRESS: 815 Church Street, Honesdale, PA 18431. Accepts unsolicited submissions for picture books, poetry, nonfiction, and middle-grade and young adult fiction, as well as picture book projects and sample illustrations from illustrators. All submissions are evaluated for all imprints. See detailed guidelines at website. For nonfiction, include bibliography with submission and if possible, an expert’s review as well as details on similar books on the market and the need for the proposed book; creating or finding illustrations (photos or other) is the author’s responsibility. (W: 2/08) CHRISTY OTTAVIANO BOOKS: 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. After 15 years as a Henry Holt Books for Young Readers editor, Christy Ottaviano has been promoted to editorial director of Holt’s new eponymous imprint. the line’s broad scope encompasses “literary and commercial picture books and fiction for all ages,” she says. “Books that encourage imagination and free-thinking, foster a sense of family and community, target the feelings of children, and speak directly to children’s interests as they explore various milestones. Books that are reassuring as well as those that challenge readers. Intriguing books for inquisitive kids.” the imprint aims to publish approximately 20 books annually—half picture books, a considerable amount of middle grade and YA fiction, and a small amount of nonfiction. (PL: 2/08) DIAL BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS: 345 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014. this division of Penguin Young Readers Group is accepting unsolicited submissions from unagented writers. Editors seek complete picture book manuscripts, and a maximum of 10 pages for longer works (novels, easy-to-reads) from the opening chapter(s) of the manuscript. As with all Penguin imprints, submissions are accepted by snail mail only. No SASE for returns, or confirmation postcards. Editors will reply within four months if interested in publishing it; there will be no reply otherwise. Please follow writer’s guidelines at website. (P: 2/08) HENRY HOLT BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS: 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. Publisher of fiction and nonfiction picture books, middle grade titles, and young adult books is open to submissions addressed to “Submissions Editor” and following company guidelines at their website. Senior Editor Reka Simonsen does not seek manuscripts in any specific categories, but says “it all comes down to how well

written the submission is.” No religious books, board books, how-to or activity books. tIP: Send complete manuscript with cover letter for best response. Simonsen’s advice for getting through the initial screening: “Write the best story you can. It all comes down to the words on the page. that’s the only thing we consider when we read submissions.” Pays royalty and advance. (CW: 1/08) KAR-BEN PUBLISHING: 11430 Strand Dr. #2, Rockville, MD 20852-4371. this division of the Lerner Publishing Group publisher books about the Jewish faith for pre-K through YA including board books, picture books, activity books, and middlegrade and young adult fiction and nonfiction. TIP: KarBen seeks submissions on Jewish holidays, traditions and folktales; the Holocaust; Bible stories; tales about Israel, and Jewish history. Of particular interest, says Director Joni Sussman, are manuscripts presenting relatable characters and stories that illuminate a Jewish point of view on topics such as cultural diversity and family heritage. No games, textbooks, or books in Hebrew. Send complete manuscript. See guidelines posted at website. Pays royalty or flat fee. (CW: 12/07) LOBSTER PRESS: 1620 Sherbrooke St. W., Suites C & D, Montreal, QC H3H 1C9 Canada. this award-winning indie publisher is currently seeking strong young adult fiction and nonfiction by Canadian authors. Specifically, the editors seek manuscripts for reluctant teen readers that have compelling protagonists and fast-paced plots. Payment varies. (CW: 1/08) WHITE MANE KIDS: 73 W. Burd St., P.O. Box 708, Shippensburg, PA 17257. Middle-grade and YA historical fiction is the specialty here, with a focus on the American Civil War and some American Revolution topics. tIP: the publishers emphasize that it’s important writers build contacts during the writing process since their market is more specific. They suggest visiting museums and battlefields while doing research to talk with historians and contacts in the field. Query. If interested, a White Mane Editor will send full guidelines and request a full manuscript. Pays royalty. (CW: 12/07) WINWARD PUBLISHING: 8075 215th St. W., Lakeville, MN 55044. An imprint of Finney Company, Winward publishes nonfiction for ages two through ten. they are currently looking for environmentally-friendly educational titles for its Ecopress imprint. “We also continue to watch nature, ocean life, wildlife and outdoor recreation titles,” says Alan Krysan, President. Not accepting queries or submissions for board books, alphabet books or counting books. Send complete manuscript with

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a cover letter telling the “story behind the story” explaining why you wrote your book and what makes it unique and marketable. Read and follow writer’s guidelines at the imprint website. Pays royalty or workfor-hire. (CW: 1/08). WALKER AND COMPANY: 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. Currently accepting unsolicited manuscripts, but guidelines have recently changed. Established in 1961, the company publishes three small lists of children’s books per year, each consisting of approximately ten picture books and four to five middle-grade and/ or YA works, for a total of up to 45 titles annually. tIP: Due to a philosophy of publishing authors, not books, Walker rarely accepts nonfiction that focuses on nature or wildlife, as they already have strong relationships with author specialists. “Our strongest needs are for middle-grade and YA novels and for well-paced picture book manuscripts for both the preschool and early elementary age levels.” No folk tales, fairy tales, textbooks, myths, legends, books in series format, novelties, science fiction, fantasy, or horror. unpublished and unagented writers are welcomed to query or submit with polished material. Simultaneous submissions O.K. as long as your cover letter states so. Responds in five months but does not return submissions. Illustrators are invited to send samples for review of to keep on file and be circulated to editors. Good quality photocopies or dummy books are fine. Catalog available at website or by request with a SASE (9 x 12) sent in a package marked “catalog request” on the outside, and we will be happy to mail one to you as long as supplies last. (P: 2/08)

tweens use technology safely and effectively. New writers are welcome. “In fact, we want to hear from teachers, tech coaches, parents, guardians, and youth ages 9 to 14 about the issues, concerns and ideas that matter most to them,” says Caitlin Johnson, Editorin-Chief. Submissions must relate to the safe use of technology including the internet, e-mail, instant messaging, social networking, cell phones, and wireless devices, and must be relevant to tweens and their parents. No fear-based articles, didactic pieces or overly general stories. tIP: “We’re looking for conversational, easy-to-read articles that are substantive.” Prefers query but will accept complete manuscript sent to internet-safety@nea.org. Articles and columns of 600-950 words pays $200 for adults, $75 for writers ages 9-14. Higher payment for longer, more complex journalistic pieces to 1,100 words. (CW: 12/07) BREAD FOR GOD’S CHILDREN: P.O. Box 1017, Arcadia, FL 34265. Christian magazine for families. Editor Judith Gibbs seeks submissions preaching faith in Jesus, especially through stories about “overcoming trials or strengthening faith, testimonies of healing and miracles.” No fantasy or science fiction, or stories about teen dating or bullying. Mail complete manuscripts to Donna Wade, editorial secretary. Pays upon publication: $50 for teen stories 900-1,200 words; $40 for children’s stories 500-800 words; $30 for shorter articles. (CW: 1/08) INTERNATIONAL GYMNAST: 3214 Bart Conner Dr., Norman, OK 73072. Geared toward the diehard fan, this magazine welcomes new writers who understand the sport of gymnastics. Editor Dwight Normile currently needs personal experience stories, fan experiences, humor, and light fiction. TIP: Do your homework. “Most stories we receive are filled with inaccuracies about the sport,” Normile warns. “I believe everyone who reads IG has a story to tell concerning their experiences as a gymnast, fan, coach, or parent. As long as you write from the heart, you will reach the reader, which is really what we’re after.” Send complete manuscripts for pieces under 800 words. Query with a brief author biography for longer works. Payment varies. (CW: 1/08) SIX78th: P.O. Box 450, Newark, CA 94560. tween magazine focusing on topics encouraged by parents and teachers to help girls navigate personal and school success. “We aim to deliver a realistic view of the transition girls experience during junior high, as well as representational voice of tween culture,” says Senior Features Editor Carol Rothchild. A wide range of freelance queries are welcome for schoolrelated articles, seasonal and holiday-themed features (submitted well in advance of holiday), and “tween

Magazines
BLAZE: P.O. Box 2660, Niagra Falls, NY 14302. For ages 8–14, “Blaze is a one-of-a-kind discovery magazine about horses, the kids who love them and the world they share,” says Publisher Jeff Tiessen. He seeks profiles of people whose life or work keeps them in close contact with horses, and short articles (200-500 words) that describe programs involving horses. Interactive games and fascinating facts are also welcome. Breed profiles are not needed. Include original photographs with submissions. Query with a creative introduction to Managing Editor Brenda McCarthy: Brenda@blazekids. com. Pays 25 cents per word. (CW: 12/07) bNetS@vvy: 224 thompson St. #17, New York, NY 10012. the National Education Association health Information Network publishes this online magazine in partnership with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Sprint. It offers information on helping

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focus topics.” No quizzes, no filler, no list-oriented articles or articles covering subjects too intense or controversial for middle school demographics. tIP: A good query comes from a writer who has a clear concept and angle in mind,” says Rothchild. “A good submission reflects an understanding of tween culture and a voice that respects the intelligence, diversity, and potential of our readers.” Request guidelines first then follow specific terms before pitching your ideas. E-mail queries to: editor@six78th.com. Include story angle and two sample paragraphs representing your article’s style and tone. Pays $100-150 for tween profiles of about 700 words. (CW: 1/08) WEE ONES: Editor Jennifer Reed announced that this magazine is no longer accepting submissions and will close at the end of 2008. (CW: 1/08) ZAMOOF!: Dream Wave Publishing, 644 Spruceview Place S., Kelowna, BC V1V 2P7 Canada. Magazine designed to educate youth in making safe and healthy choices now in preparation for the teen years ahead. “We do this through select editorials dispersed among the fun,” says Editor and Publisher teLeni Koochin, who is open to freelancers, especially Canadian citizens, due to grant restrictions. “On the whole we want topics that kids can directly relate to and that catch their interest. I try to balance our stories so that some are geared more for our younger readers (8-10) and others to our older ones (11-13).” Stories can also be just for entertainment. No games or puzzles. Freelances should start by emailing samples that target Zamoof’s readers to mail@zamoofmag.com. Pays 25 cents per word. (CW: 1/08)

driven literary fiction with intense emotional content, smart thrillers and mysteries, science fiction, surreal stories and magical realism, sweet, funny, quirky chapter books and picture books.” Laughran was a buyer and children’s specialist for Books Inc. in San Francisco, and represents middle grade and YA fiction. She is looking for YA and middle grade realistic fiction, science fiction, mystery, adventure and humor. Details and submission guidelines: andreabrownlit.com. (A: 1/08) BLISS LITERATY AGENCY INTERNATIONAL After four years as an agent with Levine Greenberg Literary Agency, Los Angeles-based Jenoyne Adams has started her own agency. She is focusing on middle grade/YA, literary/ethnic-world fiction, and creative nonfiction/women’s interest. Levine Greenberg will continue to represent Adams, who is also a novelist, on her own fiction. (PL: 1/08) THE CREATIVE CULTURE Matthew Elblonk has joined as an agent. He was formerly at Collins Literary. (PL: 1/08) FINEPRINT LITERARY MANAGEMENT Colleen Lindsay has joined as an agent, focusing on fantasy and science fiction, horror, paranormal romance, YA fiction and non-fiction, pop culture, and graphic novels. Working in the book business for over 20 years, Lindsay’s primary background is in publicity, marketing and genre publishing. (PL: 2/07) ICM Children’s book agent Christine Earle has left the agency to take a post with Random House Films. Agent Tina Wexler has assumed her client roster. (A: 1/08) KT LITERARY Agent Kate Schafer has left Janklow & Nesbit after almost 10 years to set up her own literary agency in Denver, Colorado. Schafer is currently seeking submissions in middle grade, YA, and women’s fiction; and pop-culture narrative non-fiction. Schafer especially seeeks “brilliant, funny, original middle grade and young adult fiction, both literary and commercial.” (PL/A: 2/08) JENNIFER LYONS LITERARY AGENCY Ruth Mirsky has been promoted to agent. (PL: 1/08) RED SOFA LITERARY Dawn Michelle Frederick is leaving the Sebastian Literary Agency after more than five years to start her own agency. (PL: 1/08) THE SCIENCE FACTORY After six years as an agent and director at uK agency Conville & Walsh, Peter Tallack is launching his own agency and consultancy. tallack focuses on

Agents
AIKEN ALEXANDER Andrew Kidd has left Pan Macmillan join Aitken Alexander as an agent. (PL: 1/08) ANDERSON LITERARY MANAGEMENT Samantha Edussuriya, formerly managing editor and marketing manager for Hippocrene Books,has become managing director of the agency. Rachel Hecht has left to become a children’s scout for Mary Anne thompson Associates. (PL: 12/07) ANDREA BROWN LITERARY AGENCY Jamie Weiss Chilton and Jennifer Laughran have joined as associate agents. Chilton, most recently SCBWI’s conference manager and previously assistant editor at Knopf and Crown Children’s, represents picture books, middle grade and YA fiction, and narrative nonfiction. Her particular interests include “character-

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representing “authors aiming to satisfy the public’s intellectual hunger for serious ideas”—including popular science along with other general nonfiction and “the occasional novelist.” tallack was science publishing director at Weidenfeld & Nicolson before joining Conville & Walsh. the Science Factory also plans to “provide science media-consultancy and editorial services, and from time to time publish its own book titles.” (PL: 2/08) STEPHANIE TADE AGENCY Dana Bacher has been hired as an agent and subsidiary rights manager. She will represent general fiction and nonfiction, and will develop a new YA and children’s book department. Bacher was associate director of subsidiary rights and marketing director, trade books at Rodale. (PL: 1/08)

LEE AND LOW’S NEW VOICES AWARD 95 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016. Lee and Low Books’ yearly award for a children’s picture book by a first-time author of color who is also a u.S. resident. Winner earns $1,000 plus publishing contract with advance and royalty payments. An Honor Award winner will receive a cash grant of $500. the award encourages writers of color to submit their work to a publisher committed to nurturing new talent. Manuscripts may be fiction or nonfiction for children ages 5 – 12, and can be no more than 1,500 words in length. No folklore or animal stories. Submissions should address the needs of children of color by providing stories they can identify with and which promote a greater understanding of one another. Entries must be received between May 1 and Oct. 31, ‘08. Winners will be selected no later than Dec. 31, ‘08. Complete rules at website. (P: 2/08) POCKETS ANNUAL FICTION-WRITING CONTEST 1908 Grand Avenue, P.O. Box 34004, Nashville, tN 37203-0004. Christian magazine’s annual contest to discover new writers. the winner will be notified Nov. 1, will receive a $1,000 award, and will have his or her story published in Pockets magazine. Previous winners are not eligible. Guidelines are essentially the same as for regularly submitted material (see website for details). Historical and biblical fiction are not eligible. Submissions must be postmarked between Mar. 1- Aug. 15 of the contest year; 1,000-1,600 words, with 1,400 recommended; have an accurate word count stated on the cover sheet; unpublished; and designated “Fiction Contest” on entry envelope and on the cover sheet. Submissions will be disqualified if do not meet requirements, and will be returned if accompanied by SASE with sufficient postage. No entry fee. the 2007 contest had 350 submissions, 20 of which are under consideration for publication. See website for full details. (P: 2/08)

Contests
DELACORTE DELL YEARLING FIRST MIDDLE-GRADE NOVEL 1745 Broadway, 9th floor, New York, NY, 10019. Delacorte Press Books for Young Readers presents its 17th annual contest for a First Middle-Grade Novel (formerly the Marguerite de Angeli Contest). the prize is a book contract for a hardcover and paperback edition, including a $7,500 advance and royalties, plus a cash award of $1,500, will be awarded Oct. 31, ‘08, to o encourage the writing of contemporary or historical fiction set in North America, for readers age 9-12. Open to u.S. and Canadian writers who have not previously published a novel for middle-grade readers. Mss. between 96-160 typewritten pages, plus brief plot summary and cover letter. Exclusive submissions only. Submissions must be postmarked after Apr. 1, 2008 and no later than June 30, 2008. Complete eligibility requirements at website. (P: 2/08) DELACORTE PRESS ANNUAL CONTEST FOR A FIRST YA NOVEL 1745 Broadway, 9th floor, New York, NY, 10019. Delacorte’s 28th annual contest for a first YA novel. Winner is awarded $1,500 in cash and a $7,500 advance against royalties. Open to u.S. and Canadian writers who have not previously published a YA novel. Foreignlanguage manuscripts and translations are not eligible. Manuscripts submitted to a previous Delacorte Press contest are not eligible. Submissions should consist of a book-length manuscript with a contemporary setting that will be suitable for readers ages 12 to 18. Manuscripts should be between 100 and 224 typed pages. Include a brief plot summary with your covering letter. Submissions must be received between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31. Complete rules at website. (P: 2/08)

Changes
ABRAMS: Penguin senior editor David Cashion joined the company as Executive Editor of Abrams Image. Howard Reeves has been promoted to Sr. VP, publisher Abrams Children’s and Amulet; Susan Van Metre has been promoted to editorial director for the Amulet imprint; and Chad Beckerman has been promoted to art director for both children’s lines. (PL: 1/08) BALLENtINE: Ballentine will distribute graphic novels from Dabel Brothers Publishing to the trade through their Del Rey imprint. Dabel’s line features comic book adaptations of bestselling novels from such authors as George R. R. Martin, Laurell K. Hamilton, and, next year their adaptations will include Dean Koontz’s

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Frankenstein: Prodigal Son. (PL: 12/07) BLOOMSBuRY uSA: Bloomsbury uSA publishing director Annik Lafarge is leaving the house as part of broader cutbacks following a 15% drop in sales for the unit. She is one of seven people laid off at the division. (PL: 1/08) CHARLESBRIDGE: Emily Mitchell has been promoted to senior editor from editor. Connie Brown has been named managing editor; she was previously designer and coordinator. Alyssa Mito Pusey is now an acquiring associate editor; she was previously managing editor. And Lynne Mehley joins the company as editorial assistant. (PW: 1/08) DK PuBLISHING: Anja Schmidt has been promoted to executive editor. (PL: 1/08) GEttY PuBLISHING: Greg Britton has been appointed publisher for the J. Paul Getty trust. He oversees all publishing activities for the museum, and works with the Getty Research Institute and the Getty Conservation Institute on program publications. He has been publisher of the Minnesota Historical Society Press & Borealis Books since 1999, reportedly the largest historical society in the country. (PL: 1/08) HARPERCOLLINS CHILDREN’S BOOKS: Gretchen Hirsch has joined as associate editor. She was previously an assistant editor at Harcourt Children’s Books. (PW: 1/08) HENRY HOLt CHILDREN’S BOOKS: After seven years with the house, Nina Ignatowicz has left to work as a freelance editor. (PL: 2/08) HOuGHtON MIFFLIN HARCOuRt PuBLISHING COMPANY: this is the renamed business formed after Houghton Mifflin officially completed their purchase of Harcourt Education, Harcourt trade and GreenwoodHeinemann. the new unit has approximately $2.5 billion in annual sales. Interim president of Houghton Mifflin’s trade and Reference division Gary Gentel has been made president of the new Houghton Mifflin Harcourt trade & Reference division. In other appointments, Houghton’s Betsy Groban has been made Sr. VP and publisher of the children’s book group, Mary Wilcox has been named VP, editorial director for franchise publishing, and Houghton’s Julia Richardson has been named editorial director of paperback publishing. Harcourt children’s head Lori Benton and Dan Farley have left the company. (PL: 2/08, 1/08, 12/07) HYPERION: Editor-in-chief Will Schwalbe “is leaving to pursue some ideas he has for the next chapter in his career.” (PL: 1/08) KINGFISHER: Following its October acquisition from Houghton Mifflin by Macmillan Children’s Books, the imprint has laid off 20% of its staff. Most cuts were in sales and marketing, with some in editorial and production, according to Macmillan managing director Emma Hopkin. the remaining staff of 35 are relocating to Macmillan offices. Hopkin confirmed that the Kingfisher imprint, which is keeping its own rights and co-edition team, would remain distinct and that publishing levels—around 100 titles a year—would be maintained. the fiction team will report to Rebecca McNally, and the nonfiction team continues to report to publisher Melissa Fairley. (PW: 1/08) LIttLE, BROWN: Joseph Monti has joined the publishing house in the new role of director of paperbacks, reporting to president and publisher Megan tingley. He oversees all middle grade and young adult paperback reissues, as well as acquiring and editing select titles. Monti was manager of national accounts for Houghton Children’s after many years as a children’s books buyer at Barnes & Noble. In promotions at Little, Brown Children’s, Jennifer Hunt is now executive editor; Alvina Ling is senior editor; Nancy Conescu has moved up to editor; and Tania Biswas is now assistant editor, Yen Press. In Little, Brown design department promotions, Alison Impey is now senior designer, and Sarah Kearney is assistant designer. (PL: 12/07; PW: 12/07) MACMILLAN: With Henry Holt president and publisher John Sterling ready for another challenge, the company has created the new role of EVP of Macmillan for him, reporting to president Brian Napack. Sterling’s new roles include serving as editor at large, directing the pod-casting venture Quick and Dirty tips, taking on a variety of other “digital initiatives across the trade companies” and directing various strategic projects. While the company conducts a new search for the Holt job (where they currently have no editor-in-chief on the adult side, either), former Harcourt trade CEO and president Dan Farley steps in as interim president and publisher. (PL: 2/08) MACMILLAN AuDIO: the audio book publisher (formerly Audio Renaissance) has acquired Language Dynamics, which creates “fast and easy to learn foreign language courses” and the Behind the Wheel line of instructional foreign language audio books. Macmillan publisher Mary Beth Roche sees the acquisition as “ideal for both the traditional audio book market as well as the new, exciting channels of distribution available to audio book listeners.” President of Language Dynamics Mark Frobose will become editorial director of Macmillan Audio’s foreign language program. (PW: 1/08)

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MACMILLAN EDuCAtION: Chairman Christopher Paterson will leave the company after 37 years, as Macmillan uK COO Julian Drinkall takes over the global education business based in Oxford in the newlycreated role of chief executive. (PL: 1/08) McGRAW HILL: Restructuring in “a limited number of business operations” includes the elimination of over 600 jobs. McGraw-Hill Education is one of the hardesthit units, with a $16.3 million pre-tax restructuring charge. About half of the job cuts will come from this division. (PL: 1/08) MILKWEED EDItIONS: Editor-in-chief Daniel Slager has been promoted to publisher and chief executive officer. Slager has served as Editor in Chief of Milkweed since 2005. (PL: 11/07) PENGuIN YOuNG READERS GROuP: Nicole Kasprazak has been promoted to associate editor at G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Kristin Ostby and Molly Kempf were both promoted to associate editor at Grosset & Dunlap/ PSS! Eileen Kreit has been promoted to president and publisher at Puffin, the division’s largest imprint, and Michael Green has been promoted to president and publisher at Philomel. At the Razorbill imprint, Jessica Rothenberg has been promoted to associate editor. At Penguin Group Canada, executive editor in charge of fiction Nicole Winstanley will also oversee children’s publishing. Senior editor Helen Reeves will now focus on nonfiction. (PL: 1/08, 12/07; PW: 12/07) POCKEt BOOKS: Jennifer Heddle has been promoted to senior editor. (PL: 1/08) RANDOM HOuSE: Appointed VP, publisher at large for Random House’s Audio Group last year, Tim Ditlow has stepped down and will serve in “an active advisory capacity” instead. Publisher Madeline McIntosh notes he will also “work on a variety of industry opportunities, particularly with his greatest love, children’s audio.” (PL: 11/07) SCHOLAStIC: Scholastic announced a number of promotions following Ellie Berger’s recent elevation to president of the company’s trade publishing division in place of Lisa Holton. Scholastic trade creative director David Saylor was promoted to the new position of VP, associate publisher & creative director, hardcover books, managing both the publishing of and art direction for hardcover imprints. David Levithan was promoted to executive editorial director, Scholastic Press Fiction, Multimedia Publishing, and PuSH. In addition to his previous responsibility for managing and developing the fiction list of Scholastic Press, working closely with Saylor, and serving as editorial director of PuSH, Levithan now leads “an editorial team

that will acquire books for a variety of Scholastic trade publishing imprints as well as book projects to be published by blending different forms of media around strong narrative properties.” Editorial director for Point, Abigail McAden, has been promoted to publishing director, paperbacks, overseeing YA and series paperback publishing for both Scholastic Paperbacks and Point. Cheryl Klein has been promoted to senior editor for Arthur A. Levine Books. At Scholastic’s trade publishing division, Amanda Maciel joined the unit as senior editor, trade paperbacks. Most recently, she was an editor at Harper Children’s. Aimee Friedman was promoted to senior editor, trade paperbacks and Gregory Rutty was promoted to assistant editor, trade paperbacks. (PL: 12/07, 11/07) SIMON & SCHuStER CHILDREN’S:the company has been reorganized into three units driven by growth that brought the division $200 million in sales in 2007. the primary structural change puts the Aladdin and Pulse imprints into their own unit. Simon Pulse associate publisher Bethany Buck moves over to serve as VP and publisher of Aladdin/Pulse. Associate publisher or deputy publisher positions have been created for each of the three units, and three other positions have been eliminated—one from Little Simon Inspirations, now integrated with Little Simon, along with one job at Atheneum and another in sub rights. Mara Anastas moves over to VP, deputy publisher for Aladdin/ Pulse group. Director of Brand Management Alyson Grubard is named associate publisher for the Novelty and Media tie-in unit (which comprises Little Simon, Simon Spotlight, Little Simon Inspirations, and Simon Scribbles), and a new brand manager is being recruited to serve under her. Laurent Linn has been hired as art director. He was associate art director at Holt Children’s. Annette Pollert has been named editorial assistant for Simon Pulse. She was previously an executive assistant with Viking/Plume. (PL/PW: 2/08) SMItHSONIAN BOOKS: Senior editor T.J. Kelleher has left to join science culture magazine Seed. (PL: 1/08) StERLING PuBLISHING: Longtime CEO and publisher Charlie Nurnberg has left the company to pursue other interests. (PL: 1/08) tIMES BOOKS: Bancroft-winning historian and Princeton professor Sean Wilentz will serve as the general editor of the American Presidents Series. the series of short biographies of the presidents of the united States was created by the late Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., who served as general editor until his death early last year. (PL: 11/07) VIKING CHILDREN’S BOOKS: Art director Denise Cronin has been named a vice-president. (PW: 2/08

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We do our best to provide current market information, but we do not guarantee its accuracy. Please verify needs, names, addresses, etc. before submitting and follow the publisher’s guidelines. Never send original art. It has long been traditional to include a SASE, however please note that many major publishers have changed their policy: most no longer return manuscripts or contact authors/illustrators unless interested in their submissions. Abbreviations: A: agent. CW: Children’s Writer. P: publisher. PL: Publishers Lunch. PW: Publishers Weekly. W: Publisher’s website.. Vicki Arkoff is an editor and writer for MAD Magazine, MAD Kids, Nickelodeon, Girls Life, Sweet 16, Midwest Book Review; HowStuffWorks.com and others. She’s also an authorized biographer and co-writer for such ’tween & teen stars as Drake Bell, The Cheetah Girls, Kelly Clarkson, Miley Cyrus, Hilary Duff, JoJo, Jesse McCartney, Kyle Massey, Hayden Panettiere, Emma Roberts, Carrie Underwood, and “High School Musical” stars. Her manuscripts have won two SCBWI “Best Nonfiction” awards, and her books include the Sinatra bestseller

(DK/Penguin) and Orange County Choppers: Dynamic Designs (Modern/Discovery Channel). Toot Your Horn! Kite Tales lists new books written or illustrated by members, twice a year, especially for the benefit of booksellers and librarians. Deadline for books on Fall/Winter lists: August 15; for books on Spring/ Summer lists: February 15. Please e-mail the following info to Bonnie Ferron at bonnieferron@ earthlink.net • Title by Author Illustrator (Ill) • ages ? and up • Genre (for ex. Picture Book) • Publisher • Author or book website • Author is/is not an SCBWI member • Illustrator is/is not an SCBWI member If you don’t have Internet access, mail the info to: Kite tales c/o SCBWI, P.O. Box 4190, West Hills, CA 91308

Critique Connections Online

Critique groups are made up of friends who were once strangers. they trust, support, and are honest with each other. Are you trying to find such a group? If so, sign up for Critique Connections Online to find other interested SCBWI members who reside in the tri-Regions (SCBWI-L.A., SCBWI-V/SB, or SCBWI-OC). It is not an online critique group or a manuscript exchange but a way to link up with like-minded people. Best of all, it’s free! Below is a sample from the ever-changing list that you will find at Critique Connections Online. to access the contact information or start your own group, join by e-mailing your request to critiqueconnect@yahoo.com. Questions can be sent to the same e-mail address. Once you’ve joined the Yahoo! Group, you will be asked to provide information about yourself as part of a database and also in an introductory e-mail. Others in the group can connect directly with you or you with them. ~Mary Ann Dames, Critique Connections Online Coordinator Name Location Join/Start Online or Face-to-Face Group Genres

Free!

AUTHORS Alan ...........................Foothill Ranch ...................Join ........................ Face-to-Face......................... Middle Grade Allison .......................Sherman Oaks ..................Join ........................ Face-to-Face......................... YA Ann ............................Laguna Woods ..................Either..................... Face-to-Face ........................ Middle Grade fiction and nonfiction Mary ..........................Santa Monica .....................Join ........................ Face-to-Face.........................Ages 1 to 5 Sue .............................Van Nuys..............................Join ........................ Face-to-Face.........................Middle grade chapter book, storybook. AUTHOR/ILLUSTRATORS John...........................Glendale ..............................Either..................... On-line or ............................. Picture Books Face-to-Face Suzanne ...................El Camino Village .............Join/Start ............. On-line or ............................. Picture Books (near LAX) Face-to-Face GROUP SEEKING MEMBER J. ..................................Silverlake/Glendale .........Looking for an author of YA fiction who has at least intermediate experience and is actively (or close to) seeking publication

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Bulletin Board
Gems From scbwi.org
by Angie Azur the purpose of this new feature is to help SCBWI members remember the free SCBWI publications, which are packed with professional info and often contain answers to common, burning questions. We’ll highlight one or more publications in each issue of Kite tales. Hey, published SCBWI authors and illustrators! there’s a lot you can do to help your book reach more young readers. Most publishers send new books to major reviewers, but you can work hard on getting your book in front of even more reviewers, and you can do it from home. Check out the SCBWI book reviewers list. Log in to the SCBWI site, using your secret password. Click on Publications. Click on SCBWI Publications. Click on: MEMBERS: click here for the complete list of publications and ordering information. Scroll down to Published Authors/Illustrators. Find Book Reviewers List and click on it: BOOK REVIEWERS LISt Compiled by Sue Bradford Edwards updated May 2007 20 pages Lists 64 reviewers and other means of publicity Provides advice on etiquette Just like when you’re sending out a new manuscript, be sure to research the reviewer’s list. Send them only what they want. Please don’t take it personally if your book doesn’t make the cut. there is limited space for reviews, but it is worth your effort. Remember, reviewers are on your side. Good luck! Getting Started? New to SCBWI? Or just new in town? Can’t find a critique group? I hear you! Being new to Manhattan Beach myself, I am looking for a critique group. Okay, so where to begin? I logged on to the SCBWI website (see step-by-step instructions above) and found StARtING A CRItIQuE GROuP. What a great idea! If I can’t find one, I’ll create one. the article is full of helpful hints and ideas on getting started. It lists where to look for potential members (see Critique Connections Online in this issue of Kite tales) and how many writers to ask. A good critique group is one that works well together, is respectful of each other, but willing to give helpful advice. Practice your listening skills and be honest! It

is always helpful to give some positive feedback first, and then your critique. Have fun and most importantly, help each other get published. Because then you get to celebrate together! See the article, “Need Your Manuscript Critiqued? Here’s Where to Go” by Alexis O’Neill in the Fall 07 issue of Kite tales.

Great News
Vicki Arkoff’s fourth cover story for MAD was recently on newsstands for a 3-month run until March. Her satirical tony Hawk interview for MAD KIDS magazine is sorta-kinda Vicki’s fifth MAD cover too, since the art director designed a gravity-defying Hawk cover so it can be shelved upside-down. the same issue also includes two more of her features: exclusive interviews with Disney stars Kyle Massey and Madison Pettis. Coming up next: Vicki’s exclusive Jonas Brothers story, and funny Q&As with the iconic Al Sharpton, Ralph Nader, Buzz Aldrin, and Cesar “Dog Whisperer” Millan. In less silly news, Vicki has also recently signed as an author with literary agent tina Wexler of ICM. Caroline Hatton sold her 11th craft activity to Highlights for Children: “Cool Cards for Car and truck Lovers” (the back door or tailgate opens to reveal the greeting). Humphrey’s First Christmas (Ideals Publications, 2007), the first original story that Carol Heyer both wrote and illustrated, got a great review from Mark and Andrea, on Just One More Book. A wonderful article appeared in the Star about Carol’s book launch for Humphrey at Moorpark College Zoo. Humphrey is on his way to being a complete sellout its first season! Carol was a breakout speaker at Asilomar last Feb. 22-24, for the 25th Annual Golden Gate Conference, sponsored by SCBWI. Barbara Jean Hicks has sold a picture book to Knopf, her publisher for The Secret Life of Walter Kitty (2007). the new work is tentatively titled Monsters Don’t Eat Broccoli and is scheduled for release in Summer 2009. the illustrator is British artist Sue Hendra.

Kite Tales Subscription Renewal Notice Kite Tales is available at scbwisocal.org for free! However, if you wish to receive a Kite Tales printout by snail mail, e-mail Mary Peterson at mary@ marypeterson.com for information on how to begin your subscription.the fee is $18 for one year/4 issues.

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...BULLETIN BOARD

Jesse Klausmeier, a picture book writer, has signed with agent Stephen Fraser of the Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency. they met at the 2006 SCBWI-L.A. Working Writer’s Retreat in Encino, where Stephen had a chance to critique one of Jesse’s works-in-progress. If you loved the book, you’ll love…the MuSICAL! Based on a true story of Operation Moses, “Return” is a new musical by Sonia Levitin adapted for the stage from her best-selling novel The Return, selected “one of the best books of the year” by the School Library Journal and the Association of American Libraries, and winner of the PEN, Sydney taylor, and Lewis Carroll Shelf awards. With Music by William Kevin Anderson, Direction and Choreography by Donald McKayle, “Return” runs June 5–July 20 at Santa Monica’s acclaimed Edgemar Center. For tickets, visit www.returnthemusical.com or call (310) 392-7327. Terry Pierce’s picture book series, “Mother Goose Rhymes” (2007), won a “Distinguished Achievement Award” from the Association of Educational Publishers and was also a finalist for their Golden Lamp Award. On Nov. 26, ‘07, Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano launched The Gingerbread Cowboy, by Janet Squires (Ill. Holly Berry), as her 2007 First Grade Book at the Magnet traditional School in Phoenix. Governor Napolitano introduced the author, then read The Gingerbread Cowboy to the assembled first graders. Afterwards, the Governor and author autographed books for students and staff. A special edition of 100,000 copies will be distributed to every first grader in the state. “Flying Balloons: the Story of the Montgolfier Brothers” by Joseph Taylor appears in the April issue of Cricket magazine.

Schmoozes
See www.scbwisocal.org for up-to-date info!

Save These Dates!
Apr. 12, 2008 : Writer’s Day May 25 MAY 18, 2008 DATE CHANGE! : Down the Rabbit Hole Field trip June 21, 2008 : Critiquenic Sept. 19-21, 2008 : Working Writer’s Retreat Sept. 11-13, 2009 – Working Writer’s Retreat

___Writing Connections __
If you liked the book, You’ll love the new musical
Based on the Award-winning Novel

The Return by Sonia Levitin
--World Premiere -thursday June 5, 2008

Classes
UCLA EXTENSION: (310) 825-9971 or (818) 784-7006 k Creating Believable Characters in Fiction for Children and Young Adults, Amy Koss, Apr. 8-May 20, tues. 7-10 p.m. k touring Wonderland: A Beginning Workshop in Writing for Children and Young Adults, Laurel van der Linde, Apr. 2-June 4, Wed. 7-10 p.m. k Writing for Sequential Art: Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels, Nunzio DeFilippis, Apr. 7-June 6, Mon. 7-10 p.m k Writing the Young Adult Novel, Sherri L. Smith, MA, Apr. 1-June 3, tues. 7-10 p.m k Creating a Children’s television Series, Karin Gutman, Apr. 16-June 18, Wed. 7-10 p.m.

at Santa Monica’s Edgemar Center for the Arts June 5-29 thurs.-Sat. 8 p.m.

Sunday 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. July 10-20 thurs.-Sat. 8 p.m. Sunday 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
For more information, visit www.returnthemusical.com
William Kevin Anderson, Music Sonia Levitin, Lyrics Donald McKayle, Director/Choreographer

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___________Writing Connections ____________________ Writer’s Ink
Judith Ross Enderle & Stephanie Jacob Gordon CRITIQUE BY MAIL www.writersinkville.com
$5.00 per page, minimum charge $60.00 Second critique of same manuscript half price judink@aol.com “We can’t guarantee a sale, we can guarantee a tighter manuscript.”

Present Perfect
Writing and Editorial Services
Specializing in: ! Grammar and punctuation ! Verse rhyme and scansion ! Dramatic structure Detailed critiques $4.50 per page $45.00 minimum
Discounts above 20 pages

Evelyn Hughes
Phone/fax (562) 433-5554 PrsPerfect@aol.com

Macintosh Support
Jason L. Levine Macintosh expert since 1984 Telephone: 818.346.1684 Email: info@ltlgems.com www.ltlgems.com
Ask about Word or Appleworks Manuscript Templates
Certified Member Apple Consultants Network

To Place an ad in Kite Tales: Contact Bonnie Ferron at bonnieferron@earthlink.net n Ads must be submitted in pdf or jpg. format n 300dpi preferred n black & white or color O.K. n Link to your website at no extra charge n Ad costs are for one calendar year (4 issues) as follows... q business card size : 3.5” wide x 2 tall” = $30 q 1/4 page: 3.5” wide x 3.75” tall = $60 q 1/2 page : 7” wide x 3.75” tall = $90 q Full page: 7” wide x 8” tall = $120 q Make checks payable to SCBWI-L.A. mail to: Kite tales c/o SCBWI P.O. Box 4190, West Hills, CA 91308

Writing Connections Disclaimer: Kite Tales accepts members’ ads for writing and illustrating businesses and activities. An ad in Kite Tales does not imply endorsement by SCBWI, and members are reminded to request brochures or additional information from advertisers. We retain the right to refuse and to suspend ads.

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___________Writing Connections ____________________

esola@adelphia.net

www.editorialservicesofLA.com

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