Arizona s Official Operation Jump Start Magazine Volume issue by againstcavs

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									Arizona’s Official Operation Jump Start Magazine

Volume 1 issue 5—January 2006

“Assist, Protect, Defend” protecting
yourself against theft. Page 6

“Border Agent Injured” requires 12
stitches Page 9

“Christmas on the Border” Master Sgt.
serves through the holiday Page 14

SECURUS
SECURUS - Latin root word for security. Meaning safe, secure, free from care, unworried, unconcerned.

OJS

Public Affairs

SECURUS is the official Command Information newsletter for Operation Jump Start - Arizona. If you would like to contribute to the SECURUS please send your articles, SECURUS, pictures and other information to : SecurusOJS@GMail.com

OPERATION JUMP START ARIZONA Chain of Command Governor Janet Napolitano Commander in Chief Maj Gen David P. Rataczak The Adjutant General Brig Gen Ulay W. Littleton Jr JTF Commander Col Robert Centner Col Wanda Wright JTF Deputy Commanders CSM James Elifritz JTF CSM Col Patrick McCarville TF Raven Commander Lt Col Robert White TF Diamondback Commander Lt Col Robert Rudolph TF Tucson Commander Major Paul Babeu TF Yuma Commander Major Paul Aguirre State Public Affairs Officer Major Paul Ellis Distinguished Visitors Bureau

The Arizona National Guard State Public Affairs Office would like to remind all soldiers and airmen working on the border for Operation Jump Start to refer to their OJS Border Media Card if any questions should arise. Remember; only participate in interviews if it has been approved through your chain of command first. This also applies to requests from communitybased organizations. When you are being interviewed, you are a representative of the military when you are in uniform. Your message is going to the American public; it can be printed or televised. Take a moment to think before you answer a question. Do not attempt to lie or shade the truth. It is better to say “I don’t know” than to make up an answer. Stay in your lane: only speak about topics you have direct knowledge of. If the reporter starts to question you in a way you think is disrespectful, do not get mad and do not start arguing. If the reporter acts this way, they are looking to get you upset so that you may say some comments that you will regret later. Be clear in your answers; do not use “military slang” and acronyms. Use your common sense. While the public affairs office can not prevent you from taking personal photographs and videos, you should exercise extreme caution as to what you make accessible to the public. Ask yourself, “Is this something I’m comfortable showing my commander? Is this something I really want my name attached to?” Most importantly, treat all operational information as classified. All of these rules can be found on your OJS Border Media Card. This can also be found in every issue of the SECURUS. If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact your local public affairs representative. Arizona State Public Affairs Office (602) 629 - 4638

Chief, National Guard Bureau Executive Summary
Lieutenant General H Steven Blum Chief, National Guard Bureau

“This past year the National Guard demonstrated how superbly it simultaneously performs our dual missions, state and federal.”

“In August 2005, with more than 80,000 troops already mobilized for the global war on terror and faced with Katrina, a catastrophic hurricane … Never before had every corner of America answered the desperate cry of our neighbors in such unison. Truly, when you call out the Guard, you call out America!” “The Guard stands more ready, reliable, essential and accessible today than at anytime in its near-four hundred years of existence.” “Guard units bring more to the war fight than just Soldiers and Airmen. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the civilian skills Guard members possess make them exceptionally well suited for peacekeeping and nation building.” “The National Guard continues to engage with Joint Forces Command and the Army to transform the lengthy and redundant mobilization process for Army Guard units.” “The Air National Guard will continue to leverage its existing capabilities as it evolves to remain a full partner in the Future Total Air Force plan.” “What used to be the State Area Command (STARC) and Air Guard State Headquarters, administrative organizations for peacetime control of units, has developed into a sophisticated headquarters and communications node capable of assuming command and control of units from all services and components when responding to a domestic emergency.” “Our priorities this year to maintain a vibrant, capable and agile National Guard are recruiting and retention bonuses and initiatives, equipment reset and modernization and obtaining critical domestic mission resources. Our nation’s future security mandates that the Guard continues to transform to meet challenges both at home and abroad.”

“The Air National Guard is at full strength, with retention and recruiting programs to fill the ranks. The Army National Guard has turned the corner and has begun to increase in strength due to the increases in bonuses and the funding of new recruiters authorized by Congress in 2004.”

“We have been, and we remain, America’s minutemen—Always Ready, Always There!”

[Task Force Yuma]

The 5 R’s of Operation Jump Start
The National Guard Professional Education Center identifies the 5 R’s needed to effectively plan, implement, and execute a new mission. The 5 R’s are Rules, Roles, Relationships, Responsibilities and Results. The 5 R’s Model is demonstrated in the initiation and execution of the Operation Jump Start (OJS) mission, specifically the Entry Identification Teams (EIT) and the Badges to Border (B2B) focus of the mission. “Rules” for National Guard service members to operate under for this mission were identified during the planning process. Through the Soldier Readiness Processing (SRP) function, rules were clearly identified. Open sharing of these rules ensured their understanding and established a solid base to support the mission. Analyzing Arizona Counter-Drug (JCNTF) operations, leadership identified the “Roles” National Guard members would be deThe 5 R’s: ployed to support. The initial roles were very narrow in scope but 1. Rules as the mission progressed, additional “Roles” have been filled by soldiers and airmen. Our “Roles” will continue to evolve and be 2. Roles negotiated with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (USCBP.) However, a vital element to the acceptance of “Roles” is the explicit 3. Relationships understanding that National Guard members will not be performing 4. Responsibilities any enforcement duties. Our role: support only. “Relationships” began to form as National Guard personnel 5. Results deployed for the OJS mission, . Those manning EIT sites began to occupy their points along the border and produce real-time reports of undocumented alien (UDA) entries. Those assigned to B2B operations began relieving USCBP agents from the administrative, mechanical, and support tasks that kept them in the CBP stations. The productive nature of these “Relationships” has contributed to the success of the mission. Using the guidelines established for the mission, service members serving on OJS orders have begun to take ownership of their “Responsibilities.” EIT and B2B soldiers and airmen accept the importance of these “Responsibilities” and understand the vital effort they provide to the success of the mission. Application of the above R’s have allowed the mission to reflect on the “Results.” The EIT mission of Task Force Yuma has resulted in a large reduction in UDA apprehensions. Equally as impressive is the number of USCBP agents returned to the field as a “result” of B2B operations. The positive implementation of the 5 R’s is demonstrated well by the OJS mission. The critical elements of this mission are the volunteer Army and Air National Guard members. Our continued hard work and dedication will assure mission success.

Maj Christopher Emmons Deputy Commander; Task Force Yuma

CPT Daniel Turner and SSG Eric Connally, both soldiers in the Arizona Army National Guard, serve dinner at the Task Force Yuma Holiday Party. (Photo courtesy of Staff Sgt. Dan Heaton, AZNG Public Affairs)

//Surrounded by Risk//
/By Maj David Church
Whether you are a soldier or an airman participating in OJS, one thing that all Guardsmen have in common is their exposure to risk. No matter what task a Guardsman may be performing, risk is involved. Without a doubt, OJS is a complex mission with many moving pieces which requires a constant and evolving state of readiness and alertness. One tool that all Guardsmen have to mitigate risk in dangerous and harmless missions alike is risk analysis. Even though the Army and Air Force address risk management in slightly different formats, both methods are parallel. The steps may vary, but the same underlying concept is present; risks can be managed and reduced. The majority of us use some kind of risk management on a daily basis and we do not even realize we are doing so. For example, every time we clasp our seatbelt in our POV or we plan a route of direction to evade heavy traffic, we are addressing the hazards complicit with driving and are consequently mitigating some of those risks. All OJS participants must make it a priority to practice risk management. The goal is to have the application of risk management so routine that it becomes second nature prior to each mission. No matter how trivial or perfunctory a task may seem, risk management is essential for the completion of a designated mission and The Army’s Composite Risk for the protection of those involved. When circumManagement: stances or conditions of a certain mission change, it is Identify the hazard/risk. imperative that a new risk analysis is conducted. For example, the many driving routes for OJS may be mun- Assess the hazard/risk. dane from day to day, but the start of wet or abnormal Develop controls and make weather dictates a driver to perform a modified risk risk decisions. analysis. Whether a Guardsman is performing surveilImplement controls. lance on an EIT site, welding on an engineer site, or Supervise and evaluate. driving a route, risk management is applicable and must be performed. Pending on the mission at hand, a risk analysis can either be done in a hasty or thorough manner. If time is limited then a hasty risk assessment is permissible. It can be as simple as verbally covering the steps of risk management prior to commencing a mission. On the other hand, when time is not a constraint, all missions should be The Air Force’s Operational preceded with a thorough discussion on risk manageRisk Management: ment. Regardless of the type of risk analysis used, Identify the hazards. leaders must review the current risk analysis of the inAssess the risks. tended mission with mission participants. Both leaders Analyze risk control measures. and subordinates must be familiar with all aspects of a Make control decisions. mission and this includes the risks involved. Implement risk controls. A Greek historian by the name of Herodotus Supervise and review. once said, “Great deeds are usually wrought at great risks.” Well, OJS is unequivocally a historic and good deed, but it is also full of serious risks. It is easy to forget about risk analysis because we get fixated on mission accomplishment as our motivation flows and incites us to complete a task. However, we must get in the habit of practicing and applying risk management prior to all OJS missions. Whether a Guardsman applies Composite Risk Management or Operational Risk Management, both tools are valuable in mitigating risks and preventing accidents.

[Force Protection Advisement]
“Assist, Protect, Defend” By Army Cpt. Bill Karlage
Protecting your identity and equipment can not be stressed enough. You must secure your personal belongings and government equipment. Items such as computers, identification cards, badges, and military equipment have been frequently reported stolen. It is critical to protect your own safety and identity, not to mention our national security. Do not leave government items in your vehicle and think that it is secured. Thieves can quickly canvass the vehicles and obtain the equipment in a matter of seconds. Over the last couple of months there have been too many law enforcement reports of theft involving privately owned, rentals, or government vehicles. It might not be fool proof but secure all your personal belongings and military equipment inside your residence. This minimizes the chances of a criminal targeting you. Do not be a victim! Please remember U.S. service members need to stay vigilant when traveling. An updated CONUS/OCONUS briefing can be conducted by the Provost Marshal’s Office prior to your travels.

[“Do not be a victim!” Cpt. Karlage.]

CPT Bill Karlage SWB Arizona Provost Marshal

CHAPLAIN’S CORNER
We’ve all seen the acronym “RHIP”, which means “rank has it’s privilege”. In the military, this is true. One spring during training exercises at Fort Riley, Kansas, a lieutenant was driving down a muddy back road. He came upon another jeep, stuck in a ditch, with a major standing beside the vehicle. "Is your jeep stuck, major?" the lieutenant asked. "No, lieutenant," the senior officer replied. "Your jeep is stuck." The lieutenant dutifully turned his jeep over to the major. In reality, if we really want to be leaders and look out for those under our supervision, we don’t pull rank in order to gain comfort, advantage or to take the pressure off of ourselves. We look for what is best for the mission and what will benefit those we supervise. This is the real test of leadership. Ask yourself, “am I more concerned about the person I oversee or am I only concerned for myself?” It is easy to follow someone who cares for you. I received some advice from Ross Perot, entrepreneur most known as a former presidential candidate, about how to treat your people: “Never ask anyone to do what you haven’t done before and wouldn’t do again. That’s a pretty fundamental rule in leadership...treat them like you treat yourself. Things you don’t like, they don’t like. You don’t like to be jerked around, they don’t either. You don’t like to be talked down to, and they don’t either. You would rather work with somebody than for somebody. So would they. You hate people who pound on your head after you gave everything you had and failed… It’s that simple.” Even God did not exert His rank. He came to this earth in the form of a child so that we could get to know Him. He placed Himself under another person’s authority so that we could learn from His example. He even was willing to endure a wrongful punishment so we could know Him. At this time of the year we are again reminded of this quality of giving by a God that gave. (Col) Chaplain Daniel Butler

OBSERVING THE HOLIDAYS

SERVICE SCHEDULES

TF Raven Marana/Casa Grande/ Tucson Sun. 0900 Hampton Sun 1900 Hilton Marana (602)489-6481

CH Krogstad

TF Raven TSGt Johnson (602)489-6478 TF Tucson/ Sierra Vista Sun. 0900 FOB Tucson CH Anderson (602)489-6482 FT. Huachuca CH Summers (602)489-6844 Sat. Sun. Sun. TF Yuma 1100 1100 0930 FOB FOB MCAS

Phoenix (602)489-6846 Yuma CH McDaniels (602)489-6719 CH Morris Phoenix

Contact the Chaplain’s office (602) 629 - 4805

BORDER PATROL NEWS
NOV 20,2006 — BORDER PATROL AGENTS ASSIGNED TO THE YUMA BORDER PATROL STATION APPREHENDED A CONVICTED MURDERER AND TWO OTHER INDIVIDUALS NOV. 20 NEAR ANDRADE, ARIZ. NOV 21,2006 — NOGALES BORDER PATROL AGENTS ARRESTED 109 ILLEGAL ALIENS AND SEIZED A VEHICLE AT A HOUSE IN RIO RICO. AGENTS WERE WORKING IN AN
AREA KNOWN FOR ILLEGAL ALIEN ACTIVE ITY WHEN THEY SAW A VEHICLE THAT THEY SUSPECTED WAS INVOLVED IN SMUGGLING.

NOV 24,2006 - BORDER PATROL AGENTS ASSIGNED TO THE YUMA SECTOR SEIZED 338 POUNDS OF MARIJUANA AFTER A VEHICLE, WHICH ENTERED THE UNITED STATES ILLEGALLY, BROKE DOWN WHILE ATTEMPTING TO RETURN TO MEXICO.

NOV 25,2006 - BORDER PATROL AGENTS ASSIGNED TO THE AJO BORDER PATROL STATION
RESPONDED TO THE ACTIVATION OF A RESCUE BEACON LOCATED IN THE NORTH WEST CORNER OF

ORGAN PIPE NATIONAL MONUMENT. THE BEACON HAD BEEN ACTIVATED BY TWO MEMBERS OF THE CIVILIAN GROUP HUMANE BORDERS

WHEN FOUR MEMBERS OF THEIR GROUP BECAME SEPARATED FROM THEIR

ALL FOUR INDIVIDUALS WERE LOCATED IN GOOD CONDITION AND DID NOT REQUIRE MEDICAL TREATMENT. NOV 30,2006 - AGENTS ASSIGNED TO THE TUCSON SECTOR, NOGALES BORDER PATROL STATION DISRUPT TEAM SEIZED 1,494 POUNDS OF MARIJUANA FROM A TRUCK LEAVING THE KINO SPRINGS AREA. THE TRUCK WAS LOADED WITH PACKAGES OF MARIJUANA AND IT WAS DETERMINED TO HAVE A STREET VALUE OF $1,194,960.00. DEC 1,2006 - BORDER PATROL AGENTS ASSIGNED TO THE NOGALES STATION SEIZED MORE THAN 366 LBS. OF MARIJUANA FROM A STORM DRAIN NEAR DOWN TOWN NOGALES, ARIZONA. FURTHER INVESTIGATION BY THE BORDER PATROL REVEALED A NEW TUNNEL RUNNING BETWEEN THE US AND MEXICO.

PARTY.

DEC 7, 2006 - U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION OFFICERS AT THE SAN LUIS, ARIZ. PORT OF ENTRY STOPPED AN ATTEMPTED SMUGGLING OF ALMOST 280 POUNDS OF MARIJUANA. OFFICERS BECAME SUSPICIOUS OF A DRIVERS IMMIGRATION DOCUMENTS. AT THE SAME TIME, ONE OF CBPS NARCOTICS INTERDICTION DOGS ALERTED TO THE ODOR OR NARCOTICS COMING FROM THE 1998 NIS SAN QUEST . THE DRIVER, FROM SAN LUIS RIO COLORADO, SONORA, WAS ARRESTED AND TURNED OVER TO IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT AGENTS FOR PROSECUTION.

“At no time in the history of this great nation has there been more attention and effort directed to ensuring that our borders are not used by terrorists as a gateway to do us harm.” Chief David V. Aguilar, US Customs and Border Protection

Border Patrol News
>Yuma Sector

YUMA, Ariz. - A Border Patrol agent assigned to the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Headquarters was hospitalized Thursday after being struck in the head by baseball-sized rocks while apprehending illegal aliens near San Luis, Ariz. The rock assault on the agent began when a remote video surveillance camera operator observed seven individuals entering the U.S. illegally. An agent was alerted and as he arrived on the scene, two individuals hid in the bushes near a canal while the other five illegal aliens ran back toward Mexico. The agent apprehended the two individuals in the bushes without incident and proceeded to pursue the other five. One subject was spotted just north of the International Boundary Fence. As the agent attempted to apprehend the individual, a struggle ensued at the base of the fence. During the struggle, two individuals from the Mexico side of the fence climbed to the top and began throwing baseball-size rocks at the agent. One of the rocks struck the agent in the head, causing a laceration and profuse bleeding. The individuals fled into Mexico and additional Border Patrol agents arrived at the scene to provide assistance and medical care. The agent was transported to Yuma Regional Medical Center, where he received 12 stitches to (Photos provided by Tucson Sector Border close the Patrol Public Information Office)

wound to his head. U.S. and Mexico authorities were notified of the incident and the San Luis Rio Colorado, Mexico, Municipal Police Department apprehended two suspects near the scene at about 4:30 a.m. They remain in the custody of Mexico officials. A Yuma Sector Border Patrol agent rendered aid to the Mexico customs worker who was kidnapped and assaulted by smugglers near Andrade, Calif., on Dec. 4. The individual, a janitor assigned to the port of entry at Algodones, Baja California, Mexico, was forced into the U.S. by the smugglers about 8:45 p.m. and was spotted by a Yuma Border Patrol agent. The worker told the agent several smugglers ambushed him as he investigated a vehicle from which the smugglers fled near the port of entry a short time earlier. The worker said he was driven into the desert by the smugglers, who beat and pistol-whipped him before forcing him to dig a hole in which he was then forced to get into. The smugglers then fired several gunshots near the worker before pulling him from the hole, beating him again, stripping him of his clothing and forcing him across the border at gunpoint. A Border Patrol agent, who is also a certified emergency medical technician, conducted a medical evaluation of the worker and noted deep bruising along his ribs, scratches and abrasions along his back and side, a bloody nose and cut on top of his head. Following the medical evaluation, the individual was transported to the Yuma Regional Medical Center. The individual was subsequently treated and returned to Mexico. Both the United States and Mexico are working to address these violent acts. Each government is cooperating in the investigation of the incidents.

Border Patrol News
>Tucson Sector

Drugs and ATV’s Seized in GuVo
Released November 28, 2006 AJO, Ariz – CBP Border Patrol Agents assigned to the Ajo Station, seized more than 11hundred pounds of marijuana in late November, near the village of Gu Vo. Agents followed tracks from three all-terrain vehicles southeast of Lukeville, near Menager’s Dam. About 2 miles southwest of Gu Vo, agents discovered a single ATV concealed in the brush. The vehicle had large bundles of marijuana on the front and rear, and was coverage with camouflaged material. Two additional ATV’s were located about a mile north, closer to Gu Vo; also concealed with numerous bundles and camouflaged. After securing the scene, agents recovered 50 bundles of marijuana, weighing just over 11-hundred thirty pounds. While the marijuana, with a reported street value of just over $900,000 dollars, was turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration, the ATV’s were processed for seizure. Since the beginning of the new fiscal year (October 1, 2006), agents in the Tucson Sector have seized more than 107,000 pounds of marijuana, which represents a 27% increase over last years record total of in excess of 617,000 lbs.

(Photos provided by Tucson Sector Border Patrol Public Information Office)

YUMA, Ariz. -- Senior Airman Mark Kreul is hoping that his Christmas this year will be a lot like his Thanksgiving was. “There are a lot of awesome people around here. People you don’t even know and they just open their arms for you on the holiday,” Senior Airman Kreul said. Senior Airman Kreul, an intelligence analyst for the 114th Fighter Wing, South Dakota Air National Guard at Joe Foss Field in Sioux Falls, is deployed to Yuma, Ariz., this holiday season as part of Operation Jump Start, a mission directed by President Bush in which the National Guard is supporting the U.S. Border Patrol’s efforts to tighten security along the nation’s southern border. Senior Airman Kreul arrived in Yuma in November for a six month deployment – his first operational deployment since joining the Air National Guard in 2004. While deployed, he is working with Task Force Yuma as an intelligence analyst at the Border Patrol’s Yuma Sector Headquarters. The data he helps to compile supports both By Staff Sgt. Dan Heaton National Guard and Border Patrol operations along the U.S.Mexico border. AZNG Public “We look at what is happening and what could happen,” he Affairs explained. “The information we compile goes all the way up to Washington, D.C., so it’s an important part of the mission.” Like Airmen in Iraq, Afghanistan, Ecuador, South Korea, other world hot spots and across the nation during the holiday season, Senior Airman Kreul is answering the call to duty this holiday season. Senior Airman Kreul, who resides in Chester, S.D., graduated from Chester Area High School in 2003. He is currently pursuing a degree in electrical engineering at South Dakota State University. Back home in Chester, Senior Airman Kreul said family members typically come in from around the country to celebrate Christmas. Senior Airman Kreul, who is single, said he’s particularly going to miss seeing his 2-year-old niece, Katrina, this year. “She’s really special to me,” he said. While he’s going to miss out on that gathering this year, Senior Airman Kreul is comforted by the fact that he’s made new friends among the National Guard Airmen and Soldiers working in Yuma. “At Thanksgiving time, I had so many offers of people inviting me to dinner. It really makes you feel good,” he said. “I think Christmas will be the same way.”
Senior Airman Mark Kreul, a member of the South Dakota Air National Guard, is on duty this holiday season with Operation Jump Start, Kreul, is an intelligence analyst for Task Force Yuma.

By Staff Sgt. Dan Heaton AZNG Public Affairs

on the Border

YUMA, Ariz – Air Force Master Sgt. Greg Curtis ay be serving in America’s Southwest desert this holiday season, but his plans for Christmas weekend still include some time on the ice. As the first sergeant for Task Force Yuma, Ariz., a component of Operation Jump Start, Master Sgt. Curtis has organized an MWR trip for National Guard Airmen and Soldiers to attend a Phoenix Coyotes NHL hockey game over the Christmas weekend. The visit to the game will include an opportunity for the service members to be “I have a duty to look recognized on the ice before the game. “I’ve been in the military for a while, so I understand being away out for our junior Airmen and Soldiers from home for the holiday,” said Master Sgt. Curtis. “Now, I’m looking out for some of the people who are maybe experiencing … that’s what I’ll do” this for the first time.” Master Sgt. Curtis Master Sgt. Curtis is on a four-month deployment to TF Yuma. When not deployed, he is the first sergeant for the a member of the Ohio Air National Guard’s 121st Air Refueling Wing at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base When not serving with the Air National Guard, Master Sgt. Curtis is a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service in his hometown of Columbus, Ohio. Master Sgt. Curtis said his wife, Ivy Nicole, and daughters, Channelle, 19, and Nakeisha, 17, are supportive of his service in the Air National Guard, including a past deployment in support oof Operation Iraqi Freedom. Master Sgt. Curtis joined the U.S. Army shortly after graduating from Marian Franklin High School in Columbus in 1986. He served four years on active duty and shortly thereafter joined the Ohio Air National Guard. He said his experience of having served in the Army has been an important asset in his current deployment. More than three-quarters of the enlisted personnel in TF Yuma are soldiers in the Army National Guard. Like Airmen in Iraq, Afghanistan, Ecuador, South Korea, other world hot spots and across the nation during the holiday season, Master Sgt. Curtis is answering the call to duty this holiday season. “I’ve been deployed to Iraq and to other places, but this is my first deployment state-side,” Master Sgt. Curtis said. “To me, this one is different from other deployments. This is right here in our own backyard.” In May, 2006, President Bush announced Operation Jump Start, a two-year mission for the National Guard to work in support of the U.S. Border Patrol to enhance security along the nation’s southern border. About 6,000 National Guard Airmen and Soldiers are on duty along the U.S.-Mexico Border this holiday season. “I know my family is at home and sure I miss Master Sgt. Greg Curtis makes a note while talking with them,” Master Sgt. Curtis said. “This year, I Sgt. 1st Class Dan Vandermolen. As the first sergeant for have a duty to look out for our junior Airmen Task Force Yuma, Curtis works with both Airmen and Sol- and Soldiers here in the Yuma area and that’s diers from National Guard units around the nation. what I’ll do.”

Nogales Station Patrol Agent In Charge John Fitzpatrick (left) describes the mechanics of seismic sensors used in the field to SASC staffers Mike McCord (2nd from right) and Dirk Mauer (far right) as AZ-OJS Commander BG Ulay Littleton (2nd from left) looks on.

Front Cover: Cpl Jesse Benson, Oregon Army National Guard, performs a radio check while working at an EIT site east of San Luis, Ariz. Cpl Benson is a part of Task Force Yuma. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Dan Heaton)

SGT Stan Doty, Wisconsin Army National Guard, and SSG Eric Connally, Arizona Army National Guard, prepare food for the Task Force Yuma Holiday Party, 21 DEC.

>Pictures from Operation Jump Start
Pictures from Tucson, Yuma and Headquarters
SPC Diego Sansores (left) of Globe, AZ, receives a congratulatory pat on the back from LTG H. Steven Blum (right), Director of the National Guard Bureau, during Blum s late November visit to Nogales.

Media Interview Guidelines Media Interviews must be cleared through your Chain of Command 1. You are a representative of the military when you are in uniform. 2. Your message is going to the American public. 3. Take a moment to think before you answer a question. 4. Do not lie or shade the truth. 5. Do not argue or get mad. 6. Radio and TV crews are looking for 10-15 second sound bites. 7. Avoid jargon and acronyms when possible. 8. It is better to say “I don’t know” than to make up an answer. 9. Don’t reinforce negative or untrue statements by repeating them. 10. Only speak about topics you have direct knowledge of. 11. Maintain eye contact with the reporter, not the camera. For questions and assistance with media, please email or call the Arizona National Guard Public Affairs Officer at: Office: (602)267-2550 E-mail: Paul.Aguirre@US.Army.Mil
LTG Stanley Green, Inspector General of the Army, visits with soldiers in the TF YUMA AO.

BP Agent Tom Pittman describes the view of Nogales, AZ and Nogales, Mexico to NY ARNG CSM Robert Van Pelt during his recent visit to the 131 members of Team NY supporting Operation JUMP START in AZ.

My name childhood ambition fondest memory indulgence current mission favorite hobby My life My Guard

My life. My Guard.


								
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