Photos by Richard F Hope 2008 As repainted and repaired photo 2009 by Richard F Hope Pomp Bixler Building 401 Northampton Street

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Photos by Richard F Hope 2008 As repainted and repaired photo 2009 by Richard F Hope Pomp Bixler Building 401 Northampton Street Powered By Docstoc
					                      (Photos by Richard F. Hope, 2008)




                      (As repainted and repaired, photo 2009 by Richard F. Hope)

Pomp/Bixler Building (401 Northampton Street)
       Deep 4-story, white brick building with dental roof cornice. The “Bixler
Building” legend appears above the Fourth Street entrance.1
       The property is the southeastern portion of Original Town Lot No.217, as
surveyed by William Parsons when Easton was formed in 1752.2 This Lot was later
carved up into smaller real estate parcels. Parsons reserved all of Original Town Lot 217,
                                              2


as well as Lot 218 (next to the West), for his own use. He initially built his residence on
this property, facing Hamilton (now North Fourth) Street close to (but not on)
Northampton Street, on ground that is apparently part of the Pomp / Bixler Building
property today. Parsons‟s residence “was probably the first house built in Easton after
the erection of Northampton County in 1752.”3 It was probably built of logs – and
certainly was not the brick building on the property today, because the first brick
construction in Easton was not begun until 1792.4
         William Parsons (1701 – 1757) was the founder of Easton. He was apprenticed as
a shoemaker in England as a boy; made his way to Philadelphia before his 21st birthday,
and opened his own successful shop Philadelphia. He taught himself mathematics and
surveying, and became one of Benjamin Franklin‟s associates, becoming a charter
member of Franklin‟s Union Fire Company, and in 1734 the Librarian of Franklin‟s
Library Company. He also began making professional surveys in the 1730s, and was
appointed Surveyor General of Pennsylvania from 1741-48.5 In 1750-51, he was a
dominant member of the team that settled the disputed boundary line between Delaware
and Maryland.6 In 1752, he was sent by his patrons, the Penn Family, to survey and lay
out the new site for Easton, and remained in the new town as the Penns‟s representative
to sell land to settlers.7 He remained to direct Easton‟s affairs and (as a Major in the
militia) the defense of Northampton County during the first years of the French and
Indian War,8 and died in Easton in 1757 in his new stone residence now numbered 60
South Fourth Street (the Parsons-Taylor House).9
       Parsons, despite his pivotal role in founding the town, was not happy about his
appointment to Easton,10 and in any event was building a stone house for himself at the
corner of Fourth and Ferry Streets (which he finally occupied in 1757).11 He never
bothered to obtain formal title to the property at the corner of Northampton and Hamilton
(now North Fourth) Streets. Nearly two years after his death, his Executor obtained a
formal patent to that land from the Penn Family for an annual rent of 14 shilling sterling,
and sold the entire property in the following year to Meyer Hart.12
        Meyer Hart was an original Easton settler in 1752 who became the town‟s
wealthiest merchant.13 He was Jewish, but in 1755 he contributed 20 lbs of nails to the
building of the first (log) schoolhouse which was also used by the German Reformed
Congregation for their worship services, which the Church to this day commemorates
with a Star of David on a stained glass window.14 In 1760, Hart had purchased Easton
founder William Parson‟s log house, from Parson‟s estate.15 In 1764, he purchased a
property on Northampton Street to the North of Hamilton (later, 4th) Street, which he may
have used for his store building for ten years.16 Meyer Hart began sending grain to
Philadelphia in Durham boats in approximately 177017 – thus foreshadowing the great
grain market trade that Easton would achieve after the Revolution.18 In 1780, when
Pennsylvania emancipated its Negro slaves, Meyer Hart owned five of them – although
three were only children.19 At the peak of his fortunes he owned “two houses, several
slaves, a bond servant, six lots, a horse, a cow, and his stock in trade.”20 He sold the store
property North of Hamilton (later, 4th) Street in 1774.21 It was Meyer Hart who gave the
“lavish” ball in 1782 in the Easton Courthouse for General George Washington and his
staff, which resulted in a social scandal after his daughter, Judith, married a Christian
officer.22 By that time, however, Meyer Hart‟s business fortunes were declining.23 He
                                              3


moved to Philadelphia in 1783.24 In that year, he assigned some of his real property in an
attempt to satisfy creditors, and in 1785 liquidated other out-of-town properties.25 In
1787 he lost the two old Parsons property Lots in a Sheriff‟s sale to Peter Shnyder, a
tanner.26 Shortly thereafter, Shnyder purchased a release of the annual rental fee from the
Penn Family.27 Peter Shnyder/Schnyder (1753 – 182328) is probably the same person
who served as one of the three Trustees of the German Reformed congregation to receive
John and Richard Penn‟s gift of land, on which the German Union Church was built in
1775-76.29 He is reputed to have been Easton‟s richest citizen in 1790, with a residence
at the corner of Bushkill and Pomfret (later North 3rd) Streets.30
         Peter Schnyder died intestate in 1823, and his heirs divided up the two old
Parsons property Lots into smaller pieces of property, and sold them off separately.31 In
particular, two parcels were sold to Peter Miller, including a portion of Original Town
Lot No.217 located at the corner of Northampton and Hamilton (now Fourth) Streets.32
Peter Miller was Easton‟s “merchant prince”33 and one of the three “rich men of
Easton”.34 He died in 1847, at age 81.35 His nephew, also named Peter Miller (of Ohio),
inherited much of his real estate. In 1849, nephew Peter Miller used 2/5 of this
inheritance to pay his agent in Easton, named Samuel Wilhelm,36 and another part to
settle the legal bills his two prominent Easton lawyers37 who prosecuted a lengthy (and
ultimately successful) lawsuit to annul one of the will‟s charitable bequests, resulting in a
landmark decision of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.38 With the lawyers‟ bills
resolved, in late 1849 Miller and Samuel Wilhelm partitioned the remaining real estate to
settle Wilhelm‟s interests – this property being among those that Peter Miller himself
kept. At that time, it was occupied by “John Dehart and others”.39 Miller died shortly
thereafter, in 1850.40
         Shortly before Peter Miller (of Ohio) died, his agent concluded a contract of sale
for this corner property to Peter Pomp. Unfortunately, the transaction had not closed
before Miller‟s death, and it took a private act of the Pennsylvania Assembly to authorize
a completion of the transaction, which was concluded by a deed dated 1 April 1850.41
At this time, a “large New Four Story Brick Building” at this location was “erected
expressly for a Drug Ware House”, and was taken over by the existing drug business of
Peter Pomp, which moved from a few doors away.42 Pomp opened during December of
1850, with his “immense four story Building . . . jammed full of goods from garret to
cellar”.43 The following June, a local newspaper enthusiastically described “Pomp‟s
Chemical Palace” by proclaiming that:
       “Mr. Pomp‟s new building in Northampton street has been raised to its full height,
       and overlooks all other building in the vicinity. – In architectureal beauty it is one
       of the most imposing buildings in the Borough, and is an ornament to the street in
       which it is located. – Mr. Lawall and Mr. Pomp in erecting their new buildings,
       have done more to improve Easton than many others who make larger claims on
       the public consideration.”44
The “Pure Drugs” store established by Peter and his son Charles Pomp at this location, at
that time numbered 143 Northampton Street.45 Pomp‟s Drug Store gave the building its
long-time designation of the “Pomp Building”.46 “P. Pomp‟s Drug Store” was, in fact,
used by other merchants as an Easton landmark to direct their customers in 1855.47
                                                      4


         Peter Pomp (1798 – 1856, whose full name was apparently Nicholas Peter Pomp)
was a son of Rev. Thomas Pomp, long-time pastor of the German Reformed Church on
North 3rd Street.48 Peter Pomp also trained his younger brother, Thomas, as a druggist,
before Thomas struck out on his own49 and eventually established a competing store at
what is now 343-45 Northampton Street.50 Peter Pomp died of “Softening of [the] brain”
in 1856, at the age of 58.51 His son, Charles Pomp52 continued as proprietor at the drug
store.53 Charles died of an accidental fall in 1863.54 By 1873, the drug store was being
operated by D.E. Becker, and was renumbered the following year as 401 Northampton
Street.55
        Apparently in the early 20th Century, Easton character “Professor” Albert
Newhart “walked across a rope stretched between the Central Hotel and the Pomp
Buildings.”56 Mr. Newhart was, among other things, a competition distance walker,57
tight-rope walker, clairvoyant,58 “Pow-Wow Doctor [a Pennsylvania Dutch faith healer59]
and Palmist”.60 His advertisement in 1907 proclaimed that he did:
       “more business than any other palmist. Advice given on business. Married
       couples reunited. Pow-wowing and palm-reading without charge, although
       presents accepted. Best time for pow-wowing at new or full moon. Office hours
       – 9 to 11 a.m., 1 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m.”61
Perhaps most importantly, Albert Newhart was also the father of Moetta Newhart, the
principal “Madam” of Easton‟s nationally-known brothels on Pine Street during the
Prohibition Era.62
        The building was identified in 1925 (during the tenure of Arthur B. Bixler) as the
“Bixler Bldg., formerly Pomp Bldg”).63 Bixler‟s Jewelers moved into the first floor of
the building in 1911,64 and acquired the building from the Pomp family in 1919.65
However, Bixler‟s moved again to its present location in the Jones Building of Centre
Square in 1925.66


1
       The Bixler family did not currently take credit for adopting the name during its brief tenure in the
       building. Interview with Joyce Mitman Welken, President and Co-Owner, Bixler‟s Jewelers.
2
       Compare A.D. Chidsey, Jr., The Penn Patents in the Forks of the Delaware Plan of Easton, Map 2
       (Vol. II of Publications of the Northampton County Historical and Genealogical Society 1937)
       with Northampton County Tax Records map, www.ncpub.org.
3
       A.D. Chidsey, Jr., A Frontier Village 234-35, 240 (Vol. III of the Publications of The
       Northampton County Historical and Genealogical Society 1940).
4
       See Rev. U.W. Condit, “History of Sitgreaves Street”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Friday, 28
       Aug. 1896, p.3, col.3 (Cudjo House identified as first brick building in Easton); James Wright,
       “Sitgreaves Street has some of Easton‟s oldest building”, EASTON EXPRESS, Sunday, 11 Sept.
       1988, p.C-2 (Cudjoe House identified as first brick building in Easton, modern address given as 63
       Sitgreaves Street); Ethan Allen Weaver, “Historical Sketches Relating to Easton and Eastonians
       No.III”, in Historical Notes First Series 9 (copied in Easton Public Library June 1926)(indicates
       first brick house in Easton was built by Sitgreaves in 1792 on Sitgreaves Alley to the North of
       Northampton Street, without identifying Cudjo as the occupant); Ethan Allen Weaver, “The Forks
       of the Delaware” Illustrated xi (Eschenbach Press 1900)(same).
5
       Chidsey, A Frontier Village, supra at 77-83.
                                                    5



6
     Chidsey, A Frontier Village, supra at 83-84.
7
     Chidsey, A Frontier Village, supra at 84-85, 89.
8
     Chidsey, A Frontier Village, supra at 89-93.
9
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Parsons-Taylor House, at 60 South Fourth
     Street.
10
     See Chidsey, A Frontier Village, supra at 88.
11
     B.F. Fackenthal, Jr., ”The Homes of George Taylor, Signer of the Declaration of Independence”,
     Paper read before the George Taylor Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, at Easton,
     PA, 6 Dec. 1922, at 21 (copy at Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society); see
     separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for Parsons-Taylor House at 60 South Fourth Street.
12
     Deed, Timothy Horsfield, Executor of Will of William Parsons, to Meyer Hart, C1 15 (21 Mar.
     1760)(reciting a Patent from the Penn Family in Patent Book A19 133 dated 20 Nov. 1759); see
     Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Shnyder, et al., Heirs of Peter Shnyder (Sr.), to Jacob Weygandt Jr., A5
     406 (21 Apr. 1824)(recitals). See also Northampton County Warrant P29 issued to Timothy
     Horsfield, Executor of the Will of William Parsons (30 Oct. 1759, returned 20 Nov. 1759),
     indexed online for Northampton County p.136 Warrant No.29 at
     www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/rg/di/r17-
     88WarrantRegisters/NorthamptonPages/Northampton136.pdf, survey copied at Survey Book
     C155 242 (returned 20 Nov. 1759)(William Parsons, entry of Timothy Horsfield‟s name is struck
     out).
13
     I. Harold Sharfman, Jews on the Frontier 74-75 (Henry Regnery Company 1977). See generally
     Joshua Trachtenberg, Consider the Years, The Story of the Jewish Community of Easton 1752 –
     1942 56, 60 (Centennial Committee of Temple Brith Sholom 1944); Rev. Uzal W. Condit, The
     History of Easton, Penn‟a 16 (George W. West 1885 / 1889)(“the first merchant of Easton”).
14
     Rev. Uzal W. Condit, The History of Easton, Penn‟a 17, 59 (George W. West 1885 / 1889); M.S.
     Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley 64 (Bixler & Corwin 1860); see A Brief History of
     EASTON, www.easton-pa.com/History/HistoricEaston.htm (accessed 2 Jan. 2005; more recently
     accessible through the “History” link from the City of Easton‟s website at www.easton-pa.com), at
     “The First United Church of Christ”. See also A.D. Chidsey, Jr., A Frontier Village 116 (Vol. III
     of Publications of The Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society 1940)(first
     shopkeeper). For a more complete history of Meyer Hart, see generally separate
     www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Pomp/Bixler Building at 401 Northampton Street.
15
     Deed, Timothy Horsfield, Executor of Will of William Parsons, to Meyer Hart, C1 15 (21 Mar.
     1760).
16
     A.D. Chidsey, Jr., A Frontier Village 259 (Vol. III of Publications of The Northampton County
     Historical & Genealogical Society 1940). See generally, separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry
     for 432-34 Northampton Street.
17
     Ethan Allen Weaver, “The Forks of the Delaware” Illustrated x (Eschenbach Press 1900).
18
     See Jacob Rader Marcus, I United States Jewry 1776-1985 151 (Wayne State University Press
     1989)
19
     Ethan Allen Weaver, “The Forks of the Delaware” Illustrated xvi (Eschenbach Press 1900)(Rose,
     age 27; Fanny, age 17; Cato, age 6; Tharase, age 5; and Jack, age 3). There was a total of only
     11 slaves emancipated in Easton in that year.
20
     I. Harold Sharfman, Jews on the Frontier 75-76 (Henry Regnery Company 1977).
                                                 6



21
     A.D. Chidsey, Jr., A Frontier Village 259 (Vol. III of Publications of The Northampton County
     Historical & Genealogical Society 1940). See generally, separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry
     for 432-34 Northampton Street.
22
     I. Harold Sharfman, Jews on the Frontier 75-76 (Henry Regnery Company 1977); see separate
     www.WalkingEaston.com entry for Centre Square (000 Centre Square).
23
     See Jacob Rader Marcus, I United States Jewry 1776-1985 151 (Wayne State University Press
     1989); Joshua Trachtenberg, Consider the Years, The Story of the Jewish Community of Easton
     1752 – 1942 66-67 (Centennial Committee of Temple Brith Sholom 1944).
24
     Trachtenberg, Consider the Years, supra at 67.
25
     Trachtenberg, Consider the Years, supra at 66.
26
     Deed, Peter Ealer, Sheriff, for Meyer Hart, to Peter Shnyder, F1 125 (20 Mar. 1787)(£305) ; see
     Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Shnyder, et al., Heirs of Peter Shnyder (Sr.), to Jacob Weygandt Jr., A5
     406 (21 Apr. 1824)(recitals).
27
     Deed, John Penn (the Elder) and John Penn (the Younger) to Peter Shnyder, G1 25 (recorded 13
     Nov. 1789)(sale price £18 13s. 4d.) ; see Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Shnyder, et al., Heirs of Peter
     Shnyder (Sr.), to Jacob Weygandt Jr., A5 406 (21 Apr. 1824).
28
     John Eyerman, The Ancestors of Marguerite Eyerman: A Study in Genealogy 16 (Free Press Book
     and Job Print 1898). We see from the deed record below that the Peter Schnyder who owned this
     property died in 1823, and therefore is not the younger Peter Schnyder (1790 – 1862) that
     Eyerman notes at page 44. This property owner is also not the same person as yet another Peter
     Shnyder, who died in 1774. See Deed, Casper Doll & Henry Allshouse, Administrators for Peter
     Shnyder, deceased, to Peter Kachlein the Younger, A4 85 (13 June 1776)(recital that Orphans
     Court appointed the Administrators for this estate in 1774).
29
     See Rev. Uzal W. Condit, The History of Easton, Penn‟a 60 (George W. West 1885 / 1889)(Peter
     Snyder).
30
     Leonard S. Buscemi, Sr., The Easton PA Trivia Book 270 (Pinter‟s Printers, Inc. 1985).
31
     See, e.g., Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Shnyder, et al., Heirs of Peter Shnyder (Sr.), to Jacob Weygandt
     Jr., A5 406 (21 Apr. 1824)(property now numbered 22-24 North Fourth Street); Deed, Peter
     (Elizabeth) Shnyder, et al., Heirs of Peter Shnyder (Sr.), to Susanna Young (and another Shnyder
     Heir), G5 382 (1 Apr. 1825)(property now numbered 18-20 North Fourth Street).
32
     Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Shnyder, et al., Heirs of Peter Shnyder (Sr.), to Peter Miller, A5 15 (21
     Apr. 1824)(first mentioned parcel, measuring 59‟ on Northampton Street X 120‟ on Hamilton
     Street to a private alley).
33
     Floyd S. Bixler, The History with Reminiscences of the Early Taverns and Inns of Easton, 11-12
     (Northampton County Historical and Genealogical Society 1931)( Paper Read before the
     Northampton County Historical Society at the St. Crispin Anniversary Dinner at the Lafayette
     Hotel on 25 Oct. 1930). See separate entries on www.WalkingEaston.com for Two Rivers
     Landing, 30 Centre Square (containing the site of Peter Miller‟s residence); the Log Cabin Lot /
     Peter Miller Buildings at 209-17 Northampton Street; and Library Hall, at 32 North Second Street
     (history of Easton Library when located in Peter Miller‟s residence).
34
     Article, “Rich Men”, EASTON ARGUS, Thurs., 21 Nov. 1861, p.2, col.3. The other two identified
     by the ARGUS were Col. Thomas McKeen and Hon. David D. Wagener. See generally separate
     entries for the Wagner Mansion (Pomfret Club) at 33 South 4th Street (owned by David Wagener‟s
     son) and the Col. Thomas McKeen Mansion at 231 Spring Garden Street.
                                                7



35
     Henry F. Marx (compiler), II Marriages and Deaths Northampton County 1799 – 1851 Newspaper
     Extracts 694 (Easton Area Public Library 1929)(from The Whig and Journal, Wed., 10 March
     1847, article stating that Miller had died on the third).
36
     Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Miller to Samuel Wilhelm, H7 573 (5 Sept. 1849)(stated sale price
     $100,000 for 2/5 interest in Miller‟s entire inheritance).
37
     Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Miller to James M. Port and Matthew Hale Jones, H7 572 (5 Sept.
     1849)(stated price $50,000 for 1/5 of the inheritance “and for divers other good causes and
     considerations”). Two months later, in return for certain of the real estate, the two lawyers
     returned their 1/5 interest. Deed, James M. (Eliza) Porter and Matthew Hale (Mary F.) Jones to
     Peter Miller and Samuel Wilhelm, C8 94 (21 Nov. 1849)(Tract No.25).
38
     Hillyard v. Miller, 10 Pa.State 326-38 (Pa.Sup.Ct. 1849); see Kempton, A History of St. John‟s
     Evangelical Lutheran Congregation, supra at 217 (decision established Pennsylvania law on the
     “rule against perpetuities” relating to trusts for the accumulation of income).
39
     Deed of Partition between Samuel (Mary) Wilhelm and Peter (Elizabeth) Miller (of Ohio), C8
     113 (29 Dec. 1849)(Tract No.25); see also Deed, James M. (Eliza) Porter and Matthew Hale
     (Mary F.) Jones to Peter Miller and Samuel Wilhelm, C8 94 (21 Nov. 1849)(Tract No.25 –
     occupied by John Dehart and others).
40
     Henry F. Marx (compiler), II Marriages and Deaths Northampton County 1799 – 1851 Newspaper
     Extracts 808 (Easton Area Public Library 1929).
41
     Deed, Peter (Elizabeth) Miller (late of Ohio), by Attorney John Miller, to Peter Pomp, B8 224 (1
     Apr. 1850)(sale price $12,050).
42
     Article, “Pomp‟s Drug Store Removed”, EASTON DEMOCRAT & ARGUS, Thurs., 19 Dec. 1850, p.3,
     col.3 (moved “a few doors below the old stand”). The article noted that the drug store fixtures
     from the “old stand”, including shelving, drawers, and counter, etc., were to be “sold cheap”.
43
     Article, “Pomp‟s New Building”, EASTON DEMOCRAT & ARGUS, Thurs., 19 Dec. 1850, p.2, col.2.
44
     Article, “Pomp‟s Chemical Palace”, EASTONIAN, Thurs., 19 June 1951, p.2, col.3. The reference
     to “Mr. Lawall” is apparently to Cyrus Lawall‟s 4-story drug store opened in 1851, now
     designated 454-56 Northampton Street. It was converted to a hardware store by William Lawall
     and his son Edward after Cyrus Lawall built another, more ornate drug store building across the
     street at 437 Northampton Street in the 1870s. See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for
     the Lawall Hardware Store at 454-56 Northampton Street, and sources cited therein.
45
     See C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 45 (Cole & Eichman‟s
     Office, 1855)(Peter Pomp and Charles Pomp, druggists at No.143, and advertisement for Peter
     Pomp, “Pure Drugs”, at NW corner of 4 th and Northampton Streets, showing a picture of the
     building); see also William J. Heller, II History of Northampton County and The Grand Valley of
     the Lehigh Biographical Section 135 (The American Historical Society 1920)(Peter Pomp,
     druggist, son of Rev. Thomas Pomp); Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of Some of Easton‟s
     Prominent Citizens 107 (Hillburn & West 1879)(Cyrus Lawall clerked in “the old drug store of
     Peter Pomp, now dead, on the corner of Fourth and Northampton streets.”).
     Two other members of the Pomp family also sold drugs on Northampton Street in 1855:
                 Thomas R. Pomp, at No.127, and
                 J.R. Pomp, at No. 129.
     See id. (alphabetical listing for Thomas R. Pomp; advertisement for J.R. Pomp).
46
     See Charles M. Barnard (compiler), West‟s Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 21 (The
     Union Publishing Co. 1914)(“Blocks, Buildings, Halls”); H.P. Delano (compiler), West‟s
                                                 8



     Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 25 (Union Publishing Co. Inc. 1925)(“Halls, Blocks,
     Buildings”).
47
     G.W. Hope‟s advertisement for his “Sky-Light Daguerrean Gallery” directed customers to
     “Rooms 2 doors above P. Pomp‟s Drug Store”, and in small letters noted that he was also “Over
     the Argus Office”. C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA (Cole &
     Eichman‟s Office, 1855).
48
     See William Jacob Heller, II History of Northampton County (Pennsylvania and the grand valley
     of the Lehigh 134-35 (American Historical Society 1920)(incorrectly lists the death year as 1836,
     and is corrected in pencil in the Marx Room‟s copy); see also Henry F. Marx (compiler), III
     Marriages and Deaths Northampton County 1852 – 1870 Newspaper Extracts 685 (Easton Area
     Public Library 1934).
49
     William Jacob Heller, II History of Northampton County (Pennsylvania and the grand valley of
     the Lehigh 135 (American Historical Society 1920).
50
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for 343-45 Northampton Street.
51
     Church Record of the German Reformed Congregation of Easton Pennsylvania (Marx Room
     Church Records designation E) 131 (copied in Easton Public Library 1936); see Henry F. Marx
     (compiler), III Marriages and Deaths Northampton County 1852 – 1870 Newspaper Extracts 685
     (Easton Area Public Library 1934)(Easton Express: age 58; Argus: age 64).
52
     See Church Record of the German Reformed Congregation of Easton Pennsylvania (Marx Room
     Church Records designation E) 145 (copied in Easton Public Library 1936)(Charles Pomp, son of
     Peter and Susan Pomp, died 1863 at age 33 of the accidental fall).
53
     See William H. Boyd, Boyd‟s Directory of Reading, Easton, [etc.] ad p.38 (William H. Boyd
     1860)(advertisement, location at the corner of Northampton and 4 th Streets). See also 1860
     Census, Series M653, Roll 1147, p.346 (Charles Pomp, druggist).
54
     See Church Record of the German Reformed Congregation of Easton Pennsylvania (Marx Room
     Church Records designation E) 145 (copied in Easton Public Library 1936)(Charles Pomp, son of
     Peter and Susan Pomp, died 1863 at age 33 of the accidental fall).
55
     Article, “The New Numbers”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Friday, 21 Nov. 1873, p.3.
56
     Obituary, “‟Prof.‟ Newhard Gone”, EASTON EXPRESS, Tuesday, 2 July 1918, p.2.
57
     Charles A. Waltman, “1887 Revisited: The Great Six-Day Walking Match”, NORTHAMPTON
     NOTES, Vol. 3, Nos. 3-4, p.5 (Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Soc‟y, March
     1987). Albert Newhart represented Easton, placed 4 th and won $5, walking 212 miles in 6 days.
     The winner walked 421 miles. See also Obituary, “‟Prof.‟ Newhard Gone”, EASTON EXPRESS,
     Tuesday, 2 July 1918, p.2.
58
     Obituary, “‟Prof.‟ Newhard Gone”, EASTON EXPRESS, Tuesday, 2 July 1918, p.2.
59
     See Ned D. Heindel, The Hexenkopf: History, Healing, and Hexerei 21 (Williams Twp. Historical
     Soc‟y 2005).
60
     See 1910 Census, Series T624, Roll 1381, p.76A line 9 (Enumeration Dist. No. 74 Sheet No.6)
     (Albert Newhart, address 644 Northampton Street).
61
     Advertisement, “Prof. Newhart, Pow-Wow Doctor”, EASTON SUNDAY CALL, 3 Feb. 1907, p.1,
     col.7.
62
     Ratner, “In the „20s Easton was city of ill repute”, supra at B-8, col. 3; Interview with Lou
     Ferrone (“Mr. Easton”), 2 Sept. 2006; Interview with Marie Hicks Storm (Easton resident across
     from Front St. Seitz Brewery in 1920s), 30 August 2006.
63
     West‟s Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 65 (Union Publishing Co. Inc. 1925).
                                                 9



64
      Article, “Bixler‟s New Location”, EASTON EXPRESS, 7 July 1911, p.1, col.6 (“The C. W. Bixler
     Jewelry Company, that now has its store in the Smith building, southeast corner of Fourth and
     Northampton street, has leased the room on the first floor of the Pomp building, northwest corner
     of the same thoroughfare, at present occupied by W. S. Pursel‟s clothing and furnishing store, and
     will occupy the same about the 15th of September, after extensive improvements”).
     But see Jennifer Heebner, “Preserving History, How Heirs to the 217-Year-Old Bixler‟s Jewelers
     Keep the Past Alive”, Jewelers Circular Keystone (trade publication) 108 (Oct. 2002)(picture said
     to be dated to 1900 of Bixler‟s “third location at Fourth and Northampton” Streets; picture of
     exterior of Pomp Building described as “One of Bixler‟s locations”). This picture is apparently
     misdated, based upon the conflicts with other data. The confusion is understandable, however,
     because Easton directories both before and after the 1911 move listed the store as being at Fourth
     and Northampton Streets, and gave no indication that it had moved from the SE to the NW corner
     of that intersection. Thus, contrary to the Heebner article, the Pomp Building was actually
     Bixler‟s fourth (not third) store location. See George W. West (compiler), Directory of Easton
     City 24 (George W. West 1906); Charles M. Bernard (compiler), West‟s Directory for City of
     Easton 30 (The Easton Directory Company 1908); Charles M. Barnard (compiler), West‟s
     Directory for City of Easton 1910 91 (The West Job Printing House 1910); Charles M. Barnard
     (compiler), West‟s Directory for City of Easton 1912 118 (The Easton Directory Company 1912).
65
     Article, “Pomp Building Sold to Bixler”, EASTON EXPRESS / EASTON ARGUS, Monday, 20 Oct.
     1919, p.1, col.3 (sale to A.B. Bixler & Co., jewelers, who already occupy the first floor).
66
     Easton Is Home, Heritage Edition 13 (2003); Jennifer Heebner, “Preserving History, How Heirs
     to the 217-Year-Old Bixler‟s Jewelers Keep the Past Alive”, Jewelers Circular Keystone (trade
     publication) 106-09 (Oct. 2002).
floor).
66
     Easton Is Home, Heritage Ed ition 13 (2003); Jennifer Heebner, “Preserving History, How Heirs
     to the 217-Year-Old Bixler‟s Jewelers Keep the Past Alive”, Jewelers Circu lar Keystone (trade
     publication) 106-09 (Oct. 2002).

				
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