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									 Resource Team Report
Clear Lake, South Dakota
    November 14-16, 2006




   A Governors 2010 Initiative
                                     Acknowledgements

                       The Community Resource Team Assessment
                       Program is coordinated by the South Dakota Rural
                       Development Council to help fulfill Goal #4 of the
                       Governors 2010 Initiative to “Brand and Develop
                       South Dakota’s Quality of Life as the Best in
                       America by 2010” by stabilizing rural populations
                       through community development.

                       This program is made possible through the
                       collaborative efforts of over 150 volunteers
                       representing 50 plus organizations throughout
                       South Dakota.

                       The program is also made possible through
                       financial contributions made by the State of South
                       Dakota (Governors Office of Economic
                       Development), USDA Rural Development, and the
                       South Dakota Community Foundation.

                       At the local level, this process would not be possible
                       without the many hours of volunteer service from
                       your local planning taskforce and local financial
                       sponsors.

                       Special recognition to South Dakota’s Elected
                       Officials including Governor Mike Rounds,
                       Senator Tim Johnson, Senator John Thune, and
                       Representative Stephanie Herseth for their
                       continuing support for the South Dakota Rural
                       Development Council. Also, special thanks to the
                       Council’s Board of Directors for initiating this
                       program in South Dakota

   South Dakota        Thank you to everyone who contributed to making
Community Foundation   this Assessment a success!
                         TABLE OF CONTENTS
                       Clear Lake Resource Team Assessment

                                  November 14-16, 2006

                                                                                     Page

 Executive Summary………………………………………………………………..                                           2

 Introductions by Resource Team Members……………………………………….                                4

 Process for the Development of the Team Study and Report……………………...                   6

 Resource Team Members…………………………………………………………..                                         7

 Interview Agenda…………………………………………………………………..                                           8

 2010 Initiative …………………………………………………………………….                                           9

 Clear Lake Themes……..….……………………….………..……………………                                       11

 Recommendations……………………………...………………………………….                                          13

              Business Development..……………………………………………..                                13
              Vision & Planning…..……………………………………………….                                  31
              Infrastructure & Recreation…………..…….……………………….                           53
              Youth ……………..…………………………………………………                                         77
              Housing……………….……………………………………………..                                        89
              Other………………..…..………………………………..………….                                     107

 What Was Said in the Interviews………………………………………………..…                                 116

 APPENDIX A – Key Points to Effective Strategic Planning and Implementation           132

Any recommendations contained herein are not mandatory. The South Dakota Rural
Development Council has not endorsed any recommendations and opinions contained
herein. Neither the South Dakota Rural Development Council, nor any of its employees,
contract labor, committee chairs, and/or members makes any warranty, express or implied,
including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, or assumes any
legal liability for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of this report or any
information, recommendations, or opinions contained herein.




                                               1
                                 Executive Summary
While conducting various community assessments, I have had the opportunity to work
with many different communities. The one thing that sets Clear Lake apart from other
communities is the large number of positive remarks that we heard during the listening
sessions. It’s this positive ―Can do‖ attitude that made it possible for Clear Lake to have
such outstanding facilities like the Community Center and the new High School. It takes
a lot of hard work and commitment to achieve these types of accomplishments.

There is also a strong sense of community pride in Clear Lake. While at the high school,
I noticed that almost every student had a shirt on supporting Clear Lake’s Volleyball
Team, and on Wednesday morning we joined much of the town for a small parade
sending them off to compete in a tournament. These types of activities show very clearly
that the citizens of Clear Lake are proud of who they are and where they come from! It’s
this community pride and a can do attitude that makes things happen. I want to stress the
fact that the people of Clear Lake have demonstrated an ability to put forth the effort
needed to accomplish whatever it is that they set their minds to. It’s these traits that will
help to overcome the challenges that Clear Lake will face in the future. The citizens of
Clear Lake will be its greatest assets when it comes to accomplishing these challenges
and goals.

This is important as it is up to the citizens of Clear Lake to make change happen. This
report can help serve as guide in the future development of the goals set by the citizens of
Clear Lake. It’s up to the citizens to drive Clear Lake there. With great organizations
like the East Central Development Company, the City, and others, I feel confident that
we will see great changes in the future of your community.

It is now up to you as a community to prioritize your ideas based on the report’s
recommendations, build your comprehensive vision for the future of Clear Lake, and then
organize yourselves to take these ideas and move from talk to action. The report includes
many suggestions how you can move forward. Mobilize your local organizations and
residents to help achieve the goals and objectives that you set for yourselves. Recognize
that you have many of the resources locally to achieve your objectives, and when
necessary, look to outside resources and technical assistance to help you meet these
goals. But primary responsibility for moving forward with your objectives resides at the
local level. There is nothing that your community cannot accomplish if you focus your
efforts on a select set of shared objectives.

The first step is broad participation by the community in the Assessment’s Follow-Up
Meeting – to be scheduled shortly after distribution of this report. It is vital that as many
people participate in this final session / town hall meeting as possible so that the results
reflect your priorities for the future of your community. Once this has been done, you
can begin to develop strategies for how you want to accomplish your objectives over the
next 2, 5, 10 or 20 years.




                                             2
On behalf of the Resource Team, I want to personally thank your community for the
warm welcome that we received while we were in your community. A special thank you
to all those who helped to plan this assessment at the local level. You did an exceptiona l
job.

Sincerely,

Mike Lauritsen
Resource Team Leader




                                            3
           Introductions by Resource Team Members
Erin Bofenkamp (Ame ricorps VISTA SDSU): A warm thanks to the Clear Lake
Community for being such wonderful hosts to the Resource team. I’d especially like to
thank all those who care enough about their community to be involved in this assessment
process. I was impressed by the constructive and honest comments we received in the
listening sessions. Your community is impressive and has many assets other communities
would covet. In particular, the golf course, new school, your hotel, specialty shopping,
and the great health care system are real assets. I encourage everyone to use their
personal talents to get involved and make a difference. I have confidence t hat with the
effort and enthusiasm your community showed to the Resource Team great projects will
happen. As famous American anthropologist Margaret Mead said, ―Never doubt that a
small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world (or Clear Lake).
Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.‖ Good luck!

Kelly Rasmussen (Dept. of Touris m & State Development): Thank you again for your
hospitality during our stay in Clear Lake. I sincerely enjoyed my time with you and it
didn’t take long for me to understand that despite its many assets, it’s the people that
make Clear Lake special! Your genuine desire to improve the community for yourselves
and future generations was obvious in all our sessions. I was truly moved by the sense of
concern that you have for one another and the many ways you give of yourselves. That is
the foundation of a successful community! I hope our report will provide you with some
tools to assist you in continuing to reach your goals.

Darlene Bresson (USDA Rural Development): Thank you to the City of Clear Lake
for your warm hospitality while we were there. Special thanks to Randy Petrich and
Marianne Beebout for spending so much time facilitating our stay and making sure we
had plenty to eat – it was all delicious! It was also fun to witness the parade for the girls
volleyball team as they left for the State tournament. Congratulations to the team for
making it to State!

I was very impressed with Clear Lake. You have a lot going for you already, and you
have a good group of volunteers! There are a lot of very dedicated people who have
spent countless hours promoting the community and working to make it a better place to
live. At each listening session during the Strengths and Assets question, someone
brought up that people in Clear Lake are friendly, helpful, and caring, and the town is a
safe place. This is a tremendous attribute and something that larger communities wish
they had, but can’t duplicate. So you have a good foundation on which to build.

I’m so glad that Clear Lake is in the area served by our office. Please contact me if you
have any questions. I really look forward to working with the community in the future!

Mike Lauritsen, Team Leader (South Eastern Council of Governme nts): Again, I
want to sincerely thank everyone in the community for their hospitality during our time in
Clear Lake. Clear Lake is indeed a unique community, from your thriving industries to



                                             4
your beautiful lake; there are some many great things Clear Lake has to offer. Your
community has a great foundation from which to grow. I believe there is so much
opportunity for Clear Lake to capitalize on and I expect to see great things accomplished
in the next several years. I hope to see Clear Lake take ownership of this report and use it
as a resource, along with each Resource Team Member, to reach your future goals.
Please feel free to contact me with any questions, concerns, or ideas as I would be glad to
help (it’s my job)!

Linda Salmonson (East Rive r Electric Powe r Cooperative): Thanks for the great tour
and hospitality while the team was in Clear Lake. The number one reason I enjoy being
part of a community assessment process is the opportunity to meet community leaders
and learn about the opportunities and challenges facing So uth Dakota’s rural
communities. Clear Lake has a strong foundation as a regional center providing goods
and services to area farms and communities. Your health care and education systems are
impressive. You also have great attractions like the lake and rodeo plus a strong
industrial base. While you may wish all the employees could live in Clear Lake, please be
thankful that your industries provide employment to the surrounding area, instead of vise
versa. As in all South Dakota communities, it is the people that ultimately make the
community what it is. I was very impressed with your pragmatic and proactive approach
to development, your community spirit and your commitment to a future that recognizes
the interdependence of area small towns and surrounding counties. The process doesn’t
end with the report, so be sure to give me a call if I might be of assistance as you
continue to chart your future.

Jon Radermacher (MBA Student University of South Dakota): I had a wonderful
time in your community, and was quite pleased with the hospitality, and sense of pride
and opportunity that you have about the future of your community.




                                             5
  Process for the Development of This Report
The South Dakota Rural Development Council (SDRDC) has provided a Resource Team
to assist the city of Clear Lake, South Dakota in evaluating the community’s assets and
liabilities and in developing suggestions for improving the environmental, social and
economic future of Clear Lake.

The East Central Development Corporation, in cooperation with the City of Clear Lake,
coordinated the Community Assessment locally. Marianne Beebout and Randy Petrick
served as the community planning leaders and, with the help of many local volunteers
serving on the planning taskforce, developed the agenda, coordinated logistics, and
publicized the assessment within the local community.

The Resource Team toured the town and surrounding area and interviewed over 150+
individuals during the three-day period from November 14-16. The team interviewed
representatives from the following segments of the Clear Lake community: City, County,
School, Government, Young Families, Newcomers, Child Care, Food Service, Lodging,
Teachers, Administration, Youth/Students, Ministerial/Church, Non Profits, Healthcare,
Law Enforcement/Emergency, Service Business, Development/Industry, Ag Businesses
and Farmers, Utilities/Streets, City Staff, and Senior Citizens/60’s Plus and more. Each
participant was asked to respond to three questions designed to begin communication and
discussion and to serve as a basis for developing an action plan. The three questions
were:

      What do you think are the major problems and challenges in Clear Lake?
      What do you think are the major strengths and assets of Clear Lake?
      What projects would you like to see completed in two, five, ten, and twenty years
       in Clear Lake?

Upon completion of the interviews, the team met to compare notes and share comments
following three days of intense study. The team then agreed that each team member
would carefully analyze the things said, synthesize what they heard with their knowledge
of programs and resources, prepare their notes and suggestions, and then forward these
items to be combined into SDRDC’s final report to Clear Lake.

An oral report was presented to the residents of Clear Lake on November 16th, 2006.
Following the oral report, a formal written report was prepared and presented to the
community of Clear Lake. A community follow-up and prioritization meeting will be
held in Clear Lake after this report is distributed and made available to the community at-
large.




                                            6
                     Resource Team Members
                         Clear Lake, South Dakota
                          November 14-16, 2006

Resource Team Members
Mike Lauritsen, Team Leader                Linda Salmonson
Planner                                    Rural Electric Economic Development
South Eastern Council of Governments       PO Box 227
1000 N West Ave., Suite 210                Madison, SD 57042
Sioux Falls, SD 57104                      605-256-4536
605-367-5390                               lsamlmonson@eastriver.coop
605-367-5394 (Fax)
mike@secog.org


Erin Bofenkamp                             Jon Rade rmacher
Americorps VISTA                           USD Student
Service Learning Consultant                403 E Main St
South Dakota State University              Vermillion, SD 57069
823 Medary Ave., Box 550                   320-444-0953 (cell)
Brookings, SD 57007                        jraderma@usd.edu
605-688-6896
Erin.Bofenkamp@sdstate.edu


Darlene Bresson                            Co-Community Contact:
Rural Development Manager                  Marianne Beebout
USDA Rural Development                     Finance Office
810 Jenson Ave. SE, Suite 2                City of Clear Lake
Watertown, SD 57201                        PO Box 107
605-886-8202                               Clear Lake, SD 57226
605-886-3268 (Fax)                         605-874-2121
Darlene.bresson@sd.usda.gov                clcity@itctel.com


Kelly Rasmussen                            Co-Community Contact:
Ag Development Specialist                  Randy Petrick
Dept. of Tourism & State Development       Economic Development Coordinator
GOED                                       East Central Development Corporation
711 E Wells Ave                            PO Box 906
Pierre, SD 57501                           809 7th St. West
605-773-3301                               Clear Lake, SD 57226
605-773-3256 (Fax)                         605-874-2674
Kelly.Rasmussen@state.sd.us                rpetrick@itctel.com


                                       7
                             Clear Lake Community Assessment Agenda
                                       November 14-16, 2006
       11-14-06
TIME                 TITLE                    SECTOR                                LOCATION
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm    Resource Team
                     Meets
                     (working Dinner)
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm    Listening Session 1      City/County/School Government         Community Center
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm    Listening Session 2      Young Families/Newcomers/Child Care   Community Center
8:00 pm – 9:00 pm    Listening Session 3      Food Service/Lodging                  Community Center

         11-15-06
TIME                 TITLE                   SECTOR                                  LOCATION
7:00 am – 8:00 am    Listening Session 4     Teachers/Administration w/breakfast     School Auditorium
8:15 am – 9:15 am    Listening Session 5     Youth/Students                          High School
9:00 am – 10:00 am   Break
10:00 am – 11:00     Listening Session 6     Ministerial/Church/Non Profits          Community Center
pm
11:00 am – 12:00     Listening Session 7     Healthcare/Law Enforcement/Emergency    Community Center
pm                                           Service
12:00 pm – 1:00      Lunch                                                           Community Center
pm
1:00 pm – 3:30 pm    Community Tour                                                  Mini Bus
3:30 pm – 4:30 pm    Break
5:00 pm – 7:00 pm    Listening Session 8 /   Business / Development / Industry
                                                                                     Community Center
                     hors d'oeuvre           (hors d'oeuvre)
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm    Listening Session 9     Ag Businesses and Farmers               Community Center

         11-16-06
TIME                 TITLE                   SECTOR                                  LOCATION
8:00 am – 9:00 am    Listening Session 10    General Open Session                    Community Center
9:00 am – 10:00      Break
am
10:00 am – 11:00     Listening Session 11    Utilities/Streets City Staff            Community Center
am
11:30 am – 12:30     Working Lunch           Senior Citizens/60’s Plus               Hidewood Estates
pm
12:30 pm – 1:30      Listening Session 12    Senior Citizens/60’s Plus               Hidewood Estates
pm
1:30 pm –2:00 pm     Break
2:00 pm – 6:00 pm    Team Preparation                                                Community Center
6:00 pm – 6:30 pm    Community Dinner        All                                     Community Center
6:30 pm – 7:30 pm    Town Hall Meeting       All                                     Community Center



                                                      8
     The Governors 2010 Initiative is the comprehensive strategic plan for
 economic development in the State of South Dakota over the next five years.
  The Community Resource Team Assessment Program is one piece of this
    initiative, with the mission of helping rural communities advance their
community planning. The Community Assessment Program helps to develop
      a local community/economic development plan that is unique to the
  community, while at the same time, fitting in with the state’s overall 2010
                                     Initiative

                   The following Goals and Objectives were
             identified in the Governors Statewide 2010 Initiative
Goal 1: Double Visitor Spending from $600 Million to $1.2 Billion by 2010

      1A. Change the way we market South Dakota

      1B. Focus new energy and investment on expanding the fall shoulder season for
      visitors in order to increase the percentage of tourism revenues for this season to 42
      percent

      1C. Expand investment in tourism’s peak season through greater use of partnership
      and cooperative efforts

      1D. Develop a statewide ―One-Click, on-call‖ reservation system by 2005

      1E. Capitalize on the existing outdoor opportunities in our state


Goal 2: Increase GSP (Gross State Product) by $10 billion by 2010

       2A. Promote the creation and development of new businesses that will contribute $6
       billion to the GSP

       2B. Promote the growth / expansion of existing businesses that will contribute $4
       billion to GSP

       2C. Promote agricultural and natural resource development in South Dakota



                                              9
Goal 3: Become a Recognized Leader in Research and Technology Development by
2010

       3A. Secure Homestake Mine for use as an underground science laboratory

       3B. Improve ranking to at least 30th nationally for NSF funding

       3C. Development research and technology infrastructure at our universities with the
       private sector
       Emphasis on research that can be commercialized and will benefit South Dakota)



Goal 4: Brand and Development South Dakota’s Quality of Life as the Best in Ame rica
by 2010

      4A. Enhance South Dakota’s image to young people in an effort to retain and import
      young adults

      4B. Enhance History and Arts as a tool for economic development and cultural
      tourism

      4C. Stabilize rural populations through community development

      4D. Stimulate affordable homeownership, rental housing, and day care facilities in
      South Dakota communities which evidence a need.

      4E. Improve cooperative efforts with the Native American Tribes



Goal 5: Uphold Our Commitme nt to the 2010 Initiative as a Work in Progress

      5A. Assign implementation to Department of Tourism and State Development

      5B. Create ongoing update and accountability structure for 2010 Initiative




Following distribution of this Community Resource Team Assessment Report,
    the South Dakota Rural Development Council will convene a follow up
 priority-setting meeting in the community to help focus on select set of goals
   and objectives based on the data collected during the assessment and the
                   recommendations included in this report.


                                           10
        What We Heard From What Was Said
After listening to citizens of Clear Lake, the Resource Team reviewed what was said and
condensed the comments down to major themes that will be addressed in the team member
reports. (These are in no particular order or priority)

                    Major The me / Sub The mes                             Page
                                                                          Number

THEME: BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
  Business Retention, Expansion, & Succession
                                                                             13
           Workforce Development
  Industrial Park                                                            16
  Ag. Development                                                            20
  Business Start-up                                                          23
  Funding
                                                                             25
            Trust Fund
  Shop Locally                                                               29

THEME: VISION / PLANNING
  Lake Development                                                           31
  Planning & Coordination                                                    33
  Communication / Coordination
                                                                             38
            Social Activities (welcoming / involving newcomers)
  Volunteerism                                                               40
  Professional Recruitment
                                                                             43
            Scholarship
  Strategic Plan                                                             46
  Community Marketing
                                                                             50
            Marquee Sign

THEME: INFRASTRUCTURE / RECREATION
  Curb / Gutter / Sidewalks / Streets / Sewer                                53
  Handicap Accessibility                                                     59
  Training & Recruiting EMT’s & Firemen                                      61
  Staffing                                                                   65
  Project Funding                                                            66
  Bike & Walking Path                                                        72
  Park & Campground Improvements                                             74

                        Continued on Next Page



                                           11
THEME: YOUTH
  Retention                                      77
  Youth Engagement
                                                 79
           Volunteering
  Activities                                     83
  Activities Center                              85

THEME: HOUSING
  Affordable                                      89
  Low Income                                      95
  Rehabilitation                                  98
  Spec Housing                                   102
  Independent / Assisted Living                  105

THEME: OTHER
  Day Care                                       107
  Attitudes                                      110
  Main St. Revitalization / Beatification        112




                                            12
                          BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                              Business Retention, Expansion, & Succession




               BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

SUB THEME:        Business Retention, Expansion, & Succession
                               Workforce Development



  Challenge:
                 1) Provide a stable environment for businesses to maintain and expand
                    operations.
                 2) Continue to train and educate the local workforce.
                 3) Develop a plan for succession of locally owned businesses.

  Recommendation: Many factors impact business success such as supply & demand,
  competition, stability of the global economy and access to capital. However, communities
  must focus their business development efforts in areas where improvements can be made at
  the local level. Those areas include workforce development, local patronage, support of
  entrepreneurs, financing and tax climate.

  Workforce Development: A skilled workforce is critical to any industry. In order to remain
  competitive, it is often necessary for employers to retrain, cross-train or upgrade the skills of
  their workers. The Workforce Development Program, administered by the Governor’s Office
  of Economic Development, provides companies with financial assistance to help train new
  and existing employees. Statewide Career Learning Centers can provide a variety of free
  services for both job seekers and employers. They are staffed with trained professionals
  ready to help employers deal with various labor issues and to help job applicants identify
  opportunities and prepare for productive employment. Employer services and programs
  include: Screen and test job applicants, schedule and host interviews, job training programs,
  and work opportunity tax credits. Jobseeker services include: search job postings, identify
  career interests, resume writing assistance, and assistance co mpleting applications and
  preparing for job interviews.

  Local Patronage: This area is covered more thoroughly under the recommendation Shop
  Locally. For Clear Lake to thrive, you as residents must make the choice to support your
  local businesses as much as your individual circumstances allow. Having spent several days
  in Clear Lake during the Assessment, we were very impressed by the number and variety of
  businesses your community has to offer. In every session we heard strong support for local
  businesses.




                                                  13
                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                            Business Retention, Expansion, & Succession
Suggestions were made by residents:

   1. Offer extended hours on evenings and weekends

   2. Where possible expand selection to include basic items such as men’s clothing,
      personal items and additional food choices.

Support of Entrepreneurs:
Starting a business can be very challenging. Starting a business in your hometown can add
another layer of complication to this process. There are many opportunities for Clear Lake
entrepreneurs to capitalize on the growing needs within Clear Lake. Community leaders need
to encourage entrepreneurship. Professionals such as attorneys, accountants, electricians,
plumbers, child care providers, mechanics, hair stylists, farmers, ranche rs and restaurateurs
can be considered entrepreneurs. Consider holding an annual entrepreneurship contest such
as a business plan contest and encourage students to participate. The East Central
Development group could judge the business plans and work with the entrepreneur to turn
the plan into a reality. Try to come up with some creative incentives to offer the winning
business plan / entrepreneur. This contest done on a yearly base could potentially bring to
reality one new business each year in Clear Lake. Encourage local business owners to mentor
contestants.

Financing:
Business financing is available through various local, regional, state and federal sources.
When assessing financing options, it is necessary to adequately match the use of funds with
the source (i.e. long-term financing should be used for long-term assets, short-term financing
should be used for short term needs). Most private and public sources can blended together to
create a complete finance package. Nearly all financing options will require the business
owner to contribute equity. A business plan and financials (historical or projected) are
necessary when applying for financing. There is more information on this topic in the
recommendation on Funding.

Note: public sources of funding often have job creation or economic impact requirements.

Tax Climate:
Cities and counties often choose to offer graduated tax abatements to new or expanding
companies. Tax Increment Financing is also an option. This is a process by which property
taxes generated by new developments are used to pay for improvements on that property.
The increase in the value of the property as improvements are made raises the taxes charged
on the property. In a TIF, the difference in taxes between the original assessed value and the
improved value - the increment - goes toward the cost of the improvements as opposed to a
local government. That continues until TIF-qualified costs are paid off, up to 20 years.

Business Succession:
This relates to entrepreneurship and many of the same principles apply. Community and
business leaders could develop a scholarship program for graduating high school seniors who
elect to study in career fields that would benefit the community. Additionally, a scholarship



                                                14
                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                            Business Retention, Expansion, & Succession
may also be offered to college students who agree to work in a professional field in the
community for 1-2 years following graduation. The community could develop a mentoring
program that would give high school or college students an opportunity to learn more about
the management aspects of local businesses.

Dakota Roots is a new program developed by the SD Department of Labor. Dakota Roots
encourages those with ties to the state to return - to live, grow, and work. It is completely
confidential web-based job database. Dakota Roots matches participants with career
openings available from the state's leading businesses and allows participants to decide
which ones to pursue.

Resources:

Labor Development:
Watertown Career Learning Center
2001 9th Ave. SW Suite 100
Watertown, SD 57201
Phone: 605- 882-5080

Labor Development:
Brookings Career Learning Center
1310 S Main Ave Suite 104
Brookings, 57006-3841
Phone: 605-688-4370

Labor Development/Financing:
Governors Office of Economic Development - GOED
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 800-872-6190
Fax: 605-773-3256
goedinfo@state.sd.us
www.sdgreatprofits.com

Financing:
Rural Electric Economic Development- REED Fund
121 SD First Street
Madison, SD 57042
Phone: 605-256-4536
Fax: 605-256-8057
lsalmonson@eastriver.coop

Financing:
First District Development Company
124 1st Avenue NW
PO Box 1207



                                                15
                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                        Industrial Park


 Resources: Continued

 Watertown, SD 57201
 Phone: 605-882-5115
 Fax: 605-882-5049
 paula@1stdistrict.org
 www.1stdistrict.org/FDDC

 Financing:
 U.S. Small Business Administration
 2329 North Career Avenue, Ste. 105
 Sioux Falls, SD 57107
 Phone: 605-330-4231
 Fax: 605-330-4215
 www.sba.gov

 Tax Climate:
 Contact your local municipal and/or county governments for information.

 Business Succession:
 SD Department of Labor- Dakota Roots
 700 Governors Drive
 Pierre, SD 57501
 Phone: 1-800-592-1882
 www.dakotaroots.com




SUB THEME:        Industrial Park
                        Spec Building


 Challenge: It was repeated in many session that Clear Lake needed more industry
 furthermore a spec building to attract new industry.

 Recommendation: Many of the resources and programs that assist in the development of
 industrial parks require that there is a commitment from a large business or industry to
 locate in the industrial park. Below are some of the programs that provide assistance in
 industrial development:




                                              16
                   BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                     Industrial Park



                              EDA Investment Programs

1. Public Works and Economic Development Program
   Public Works and Economic Development investments help support the construction
   or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate
   or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and
   promote regional competitiveness, including investments that expand and upgrade
   infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology- led development,
   redevelop brownfield sites and provide eco- industrial development.

2. Economic Adjustment Assistance Program
   The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical,
   planning and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic
   changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond
   flexibly to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address
   challenges faced by U.S. regions and communities.

3. Research and National Technical Assistance
   The Research and National Technical Assistance Program supports research of
   leading, world class economic development practices, and funds information
   dissemination efforts.

4. Local Technical Assistance
   The Local Technical Assistance Program helps fill the knowledge and information
   gaps that may prevent leaders in the public and nonprofit sectors in economically
   distressed regions from making optimal decisions on local economic development
   issues.

5. Planning Program
   The Planning Program helps support planning organizations, including District
   Organizations and Indian Tribes, in the development, implementatio n, revision or
   replacement of comprehensive economic development strategies (CEDS), and for
   related short-term planning investments and State plans designed to create and retain
   higher-skill, higher-wage jobs, particularly for the unemployed and underemplo yed
   in the nation’s most economically distressed regions.

6. University Center Economic Development Program
   The University Center Economic Development Program is a partnership between the
   Federal government and academia that helps to make the varied and vast resources of
   universities available to economic development communities.

7. Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms Program
   EDA administers the Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms Program through a
   national network of eleven Trade Adjustment Assistance Centers to help



                                           17
                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                         Industrial Park
       manufacturing and production firms, which have lost domestic sales and
       employment due to increased imports of similar or competitive goods, become more
       competitive in the global economy.

              Programs available through the SD Department of Transportation

   1) The Industrial Park grants will be made to any local unit of government for the
      development of new and expanded access for new industry located within industrial
      parks.

   2) The Agri-Business Access Grants will be made to any local unit of government for
      the development of access to new or expanded agri-business industries.

   3) The Community Access Program grants will be made to communities with
      populations of less than 5,000 to enhance existing access to downtown areas or for
      roads leading to schools, hospitals, grain terminals, or other significant traffic
      generating features of a small community.

                                  USDA Rural Development

    1. Rural Economic Development Grants/Loans (REDG/REDL): Provide loans and
       grants through Rural Utility Service borrowers to be used to promote rural economic
       development and job creation projects.

                       Community Development Block Grant Program:

The South Dakota CDBG program is also an option to assist with financing. This program is
the same program that was used to develop Clear Lake Community Center. I would suggest
working with First District Association of Local Governments on how this program could be
utilized.

These programs, although useful, are not much help unless you’ve got a committed
prospect. To secure a prospect, Clear Lake will have to embark on a recruitment / attraction
campaign. Attraction / recruitment of a business can be a very difficult goal to achieve.
Before I discuss outside recruitment and attraction strategies, I want to stress the importance
of searching locally for prospects to develop and grow businesses that are already in the
area. If a business has been developed locally, it often caters to the needs of that
community, offering a new service or good that is in demand. I do want to stress that when
a business is developed locally, the benefit is often two- fold including the creation of a new
job and a new product or service for the citizens of Clear Lake

Clear Lake is unique in the fact that the community has many large industries located in the
area. This often means the community has much of the infrastructure that is required to
entice a prospect to locate in Clear Lake’s industrial area. When considering what kind of
business or industry to attract / recruit I would suggest looking at what busine ss would
complement a current industry. For example, what type of industry would complement



                                               18
                       BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                        Industrial Park
and/or provide services to a large employer such as EMPI? This will help to focus your
efforts when seeking out new prospects. You may consider surveying your cur rent
industries to get their input on what type of business or industry they feel would be of
assistance to them.

Another issue that should be addressed is developing marketing or promotional materials for
recruitment. I would suggest the community development group compile a list of State and
local incentives that can be used to entice prospects and then publicize it on the City’s
website and also in print form. High schools students could be utilized in developing both a
webpage on the City’s website and also in creating print material.

It’s important to remember that industrial development is an investment in the future of the
community of Clear Lake, and it can be a long slow process. Almost every community in
South Dakota, and for that matter the country, is attempting to recruit and attract new
business. Thus, it is a very competitive market. Recruitment and attraction can be a slow
process with little activity throughout the year, but it’s crucial to be ready when that
opportunity arises. The impact of recruiting a business has on the local economy in a
community the size of Clear Lake is tremendous. The more attractive Clear Lake can look to
a prospect the better. Attraction and recruitment of industries is just one among many
business and economic development strategies that communities should pursue.

Resources:

First District Association of Local Governments
PO Box 1207 / 124 1st Avenue NW
Watertown, South Dakota 57201
Phone: (605) 882-5115
1-800-981-9092 (in-state only)
Fax: (605) 882-5049

US Department of Commerce – EDA
John Zender
1244 Speer Blvd., Suite 632
Denver, CO 80204
303.844.4902 - phone
303.844.4919 - fax
jzender@eda.doc.gov

South Dakota Department of Transportation
700 E. Broadway Ave. | Becker-Hansen Building | Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-773-3265
Website: www.sddot.com




                                              19
                         BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                          Ag Development



  Resources: Continued

  Steve Harding
  Governor’s Office of Economic Development
  711 East Wells Ave.
  Pierre, SD 57501
  Phone: 605-773-3301 or 1-800-872-6190




SUB THEME:        Value-Added Agribusinesses, Beginning Farme rs/Ranchers,
                    Renewable Energy


  Challenge:
                 1. Develop new value-added agribusiness ventures
                 2. Locate capital for beginning farmers & ranchers
                 3. Explore renewable energy developments

  Recommendation:

  Value-Added Agribusiness Development:
  South Dakota has expanded its involvement in agriculture to include further processing and
  niche marketing of our high quality products. Value-added ag allows producers to realize
  higher prices for their products, creates quality jobs in rural communities and stabilizes our
  ag economy through diversification. The term ―value-added‖ is commonly used to refer to an
  agricultural product that has undergone a change in physical state (i.e. milk to cheese), or a
  product that may possess qualities that allow for differentiation in the marketplace (i.e.
  organic or natural).

  As with any business, a business plan and in some cases feasibility studies are often required
  by lenders and investors prior to making financial contribution to a value-added agribusiness.
  There are a number of resources available to assist with development of these documents.

  The Value-Added Ag Subfund Program, administered by the Governor’s Office of Economic
  Development (GOED), is designed to provide financial assistance for feasibility studies and
  business plan development for value-added ag ventures. GOED also offers a variety of fixed
  asset financing options for new and/or expanding agribusinesses.

  The South Dakota Value-Added Ag Development Center (VAADC) is funded by sixteen
  producer based ag commodity groups, trade organizations and cooperatives dedicated to the
  development of value-added agricultural businesses in South Dakota. The VAADC


                                                20
                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                        Ag Development
can provide project management services, technical assistance with value-added agribusiness
development as well as access to grants. All services are offered free of charge.

USDA Rural Development has a variety of programs that offer grants funding for feasibility
studies and business planning activities, as well as, working capital and fixed asset financing
for new and/or expanding agribusinesses.

Beginning Farmers/Ranchers:
The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) in conjunction with the South Dakota
Value Added Finance Authority (VAFA) offers financial assistance to South Dakota's
farmers and ranchers as well as value-added businesses.

The Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides direct and guaranteed loans to beginning farmers
and ranchers who are unable to obtain financing from commercial credit sources.

Renewable Energy Development:
USDA Rural Development oversees a program to help farmers, ranchers and rural small
businesses purchase renewable energy systems and make energy efficiency improvements.
(Renewable energy projects include those for which energy is derived from wind, solar,
biomass, geothermal, or for which hydrogen is derived from biomass or water using one of
the previously stated energy sources.)

The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission maintains an extensive on- line library of
resources for renewable energy development including efficiency fact sheet s, feasibility
studies, emerging technology reports and South Dakota case studies.

Resources:

Value-Added Agribusiness Development/ Financing:
Governors Office of Economic Development – Value-Added Ag Subfund Program
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-773-5032 or 800-872-6190
Fax: 605-773-3256
goedinfo@state.sd.us
www.sdgreatprofits.com

Value-Added Agribusiness Development:
South Dakota Value-Added Ag Development Center
210 E. Capitol Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-224-9580
www.sdvalueadded.coop




                                              21
                      BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                       Ag Development



Resources: Continued

Value-Added Agribusiness Development/Financing/Renewable Energy Development:
USDA – Rural Development
810 Jenson Avenue, SE, Suite 2
Watertown, SD 57201-5256
Phone: 605- 886-8202
Fax: 605- 882-3268
www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd/a

Begninning Farmers/Ranchers:
South Dakota Department of Agriculture
Division of Agricultural Development
523 E. Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501-3182
Phone: 605-773-3375 or 800-228-5254
Fax: 605-773-3481
agmail@state.sd.us
www.state.sd.us/doa

Beginning Farmers/Ranchers:
U.S. Department of Agriculture - Farm Service Agency
200 4th St SW
Fed Bldg Rm 308
Huron, SD 57350
Phone: 605-352-1160
Phone: 605-874-8225 (Deuel County)
Fax: 605-352-1195
www.fsa.usda.gov/sd/

Renewable Energy Development:
Public Utilities Commission
Capitol Building, 1st floor
500 East Capitol Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501-5070
www.state.sd.us/puc/energy/index.htm




                                            22
                          BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                           Business Start-Up




SUB THEME:        Business Start-Up

  Sub The me: Business Start-Up

  Challenge:
                 1. Identify resources to assist with business start up
                 2. Locate financing

  Recommendation:
  Business Start Up:
  An economic development coordinator is an important resource in business development.
  This person should serve as a sounding board, contact manager and information clearing
  house for local entrepreneurs and business leaders. As referenced earlier in this report, it is
  necessary for community leaders to foster an atmosphere that encourages local
  entrepreneurialism.

  Developing an idea is the first step entrepreneurs must take when looking to develop a
  business. Encourage entrepreneurs (new and experienced) to perform due diligence on their
  proposed business concept. The internet, lenders, other area businesses, universities,
  technical schools and retired executives can provide valuable experience and insight. Once a
  concept is fully explored, a business plan can begin to take shape. The business plan is
  necessary to gain access to capital from investors and lenders. Start up businesses are often
  viewed as higher risk since they don’t have historical financial performance, so a complete
  business plan and financial projections become the tool by which viability is assessed.

  The Governors Office of Economic Development (GOED) offers a free information packet to
  individuals interested in starting a business in South Dakota. The Startup Package includes
  helpful information on topics such as preparing a busienss plan, marketing, protecting your
  idea, licensing, state taxes and more.

  The South Dakota Small Business Development Center (SBDC) provides free business
  planning and management guidance to our state's entrepreneurs through individual consulting
  and group training (group training may include a small fee). These services enhance the
  potential for success, resulting in the creation and retention of jobs and wealth for Sout h
  Dakotans.

  The Enterprise Institute was developed by the South Dakota State University Foundation to
  encourage and assist the establishment of entrepreneurial growth enterprises in the region.
  The Institute supports this objective through their Business Resource Center and
  Entrepreneurial Network. The Business Resource Center is the first stop for any business in
  the region seeking to go to the next growth level, including assistance to start- up companies.
  Some of the services available are market assessment and analysis, business plan editing and


                                                  23
                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                       Business Start-Up
evaluation, and financial assessment. The Entrepreneurial Network is an association of chief
executive officers, business owners, and other key individuals who are available to share
ideas, problems, opportunitites, and other issues involved in start-up or growing businesses.

The Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) is a nonprofit association of volunteers
dedicated to entrepreneurial education and the formation, growth and success of small
businesses nationwide. Through free, small business counseling and support services,
SCORE volunteers are here to keep your business going and growing.

Financing:
Once a business plan has been prepared, fiancing can be sought from private and public
sources. When assessing financing options, it is necessary to adequately match the use of
funds with the source (i.e. long-term financing should be used for long-term assets, short-
term financing should be used for short term needs). Most private and public sources can
blended together to create a complete finance package. Nearly all financing options will
require the business owner to contribute equity.


Resources:

Watertown SBDC
124 First Ave. N.W.
Watertown, SD 57201-3503
Phone: 605-882-5115
Fax: 605-882-5049
sbdc@dailypost.com
www.sdsbdc.org

Enterprise Institute
823 Medary Avenue, Box 525
Brookings, SD 57007-0499
Phone: 605-697-5015
info@sdenterpriseinstitute.org
http://sdenterpriseinstitute.org

SCORE
124 First Ave. N.W.
Watertown, SD 57201
Phone: 605-882-5115
Fax: 605-882-5049
sbdc@dailypost.com
www.sdsbdc.org




                                              24
                         BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                            Funding
  Resources: Continued

  Governors Office of Economic Development - GOED
  711 E. Wells Ave.
  Pierre, SD 57501
  Phone: 605-773-5032 or 800-872-6190
  Fax: 605-773-3256
  goedinfo@state.sd.us
  www.sdgreatprofits.com

  Rural Electric Economic Development- REED Fund
  121 SD First Street
  Madison, SD 57042
  Phone: 605-256-4536
  Fax: 605-256-8057
  lsalmonson@eastriver.coop

  First District Development Company
  124 1st Avenue NW
  PO Box 1207
  Watertown, SD 57201
  Phone: 605-882-5115
  Fax: 605-882-5049
  paula@1stdistrict.org
  www.1stdistrict.org/FDDC

  U.S. Small Business Administration
  2329 North Career Avenue, Ste. 105
  Sioux Falls, SD 57107
  Phone: 605-330-4231
  Fax: 605-330-4215
  www.sba.gov




SUB THEME:      Funding



  Challenge:    1. Identify resources to assist with developing a local revolving loan fund
                2. Establish a community trust fund




                                               25
                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                            Funding
Recommendation:

Local Revolving Loan Fund:
There are more than 80 different local, regional and statewide revolving loan funds. These
funds were established to provide grant and/or loans to economic and community
development projects. Initial proceeds can come from temporary sales taxes,
personal/corporate charitable gifts and community fund raising efforts. The local revolving
loan funds are governed by economic development boards or city government, who establish
eligibility criteria, objectives and terms. Funds are typically invested in a local bank and
where loan officers assist the governing authority in determine project eligibility and risk.

Interstate Telecomm Coop of Clear Lake has an established revolving loan fund. They may
be able share their experiences or assist you in establishing your own fund. H-D Electric
Cooperative also offers capital through its loan fund, Rural Electric Economic Development,
Inc. (REED) that has been used for projects in Clear Lake and throughout eastern SD and
western MN including business, value-added agriculture and community projects. Other loan
funds that serve Clear Lake include First District Development Company and NES DEC.

The South Dakota Community Capital Fund (SDCCF) offers economic development
organizations the opportunity to leverage local capital into millions of dollars through access
to national capital markets. SDCCF participants have the advantage of offering much larger
loans than would be possible with limited existing local resources, greater lending flexibility
for financing local development projects and significantly lower loan risk - all with the
support of a professional fund manager who packages the deal. Contact South Dakota Rural
Enterprise for additional information.

The South Dakota Rural Enterprise also offers the Capital Investment Fund (CIF). CIF loans
make capital available to local and regional revolving loan funds and can be used in
conjunction with other funds to create locally managed loan fund s. These funds could be
used to help create a local fund or by the ITC loan fund. CIF funds:

      Count as local matching funds when applying for State, Federal or other sources of
       funding
      Can be blended with grants and other funding to achieve an effective interest rate
      Carry a $50,000 loan minimum
      Loan maximum depends on the size of the Economic Development Corporation or
       Revolving Loan Fund's current capital pool and the experience of the organization
      Are easily accessible, reasonably priced
      Bear interest, but do not require principal repayment until maturity, and may be
       renewed
      Are flexible – without job creation requirements, limits or restrictions on the kinds of
       projects or businesses financed

Some considerations include asking ITC to assist in managing a locally created fund along
side its existing fund, but restricting use of the funds to locations determined by a separate
board of directors. Clear Lake should also consider using all of the regional funds that serve



                                              26
                       BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                           Funding
the area. This helps to both share the risk and make the available local funding go further.
Sometimes we get focused on alternative sources of capital because we think they are either
easier or cheaper, which is not necessarily the case. Local banks must also be considered.
Loan funds generally require local bank involvement and since lending and managing money
is the bank’s primary business, they are permanent, long term resources for business capital.
A loan fund makes loans, it doesn’t offer the wide array of services to business available
from a commercial lender.

Community Trust Fund:
Trust funds offer scholarships to students and grant awards to community programs that
impact the local quality of life—a trust fund or foundation can be anything charitable,
educational or philanthropic, including but not limited to the above mentioned.

I recommend that Clear Lake contact the South Dakota Community Foundation for a
presentation about the Foundation and Community Savings Accounts. The following is a
brief overview: Since 1987, the South Dakota Community Foundation has awarded over $25
million in grants generated by earnings on its permanent endowment fund. These grants have
been awarded across the state of South Dakota for charitable causes ranging from the
economic development initiatives to providing the most basic human needs such as food and
shelter. The South Dakota Community Foundation manages assets totaling over $50 million,
of which $47 million are permanently endowed. The endowment is held in over 300 separate
funds, each with a charitable purpose and direction. The philanthropic individuals and
organizations that have established these funds will leave a lasting legacy to the charitable
causes of their choice.

One classification of permanently endowed fund is a Community Savings Account or Local
Community Foundation. In this case the community raises capital that is placed in a
permanent endowment. Interest earnings on the endowment are made available for charitable
purposes established by the community. SDCF manages the endowment to maximize
earnings and a local board of directors directs use of the earnings within the community. See
www.sdcommunityfoundation.org/map/SDMap.aspx for a map of local community
foundations managed by the SDCF. Also check out the SDCF wealth transfer study to help
clarify the benefits of creating a local foundation.

Citizens of Clear Lake or possibly all of Deuel County could create a community savings
account and participate in the established trust of the SDCF. The SDCF also makes grant
awards from its unrestricted fund in the areas of economic development, human services,
health, education and cultural programs, including so me seed funds/challenge grants to
communities in the process of raising capital for their own foundation and/or revolving loan
fund. Note in the map, a number of the savings accounts list a bank and a community. In
these cases the local bank has also provided an endowment as a challenge to the community.




                                             27
                      BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                         Funding



Resources:

Local Revolving Loan Fund: Local, regional and state examples can be found at
www.sdcommunitynetwork.com

Local Revolving Loan Fund:
Interstate Telecomm Coop
PO Box 920
Clear Lake, SD 57226
Phone: 605-874-2181

Local Revolving Loan Fund:
South Dakota Rural Enterprise- SD Community Capital Fund, Capital Investment Fund
Beth Davis, President
629 S. Minnesota Ave. Suite 201 (57104)
PO Box 802
Sioux Falls, SD 57101-0802
Phone: 605-978-2804
Fax: 605-978-2805
 www.sdrei.org
beth@sdrei.org

Rural Electric Economic Development, Inc.
Matt Hotzler
H-D Electric Cooperative
423 3rd Ave
Clear Lake, SD 57226
Phone 874.2171
www.eastriver.coop/About_East_River/Partnerships_Alliances/REED.htm

First District Development Company
PO Box 1207
Watertown, SD 57201
605.882.5115
www.1stdistrict.org

Community Trust Fund:
South Dakota Community Foundation
Bob Sutton, President
PO Box 296
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-224-1025 or 800-888-1842
www.sdcommunityfoundation.org
bsutton44@sdcommunityfoundation.org



                                           28
                         BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                         Shopping Locally




SUB THEME:       Shopping Locally



  Challenge: Clear Lake has many unique stores, yet it was repeatedly said that ―people need
  to shop locally‖ to help the community retain and expand the businesses it currently has.

  Recommendation: Shopping locally has to be something the community buys into. It is
  often said that ―we need to shop locally,‖ but Clear Lake’s residents must make a decision to
  support and keep what businesses Clear Lake has.

  Shopping locally needs to be a program the local merchants drive with the support of the
  Commercial Club. Below are some examples of ideas to support a ―shop locally‖ campaign:

        Work with local businesses to stay open late one night a week. This would provide
         more convenient shopping hours for many people who work during the day. For
         example, several communities’ downtown areas have extended hours on Thursday
         nights, opting to stay open until 8:00 pm instead of closing at 5:00 or 6:00.
        Make sure you say ―Thank you, we appreciate your business‖ to each and every
         customer. Thanking customers regularly shows them know you appreciate their
         business.
        Start a Christmas campaign to bring more people into Clear Lake. This could include
         starting and annual Parade of Lights to kick off the holiday season and encouraging
         businesses to ―light up‖ Main Street to create a festive atmosphere.
        Sell Clear Lake gift certificates. The Commercial Club or local bank could make gift
         certificates good only at local businesses. They make great gifts. The business
         accepting the certificates can either deposit them as they would a check or return
         them to the Commercial Club or bank for reimbursement.
        Lead by Example. Local businesses should lead by example by promoting other
         businesses. If you do not carry an item a customer is shopping for, try to refer them to
         another business or service that may be able to help them. It is also important for the
         city, county and local organizations to buy local whenever possible. Likewise, local
         businesses should buy from each other as well.
        Feature a ―Monthly Business Spotlight.‖ Work with the newspaper to feature a
         different business each month. Personalize the story and focus on the human- interest
         side of the business. Ask them why they chose Clear Lake as a community to live and
         work in.
        Promote customer service training for local businesses by developing a ―Clear Lake
         Superior Customer Service Program.‖ This would be a great opportunity for
         employees in the area to improve their customer service, learn the importance of cross
         selling and referring customers, and knowing your community (including hours of
         operation for attractions, special activities taking place in the area, what businesses
         offer and where visitors can find special items, etc.) Clear Lake could also contact


                                               29
                       BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
                                       Shopping Locally
       the Small Business Administration (SBA) to help facilitate these training sessions as
       the SBA supports a wide range of small business planning, marketing and counseling
       services and educational seminars through its partnership with Small Business
       Development Centers and EQUIP. It may be a good idea to include these training
       sessions in a series of sessions for local business owners where they are able to
       network and gain and expand their skills.
      Plan community events like ice cream socials, band concerts, harvest festival, etc.
       downtown during the summer to bring people into the area. Market these events in
       Clear Lake as well as the surrounding communities including Brookings and
       Watertown.
      Create a Clear Lake Business Map. This can simply be done by using the current map
       of Clear Lake and then emphasizing the businesses. For ease and readability,
       businesses should be numbered on the map and then categorized (i.e. restaurants, auto
       service establishments, insurance companies, etc).

When developing the Shop Local campaign, use other communities as resources. The
Chamber of Commerce in other communities are always willing to share their ideas on how
they encourage their community to shop locally. It is also important to attract customers from
Brookings and Watertown as Clear Lake is conveniently located in-between these two towns.
Marketing how you are different, ―a small town friendly atmosphere,‖ as compared to the big
box stores in other communities may help. Try to pull drivers off I-29 for a unique shopping
experience.

Resources:

Small Business Administration
2329 North Career Avenue, Ste. 105
Sioux Falls, SD 57101
Phone: 605-330-4231
Fax: 605-330-4215
www.sba.gov
Online Training Tools available at www.sba.gov/traini

Rural Initiative Center
100 South Spring Ave., Suite 106
Sioux Falls, SD 57104-3626
605-334-1980
office@accsd.org
www.accsd.org/RIC.html

EQUIP - University of Sioux Falls
1101 W 22nd St
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
605.331.6697
www.sdbusinesssuccess.org




                                             30
                              VISION & PLANNING
                                         Lake Development




                      VISION / PLANNING

SUB THEME:        Lake Development


  Challenge: To bring development around the lake.

  Recommendations: Lakefront property is becoming a valuable resource in the expanding
  world, and according to the comprehensive plan for Deuel County, the highest growth in
  rural housing was around the Lake Cochrane area. During the assessment process,
  mentioned as an issue, a strength, and a future project was the development of the property
  around Clear Lake (the lake). I would recommend that in the creation of the comprehensive
  plan that there is significant attention paid to lake property development. I would enlist the
  services of engineers and ecologists to help you to ensure the development of the lake is done
  to prevent environmental problems and issues with future development. One of the problems
  currently facing lake development is the proximity of the road to the lakeshore, and the
  maintenance responsibilities of the road are controlled by different entities. Planning for the
  future development requires all interested parties working together to accomplish their shared
  objectives.

  A number of additional resources that can be used for the park and campsites at the lake are
  listed under infrastructure.

  Resources:

  First District Association of Local Governments
  PO Box 1207
  Watertown, SD 57201-6207
  Phone: 605-882-5115
  Fax: 605-882-5049
  Email: todd@1stdistrict.org
  Web: www.1stdistrict.org
  Todd Kays




                                                31
                            VISION & PLANNING
                                       Lake Development


Resources: Continued

South Dakota Planners Association
Neil Putnam, Secretary/Treasurer
City of Mitchell Planning Department
612 N. Main Street
Mitchell, SD 57301
Phone: 605 995-8433
Fax: 605 995-8410
e-mail: nputnam.cityofmitchell@midconetwork.com

USDA Rural Development
Office of Community Development
Reporter’s Building, Room 701
300 7th Street, SW
Washington, DC 20024
1-800-645-4712
http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/ocd

South Dakota Office of Tourism
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501-3369
Phone: 605-773-3301
Fax: 605-773-3256
Email: sdinfo@state.sd.us
Web: www.TravelSD.com or www.SDVisit.com

Article: ―Developing GIS Applications for Coastal Management in Wisconsin Local
Government‖
This article describes and analyzes the use of GIS in the development of lake property.
David A. Hart
Allen H. Miller
Bernard J. Niemann, Jr.
Stephen J. Ventura
http://www.lic.wisc.edu/pubs/hartesri97.html#Section_8




                                             32
                              VISION & PLANNING
                                     Planning and Coordination


SUB THEME:        Planning and Coordination


  Challenge: Several respondents expressed the need for a long-term plan for the community
  and the possibility of having a local planning coordinator to oversee community and
  economic development activities.

  Recommendation:

  Planning is crucial to long-term success in rural communities and it comes in many forms.
  This may include more technical planning tools such as Comprehensive Plans, Zoning
  Ordinances, Capital Improvement Plans, etc. Other more general planning tools include
  strategic plans or community ―visioning‖, which is covered in more depth in a later
  recommendation. The goals and objectives developed in this Community Assessment set the
  foundation for a community’s Strategic Plan or Vision. Much of this can also be
  incorporated into a Comprehensive Pan, which helps guide future land use decisions. Thus,
  all of these plans tend to be inter-connected.

  Comprehensive Plans are generally the first step to community planning and the foundation
  from which ordinances such as zoning and subdivision regulations are drafted. It is a
  document that includes analysis of current statistics, recommendations for future growth, and
  sets long-range goals for the community. Comprehensive plans generally look at the city in
  terms of demographics, economy, housing, infrastructure, community facilities and land use.

  Many of South Dakota’s rural communities adopted Comprehensive Plans in the 1990’s after
  a series of court cases required these plans to support zoning ordinances. Since that time,
  many communities have chosen to revise and update these plans to reflect changes that have
  occurred over the last 10 to 15 years and incorporate specific goals and objectives of the
  community.

  Your primary planning resource is the First District Association of Local Governments.
  Planning. First District can help guide your city/planning commission (as appropriate)
  through the process of updating or developing a Comprehensive Plan if that is deemed to be a
  priority.

  The next step for many communities is to work on a zoning ordinance which is a tool to help
  implement the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan. Zoning regulates the various
  aspects of how land can be used by dividing the city into separate ―districts‖ such as
  residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural. Each district has different permitted,
  accessory, and conditional uses and also setbacks such as front yard, side yard, and rear yard
  distances. The following are the four basic principles that comprehensive planning and
  zoning hope to achieve:

      To ensure the health and safety of all citizens,
      To protect natural resources,


                                                33
                             VISION & PLANNING
                                    Planning and Coordination



    To enhance the visual quality of the community, and
    To preserve the function and character of the rural area.

Subdivision ordinances address new residential development and provide a legal basis of
land registration. It is a document that assures new buildings are properly located on the lot;
infrastructure such as streets, water, and sewer is constructed to match current city designs,
and establishes the division of lots with the services that the developer is responsible to
provide.

A Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) is a management and fiscal planning tool communities
can use for financing and constructing needed public improvements or facilities. A properly
designed CIP enables a community to identify its capital needs, rank them by priority,
coordinate their scheduling, and determine the best method of paying for them within the
community's fiscal capacity. The CIP should be based on the comprehensive plan and
schedule capital improvements over a specific number of years, generally a shorter period of
time like 1, 3, or 6 years.

As noted earlier, for assistance in the development or updating of any of these planning tools,
please contact the First District Association of Local Governments.

Also noted in the listening sessions was the need for a paid individual to serve as a planning
coordinator. This may be something that Clear Lake might like to have, but city budget
limitations might make this difficult to achieve. Few rural communities have staff dedicated
explicitly to planning, and instead rely on the services of their regional Planning District like
First District. In some cases, however, rural communities might make planning one of many
responsibilities of a local chamber or economic development official.

Many communities have or are looking to implement a part-time or full-time economic
development coordinator. The coordinator’s job responsibilities and how the positions are
funded varies from community to community. In some cases, the economic development
coordinator does take on some planning aspects within their job, especially as it relates to
economic development.

Many communities believe that it is possible to fund economic development positions
through grants or non- governmental funds, but this is rarely the case. Most often, some level
of sustainable and committed funding must be provided by public entities, whether that is the
city or county. Other communities have gotten together to share an economic development
coordinator. For example, the community of Brookings, working in conjunction with several
surrounding communities, recently hired a development coordinator to work with towns and
cities surrounding Brookings.

In the future, it will be up to your community to decide if you think it merits hiring a part-
time or full time economic or community development director specifically for your
community, or in conjunction with other surrounding communities.



                                               34
                           VISION & PLANNING
                                  Planning and Coordination


Resources:

First District Association of Local Governments
PO Box 1207
Watertown, SD 57201-6207
Phone: 605-882-5115
Fax: 605-882-5049
Email: todd@1stdistrict.org
Web: www.1stdistrict.org
Todd Kays

South Dakota Planners Association
Neil Putnam, Secretary/Treasurer
City of Mitchell Planning Department
612 N. Main Street
Mitchell, SD 57301
Phone: 605 995-8433
Fax: 605 995-8410
e-mail: nputnam.cityofmitchell@midconetwork.com

South Dakota Municipal League
214 E. Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-224-8654
Fax: 605-224-8655
www.sdmunicipalleague.org
yvonne@sdmunicipalleague.org

Heartland Center for Leadership Development
941 "O" Street, Suite 920
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: 402-474-7667 or 800-927-1115
Fax: 402-474-7672
info@heartlandcenter.info
www.heartlandcenter.info

South Dakota Association of County Commissioners
306 E. Capitol Ave, Suite 10
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-224-4554
Fax: 605-224-4833
SDACO@aol.com




                                             35
                             VISION & PLANNING
                                    Planning and Coordination


Resources: Continued

South Dakota Department of Legislative Audit
500 E. Capitol
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-773-3595
Fax: 605-773-6454
www.state.sd.us/legislativeaudit/home.htm

Southeast Enterprise Facilitation Project
Nancy Larsen, Facilitator
PO Box 106
501 S. Broadway
Marion, SD 57043
605-648-2909
sefp@southeasternelectric.com

Badlands / South Central Enterprise Facilitation
Freya Simpson
32551 271st St.
Hamill, SD 57534
605-842-3220
fsimpson@gwtc.net

Eureka Community Development Company
Wanda Jundt
PO Box 134
Eureka, SD 57437-0134
605-284-2130
ecdc@valleytel.net

Freeman Economic Development Corporation
Sharon Schamber, Development Coordinator
PO Box 43
Freeman, SD 57029
605-925-4444
freemansd@gwtc.net

On Hand Economic Development Corporation
Vacant, Executive Director
224 N. Broadway
Miller, SD 57362
605-853-3098
605-853-32765 (Fax)




                                               36
                           VISION & PLANNING
                                   Planning and Coordination


Resources: Continued

Greater McCook Development Alliance
Joe Bartmann, Executive Director
100 Main Street Suite B
PO Box 217
Montrose, SD 57048
605-363-3020
mccookalliance@dtnspeed.net

Platte Development Corporation
Karen Burket, Executive Director
PO Box 393
500 S. Main St..
Platte, SD 57369-0393
605-337-3921
mkb@midstatesd.ne

North Central South Dakota Economic Development Corporation
Jackie Heil, Executive Director
Mobridge, SD 57601
605-845-5202
ncsded@westriv.com

Parker Development Corp., Inc.
Mark Kasten, Economic Development Coordinator
PO Box 57
Parker, SD 57053-0057
605-297-4305
info@parkersd.org
www.parkersd.org

Minnehaha / Lincoln County Economic Development Association
Jeff Eckhoff
200 N. Phillips Avenue, #101
Sioux Falls, SD 57101
605-339-0103
jeffe@siouxfalls.com

Lake Francis Case Economic Development Corporation
Jessica Schoenhard, Executive Director
115 West Lawler St.
Chamberlain, SD 57325
605-734-4418
lfc@midstatesd.net



                                              37
                              VISION & PLANNING
                                   Communication & Coordination



SUB THEME:       Communication & Coordination


  Challenge: There were concerns addressed about an apparent lack of communication and/or
  coordination between leaders and community organizations over projects, plans, and
  direction of the community.

  Recommendations: Having a broad vision or strategic plan for the community, that
  everyone embraces and buys into, is crucial in order to come together as a community with
  shared goals and objectives. The more people participate in the creation of this community
  Vision or plan, the more ownership people will have in it and the more likely that you can
  leverage the talents and resources of a broad range of citizens in your community to
  implement that plan. Furthermore, by identifying your vision and goals, the public will be
  able to see where they can be of assistance, or identify potential problems with completing
  certain goals.

  Another recommendation or way that you might work to bring the community’s leadership
  together is to implement a leadership training program such as LeadershipPlenty. This
  program helps to build skill in inter-organizational communication, goal orientation, and
  conflict resolution. The nature of a good leader is one that gets people to believe in and
  follow their vision and values. With good leadership will come good coordination and
  communication.

  Another recommendation is to make information more readily available to the public. This
  can be done by maintaining and updating your current website, more accessible public
  display of community meetings (displayed online and in a known public display), having a
  community marquee that displays time, place, and dates of community events, and passing
  on announcements to be made at other community meetings like Lion’s Club, Kiwanis,
  school, or even church services.

  Finally, it was stated in the listening sessions that newcomers are having trouble knowing
  what is going on the community. One recommendation would be to create a welcoming
  committee. This would help to gain input from new community members and make them
  feel welcome. Furthermore, incorporating new community members may help get them to
  be involved in the community in the future.

  Resources:
  First District Association of Local Governments
  (Has offered LeadershipPlenty Training in the past)
  PO Box 1207
  Watertown, SD 57201-6207
  Phone: 605-882-5115
  Email: todd@1stdistrict.org
  Web: www.1stdistrict.org



                                               38
                           VISION & PLANNING
                                Communication & Coordination
Resources: Continued

Leadership Plenty
South Dakota Rural Enterprises, Inc.
1000 N. West Ave, Suite 210
Sioux Falls, SD 57104
605-367-5390
lynne@secog.org
www.secog.org

Heartland Center for Leadership Development
941 "O" Street, Suite 920
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: 402-474-7667 or 800-927-1115
Fax: 402-474-7672
info@heartlandcenter.info
www.heartlandcenter.info

South Dakota Office of Tourism
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501-3369
Phone: 605-773-3301
Fax: 605-773-3256
Email: sdinfo@state.sd.us
Web: www.TravelSD.com or www.SDVisit.com

629 S. Minnesota Ave. Suite 201 (57104)
PO Box 802
Sioux Falls, SD 57101-0802
Phone: 605-978-2804
Fax: 605-978-2805
 www.sdrei.org


Colleges and Universities may provide access to high quality inexpensive research, web
development, or creative thinking.

USD – Vermillion
      www.usd.edu
SDSU – Brookings
      www3.sdstate.edu
DSU – Madison
      www.dsu.edu
Lake Area Technical Institute – Watertown
      Lakeareatech.edu




                                            39
                               VISION & PLANNING
                                            Volunteerism



SUB THEME:        Volunteeris m


  Challenge: It is clear that many feel Clear Lake’s greatest asset is its people. The challenge
  is getting more than only a handful of people to volunteer their time. Volunteers are
  necessary for community-based projects and programs, and without volunteers these
  community projects wouldn’t be possible.

  Recommendation: Clear Lake already has many outstanding volunteers who dedicate their
  time, energy, and talents to the betterment of the community. The community assessment
  process is a way to get people involved in projects they are interested in. During the listening
  session, concerns were expressed about the troubles and barriers of getting new people to
  volunteer in the community. Capitalize on this process and the interest it generates within
  the community to solicit new volunteers.

  Today, most households consist of two working parents, making it difficult to get young
  families involved in community work. Many of these individuals are not willing to do
  outside volunteer activities if it means leaving their kids at home, thereby surrendering more
  time to spend with their own family. The cure for this is to develop volunteer activities that
  engage the entire family. This will provide another local activity for families and will help
  build a sense of volunteerism and ownership in the community for youth and young adults
  starting at an early age. When volunteer opportunities do not lend well to the work of
  children, such as board meetings, make an effort to have childcare available at that location.

  Senior citizens were also identified as an underutilized resource, so do not forget to enlist
  their help. During the senior listening session at Hidewood Estates, the reside nts expressed
  an interest in volunteering and remaining active participants in the community. Seniors are an
  excellent resource in terms of experience, talents, and perspectives. One volunteer
  organization that helps coordinate senior volunteers at the local level is the Retired Senior
  Volunteer Program (RSVP).

  Here are a few pieces of advice and best practices that helped other rural communities
  become successful in their volunteer programs:

        Utilize individual talents. (Everyone has something to offer! People are more likely
         to volunteer if they feel they are using their unique talents to complete an important
         task they are good at.)

        Allow volunteer to have ownership of the project. (Find ways for volunteers to feel
         like they have a stake in the project and give them leadership positions and room to
         voice their own unique opinions in the process. Listen to the innovative suggestions
         of your volunteers whose commitment can be the driving force for sustainable
         change.)




                                                40
                         VISION & PLANNING
                                      Volunteerism
   Be clear about your request when you ask someone to volunteer. Be able to tell the
    person what tasks they will be expected perform and the time commitment required.

   Respond effectively to the unique needs of their community. In the listening session
    there were concerns with the availability of transportation. If the people who are
    interested in volunteering their time (such as seniors or those who live out of city
    limits) cannot get to the location because of transportation issues, you are missing out
    on possible volunteers. Also mentioned, childcare may be an issue as well. Again, if
    people would like to volunteer but have children they need to tend to, you are missing
    out on a potential population of volunteers.

   Reach out to volunteers through existing networks. According to a survey by the
    Points of Light Foundation, the number one reason people do not volunteer is because
    no one asked them! Being asked by someone you know, being asked personally, and
    asking for an individual to use their unique talents are all ways to inc rease
    volunteerism in your community.

   Take an inventory of community members to find out what skills and interests they
    have and might be willing to volunteer or donate to the betterment of the community.
    Volunteers usually take three forms:
        1. Leaders and coordinators
        2. Worker bees
        3. Donators
    All types of volunteers are necessary to create a successful and ongoing volunteer
    network. Not everyone is willing to step up and be a leader, but they would be more
    willing to be a worker bee for a project or function. Some residents may not have
    time to be present at a function but would be more than willing to donate money or
    in-kind donations toward a project. By classifying various individuals’ interests and
    skills, you can work to better engage these individuals at a level they feel comfortable
    with.

   Finally, celebrate and recognize the combined efforts of community members! Every
    volunteer wants to be recognized in some way. For some, it is a phone call or written
    note; for others, they are comfortable in a more public setting—others just want to see
    a job well done. Remember, the way volunteers prefer to be recognized often
    depends on their age. Young kids may enjoy a balloon or candy; teenagers would
    rather have a pizza party where they can socialize with peers, while older volunteers
    may find value in a plaque that recognizes their efforts. Also, consider hosting an
    annual city-wide volunteer recognition event or having a community ―Volunteer of
    the Month‖ that is advertised in the local paper. One idea would be to offer a
    program where residents could log their volunteer hours and turn in those logs each
    month to an appointed person. One interesting way to show the impact of volunteers
    in the community is to figure the value or their efforts in a way everyone can
    understand: money. The Points of Light Foundation provides a calculator that turns
    volunteer hours into monetary values. Consider setting an annual monetary goal for
    the community and showcasing the progress on Main Street.


                                           41
                            VISION & PLANNING
                                          Volunteerism


If possible, consider having a volunteer manager to coordinate efforts in the community.
This would provide a central figure for organizations and individuals to call when they need
volunteers. This person could also inventory the residents’ interests and talents and
coordinate volunteer recognition and celebrations. When managed successfully, volunteer
networks can accomplish amazing work in a community. As stated by the late Minnesota
Senator Paul Wellstone, ―We all do better when we all do better.‖

Resources:

Publications:

Conely, Mary. Strengthening Rural America
Provided by the Points of Light Foundation and the Annie E. Casey Foundation
Found at:
http://www.pointsoflight.org/programs/neighboring/resources/pdfs/RuralEffPractices.pdf

This is a publication of best practices and lessons learned about volunteer management in
rural communities.

Conely, Mary. Connecting Rural Communities: Volunteering and Neighboring
Provided by the Points of Light Foundation & Volunteer Center National Network
Found at:
http://www.pointsoflight.org/programs/neighboring/resources/pdfs/ConnectingRuralCommunities.pdf

Macduff, Nancy. (1996) Volunteer Recruiting & Retention: A Marketing Approach.

McCurley, Stephen & Vineyard, Sue. (1986) 101 Ideas for Volunteer Program.

Fisher, James C. & Cole, Kathleen M. (1993) Leadership and Management of Volunteer
Programs: A Guide for Volunteer Administrators.

Contact:

John Pohlman, Retired and Senior Volunteer Program in South Dakota
South Dakota State Office
Corporation for National and Community Service
225 S Pierre St, Room 225
Pierre, SD 57501-2452
Phone: (605) 224-5996
Email: JPohlman@cns.gov
Website:
http://www.seniorcorps.org/about/role_impact/state_profiles_detail.asp?tbl_profiles_state=S
D

There is a East Central South Dakota RSVP program based in Brookings that can serve as a
resource for Clear Lake. Contact the state office for more information.


                                              42
                               VISION & PLANNING
                                        Professional Recruitment
  Resources: Continued

  Websites:

  Points of Light Foundation @ http://www.pointsoflight.org

  The Points of Light Foundation & Volunteer Center National Network engages and
  mobilizes millions of volunteers who are helping to solve serious social problems in
  thousands of communities. Through a variety of programs and services, the Foundation
  encourages people from all walks of life — businesses, nonprofits, faith-based organizations,
  low- income communities, families, youth, and older adults — to volunteer.

  Volunteer Resource Organization @
  http://www.pointsoflight.org/resources/volunteerresource/

  VolunteerResource.org is a comprehensive virtual library for the most up-to-date information
  on volunteering, volunteer management, and effective engagement of people and resources to
  solve community problems.

  Service Leader @ www.serviceleader.org

  This site provides information on all aspects of volunteerism.




SUB THEME:        Professional Recruitme nt


  Challenge: Clear Lake has many professionals reaching the retirement age and the
  community is concerned that they will lose the services those professionals provide. A
  recruitment strategy is needed if Clear Lake is going to keep those services in the
  community.

  Recommendation: One option other communities have been using to recruit professionals
  is an alumni list. If this has not already been done, compile a list of students that have
  graduated from high school in Clear Lake. Send alumni a detailed survey, ask questions
  about their career, lifestyle, interest, family, etc. The more detailed the survey the better your
  database on alumni will be, for example don’t just ask what their occupation is, but also what
  their spouses’ occupation is. Also track what recent high school graduates are majoring in at
  college. The alumni database can be a very useful tool when trying to attract and recruit
  professional services. An incentives package will also help when trying to recruit
  professionals.




                                                  43
                              VISION & PLANNING
                                      Professional Recruitment
Incentive programs currently offered in South Dakota include:
            Physician Tuition Reimbursement Program
            Dentist Tuition Reimbursement Program
            Tuition Reimbursement for PA’s, Nurse Practitioners, and certified Nurse
               Midwife
            National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment/Scholarship Program
            State Loan Repayment Program

More information on these programs is available online at
http://www.state.sd.us/doh/rural/recruit.htm. To access any of these programs, contact the
State of South Dakota’s Office of Rural Health Policy.

Clear Lake may look at adding additional incentives at the local level to help sweeten the
package when recruiting professionals. The alumni database will make it much easer and
give Clear Lake is a starting point when it comes to recruiting professionals. These
individuals already have a tie to Clear Lake and are more likely to be attracted to the rural
lifestyle

Another option to get services that are not currently offered in Clear Lake would be to recruit
businesses in the area to come to Clear Lake on a weekly or monthly basis. This is done in
larger communities with very specialized services. Hospitals for instance have a specialist
that comes in once a week or once a month to see patients with special needs. This model
could also work with other specialty services such as a massage therapist, aerobics
instructors, house wear, clothing, food… the imagination is the only limit! This could also
work as an economic development tool to fill empty b uildings. After professionals have
established a customer base they will be more likely to buy or rent empty space for their
visits.

When recruiting professionals, a decision on how to market to these individually will have to
be made. Look at the assets your community has to offer and use these assets to focus your
marketing efforts. What sets your community apart from other communities? Your access to
local recreation makes you a particularly attractive area for certain types of individuals that
prefer the outdoors and sportsman. Use this to your advantage in attracting individuals with
these types of interests. Not only are they more likely to pick your community, but they are
more likely to stay once they do. An example of this is Platte’s strategy for attracting some
healthcare providers. Rather than advertising in professional healthcare periodicals, they
instead have focused on what makes them unique. For example, they have identified their
strong Christian influences as one of their assets, so they have been relatively successful in
attracting healthcare providers by advertising in Christian periodicals and advertising for
healthcare professionals that are looking to locate in a Christian community. Clear Lake can
do the same thing once you select what sets you apart.

Platte was also successful in setting up a scholarship fund for youth linked into a mentorship
program. Youth and a local business are matched while they are in high school. If the
student discovers they are interested in that particular trade, they are able to go to college for
that profession. The cost of their tuition is picked up 1/3 by the student, 1/3 by the



                                                44
                             VISION & PLANNING
                                     Professional Recruitment
development corporation, and 1/3 by the local business. The student then agrees to come
back to Platte and work for a certain number of years. The portion of the student’s tuition
paid for by the business and development corporation is then forgiven on a pro-rated basis
after a certain number of years. Platte is focusing on local trade based industries that require
technical degrees. The nice thing about this strategy is that it works exclusively with youth
from the community who know what it is like to live in that community and are willing to
come back (75% of rural youth want to move back to their home commun ity or a rural
community in general if the opportunity exists. Your youth responded in similar fashion
when posed with this question during the on-site assessment).

Resources:

South Dakota Office of Rural Health
207 E. Missouri
Pierre, SD 57501
800-738-2301
http://www.state.sd.us/doh/rural/recruit.htm

National Rural Recruitment and Retention Network (3R Net)
http://www.3rnet.org/

Platte Development Corporation
Karen Burket
P O Box 336
Platte SD 57369
Phone: 605-337-2895

Ann Gessick
Governors Office of Economic Development
811 E. 10th St., Dept 44
Sioux Falls, SD 57103-1650
605-367-5340
ann.gesick-johnson@state.sd.us
www.sdgreatprofits.com

SD Department of Labor
605-773-3101
www.state.sd.us/dol/
www.sdjobs.org




                                               45
                               VISION & PLANNING
                                           Strategic Plan




SUB THEME:        Strategic Plan


  Challenge : Develop a comprehensive strategic plan for the City of Clear Lake.

  Recommendations : It is crucial for the City to continuously develop, update, and follow a
  comprehensive strategic plan for future goals to be reached and for projects to run smoothly.
  As discussed previously, development or updating your Comprehensive Plan is part of the
  process of developing a broad based Strategic Plan for the community.

  The creation of a comprehensive plan is a large undertaking; however there many resources
  to assist you in this process, and once it is in place all it should need is updating through
  reevaluation. Your planning district, First District, who aided in the creation of the county’s
  comprehensive plan, is going to be your key resource in the development of the
  comprehensive plan. The comprehensive plan is a collection of all the strategic plans a
  community has in the development of land use in particular to residential, commercial, and
  industrial areas, as well as development of recreation areas, transportation, infrastructure,
  housing, staffing, community marketing and facilities. It also incorporates the demographic
  and economic trends of your community, therefore it is important, during the creation of the
  comprehensive plan, to include as many of the affected parties, or stakeholders, as possible.

  It is also very important that the community determines its goals and its vision, which can be
  a mission statement of how the values of your community will influence the future changes.
  The importance of identifying a vision will drive the creation of the comprehensive plan.
  Included in the appendix is a guide to creating and using a mission statement. The following
  are the elements of a strategic plan based on a strategic plan guidebook produced by the
  UDSA Rural Development’s Office of Community Development.

  Strategic Plan Elements
  What is the product of the strategic planning process? Unless required by a specific program,
  the plan does not have to follow any specific format. Here are all the major elements of a
  strategic plan:

  Vision Statement
       What values will guide our activity?
       What kind of community do we want to become?

  Community Assessment
     Trends/conditions (economic, social, etc.)
     Problems and barriers, their root causes and their magnitude/severity
     Community strengths and opportunities
     Ranking or prioritizing of problems and opportunities
     Existing resources, assets, capabilities and new resources needed


                                                46
                             VISION & PLANNING
                                         Strategic Plan


Goals
Group goals under key issues, such as housing, transportation, employment, and environment
and under each major heading, describe:
    What are out long-term goals?
    What is our desired condition?
    What do we want to change (condition, problem, barrier, opportunity)?

Strategies
     How can we best achieve each goal?
     How will partnerships help us achieve our goal?

Evaluation Process
    How and when will the strategic plan be reviewed and updated?
    How will the community report on progress every year?
    How will the community evaluate its process, outputs and outcomes?
    How will members of the community be kept involved and informed?

This guidebook is made available online at http://www.ezec.gov/About/strategic.pdf, and
provides an excellent background of the development, implementation, and evaluation of a
strategic plan.

It is clear that the community is committed to doing what is necessary for the survival of the
city, and what I believe a comprehensive strategic plan can do is coordinate efforts of
community members. Ideally, creating, implementing, and reevaluating your plan will lead
to improvements in communication and coordination of organizations and leadership, a
strategic plan for development of the lake, and the completion of the goals your community
sets forth. The keys to the success of this plan are complete community input and buy-in,
setting and sticking to deadlines, and reevaluating the plan on a consistent basis.

The first key will help ensure that your community has ―all the details,‖ and that is hopefully
not being surprised by problems. If the entire community is involved in the creation of the
plan, you will likely identify problems before they occur, which will allow the community to
plan ahead and avoid or respond to those problems in the most effective manner.

The second key will ensure the implementation of your goals become realities. Setting
deadlines are essential to gaining buy-in in the project, holding people accountable for the
completion of the goal, and turning the dreams or vision of your community into tangible
goals and projects your community can take pride in accomplishing.

The final key will ensure the process continues for more than 2, 5, 10, or 20 years in the
future. Rural communities today are struggling to survive or simply just to become
sustainable communities. In my opinion, I would hardly categorize Clear Lake as struggling
with survival, because the people have an uncanny ability to pull together and help each other
when in need. Sustainability is what a strategic plan strives to create, and the reevaluation of
that plan is how sustainability is achieved


                                              47
                             VISION & PLANNING
                                          Strategic Plan


This Assessment Process, because it is based on the input of a broad range of citizens in your
community, provides an excellent basis for building a Strategic Plan or Vision for your
community. After this report is released to the community, a follow up meeting will be held
to allow residents to set priorities for the future. The results of this meeting will culminate in
the development of an initial Strategic Plan or Vision for your community to utilize as you
look to move forward.

Leadership Development
Before, during and after any strategic planning process, a community needs to consider
leadership. Supporting existing leaders and giving them the tools to lead, mentoring and
developing new leaders is also essential to not only the planning process, but also the
continuity and long term viability of the plan. Leadership transition planning will ensure that
the community builds sustainability into its vision and direction. Education for both existing
and emerging leaders provides not only new tools for community development, but also
opportunities for community dialog. Clear Lake has many excellent leaders, as evidenced by
the thoughtful comments and long range goals expressed during the listening sessions.

The time to start cultivating new leaders is now. Leadership Plenty offers skills based
training for new and emerging leaders. Several organizations have been involved in
providing LeadershipPlenty training in the past including First District, South Dakota Rural
Enterprises, and SD Cooperative Extension If you are interested in this program, I would
encourage you to contact one or more of these organizations to determine if training could be
provided in your community.

Resources

First District Association of Local Governments
PO Box 1207
Watertown, SD 57201-6207
Phone: 605-882-5115
Fax: 605-882-5049
Email: todd@1stdistrict.org
Web: www.1stdistrict.org
Todd Kays

South Dakota Planners Association
Neil Putnam, Secretary/Treasurer
City of Mitchell Planning Department
612 N. Main Street
Mitchell, SD 57301
Phone: 605 995-8433
Fax: 605 995-8410
e-mail: nputnam.cityofmitchell@midconetwork.com




                                                48
                           VISION & PLANNING
                                       Strategic Plan
Resources: continued

USDA Rural Development
Office of Community Development
Reporter’s Building, Room 701
300 7th Street, SW
Washington, DC 20024
1-800-645-4712
http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/ocd

South Dakota Municipal League
214 E. Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-224-8654
Fax: 605-224-8655
www.sdmunicipalleague.org
yvonne@sdmunicipalleague.org

University of South Dakota
Contact: Jamison Rounds, Assistant Professor, Planning
Dakota Hall 101
414 E Clark St
Vermillion, SD 57069
Phone: 605-677-5242
Email: Jamison.Rounds@usd.edu

Leadership Plenty
South Dakota Rural Enterprises, Inc.
1000 N. West Ave, Suite 210
Sioux Falls, SD 57104
605-367-5390
lynne@secog.org
www.secog.org


Heartland Center for Leadership Development
941 "O" Street, Suite 920
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: 402-474-7667 or 800-927-1115
Fax: 402-474-7672
info@heartlandcenter.info
www.heartlandcenter.info




                                            49
                                VISION & PLANNING
                                         Community Marketing


   Resources: Continued

   South Dakota Department of Legislative Audit
   500 E. Capitol
   Pierre, SD 57501
   Phone: 605-773-3595
   Fax: 605-773-6454
   www.state.sd.us/legislativeaudit/home.htm

   National Center for Small Communities
   444 N. Capitol Street, NW, Suite 397
   Washington, DC 20001-1202
   Phone: 202-624-3556
   Fax: 202-624-3554
   ncsc@sso.org
   www.natat.org and www.smallcommunities.org

   Publication: A Guide to Strategic Planning for Rural Communities
   http://www.ezec.gov/About/strategic.pdf


   Publication: Community Participation- How People Power Brings Sustainable Benefits to
   Communities. Available online at http://www.ezec.gov/Pubs/commparticrept.pdf




SUB THEME:       Community Marketing



   Challenge: Promote the City of Clear Lake as a great place to live and work and encourage
   travelers to stop and have a unique experience in Clear Lake.

   Recommendations: During the listening sessions we heard a lot about the strengths in your
   city; however, some of the issues we heard revolved around a lack of community marketing
   or advertising those strengths. I would suggest developing a marketing plan centered on the
   values and highlight the strengths of your community.

   One of Clear Lake’s strongest assets is its proximity to other cities like Brookings and
   Watertown. Marketing to those cities is essential to your community marketing.

   Another suggestion we heard was putting up a new community marquee, possibly a digital
   sign that displays current events and other important information. An area resource for this
   sign would be Daktronics. However, these signs can be very expensive and may not be



                                                 50
                            VISION & PLANNING
                                     Community Marketing
within a reasonable budget for the city to purchase. It might be necessary to collaborate
these efforts with local businesses or maybe apply for a grant.

Another resource is an example from Watertown, SD and Kay Solberg: Another idea is to
set up a program in which certain signs are sponsored by local businesses as an advertising
tool for them, as well as a promotional tool for the town. A portion of this project could be
delegated to a civic group such as the Optimist Club or perhaps a youth organization such as
a 4-H club, Girl Scouts or Boy Scouts. In Watertown, SD, the school was a catalyst in
developing signage for the city and you can contact Kay Solberg to find out more about their
process and results.

It’s also very important that the signs created to promote Clear Lake are very attractive to
view, remember these signs are often the first and most direct impression a person will have
of Clear Lake. When developing signs promoting Clear Lake, be sure to include annual
events and the dates of those events to help bring visitors to your community. The same
holds true to Clear Lake’s website.

Resources:

Billie Jo Waara
Director of Tourism
South Dakota Department of Tourism
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501-3369
605-773-3301

Value Added Tourism Subfund
Governors Office of economic Development
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
605-773-5032
goedinfo@state.sd.us
www.sdgreatprofits.com/finance/tourismsubfund.htm

The Brookings Register
312 5th St.
Brookings, SD 57006
605-692-6271
605-692-2979
www.brookingsregister.com




                                              51
                          VISION & PLANNING
                                   Community Marketing


Resources: Continued

Watertown Public Opinion Company
120 3rd Avenue NW
P.O. Box 10
Watertown, SD 57201
(605) 886-6901
(605) 886-4280 (fax)
www.thepublicopinion.com

Kay Solberg, Classroom Connection
Watertown, SD
PH: 605.886.3040
South Dakota Department of Transportation
PH 605.773.3265

South Dakota Newspaper Association
PO Box 8100
Brookings SD 57006
1.800.658.3697
www.sna.com
sdna@sdna.com




                                            52
                  INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                               Curb / Gutter / Sidewalks / Streets / Sewer




   INFRASTRUCTURE / RECREATION

SUB THEME:        Curb / Gutter / Side walks / Streets / Sewer



  Challenge: Replacement and or installation of old or nonexistent infrastructure.

  Recommendation: Infrastructure projects don’t happen over night. They often take many
  years and many hours of planning. The best tool for this process is developing a Capital
  Improvement Program (CIP). Clear Lake may already have a Capital Improvement Program
  (CIP) in place. A CIP works hand-in- hand with achieving infrastructure goals by mapping
  out a schedule for the repair and replacement of crucial community facilities and
  infrastructure.

  One of the primary responsibilities of local government officials is to preserve, maintain, and
  improve a community’s stock of buildings, roads, parks, water and sewer facilities, and
  equipment. Planning for capital improvements is a matter of prudent financial management
  as well as sound development practice.

  Capital Improvement Program (CIP)
  A Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for Clear Lake would be a community plan for short-
  and long-range physical development. It is intended to link the community’s comprehensive
  plan and fiscal plan to physical developments, and provide a mechanism for:
       Estimating capital requirements, including the capital needs of Emergency Service
         providers (Fire & EMS);
       Planning, prioritizing, scheduling, and implementing projects during the next 5 to 10
         years ;
       Developing revenue policy for proposed improvements;
       Budgeting high priority projects;
       Inter- fund & Inter-Department coordinating of projects within Clear Lake; and
       Informing the public of planned capital improvements .

  Critical Components
  This policy is intended to be an evolving plan which will facilitate meeting the future capital
  needs of Clear Lake, including public works infrastructure. There are numerous factors that
  will influence and affect the planning process as the CIP continues to develop and mature
  over time, including the following list of critical components:




                                                  53
                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                              Curb / Gutter / Sidewalks / Streets / Sewer
      Forecast Demand for future services and capital facilities, taking into account all
       applicable demand factors such as population trends, housing units, traffic volume,
       commercial growth, etc.
      Inventory of Existing Capital Facilities to determine future demands for maintenance,
       repair, rehabilitation or replacement; and to determine adequacy of existing facilities
       to meet future needs.
      Funding plans for use of public funds for capital projects. Where use of public debt is
       planned, cash flow projections over the life of the debt amortization must be
       calculated, and the impact on future City budgets and financial statements must be
       estimated.
      Commitment, active involvement, and support by the Town’s management staff,
       elected policy makers, community interest groups, and the public.

Clear Lake’s City Council along with other participants will need to draw upon a variety of
resources in order to institute this policy effectively and efficiently. Clear Lake’s main
resource for advancing its CIP would be Todd Kays, of First District Association of Local
Governments. Contact information listed below in the Resource Section at the end of this
recommendation.

Curb and Gutter

In many of the sessions we heard about the problems with drainage and the lack of curb and
gutter. Curb and gutter projects are often taken on during street improvement projects which
I will address below. Grant resources for curb/gutter projects are scarce and often limited to
broader projects that also involve street reconstruction. Most often, the cost of placing and/or
replacing curb/gutter is assessed to homeowners. Although this does cause the burden to be
shared by the homeowner, they do benefit from the project. Often, communities looking to
implement curb/gutter will do so using a phased approach over time. The City of Clark has
taken this approach to installing curb and gutter. Implementation of this program was
difficult at first as residents were concerned about the cost incurred. However, as the
program has progressed and various sections of town were completed, the attitude has
changed with residents now wanting to know when their street will get done because they are
seeing the value of these infrastructural improvements. By doing these improvements over
time, it helps to mitigate the costs to the city. Over a five year period, the community has
been able to upgrade the streets and curb/gutter for nearly 50% of the town.

Sidewalks
The first step, if the city hasn’t already done so, would be to pass an ordinance stating that it
is the property owner’s responsibility to install, maintain, and replace sidewalks. I would
suggest working with the First District Association of Local Governments on drafting an
ordinance. I would also suggest working with First District Association of Local
Governments in establishing a plan as part of the CIP for installing, maintaining, and
replacing sidewalks throughout the community.

USDA Rural Development Community Facility Loan/Grant Programs are available to assist
with the construction of sidewalks and other community facilities, but will need to be backed


                                                 54
                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                             Curb / Gutter / Sidewalks / Streets / Sewer
by a revenue source (sales tax) and/or general obligation bonds (general tax dollars). General
obligation bonds will require an election. The HUD Community Development Block Grant
(CDBG) funds administered by the Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED)
can be used for sidewalk construction in areas that primarily benefit low and moderate
income persons. This is usually part of a broader project that might include upgrading the
water and waste infrastructure, streets, etc. First District can assist in applying for these
funds from the state.

Streets

Street improvements can be financed in a number of ways including:
        a) USDA-Rural Development’s Community Facility loan program
        b) A city special assessment process
        c) General city tax dollars
        d) General obligation bonds issued by the city
        e) Sales tax revenue bonds
        f) Rural Electric loan funds (REED)
        g) SD Department of Transportation Grant funds (Industrial Park, Agri-Business, and
          Community Access Grants),
        h) HUD CDBG funds from the State.

Grant funds for building and reconstructing streets are very limited and focused to specific
areas in the community. The primary resource for road construction grants is the SD
Department of Transportation or SDDOT. The three primary grant programs administered
by SDDOT include the industrial park grant program, agri-business grant program, and the
community access grant program.

Industrial Park Road Grants
    Primarily for building new roads in industrial parks when a known business is
        preparing to move in or expand.
    Commitment by a business to begin construction on their facility within six months of
        date of grant approval; or evidence that the new construction has taken place within
        the last year.
    No Application Deadline
    Eligible applicants are units of government
    There is 20% local cash match required for construction costs if the project is located
        within an industrial park or 40% for a road leading to or running adjacent to an
        industrial park.
    The unit of government also agrees to operate and maintain the road for its useful life.
    Minimum capital investment of at least five times the required state participation
        costs
    Five new jobs will be created by the industry.
    Land in industrial park must be zoned Industrial.
    Land in the industrial park must be owned by the government, industry, or an
        industrial development corporation.



                                                55
                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                Curb / Gutter / Sidewalks / Streets / Sewer
Agri-Business Access Grants - Requirements are similar to the industrial road grant program,
except there is a 40% local match required on all construction costs and the road must serve
as the primary access to an agricultural production or service business. There is no deadline
for submitting applications.

Community Access Grant Program
   Available to units of governments with populations less than 5,000 in population.
   The purpose is to enhance existing roads to downtown areas or for roads leading to
     schools, hospitals, grain terminals, or other significant traffic generating features of a
     community.
   Grant may not exceed $400,000 and a local match of 40% of the construction costs is
     required.
   Applications usually are accepted once a year around August 1.


The Community Development Block Grant is another potential option for financing road
improvements, particularly as it may relate to building access to a new or expanding
business. Certain income qualification would apply in order to meet eligibility requirements
for this program.


Water / Sewer Infrastructure.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has several funding sources
to aid communities in planning for and implementing projects to improve its infrastructure
systems.

Small Community Planning Grant: This program was established to promote a proactive
approach to water and wastewater infrastructure management. It provides small communities
with funds to hire an engineering consultant to develop a project specific engineering report,
communities can also access grant funds to procure professional services to conduct a rate
analysis and review using the Show- me Ratemaker™.

Consolidated Water Facilities Construction Program: This program was established to
provide grants and loans for water, wastewater and storm sewer projects.
    Projects must be listed on the State Water Plan before sending in an application.
    Water and Sewer Rates must meet the minimum requirements before an applicant is
       eligible to apply.

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Loan: This program was established to provide low
interest loans for drinking water projects. The funds available are dependent upon
appropriations from the U.S. Congress and repayments from funds previously loaned.
     Projects must be listed on the State Water Plan before sending in an application.
     The rates and terms are established each year by the board and available on the
        DENR website. Currently the rates are 3.25% with a 20 year term or 2.5% with a 10
        year term. There are also ―disadvantaged‖ rates for communities with median


                                                   56
                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                             Curb / Gutter / Sidewalks / Streets / Sewer
       household incomes lower than the states median household income. This enables a
       community to access lower interest rates and/or longer terms.
      This loan cannot be used for funding growth projects.

Clean Water State Revolving Fund Loan: This program was established to provide low
interest loans to governmental entities for clean water and non-point source pollution control
projects. The amount of funds available is dependent upon the amount of appropriation from
the U.S. Congress and the amount of repayments from funds previously loaned.
     Projects must be listed on the State Water Plan before sending in an application.
     The rates and terms are established each year by the board and available on the
        DENR website. Currently the rates are 3.25% with a 20 year term or 2.5% with a 10
        year term.
     This loan can be used for funding growth projects.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG): These are federal funds given to the state
and are administered by the Department of Tourism and State Development through the
Governors Office of Economic Development.
            Types of projects that may be funded include water, sewer, fire halls,
              community centers, storm sewers and health care clinics.
            At least 51% of those being serviced by the project must be low/moderate
              income households.
            CDBG staff expects applicants to utilize planning district staff in the
              application and administration of these grants as the requirements are
              cumbersome, although, not insurmountable.

USDA Rural Development: RD Water and Wastewater Program: Grants and loans are
available to assist with economic development
             Used to construct, repair or expand water and/or wastewater systems and
                storm sewer systems, acquire water rights, pay necessary fees for legal and
                engineering services and other development related costs.
             Grants are not available for storm sewer projects.
             Interest rates may change every quarter and depend on the US Treasury rate
                and on the service area of the borrower.
             The loan and grant rate is determined by the median household income of
                those served.
             Infrastructure for new housing development can be financed by site
                development loan programs.

USDA – Rural Development’s Community Facilities Program can also provide low- interest,
long-term financing for general community infrastructure projects such as water, sewer,
curb/gutter, etc. The loan program presently offers rates in the 4.25% to 4.75% range for a
40 year period.

Rural Electric Loan Funds (REED): Provide low interest loans for projects which are
beneficial to the area as a whole.



                                                57
               INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                              Curb / Gutter / Sidewalks / Streets / Sewer
              Includes medical clinics, street projects, fire halls/ambulance shelters, fire
               truck/ambulances, fire equipments, water and sewer projects.

Resources:

USDA Rural Development
810 Jensen Ave, Suite 2
Watertown, SD 57201
(605) 886-8202

South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Foss Building
523 E Capitol
Pierre, South Dakota 57501
605-773-4216

Jay Gilbertson, Director
East Dakota Water Development District
123 B Airport Drive
Brookings, SD 57006
605-688-6741

Rural Electric Loan Funds—REED
Linda Salmonson
Rural Electric Economic Development
East River Electric Cooperative
PO Box 227
Madison, SD 57042
605-256-4536
lsalmonson@eastriver.coop

Kingsbury County Electric
511 Hwy 14
De Smet, SD 57231
(605) 854-3522

First District Association of Local Governments
PO Box 1207
124 1st Ave NW
Watertown, SD 57201
605-882-5115




                                                 58
                   INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                         Handicap Accessibility


   Resources: Continued

   SD Department of Transportation
   Office of Local Government Assistance
   Paula Huizenga and/or Terry Jorgensen
   700 E Broadway Ave
   Pierre, South Dakota, 57501
   605-773-3921

   SD Governor’s Office of Economic Development- Community Development Block Grant
   711 E. Wells Avenue
   Pierre, SD 57501
   800-872-6190
   www.sdreadytowork.com




SUB THEME:       Handicap Accessibility



   Challenge: Improve handicap accessibility throughout Clear Lake.

   Recommendation: When looking to improve handicap accessibility throughout Clear Lake,
   the following organizations can provide assistance in meeting basic handicap accessibility
   regulations:
               The Rocky Mountain ADA Center for Region 8, which includes South Dakota
               SD Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities.

    There are also some funds available to help homeowners who qualify based on their income
   with handicap accessibility features including USDA Rural Development and Interlakes
   Community Action, Inc. USDA Rural Development’s Community Facility Loan and Grant
   programs may also be a possibility to make public buildings accessible. The federal
   government has tax incentives for improving handicap accessibility to existing businesses
   and apartment units. First Planning District can assist in determining what is available and
   the process for completing an application.

   Another resource is Opportunities for Independent Living (OIL) in Watertown. They
   provide services to individuals with disabilities to assist them in remaining or obtaining
   housing that allows them to be as independent as possible.




                                                  59
               INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                     Handicap Accessibility
Opportunities for Independent Living (OIL) offers the following programs:

      Home Modification and Adaptive Devices Program (HMAD) which can provide
       adaptive devices such as doorbell indicators, reachers, etc, or home modifications,
       such as ramps or widening doorways.

      Telecommunications Adaptive Devices Program (TAD) which provides special
       telephones for persons with disabilities who can not utilize a regular telephone, and

      Independent Living Skills Training which provides one-on-one in-home training of
       life skills to help people with disabilities learn the skills they need to live
       independently.

Technical information on Federal accessibility standards (UFAS) or the Americans with
Disability Act (ADA) can be found at the following websites:

       SECTION 504 OF THE REHABILITATION ACT (RA)
       Applies to direct loans and grants…design standards are the Uniform Federal
       Accessibility Standards (UFAS).
       http://www.access-board.gov/ufas/ufas-html/ufas.htm

       AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) Applies to areas of public
       accommodation whether direct or guaranteed. Public bodies, including state & local
       governments are covered by Title II & private entities by Title III. Design standards
       are the ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADA-AG).
        http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/html/adaag.htm

Resources:

Rocky Mountain ADA & IT Center
3630 Sinton Road, Suite 103
Colorado Springs, CO 80907
(719) 444-0268
rmdbtac@mtc- inc.com
www.adainformation.org

South Dakota Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities
221 S Central Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
1-800-210-0143 or (605) 945-2207

Tax Credit Information
www.usdoz./gov/crt/ada/taxpack.htm




                                              60
                  INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                Training & Recruiting EMT’s / Firemen
  Resources: Continued

  Inter- lakes Community Action Agency
  PO Box 268
  111 N Van Eps Avenue
  Madison, SD 57042-0268
  (605) 256-6518

  First Planning District
  P.O. Box 1207
  124 1st Ave. NW
  Watertown, SD 57201
  605-882-5115

  USDA Rural Development
  Darlene Bresson, Rural Development Manager
  810 Jensen Ave, Suite 2
  Watertown, SD 57201
  (605) 886-8202, Ext 4

  Opportunities for Independent Living
  316 E Kemp
  Watertown, SD 57201
  605/882-5249




SUB THEME:        Training and Recruiting EMT’s / Fire men



  Challenge: The current ambulance and fire departments have good equipment and are
  adequately staffed. However, it is important that new volunteers are recruited and trained to
  take the place of current volunteers who will be retiring from Emergency Services.

  Recommendation: Being a volunteer EMT or fireman takes a big commitment – but the
  friends made and the reward of helping another person makes it all worthwhile. Recruiting
  new members is essential to the future of the emergency services in Clear Lake.

             Suggestions on how best to recruit and train new EMT’s and Firemen:

     1. Establish a Volunteer Task Force to organize your recruitment efforts. The Task
        Force will decide who, when, how, and where to recruit and will follow up on the




                                                 61
            INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                          Training & Recruiting EMT’s / Firemen
   training of new volunteers. Involve your current members by asking for their ideas
   on recruiting. Decide which groups to contact and make a list of potential volunteers.

2. Make the public aware of the problem through features in the local newspaper.
   People in the community are very supportive of these volunteer organizations and
   appreciative of their efforts. Having a more aware public can help in your
   recruitment efforts. Also point out that by having a volunteer service, the residents
   are saving on taxes.

3. Make personal contact when recruiting volunteers. In many situations personal
   contact with potential volunteers will be the most effective recruiting effort. Draft a
   list of potential candidates and work with your current volunteers to follow up with
   these individuals. Tell the potential applicant why you are personally committed to
   your work – the ―payoffs‖ you receive from volunteering – and recruit on the basis of
   the people you help, not the organization’s need for more volunteers.

4. Give a presentation to service groups or local churches. They are already serving the
   community and may be willing to volunteer. Try to utilize a visual presentation with
   slides, pictures, etc. and have several current members at the presentation – both to
   talk about their own experiences and to help talk to interested volunteers. Don’t
   forget to ask for volunteers – very few people will volunteer without being asked to
   do so. Make sure to make a list of interested volunteers and get back to them as soon
   as possible.

5. Hold meetings at different times of day and different days of the week when
   recruiting to encourage people working all different shifts to attend.

6. Define the training and supervision the person will be given. Many people are
   concerned that they won’t know what to do when an emergency happens. Be honest
   about the work and time involved, the job requires considerable commitment.

7. Work with the local businesses to provide flexibility in allowing employees to
   participate as volunteers. Businesses recognize the need for this service in the
   community and they are usually willing to help promote volunteering for these
   organizations with their employees.

8. Make your meetings FUN! Consider ordering pizza or grilling out so volunteers
   don’t have to take time to eat before coming to the meeting. This also gives them an
   opportunity to get to know the other members and talk about different calls that the
   current members have been on.

9. When you get a volunteer, assign a senior member to act as a mentor to the new
   volunteer. The ―newbie‖ will feel more comfortable talking to one person and asking
   questions, than to risk asking a ―dumb‖ question during a meeting.




                                           62
               INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                              Training & Recruiting EMT’s / Firemen


   10. Stay active in statewide efforts to address this issue. A statewide advisory panel is
       being developed to look at this issue. For more information, contact the Office of
       Emergency Medical Services.

   11. Make sure that your budget has a line item in it for ―volunteer recognition.‖ It is
       important to recognize volunteers in the program often and in ways that they
       appreciate.

   12. Getting youth involved in volunteering for these organizations can also be beneficial.
       This is more difficult with EMT services, but you might look to start a Fire Cadets
       program to allow local youth a chance to get involved in the local fire department.
       For more information on this, contact that Custer Fire Department, which currently
       operates a Cadets program in their community.


Some of the various programs related to Emergency Services include:

      US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) - Rural Health Outreach Grant
       Program - The emphasis of this grant program is on service delivery through creative
       strategies requiring the grantee to form a network with at least two additional
       partners.

      HHS - Network Development Grant Program - These grants are designed to further
       ongoing collaborative relationships among health care organizations by funding rural
       health networks that focus on integrating clinical, information, administrative, and
       financial systems across members.

      HHS - Network Development Planning Grant Program - This new grant program
       provides one- year of funding to rural communities needing assistance in the
       development of an integrated healthcare network. The planning grants are to be used
       to develop a formal network with the purpose of improving the coordination of health
       services in rural communities and strengthening the rural health care system as a
       whole.

      HHS - Rural Access to Emergency Devices (RAED) Grant Program - The Rural
       Access to Emergency Devices (RAED) Grant Program provides funding to rural
       communities to purchase automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and provide
       training in their use and maintenance.

      HHS – Rural Emergency Medical Services Training and Equipment Assistance
       Program (REMSTEP) - The REMSTEP grant program seeks to funds eligible entities
       that propose to develop improved emergency medical services (EMS) in rural areas.
       This program provides funds to help recruit and train emergency services personnel.
       It can also be used to acquire emergency medical services equipment and acquire
       personal protective equipment.


                                               63
               INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                              Training & Recruiting EMT’s / Firemen


      Department of Homeland Security (DHS) – Assistance to Firefighter Grants - The
       AFG program awards grants directly to fire departments of a state to enhance their
       ability to protect the health and safety of the public and firefighting personnel, with
       respect to fire and fire-related hazards. Grants are awarded on a competitive basis to
       applicants that address AFG program priorities, demonstrate financial need, and
       demonstrate the benefit to be derived from their projects.

      DHS – Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER) Grants - The
       purpose of the SAFER grants is to award grants directly to volunteer, combination,
       and career fire departments to help the departments increase their cadre of
       firefighters. The SAFER grants have two activities that will help grantees attain this
       goal: 1) hiring of firefighters and 2) recruitment and retention of volunteer
       firefighters.

      USDA Rural Development – Community Facilities Guaranteed Loans, Direct Loans,
       and Grants – Provides funds to construct, enlarge, extend, or otherwise improve
       community facilities, such as the fire and ambulance departments, providing essential
       services to rural residents.

      Community Development Block Grants (GOED) – Can be used for the construction
       or expansion of essential community facilities.


Resources:

SD Office of Rural Health
Bernie Osberg, Director
207 E. Missouri Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
605-773-3366
http://www.state.sd.us/doh/rural/index.htm

US Department of Health and Human Services
Office of Rural Health
http://ruralhealth.hrsa.gov/overview/

Department of Homeland Security
Assistance to Fire Fighter Grant Program
http://www.firegrantsupport.com/

Steve Harding
Governors Office of Economic Development – GOED
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
1-605-773-5032



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                  INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                              Staffing


  Resources: Continued

  USDA Rural Development
  810 Jensen Ave SE, Suite 2
  Watertown, SD 57201
  605-886-8202, Ext 4
  www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd/
  e-mail: Darlene.Bresson@sd.usda.gov




SUB THEME:        Staffing


  Challenge: Addressing the issue of a shortage of city employees and staff.

  Recommendations: This is an issue that is not unique to Clear Lake as many rural
  communities find it difficult to find funds in the budget to add additional staff. Although a
  position may be needed, with limited funds, it’s not always possible to staff that position.
  However, there are some alternatives to consider helping fill the void.

  One alternative is to recruit volunteers to help where there is a short fall. High School
  students can be a great pool from which to draw such volunteers. Each semester the different
  City staff could take an intern. This will give the student real world work experience while
  helping the community.

  Another pool of volunteer to draw from are the seniors in Clear Lake. Many seniors are
  more than will to lend a hand, if you explain the need and how much it would be appreciated
  and then make the ask.

  I would also suggest working with the local newspaper to include a section on what’s going
  on in the community, with things such as the City Council meetings and a law enforcement /
  emergency services log to help keep the community up-to-date. I would also suggest reading
  the recommendations on Volunteers and Youth Engagement.




                                                65
                  INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                           Project Financing



SUB THEME:        Project Financing



  Challenge: When the city has decided to go ahead with a project, what resources are
  available to help finance the project?

  Recommendation: There are various Federal, State, and other sources for funding
  Infrastructure and Recreation, although the programs may be limited to a specific purpose.
  Many of these resources were covered under various other recommendations in this report,
  but they are repeated here for reference purposes.

  Bike & Walking Path
  The Rails to Trails Conservancy has a lot of information on designing and construction of
  trails. It is a not for profit group whose primary goal is, ―Creating a nationwide network of
  trails from former rail lines and connecting corridors to build healthier places for healthier
  people.‖ The Rails to Trails Conservancy does not provide monetary funding but does help
  with information, technical assistance, and training for trail builders.

  The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) administered by the Game, Fish and Parks
  Department provides 80 percent reimbursement for projects such as new trails, rehabilitation
  of existing trails, developing trail- related facilities, and educational programs. Trails include,
  but are not limited to, pedestrian/walking paths, bicycling, in- line skating, equestrian use,
  cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, off-road motorcycling, all-terrain vehicle riding, four-
  wheel drive use and other off- road motorized use. Sidewalks are not eligible. Trailheads
  (parking and bathroom facilities) are eligible, as long as there is a direct relationship with a
  recreational trail. Also, eligible is the purchase of trail maintenance equipment, such as lawn
  mowers and trail- grooming machines. The program has limited dollars available, is highly
  competitive, and likes to fund smaller scale projects. For more information on this program,
  contact the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks.

  The South Dakota Department of Transportation also has a program for trail projects called
  the Transportation Enhancement Grant. This program provides 81.95 percent reimbursement
  for projects such as recreational trails, landscaping, historic preservation, and establishment of
  transportation museums.

  Park and Campground Improvements:
  There are few grant opportunities for this type of project, but it does fit under the Land and
  Water Conservation Fund grant program. Campground development, however, is assessed as
  a low priority for all classes of municipalities according to the 2002 State-wide recreation
  survey.

  The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), which is administered by the South
  Dakota Game, Fish and Parks department, provides 50/50 matching grants for outdoor
  recreation improvements. Requests can be for no less than $3,000 and no more than $50,000.


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                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                        Project Financing
Projects may range from swimming pools to playground equipment to ball field
development, etc. A critical obligation that must be considered is that park or recreation areas
acquired, developed, or improved with L&WCF must be dedicated to outdoor recreation use
in perpetuity

This would make an excellent project for local service-related organization. With volunteer
labor and donated supplies, this is a project that might not be too expensive to complete.

Wastewater Financing:
Planning and construction costs associated with infrastructure projects are often grant eligible
and those funds should always be considered when planning and developing a project. The
following is a list of available resources that Clear Lake may consider using to replace sewer
lines or lagoons.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has several funding sources
to aid communities in planning for and implementing projects to improve its infrastructure
systems.

Small Community Planning Grant: This program was established to promote a proactive
approach to water and wastewater infrastructure management. It provides small communities
with funds to hire an engineering consultant to develop a project specific engineering report
or to hire a recognized technical assistance provider or financial planning professional
competent in providing a utility rate analysis.
     Available to cities/towns with a population of 2,500 or fewer.
     Communities will be reimbursed 80% of the cost of the engineering study upon
        completion of the engineering report.
     The maximum reimbursement a community may receive is $6,000 for a water or
        wastewater engineering study.
     Wastewater related studies may receive reimbursement up to $8,000 if activities
        related to infiltration and inflow (I/I) analysis is conducted.
     Communities conducting a utility rate analysis and review study may receive
        reimbursement of 80% of costs up to $1,600. The study must be an analysis using the
        Show- me Ratemaker™ process.
     Grants are made on a first come, first serve basis.

Consolidated Water Facilities Construction Program: This program was established to
provide grants and loans for water, wastewater and storm sewer projects.
    Projects must be listed on the State Water Plan before sending in an application.
    Water and Sewer Rates must meet the minimum requirements before an applicant is
       eligible to apply.

Clean Water State Revolving Fund Loan: This program was established to provide low
interest loans to governmental entities for clean water and non-point source pollution control
projects. The amount of funds available is dependent upon the amount of appropriation from
the U.S. Congress and the amount of repayments from funds previously loaned.
     Projects must be listed on the State Water Plan before sending in an application.


                                               67
                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                       Project Financing
      The rates and terms are established each year by the board and available on the
       DENR website. Currently the rates are 3.25% with a 20 year term or 2.5% with a 10
       year term.
      This loan can be used for funding growth projects.

Midwest Assistance Program (MAP) - This program provides technical assistance to small
communities, most of which is free of charge.
      Technical Assistance - Development:
           Provided to help communities obtain or expand water or wastewater facilities.
           Includes needs assessments, income surveys, dealing with engineers, financial
              packaging, application preparation, construction supervision, and many other
              kinds of ―front-end‖ work necessary to put facilities into place.
      Technical Assistance – Support:
           Provided to help communities manage operate and maintain facilities that are
              already in place.
           May include operator training, improving financial management systems,
              setting rates, or other items to help systems work more effectively.
      Community Revolving Loan Fund:
           Created to provide loans to finance pre-development activities, interim
              financing, construction loans, gap financing, and equipment.
           Given to communities with a population of 3,000 or less.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) - These are federal funds given to the state
and are administered by the Department of Tourism and State Development through the
Governors Office of Economic Development.
            Types of projects that may be funded include water, sewer, fire halls,
              community centers, storm sewers and health care clinics.
            At least 51% of those being serviced by the project must be low/moderate
              income households.
            CDBG staff expects applicants to utilize planning district staff in the
              application and administration of these grants as the requirements are
              cumbersome, although, not insurmountable. First District Association of
              Local Governments staff is knowledgeable in this area and is in constant
              contact with the CDBG staff.

USDA Rural Development - RD Water and Wastewater Program: Grants and loans are
available to assist with economic development
             Used to construct, repair or expand water and/or wastewater systems and
                storm sewer systems, acquire water rights, pay necessary fees for legal and
                engineering services and other development related costs.
             Grants are not available for storm sewer projects.
             Interest rates may change every quarter and depend on the US Treasury rate
                and on the service area of the borrower.
             The loan and grant rate is determined by the median household income of
                those served and the financial need of the community.



                                              68
                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                       Project Financing
              Before grant funds are available, water and sewer rates have to be at a normal
               rate and a health hazard must be shown.
              Infrastructure for new housing development can be financed by site
               development loan programs.

South Dakota Housing Development Authority
This program’s mission is dedicated to the preservation, rehabilitation, purchase and
development of both affordable single and multifamily housing units and daycare facilities.
    Programs range from tax credits to rural site development programs
    Grant programs for domestic crisis centers, emergency shelters and youth centers.
    Infrastructure for new housing development can be financed by s ite development loan
       programs

Curb and Gutters:
Curb and gutters can be included in financing on SDDOT funded projects under the
Community Access Program (See information on this program under Streets.) The HUD
CDBG funds administered by the Governor’s O ffice of Economic Development can be used
for curb and gutter installation in areas that primarily benefit low and moderate income
persons. However, this is usually done in conjunction with a broader project such as a street
reconstruction and/or water and waste system upgrade. USDA Rural Development could
also finance curb & gutter projects under the Community Facilities Program.

Streets:
Street improvements can be financed in a number of ways:
           1. USDA-Rural Development Community Facility loan program
           2. City special assessment process
           3. General city tax dollars
           4. City general obligation bonds
           5. Sales tax revenue bonds
           6. Rural Electric loan funds and/or SD Department of Transportation Grant
              funds (Industrial Park, Agri- Business, and Community Access),
           7. HUD CDBG funds from the State.

The City may use several sources to complete street projects, depending on the location of
the project and the source of funds available. Each program may have some different
requirements about how and where the money may be used. For example, USDA Rural
Development Community Facility Loan/Grant Programs are available to assist with the
construction of streets, but will need to be backed by a revenue source (sales tax) and/or
general obligation bonds (general tax dollars). General obligation bonds will require an
election.

SDDOT Industrial Park Road Grants are available to provide competitive matching grants for
roads located within industrial parks. Having an interested business is usually a requirement
for accessing these funds. Agri- Business Access grants are similar to the industrial road
grant program, except that the road must serve as the primary access to an agricultural
production or service business.


                                              69
               INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                      Project Financing


SDDOT’s Community Access Grant Program is available to units of local government to
enhance existing roads in downtown areas or roads leading to schools, hospitals, grain
terminals, or other significant traffic generating features of a community.

Resources:

Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
1100 17th Street, 10th Floor, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 331-9696
http://www.railtrails.org/

Department of Game, Fish and Parks
Trails Program Specialist, Scott Carbonneau
523 E. Capitol
Pierre, SD 57501
(605)773-3391
Scott.Carbonneau@state.sd.us

Department of Transportation, Office of Local Government Assistance
Paula Huizenga
700 East Broadway
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 773-4831
Paula.Huizenga@state.sd.us

Rural Electric Economic Development
Linda Salmonson
East River Electric Cooperative
PO Box 227
Madison, SD 57042
605-256-4536
lsalmonson@eastriver.coop

South Dakota Department of Transportation
Community Access Grants
700 Broadway Ave. E.
Pierre, SD 57501-2586
Phone: 605-773-6253
Fax: 605-773-3921
http://www.sddot.com/fpa/lga/econdevgrants.asp




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               INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                      Project Financing
Resources: Continued

Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Division of Financial and Technical Assistance
523 East Capitol Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501-3182
(605) 773-4216
denrinternet@state.sd.us
http://www.state.sd.us/denr

Midwest Assistance Program/SD Field Office
PO Box 1093
Hill City, SD 57745-1093
(605) 574-4795
sdmap@aol.com

USDA Rural Development
Darlene Bresson
810 Jensen Ave SE, Suite 2
Watertown, SD 57201
605-886-8202, Ext 4
605-882-3268 Fax
www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd/
e-mail: Darlene.Bresson@sd.usda.gov

Community Development Block Grant Program
SD Department of Tourism and State Development
Steve Harding/Dale Knapp
Capitol Lake Plaza
711 East Wells Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 773-5032
steve.harding@state.sd.us
dale.knapp@state.sd.us

South Dakota Association of Rural Water S ystems
Cedar Plaza, Suite 5
5009 West 12th Street
Sioux Falls, SD 57106-0379

Department of Game, Fish and Parks
Land Water Conservation Fund
523 E. Capitol
Pierre, SD 57501
(605)773-3391




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                  INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                         Bike & Walking Path



  Resources: Continued

  Publication: Land & Water Conservation F und Manual
  http://www.sdgfp.info/Publications/Parks/LWCFmanual.pdf




SUB THEME:        Bike and Walking Path




  Challenge: Develop an outdoor bike and walking trail in and around Clear Lake.

  Recommendation:
  South Dakota has some wonderful trails, and this could be another! When considering what
  to develop consider a well- maintained multi-purpose hiking/biking trail with plenty of
  interpretive features and places to stop. Printed trail guides and trail markers can point out
  natural, historical and other points of interest. Some basic structures to consider are a shelter
  with a view of the lake or an accessible tree house where people can take a break.

   Grant programs that address funding for planning trails and also construction of the trails:

     1. The Rails to Trails Conservancy - This is a great place to start in the early stages of
        implementing a trial system. The Rails to Trails Conservancy has information on
        designing and construction. It does not provide money but can help with information,
        technical assistance, and training for trail builders.

     2. The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) administered by Game, Fish and Parks
        provides up to 80 percent reimbursement for projects such as new trails, rehabilitation
        of existing trails, developing trail related facilities, and educational progra ms. The
        program has limited funds, is highly competitive and likes to fund smaller scale
        projects.

     3. The South Dakota Department of Transportation offers the Transportation
        Enhancement Grant. - This program provides partial reimbursement for projects such
        as recreational trails, landscaping, historic preservation, and establishment of
        transportation museums. First Planning District is a source of information and
        assistance with grant applications, analysis, and research and I believe they were very
        involved with the trail around Watertown and Lake Kampeska.




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                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                        Bike & Walking Path
I recommend that you enlist some professional help with design, natural and historical
interpretation, construction, maintenance plan, and signage, but involve as many people from
the community as possible in the planning and ―blazing‖ of the trail. Setting up some
charitable community walks or jogs is a great way to get people on the trail for the first time,
and some special events all through the year will help to keep it well used.

Resources:

Northern Trails Training Partnership
American Trails
P.O. Box 491797
Redding, CA 96049-1797
(530) 547-2060
www.americantrails.org (great web site)

Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
1100 17th Street, 10th Floor, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 331-9696
http://www.railtrails.org/default.asp
www.trailsandgreenways.org

Department of Transportation
Office of Local Government Assistance
700 East Broadway
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 773-4831

SD Department of Game, Fish & Parks
Recreational Trails Program
Joe Foss Building
523 East Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501-3185
(605)773-3391
www.sdpfg.info

First Planning District
P.O. Box 1207
124 1st Ave. NW
Watertown, SD 57201
605-882-5115




                                                73
                   INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                   Parks & Campground Improvements




SUB THEME:       Parks and Campground Improve ments


   Challenge: There were many comments on the great parks and campsites in town and by the
   lake. There were also comments about needed improvements to both parks and camping
   facilities.

   Recommendation: The Land and Water Conservation Fund (L&WCF), administered by the
   South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks department provides 50/50 matching grants for outdoor
   recreation improvements. Requests can be for no less than $3,000 and no more than $50,000.
   Projects may range from swimming pools to playground equipment to ball field
   development, etc. A critical obligation that must be considered is that park or recreation areas
   acquired, developed, or improved with L&WCF must be dedicated to outdoor recreation use
   in perpetuity.

   There may be grant funds available through the state’s Community Development Block
   Grant (CDBG) program. Clear Lake has utilized this program in the past. First Planning
   District can advise the community of programs and assist you with the application process.

   USDA Rural Development’s Guaranteed Community Facility Loan program can provide
   loans, through a local lender, for recreational facilities. Contact the Watertown Rural
   Development office for additional information.

   The South Dakota Community Foundation has grant funds available for several types of
   project areas. The Ronald McDonald Foundation has grant funds available for projects
   which are directly related to children’s health and well being, including playground
   equipment. The applicant must be a non-profit or have 501I (3) status. This program
   generally has smaller awards of $10,000 or less for projects or programs.

   There have been three groups/communities in South Dakota that have secured grants through
   the Tony Hawk Foundation for the creation of skateboard parks (grants ranging from $1,000
   up to $15,000) including Pine Ridge (Visions of Suzanne Big Crow, Inc.), Gregory (Midwest
   Extreme), and Lennox (Lion’s Club). Additional information on this grant program can be
   found by visiting www.tonyhawkfoundation.org In some communities, the local FFA
   program provided assistance in the construction of ramps for a skateboard park that are
   eventually placed in a converted basketball or tennis court.

   I would also suggest seeking volunteers to help with the campground work. Local contractors
   and construction business, if asked, may be willing to volunteer some time and equipment.
   This would make an excellent project for local service-related organizations, too. Volunteer
   labor and donated supplies help hold down the cost of improvements. Service organizations
   may also have associated foundations or local funds they can invest in this type of project.



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                INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                                 Parks & Campground Improvements


If the City is interested in developing additional softball or baseball fields, a small source of
funding for construction and renovation is the Minnesota Twins Fields for Kids program
which provides matching grants ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 for the renovation or
construction of baseball and/or softball fields used primarily by youth. Eligible renovation
projects include the upgrading of essential field components, such as new sod, infield,
fencing, and dugouts. Non-essential items, such as lights, bleachers, grandstands, restrooms,
and scoreboards, do not qualify for support.

Combining park and camping upgrades into the biking/walking trail may also be a
possibility.

Resources:
Department of Game, Fish & Parks
Contact: John Simpson – New Parks/Equipment
523 E. Capitol
Pierre, SD 57501
PH: 605.773.5490
Email: john.simpson@state.sd.us
Web: www.sdgfp.info/parks

For playground equipment:
Ronald McDonald Foundation of SD
2001 S. Norton Ave.
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
PH: 605.336.6398
FX: 605.339.2638
Web: www.rmhc.com/grant/index.html

Land & Water Conservation Fund Manual
http://www.sdgfp.info/Publications/Parks/LWCFmanual.pdf

Publication: Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan
http://www.sdgfp.info/Publications/Parks/SCORP_MASTER.pdf

USDA Rural Development
Darlene Bresson
810 Jensen Ave SE, Ste 2
Watertown, SD 57201
605-886-8202, Ext 4
605-882-3268, Fax
E- mail: darlene.bresson@sd.usda.gov




                                                75
              INFRASTRUCTURE & RECREATION
                            Parks & Campground Improvements


Resources: Continued

Tony Hawk Foundation
1611-A S. Melrose Drive #360
Vista, Ca 92081
(760) 477-2479
www.tonyhawkfoundation.org

Twins Fields for Kids Program
TWINS COMMUNITY FUND
HaiVy Nguyen
34 Kirby Puckett Place
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55415
612-375-7523
http://minnesota.twins.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/min/community/field_for_kids1.jsp

South Dakota Community Foundation
Box 296
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 224-1025
www.sdcommunityfoundation.org




                                          76
                                           YOUTH
                                             Retention



                                       YOUTH

SUB THEME:        Retention


  Challenge: The issue of youth retention has been identified as a crucial issue for
  communities like Clear Lake and throughout rural South Dakota. The lack of employment
  opportunities for youth is a concern as they are forced to go elsewhere to find jobs. What can
  be done to encourage them to return to their home community for careers and to raise a
  family?

  Recommendation: One thing you already have going for you in Clear Lake is the attitudes
  of the youth. During the Youth Session, we asked the students if they would live in Clear
  Lake after high school or college and the response was overwhelmingly, ―YES!!!,‖ if job
  opportunities were present.

  A recent study by the North Central Rural Development Center at Iowa State University
  came up with six areas in which communities were successfully in addressing youth
  attraction and retention. These include investments in:
                  1. Financial capital: Having opportunities for jobs and economic support.
                  2. Political capital: Having the youth voices heard and involved in
                      community affairs.
                  3. Social Capital: Integrating youth into community organizations (i.e.
                      chamber, economic development, etc)
                  4. Education and Health Capital: Having a strong education source and
                      access to quality healthcare.
                  5. Cultural Capital: Maintaining roots to your heritage and cultural affairs.
                  6. Natural Capital: Having amenities for recreation.

  Clear Lake already has a head start on some of these issues such as education, health, cultural
  and natural capitol. The first three are the ones that are the most critical to address.

  To begin with, start making an impression when they are young. Make sure that the students
  feel ―ownership‖ in the community. This gives them a reason to want to return after they
  have had some time to be on their own. For more information on how to instill ―ownership‖
  read the recommendation in the section about Youth Engagement and Volunteerism.

  The community of Clear Lake needs to develop a method of tracking its high school
  graduates once they leave, be it work or to pursue higher education, tracking these Alumni is
  crucial. An alumni network could possibly be developed with a newsletter to keep the
  students connected to what is happening in the community. These alumni could be recruited
  back into the community when business opportunities arise. A database of former youth that


                                                77
                                         YOUTH
                                           Retention
compiles their degrees, experiences and skills could prove to be a valuable resource in the
recruitment of young families back to Clear Lake.

The community of Platte addresses the retention of youth through a shadowing/scholarship
program. The program is under the Platte Development Corporation and it works with area
businesses and the local high school. The basic concept has a student shadowing at a
business during high school. After high school graduation, if the student and business both
agree, a contract is entered into for tuition reimbursement to college. The PDC, business and
student would be responsible for 1/3 of the student’s tuition. The student is required to return
to the business after graduation for four years, otherwise they repay the employer. The
concept is based on the Dakota Corp scholarship the state offers, only this is geared more
toward the vo-tech schools. Platte funded their program with a grant from the City of Platte
and the South Dakota Community Foundation.

Some marketing of the benefits of Clear Lake may be helpful in attracting young people back
into the community. Business Beyond the Farm is one model which was developed in
Nebraska to market the benefits of a rural lifestyle to young people. This website is listed
below in the resource section and includes information to rural business opportunities, job
openings, housing opportunities, and activities.

Young families look for adequate and affordable housing, access to healthcare, available
shopping and services. Recreational opportunities are also importa nt along with active
churches. Clean looking neighborhoods with good streets and parks with safe playground
equipment are important to young families. Clear Lake has a great new school. Clear Lake
has a lot going on that would make young people want to return. A strategic retention plan
would increase the number of former Clear Lake youth who return to work and live.

Resources:

Business Beyond the Farm
http://www.businessbeyondthefarm.com/about.asp

North Central Regional Center for Rural Developme nt
http://www.ncrcrd.iastate.edu/#

South Dakota Community Foundation
Bob Sutton, Executive Director
PO Box 296
207 E. Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
605-224-1025 or 800-888-1842
www.sdcommunityfoundation.org




                                              78
                                          YOUTH
                                    Engagement & Volunteering
  Resources: Continued

  South Dakota Council on Economic Education
  University of South Dakota
  School of Business
  414 E. Clark St.
  Vermillion, SD 57069
  lroach@usd.edu
  http://www.usd.edu/business/econed/homepage.cfm




SUB THEME:       Youth Engage ment & Volunteering


  Sub The me: Youth Engagement/Volunteering

  Challenge: True engagement of youth involves a process of allowing young people to build
  ownership in their community. Though engaging youth to feel a part of the community has
  many indirect benefits, it is much easier said than done. Clear Lake’s unique problem seems
  to be it’s proximity to Brookings and Watertown. Both of these larger towns offer more
  opportunities and lure Clear Lake’s youth out of town.

  Recommendation: Small communities often face challenges of retaining their youth and
  recruiting new leadership for the community. Effective engagement of youth holds the
  potential to develop new and emerging leadership in the community and nurture a sense of
  ownership from the youth so that they will want to remain in or return to Clear Lake.

  One of Clear Lake’s greatest assets is the people, and that certainly includes the youth who
  are a great resource to utilize for community and economic development objectives. The
  young people at the high school who participated in the Community Assessment are a
  thoughtful and intelligent group who want to play a role in the growth of Clear Lake.
  Allowing students to play sincere roles in efforts from community and economic
  development and city beautification to entrepreneurship and city government will offer youth
  the skills, experience, and confidence needed to emerge as effective leaders and contributing
  members of society.

  According to the Sierra Health Foundation’s publication Engaging Youth: A How to Guide
  for Creating Opportunities for Young People to Participate, Lead and Succeed, there are five
  key supports and opportunities that allow youth to develop in to self sufficient, caring, and
  contributing adults:
      1. Caring adult relationships
      2. Emotional and physical safety
      3. Opportunities to participate



                                               79
                                         YOUTH
                                   Engagement & Volunteering
   4. A connection with the community
   5. Opportunities to develop meaningful skills

Clear Lake already offers their youth adults who care for them through the school system and
physical safety in the community. Effective youth engagement has the potential to meet the
other three needs.

When youth are truly engaged in activities they are not passive participants who are simply
present. There are three things to consider when determining the level of youth participation
in an activity: youth input in decision making, meaningful roles and responsibilities, and
leadership development and skill building. The combination of these will effectively engage
youth and give them ownership of the project. Some examples of effective youth
engagement include:
     Youth serving on adult boards of directors or adult advisory boards as voting
        members. (For example, allow a few youth to help coordinate the summer recreation
        programs.)
     All- youth advisory boards that provide advice without any formal authority.
        (The students in Clear Lake were interested in having more opportunities to be
        involved in activities outside of sports. Maybe allow them to form an ―Arts and
        Culture‖ board that would organize classes, speakers, and other cultural activities for
        the community.)
     Youth serving on task forces, policy boards, or short-term committees set up for a
        specific purpose. (This community assessment process is a great way to allow youth
        to take part in committees they are interested in. One possibility is to have youth
        apply to be a part of a planning committee for one of the projects such as the bike
        path.)
     Youth serving as staff to an agency. (Maybe a student is interested in early childhood
        education. That student could serve at a daycare a few hours a week and would be
        responsible for developing activities for the children.)
     Youth serving as peer mentors conflict mediators, and educators. (Older students can
        gain a lot of confidence from helping younger students. This relationship also
        provides role models for the younger students. For example, allowing 5 th grade
        students to read with 1st graders on a weekly basis is a reciprocally beneficial
        relationship.)

The key to genuine youth engagement in the community is to allow young people to hold
authentic, central roles that make a difference and provide leadership roles and skill building
opportunities. Although it is easy to want to do the project for them, hold back and allow the
students to take the lead with advice and assistance provided by the adults. If it is something
that is driven by the youth, themselves, they will more likely take an inherent interest and
ownership of the project. Use this as a learning exercise for them. Work with them to write
a grant application and identify potential funding resources. If a grant is secured, work with
them to build their administrative and project management skills.

Youth / adult partnerships are also a good way to engage youth in the community. Partnering
youth with adult community leaders who are interested in working on the same projects


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                                        YOUTH
                                   Engagement & Volunteering
builds leadership, provides a mentor relationship, and provides necessary volunteers for the
community. There are numerous training manuals to help build this model in Clear Lake,
some are listed in the resource section below. By working in true partnership, the
developmental needs of the youth in your community are met while they are in leadership
roles improving and being actively engaged in their communities.

Service- learning is a pedagogy that is becoming an increasing popular way to engage and
educate students in their communities. Service- learning integrates service in the community
with academic courses to meet specific learning goals for students.

The two main objectives are:
   1. To meet identified community needs which helps strengthen the community
   2. Advance the students understanding of specific course content and related civic
       learning objectives.

Service- learning training is available for interested teachers through the SDSU Cooperative
Extension. There are service- learning programs at many of the higher education institutions
in the state. South Dakota State University could serve as a contact for the Clear Lake area.

The important thing is to give youth a voice and take it seriously. The more connections you
build with the youth in the community, the more likely they are to want to stay in the
community if an opportunity arises allowing them to do so.

Resources:

Publications:

Taking the Reins Together: Youth-Adult Partnerships
Provided by the Innovation Center for Community and Youth Development
Found at:
http://www.theinnovationcenter.org/r_toolkits.asp


Reflect and Improve: A Tool Kit for Engaging Youth and Adults as Partners in Program
Evaluation
Provided by the Innovation Center for Community and Youth Development
Found at:
http://www.theinnovationcenter.org/r_toolkits.asp

Youth Voice: A Guide for Engaging Youth in Leadership and Decision Making in Service -
Learning Programs

Provided by Learn and Serve America, the Corporation for National and Communtiy Service,
the Points of Light Foundation, and Youth Serve America
Found at:http://www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/7/YVGuide.pdf




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                                        YOUTH
                                  Engagement & Volunteering
Resources: Continued

Ho, Josephine. Youth and Community: Engaging Young People in Philanthropy and Service
Provided by W.K. Kellogg Foundation
Found at:
http://www.wkkf.org/Pubs/PhilVol/youthcommunity1_00251_03773.pdf

Paul, Andy & Levkovitz, Bina. (2006). Engaging Youth: A How-to Guide for Creating
Opportunities for Young People to Participate, Lead and Succeed
Provided by the Sierra Health Foundation
Found at:
http://www.sierrahealth.org/programs/reach/docs/Engaging_Youth_Report.pdf


Contacts:

Sheryl Lynne Coleman, Learn and Serve America School Based K-12 programs
P. O. Box 302101
50 North Ripley Street, Room 5348
Montgomery, AL 36130-2101
Phone: (334) 242-8216
Email: scoleman@alsde.edu
Website:
http://www.learnandserve.org/about/role_impact/state_profiles_detail.asp?tbl_profiles_state=
SD

Dianne Nagy, Service-Learning Coordinator
South Dakota State University, Box 550
823 Medary Avenue
Brookings, SD 57007
Phone: 605-688-6004
Email: Dianne.nagy@sdstate.edu
Website: http://www3.sdstate.edu/Administration/OfficeforDiversityEnhancement/Index.cfm

Sonia Mack, Cooperative Extension Youth Development Coordinator Clear Lake
Phone: 605-874-2681

Websites:

Youth Serve America @ http://www.ysa.org/

Youth Serve America is dedicated to Building a global culture of engaged youth who are
committed to a lifetime of service, learning, leadership, and achievement. This website will
direct you to information about programs, services, awards, grants and other information
dealing with engaging youth in their communities.




                                             82
                                          YOUTH
                                            Activities
  Resources: Continued

  National Service-Learning Clearinghouse @ http://www.servicelearning.org/

  The National Service-Learning Clearinghouse (NSLC), a program of Learn and Serve
  America, operates America's premier website supporting the service-learning efforts of
  schools, higher education institutions, communities, and tribal nations.

  Learn and Serve America @ http://www.learnandserve.org/

  Learn and Serve America supports and encourages service-learning throughout the United
  States, and enables over one million students to make meaningful contributions to their
  community while building their academic and civic skills. Learn and Serve America
  provides direct and indirect support to K-12 schools, community groups and higher education
  institutions to facilitate service- learning projects.




SUB THEME:          Activities



  Challenge: Finding and creating productive activities for youth when there is, ―nothing to
  do.‖

  Recommendation: This issue of having, ―nothing to do‖ is a vital one to address because
  boredom may lead to higher levels of risky behavior. Also, there was a repeated concern in
  the listening sessions that the youth often drove to Watertown or Brookings to find
  something to occupy their free time.

  We were continually reminded in the listening sessions of some assets the community
  already has in place including the golf course, swimming pool, wellness center, and the
  summer recreation program. Work to market these existing assets to the youth. For
  example, you could give a discount price to youth memberships at the wellness center. To
  take that a step further, you could also involve the youth in teaching aerobics classes or
  helping new members get oriented on the equipment. The idea here is that if some youth are
  involved they will involve their friends and so on. Another example, have a youth night at
  the golf course like courses do with ladies’ night or men’s league.

  Work to expand your summer youth programs. One idea is to have older students hold
  summer camps for the younger students. For example, the varsity football players could hold
  some camps for younger students to learn the basic skills of football. This would also be an
  opportunity to provide positive role models within the community. We heard in the listening



                                               83
                                          YOUTH
                                            Activities
session that there were not enough opportunities for youth not involved in sports. Have a
summer book club led and organized by the youth. Another idea that was brought up at the
youth session was summer theater and arts programs. Make it a summer tradition to have a
play. Utilize community members who have talents in the arts and have them teach classes
for the youth.

One idea that came to mind is a community movie theatre. There is no movie theatre in
Clear Lake and youth often end up driving to Watertown or Brookings to see a new release.
With the lack of businesses on Main Street there are vacant buildings that could be converted
into a theatre. Both Philip and Platte have accomplished this goal – with mostly volunteer
and donated labor and materials. The contact information for these communities is listed
below. This could prove to be a real asset to both the youth and families alike.

The idea of a youth center was also brought up. Though a grant or other significant
donations would be needed to do this, it could be done. Fix up an old building on Main
Street. This needs to be largely led by the youth so it can best suit their interests. Let the
youth paint and decorate it and decide what they want to be included. Some ideas include
internet access, ping pong, card tables, vending machines, video games, pool table and a
lounge area. Allow the youth to start interest groups. For example, they could start a
knitting club, intramural sports, or a computer club, whatever they are most interested in.
The key to success here is to keep it youth led.

One last request from the youth session is to have a fast food restaurant in town where they
can go with their friends. They suggested Dairy Queen or Taco Johns. The overall feeling
was that the youth just wanted something to do, or a place to hang out. This need can be met
in different ways. Work with the local youth to find a suitable starting po int.

Resources:

Websites:
Rural Information Center’s Youth and Education Resources:
http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ruralres/educate.htm

Youth Zone: Designing a Youth Center
http://nyec.org/designguide.htm

Contacts:

Platte Development Corporation
PO Box 393
500 S. Main St..
Platte, SD 57369-0393
605-337-3921
605-337-3988
mkb@midstatesd.net




                                               84
                                           YOUTH
                                           Activities Center
  Resources: Continued

  Philip Chamber of Commerce & Economic Development
  P.O. Box 378
  Philip, SD 57567
  (605) 859-2645
  ccphilip@gwtc.net
  philipsouthdakota.com




SUB THEME:        Activities Center


  Challenge: Comments from throughout the listening session, including those from the youth
  session, noted a need for a Center for youth activities—a place for youth to go.

  Recommendation: I believe the best way to develop a sustainable youth center is to allow
  the youth to develop a center for themselves based on their own needs. Adults can help
  initiate the process and provide assistance and supervision, but this should be a process that is
  driven by the youth themselves. From our discussions at the high school, those young people
  seemed very interested in this type of project. The development of a youth center would
  make an excellent project for the youth to undertake and would serve as learning experience.
  The school might be willing to help advise students as part of this task – perhaps building
  this project into a business based course in the high school.

  There are various organizations that, through your school, could support the development of
  this initiative. Organizations that can help are DECA, Distributive Education Clubs of
  America; Junior Achievement, curriculum that teaches students how to start and run
  businesses through student led enterprises and voluntary assistances from mentors in the
  community; REAL, assistance to schools looking to implement a youth enterprise
  curriculum; Youth Ventures, helps support the development of ―youth teams‖ interested in
  starting a business or providing a social service in a community. Youth Venture may also
  provide a small amount of financial assistance for start- up. Curt Shaw, with Black Hills
  Special Services Coops has assisted with similar projects in small communities. Curt would
  be an excellent resource person to visit with and get direction.

  It is important that the students take ownership over the project. Work with them to develop
  the concept and research using an existing facility in the community vs. building a new
  facility. Both Hill City (Boys and Girls club) and the City of Dupree have used Governors
  Houses for this type of facility. Students need to decide what types of activities the center
  will provide such as a computer projector for showing movies, a popcorn machine, pool
  table, video games, etc. Are there people in the community willing to donate some of the
  equipment?


                                                  85
                                          YOUTH
                                         Activities Center


I would suggest asking the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) (Watertown) to
work with the youth to develop this business plan, or some other business person in the
community. Identify financial and other resources to use in the development of the activity
center. Students could learn how apply for grants and seek financial partners. Determine who
will operate the facility and what it will cost, this is an excellent learning opportunity for the
youth, and it provides the basis for an on-going youth activity. Be creative, allow the youth to
take a leadership role in developing this project, and focus on meeting the needs of the youth.

Resources:
Beaumont Foundation of America
PO Box 1855
Beaumont, TX 77701
866-546-2667
www.bmtfoundation.com

Black Hills Special Services Cooperative
Curt Shaw
PO Box 218
Sturgis SD 57783
605-347-4467

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Governors Office of Economic Development – (GOED)
Department of State Development
711 E. Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
1-605-773-5032
Contact the First Planning District for assistance with CDBG grants.

DECA – South Dakota
Destributed Education Clubs of America
700 Governor’s Place
Pierre, SD 57501
605-773-4673
605-773-4236 (Fax)

Junior Achievement
1000 N West Ave, Ste. 110
Sioux Falls, SD 57104-1314
605-336-7318
jasd@jasd.org
www.soudakota.ja.org




                                                86
                                     YOUTH
                                     Activities Center


Resources: Continued

Kauffman Foundation
4801 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 6410-2046
816-932-1000
www.kauffman.org

National Council of Economic Education
1140 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10036
212-730-7007
202-730-1792 (Fax)

REAL Enterprises
Corporation for Enterprise Development
115 Market Street, Ste. 221
Durham, NC 27701
919-688-7328
919-682-7621
info@realenterprises.org
www.realenterprises.org

South Dakota Community Foundation
Bob Sutton, Executive Director
PO Box 296
207 E. Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501
605-224-1025 or 800-888-1842
www.sdcommunityfoundation.org

South Dakota Council on Economic Education
University of South Dakota
School of Business
414 E. Clark st.
Vermillion, SD 57069
lroach@usd.edu
www.usd.edu/~econed/1.htm

USDA Rural Development
1707 4th Ave., SE, Suite 100
Aberdeen, SD 57401-5087
605-226-3360
www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd




                                            87
                                YOUTH
                                Activities Center



Resources: Continued
US Department of Education
OVAE, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-7110
202-245-7708
Karen.Holliday@ed.gov
www.ed.gov/news/fedregister

Youth Venture
1700 N. Moore St. Suite 2000
Arlington, VA 22209
703-527-4126
www.youthventure.org




                                       88
                                           Housing
                                             Affordable




                                     HOUSING
SUB THEME:       Affordable Housing


   Challenge: Developing housing that is affordable for low- income families.

   Recommendation: First of all, the community should consider having a housing needs
   assessment completed to determine the exact areas of housing that is needed. Existing
   homeowners and lot owners should be brought into the discussions. I would suggest
   contacting First District Association of Local Governments of Watertown for aid in
   completing the assessment.

   Housing developments in rural communities have there own set of unique challenges.
   Capacity must be developed at the local level to address rural housing issues. A great
   reference guide for rural housing developments is available online from the Iowa Extension
   Service at http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/housing/media/pdf/aahe-guidebook.pdf.

   Another suggest would be to establish a housing taskforce, separate, but inclusive of, your
   current community organizations. The taskforce should include city, county, economic
   development, and other representation– which will continue exploring this issue to
   determining possible solutions.

   Affordable Housing - Development
   One of the means of providing affordable housing is through the Governors House program
   through the South Dakota Housing Development Authority. Governors homes are
   standardized 1008 sq. ft homes built in South Dakota. They are sold to individual home
   buyers or development groups for $33,000. These can be placed on top of a full basement, as
   in a ranch style home, or turned into split levels in order to increase the size of the home
   (with the use of egress windows in the basement, this area can be finished, thereby doubling
   the living space). Income qualifications for potential homebuyers apply. In some
   communities, these have been used to provide affordable housing for all age groups. In other
   communities, they have placed these homes side by side, attached garages, and created one-
   level homes for elderly individuals in the community, including rentals.

   Homes Are Possible Inc from Aberdeen and Praireland Housing through Planning &
   Development District III have utilized the Governor’s Homes and have created unique
   designs that make them blend into the community as a traditional on site stick built home.
   Please contact both of these great sources for more information.




                                                 89
                                          Housing
                                            Affordable
Another strategy used by some rural communities is to give lots away free to individuals
looking to build a home. Generally they require construction be completed within 6 months
of purchase and a decreasing lien on the property for the cost of the lot if the family lives in
the home for 3 years. Incentives may prove to be a worthwhile short-term action that would
provide long-term property tax benefits to the community and draw in families. The
Plankinton Development Corporation has been doing this, with some success, for a couple
years.

             Development Resources & Programs that service your area include:

South Dakota Housing Development Authority:

HOME program
The primary purpose of the HOME program is to expand the supply of decent, safe, sanitary,
and affordable housing for very low-income and low- income households. Participating
jurisdictions develop their own programs in partnership with local governments, nonprofit
organizations and the private sector. Participating jurisdictions provide HOME funds for
acquisition, new construction, and rehabilitation of affordable housing or direct rental
assistance.

HOME funds may be invested in both rental and homeownership activities; however,
affordability periods, occupancy requirements, property standards, low- income benefit
requirements, and other federal requirements must be fulfilled. The minimum amount of
HOME funds invested in a project that involves rental or homeownership housing is $1,000
per each HOME assisted unit in a project. Eligible activities include rental new construction,
rental conversion, rental acquisition and/or rehabilitation, rental refinancing with
rehabilitation, homeowner rehabilitation, homebuyer programs, and tenant-based rental
assistance. Other eligibility requirements apply.

Housing Tax Credit Program
The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 established the Housing Tax Credit Program as an
incentive for construction and rehabilitation of housing for low-income households.
Developers of housing tax credit projects typically raise equity capital for the ir projects by
syndicating the tax credits to investors who are willing to invest in the project. The investors'
return is the annual tax credit and other economic benefits generated by the project. South
Dakota is allocated over $2 million annually for this tax credit program.

Projects eligible for housing tax credits involve construction and/or preservation of decent,
safe, sanitary and affordable housing in areas of the greatest housing need. A minimum of
either 20 percent of the total units must be available to tenants whose incomes do not exceed
50 percent of the area median gross income; or 40 percent of the total units must be available
to tenants whose incomes do not exceed 60 percent of the area median gross income. Gross
rents on the low-income units, including tenant-paid utilities, cannot exceed 30 percent of the
qualifying monthly median income. The project owner must also enter into an agreement to
meet the low income occupancy requirements for a minimum of 15 years beyond the initial
15 year compliance period. Other conditions apply.


                                               90
                                          Housing
                                            Affordable



Multifamily Bond Financing Program
This program provides sponsors of selected multifamily housing developments with
permanent and construction loans through the sale of tax-exempt or taxable revenue bonds.
Loans are made for a term up to 50 years and may provide 100% financing for nonprofit
sponsor/owner or 90% financing for limited profit sponsors/owners. Interest rates are
determined by the market.

Rural Site Development Program
The purpose of this program is to stimulate the development of new affordable housing
subdivisions in rural communities by using funds in a prudent manner; leveraging other
resources to the maximum extent possible. Local lender involvement is required. Because of
the high emphasis on SDHDA assistance being the last piece of the puzzle, SDHDA strongly
discourages applications that have not already pursued other financing sources.

The purchase price of all homes within the development must not exceed $80,000. Loans are
available for projects of no less than 5 and no more than 30 lots. Loan amount is to be
determined based on availability of other financing resources and upon scope of construction
required. Interest rates and repayment terms will vary.


USDA Rural Development:

Rural Housing Site Loans
The purpose of this program is to assist public or private nonprofit organizations interested in
providing sites for housing; to acquire and develop land in rural areas to be subdivided as
adequate building sites and sold on a cost development basis to families eligible for low and
very low income loans, cooperatives, and broadly based nonprofit rural rental housing
applicants.

Loans may be used for the purchase and development of adequate sites, including necessary
equipment which becomes a permanent part of the development; for water and sewer
facilities if not available; payment of necessary engineering, legal fees, and closing costs; for
needed landscaping and other necessary facilities related to buildings such as walks, parking
areas, and driveways.

Rural Rental Housing Guaranteed Loans
This program has been designed to increase the supply of affordable multifamily housing
through partnerships between RHS and major lending sources, as well as State and local
housing finance agencies and bond insurers. The program provides effective new forms of
Federal credit enhancement for the development of affordable multifamily housing by
lenders.

The guarantee will encourage the construction of new rural rental housing and appropria te
related facilities. Housing as a general rule will consist of multi- units with two or more
family units. The guarantee may not be made for nursing, special care or industrial type


                                               91
                                         Housing
                                           Affordable
housing. Tenant income cannot exceed 115% of area median income, adjusted for family
size. Other conditions apply.

Rural Rental Housing Loans
The purpose of this program is to provide economically designed and constructed rental and
cooperative housing and related facilities suited for rural residents. Loans can be used to
construct, or to purchase and substantially rehabilitate rental or cooperative housing or to
develop manufactured housing projects. The housing is for families and individuals with
very low, low and moderate incomes and may include persons age 62 or over. The
maximum level for occupancy will be established by USDA Rural Development.

Housing as a general rule will consist of multi- units with two or more family units and any
appropriately related facilities. Funds may also be used to provide approved recreational and
service facilities appropriate for use in connection with the housing and to buy and improve
the land on which the buildings are to be located. Loans may not be made for nursing, special
care, or institutional-type homes. Other conditions apply

InterLakes Community Action (ICAP)/USDA Rural Development’s Self- Help Housing
Through a grant from USDA Rural Development, ICAP provides the technical assistance and
supervision for a group of families, generally 4-5 families, to build a house. Financing for
the cost of materials and trade labor is provided by USDA Rural Development in the form of
a low- interest loan to each family. Construction takes 6-8 months. Income limits apply.

Federal Home Loan Bank:
The Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines (FHLBDM) dedicates 10 percent of net
income to the Affordable Housing Program (AHP). Through this program, FHLBDM
member financial institutions may apply on behalf of Private Businesses, Non Profits,
Municipalities, Tribes and other organizations for grant funding to develop affordable
housing projects. A list of South Dakota's FHLBDM member institutions is available on the
FHLBDM web site.

Housing Assistance Council:
HAC Loan Program provides low- interest loans to finance affordable and mixed-income
housing projects in rural communities nationwide. Loans are available to support projects at
all stages in the development process, from predevelopment through construction. Financing
is available for single- and multi- family housing, with various forms of ownership (including
cooperatives and condominiums) and using traditional and alternative models of land tenure
(including land held in trust).

Loan funds may be used for predevelopment, acquisition, site development and construction.
HAC also makes loans for (1) bridging tax credit proceeds or other financing compensating
deposits to leverage commercial bank financing; (2) acquisition and predevelopment lines of
credit; (3) developing potable water and sanitation services (easements, purchasing water
rights, legal expenses to establish utility districts, bonding, interim financing of local share
costs, emergency repairs of existing systems, etc.; (4) working capital; and (5) construction
bonds.



                                               92
                                          Housing
                                            Affordable




US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD):
Housing Counseling Grants; Rural Housing and Economic Development Grants; Supportive
Housing for the Elderly Program; Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities; Youth
Build.

Tax Increment Financing:
The city can consider creating a tax increment financing (―TIF‖) district to enhance and
support development of new housing or a subdivision. TIF districts have been utilized for
housing development within other rural communities in South Dakota. TIF is a method of
financing improvements and development in the district which has been determined to be
blighted. The first step is to determine the ―base evaluation‖ of the district. The ―base
evaluation‖ is the assessed value of a district determined by the South Dakota Department of
Revenue at the time the district is created by the city administration. As the property taxes
for the property are paid, those portions of the taxes paid on the ―base evaluation‖ continue to
go to those entities (City, County, School, etc.) which levy property taxes. In succeeding
years when the assessed valuation of the district increases, the total property taxes paid by the
owners of the property in the district will increase accordingly. That increase in taxable
valuation is the ―increment.‖ When the tax bills are paid, only that portion of the tax bill,
which results from the ―base valuation,‖ is paid to the taxing entities. The remainder of the
tax bill, known as the Tax Increment, is deposited in a special fund. There must be a plan
that determines how these accumulated funds will be used. It should be noted that based on
statute, an additional tax is levied against all property within the School District’s jurisdiction
to make up for the School District’s share of the increment. Thus the School District
continues to receive tax revenue based on the full valuation of the property within the district.
A TIF district was utilized in Aberdeen, SD as part of a housing project developed by HAPI,
a nonprofit organization. Contact information is listed in the resources section. The South
Dakota Municipal League should also be able to provide information about TIF districts.

Fannie Mae
Fannie Mae has a community development division called the American Communities Fund
(―ACF‖). The funds can be made available to a municipality or other governmental entity to
support housing development in the community. The financing is provided in the form of a
short term (3-5 years) interest bearing loan or line of credit, repayment of which is
guaranteed by the municipality’s general fund. The municipality can re- lend the money to
developers, or can use it directly to support housing development in the community.

Essential Function Bonds:
ESF’s are used by communities that declare an essential need according to South Dakota law,
to develop housing for those who do not qualify for eligibility criteria of other federal and
state programs. The City of Mobridge has successfully used Essential Function Bonds to
construct town homes with garages that have appealed to older res idents, although they are




                                                93
                                        Housing
                                          Affordable
open to anyone. The local housing authority manages the units for the developer; they are
not low- income units. They are open to any family interested in renting.

For full information on each of these programs, contact the various assistance providers (see
contact information below) or for a short overview of the programs, you can go to
www.sdcommunitynetwork.com and click on Financial Resources, Housing Development
section. Most of these various programs specifically address affordable single- family and
multi- family housing rather than mid or upper level housing.

Resources:

Federal Home Loan Bank
907 Walnut Street
Des Moines, IA 50309
800-544-3452
www.fhlbdm.com

US Department of Housing and Urban Development
2400 West 49th Street, Suite I-201
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
Phone: 605-330-4223
www.hud.gov/southdakota

USDA Rural Development
810 Jensen Ave SE, Ste 2
Watertown, SD 57201
Phone: 605-886-8202, Ext 4
Fax 605-882-3268
E- mail: Darlene.Bresson@sd.usda.gov
www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd/

South Dakota Housing Development Authority
PO Box 1237
221 South Central Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-773-3181
Fax: 605-773-5157
www.sdhda.org

Fannie Mae’s American Communities Fund
South Dakota Partnership Office
101 N. Main, Suite 309
Sioux Falls, SD 57104
Phone: 605-782-2540
www.fanniemae.com




                                              94
                                          Housing
                                            Low Income


  Resources: Continued

  South Dakota Municipal League
  214 E. Capitol Ave.
  Pierre, SD 57501
  Phone: 605-224-8654
  Fax: 605-224-8655
  www.sdmunicipalleague.org
  yvonne@sdmunicipalleague.org

  Homes Are Possible, Inc. (―HAPI‖)
  Lea Amdahl, Executive Director
  P. O. Box 1972
  Aberdeen, SD 57402
  Phone: 605-225-4274
  Fax: 605-226-3217
  www.homesarepossible.org
  hapi@nvc.net

  Plankinton Community Development Company
  PO Box 482
  Plankinton, SD 57368-0482

  Todd Meierhenry, Counsel
  (Has provided bond counsel services for many Essential Function Bond transactions and Tax
  Increment Financing)
  Danforth, Meierhenry & Meierhenry
  315 So. Phillips Avenue
  Sioux Falls, SD 57102
  605-336-3075
  todd@meierhenrylaw.com



SUB THEME:        Low Income



  Challenge: Financing programs to assist low income families in purchasing a home.

  Recommendation: Housing may be one of the most important aspects of economic
  development, not to mention the wealth building potential for the individual homeowner.
  When an industry looks at your community for a possible relocation or start up, or a current
  company wants to expand, one of the first questions asked is, ―Is there housing available for
  my employees?‖ Clear Lake should assess what housing is available for young families that
  may be interested in relocating to the community for employment.


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                                         Housing
                                          Low Income


The city might want to consider hosting a home ownership (and Home Rehabilitation) forum
for the community. Set up booths/tables (possibly at the Community Center) so that
attendees can visit one-on-one with the resource people in attendance. USDA Rural
Development has helped to coordinate these events for communities. It will help low-income
families to learn of the resource that are available to buy or build a home.

You can also help this process along by making sure that this information is available to
potential homebuyers at several places (i.e. from the bank, city office, realtors, etc). Having
a short and concise publication about these various financing alternatives readily available to
potential homeowners will assist them. A few of these programs are listed below. Again, for
more detailed information on each of these financing sources, you can contact the various
sources directly.

South Dakota Housing Development Authority (SDHDA):

   1. First Time Home Buyers Program – This program provides below-market fixed
      interest rate mortgage loans for applicants who have never owned a home or have not
      owned a home for 3 years. The current interest rate is 5.125% or 4.125%, step rate.
      With the step rate interest, the interest rate starts at 4.125% for the first year. It
      increases ½% each year for four years, when it reaches 6.125%. The interest rate
      remains at 6.125% for the balance of the 30-year term. This program is available
      through local banks.

   2. Down Payment Assistance Programs:
            1. Employer Mortgage Assistance Program (EMAP) – Works with
               employers to provide funds for down payment and closing cost assistance
               to their employees through low- interest second mortgages.

               2. Loan Assistance Program (LAP) – provides down payment, closing cost
                  and gap financing in connection with a home purchase.

               3. American Dream Down payment Initiative (ADDI) – provides 6% of the
                  purchase price (up to $10,000), for down payment and closing costs
                  assistance. No monthly payments are required and no interest is charged.
                  The funds will be repaid when the house is sold.

   USDA Rural Development:

   1. The 502 Direct Loan program is designed to make loans to buy an existing home,
      build a house, buy a Governor’s house, or make improvements to a home already
      owned. They are made available to people with very low or low incomes. Loans are
      made for 100% of the appraised value with a repayment period of 33 years. The
      interest on the loan could be subsidized to as low as 1% based on household income.




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                                        Housing
                                         Low Income
   2. The Guaranteed Rural Housing Loan is similar to the Direct 502 except that the
      applicant obtains a loan from a commercial lender and USDA guarantees it. This
      loan can also be made for 100% of the appraised value. Many times, these loans will
      be purchased by South Dakota Housing Development Authority, which results in a
      lower interest rate to the borrower.

   FHA:

   1. Insured mortgages for single family to four-family homes made through local banks.
      3% to 5% down payment is required as well as Private Mortgage Insurance for low-
      equity financing.

   Veterans Administration:

   1. Home Loan Guaranty – Home loan guarantees for veterans, certain service personnel
      and unmarried surviving spouses.

   2. Home Ownership Assistance Program (HOAP) offers $4,000 forgivable loan for
      income eligible home buyers. Loan funds can be used for closing costs or down
      payment assistance (if needed). If buying an existing house, at least $1,000 must be
      used for repairs. The loan if forgiven after 5 years if the home owner continues to
      own the home; the loan is forgiven 1/60 th each month. If the house is sold, the loan is
      pro-rated for the time that the home has been owned. To qualify, the applica nt must
      take a home buyer education class, provided by HOAP. Their website:
      www.hoap.info

Home Buyer Education classes are also available through Consumer Credit Counseling
Services of Watertown. They have Home Buyer Education seminars monthly. Check the
schedules on their website at www.lsssd.org

Resources:
South Dakota Housing Development Authority
PO Box 1237
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605/773-3181
Website: www.sdhda.org

USDA Rural Development
Darlene Bresson, RD Manager
810 Jensen Ave SE, Ste 2
Watertown, SD 57201
Phone: 605/886-8202, Ext 4
Website: www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd




                                             97
                                           Housing
                                           Rehabilitation


   Resources: Continued

   FHA and VA programs are available through your local mortgage lender.

   Home Ownership Assistance Program
   Mary Ann Schroeder, Exe Director
   1424 9th Ave SE
   Watertown, SD 57210
   Phone: 605/882-5336

   Consumer Credit Counseling Services – Lutheran Social Services
   1424 9th Ave SE, Ste 7
   Cedar Square
   Watertown, SD 57201
   Phone: 605/882-222




SUB THEME:      Rehabilitation



   Challenge: Housing rehabilitation involves more than just painting a home or cleaning up
   the yard. There may be families in town that need assistance with either minor or major
   repairs on their homes, including roofs, heating systems, window replacements, plumbing,
   etc. These repairs may be costly and beyond the reach of some homeowners, particularly the
   elderly on fixed incomes. Such repairs, however, will allow residents to remain in their
   homes longer, and will maintain the housing stock in town for future residents.

   Recommendation: There are a number of programs available on a wide range of topics that
   may be used for home repairs. Again, it would be helpful to develop a list of available home
   improvement resources and their terms and distribute the information to residents/owners of
   the property.

   Another option is to host a housing rehabilitation forum and invite sponsors of various
   programs to present basic information about their programs and how community residents
   can access them. This could be done in conjunction with a home ownership forum
   mentioned in the previous section, and integrated into a single session.

   Some of the programs you may wish to highlight include:

      1. USDA – Rural Development
          The Section 504 Rural Home Repair Loan & Grant Program is available to assist
           eligible very low- income homeowners make repairs to their homes. Repairs can
           be made to improve or modernize the home, to make it safe, sanitary, or to


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                                    Housing
                                     Rehabilitation
       remove health and safety hazards. Rates and terms are 1% with up to 20 years to
       repay the loan. Grants are available only for repairs that remove health or safety
       hazards. Applicants for the grants must be at least age 62.
      The Direct 502 Housing Program is available to eligible Very Low and Low
       income families to repair or improve their homes. This is a program with interest
       rates as low as 1%, depending on household income. Loans may be made for
       100% of the appraisal with a maximum 33 year term.

2. South Dakota Housing Development Authority (SDHDA)
    SDHDA together with various banks throughout the state has a Community Home
      Improvement Program or CHIP. The program provides low interest loans (1.9%,
      3.9% or 5.9%) to income eligible owners for repairs or improvements to their
      single family residence. The interest rate depends on the family income with a 7
      year repayment term.
    HOME Homeowner Rehab Program – provides funds for rehabilitation of
      affordable housing in conjunction with the weatherization program to ensure that
      needed repair items that cannot be financed with weatherization funds are
      addressed. The funds are available to eligible persons / families on a zero-
      interest, five year decreasing balance loan. Funds can be used for accessibility
      modifications for persons with disabilities, in addition to making necessary
      repairs for health, safety, and code compliance. This pro gram is administered by
      InterLakes Community Action Program (ICAP).
    HOME Program – developers can apply for funding to purchase and rehab single
      family homes that can be either sold or rented to low income households.
    Paint-South Dakota Program – Provides paint and supplies to community-based
      organization to paint one house in the community. The application for these funds
      is generally announced in January or February and the homes are painted in June.

3. InterLakes Community Action Program (ICAP) Energy Assistance and
   Weatherization. The Weatherization program helps low- income South Dakota
   households overcome the high cost of energy by making their homes more energy
   efficient. It can be used to repair/replace windows, do weather stripping and
   caulking, and additional energy efficient items. This program is limited to energy
   conservation type items like insulation, windows, furnaces, and wiring. No cosmetic
   repairs are available under this program.

4. InterLakes Community Action (ICAP) Self Help Rehab. ICAP provides technical
   assistance so homeowners, with the assistance of family or friends, can make repairs
   themselves. Material funding is available through USDA Rural Development,
   HOME funds, or a CHIP loan.

5. Opportunities for Independent Living offers assistance for people with disabilities to
   allow them to live independently. They have funding available to help families make
   accommodations in their homes for disabled family members. Funds can help build
   ramps, widen doors, add grab bars, and other needed features.



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                                    Housing
                                     Rehabilitation
6. FHA insured loans - HUD offers a number of home loans, available through
   participating lenders, to help homeowners repair their homes.
    HUD’s 203K loan requires a minimum of $5000 worth of basic repairs to be done
       on the home. Such repairs can include basic systems such as water, heating,
       electrical, and roofs. The 203K loan requires the owner to refinance into this
       loan, and allows additional expenses beyond the appraised value for these repairs.
       For more information, their website is
       http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/203k/203kabou.cfm
    FHA Title I loans may be used to finance permanent property improvements that
       protect or improve the basic livability or utility of the property--including
       manufactured homes, single- family and multifamily homes, nonresidential
       structures, and the preservation of historic homes. The maximum loan amount is
       $25,000 and the term may go up to 20 years.
    Reverse Mortgages. Homeowners 62 and older who have paid off their
       mortgages or have only small mortgage balances remaining are eligible to
       participate in HUD's reverse mortgage program. The program allows homeowners
       to borrow against the equity in their homes, and use it as a line of credit to not
       only do home repairs, but also use as a source of income fo r living expenses or
       other items. There are no loan repayments made until the homeowner no longer
       lives in the home. At that point the home is sold, and the loan repaid to the
       lender. The homeowner is never responsible to pay any more than the house is
       worth.

7. Veterans Administration offers Specially Adapted Housing for Disabled Veterans –
   Help certain severely disabled veterans acquire a home which is suitably adapted or
   to purchase equipment to adapt a current home to meet the special needs of the
   individual.

8. Another program worth consideration is Youthworks. Youthworks is a Christian
   based ministry that will come to your community for free as a non-denominational
   youth ministry and may do various painting and rehabilitation projects, facilitate a
   Kids Club program or partner with other organizations, working to meet community
   needs. Youthworks firmly believes there is a need for people to have their homes
   painted and rehabilitated; a need for children to learn about the Bible through music,
   stories and games; and a need to serve existing community ministries. We know that
   paint on houses will eventually chip off, and that stories and games may be forgotten
   in time, but the relationships you develop with community members will create a
   vehicle for ministry to occur for a long time in the future.



   Youthworks was invited to assist in Bennett, Jackson, and Shannon Counties by
   Badlands RC&D and the residents have been excited about the positive changes and
   results that Youthworks has brought not only to the b uildings but to the people in the
   many areas they serve!



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                                       Housing
                                       Rehabilitation
       For more information on how Youthworks please contact Badlands RC&D or
       Youthworks. The contact information is listed in the Resources below.
Resources:

USDA Rural Development
Darlene Bresson, RD Manager
810 Jensen Ave SE, Ste 2
Watertown, SD 57201
Phone: 605/886-8202, Ext 4
Website: www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd

South Dakota Housing Development Authority
PO Box 1237
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605/773-3181
Website: www.sdhda.org

InterLakes Community Action Program (ICAP) – Weatherization Program
Terry Olson, Weatherization Coordinator
111 N Van Eps Ave
Madison, SD 57042
605-256-6518

ICAP Self Help Rehab
Dana Whitehouse
619 5th Ave
Brookings, SD 57006
605-692-6391

Opportunities for Independent Living
316 E Kemp
Watertown, SD 57201
605-882-5249

US Department of Housing and Urban Development
2400 West 49th Street, Suite I-201
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
Phone: 605-330-4223
www.hud.gov/southdakota




                                           101
                                             Housing
                                              Spec Housing


      Resources: Continued

      U.S Department of Veterans Affairs
      VA Regional Loan Center
      1 Federal Drive
      St. Paul, MN 55111-4050
      800-827-0611
      www.vba.va.gov/rostpaul.htm

      YouthWorks, Inc.
      3530 East 28th Street
      Minneapolis, MN 55406
      phone: 612.729.5444
      toll- free: 800.968.8504
      fax: 612.729.4113

      YouthWorks Service Center
      servicecenter@youthworks.com
      www.youthworks.com




SUB THEME:         Spec Housing

      Challenge: To provide readily available, affordable housing for new people moving to the
      community.

      Recommendation: Building spec houses involves some risk, but can also provide rewards
      by having houses available when people are considering moving to Clear Lake.

 1.      One program that has been used by several communities involves the Governor’s house.
         Non-profit organizations can obtain a Governor’s house and will receive a year to pay for
         it – or until it’s sold to an eligible family. Several communities have used this option,
         including Homes Are Possible Inc (HAPI) in Aberdeen and Prairieland Housing (with
         Planning and Development District III, based in Yankton) to build homes in Plankinton,
         Alexandria, and Emery. Prairieland Housing is taking the lead as developer for these
         housing units. Communities donate or sell the lots to Prairieland. A Governor’s Home is
         placed on the lot and turned into a split level home with a garage added. If you went by
         these homes, you would barely recognize them as Governors Homes. These homes are
         then put up for sale at a price ranging from about $88,000 to $100,000. Residents
         looking to purchase these homes, however, must meet certain income requirements set by
         the Governors Home Program through SDHDA.




                                                  102
                                              Housing
                                               Spec Housing
2.      The city can consider creating a tax increment financing (―TIF‖) district to enhance and
        support development of new housing or a subdivision. TIF districts have been utilized
        for housing development within other rural communities in South Dakota. TIF is a
        method of financing improvements and development in the district which has been
        determined to be blighted. The first step is to determine the ―base evaluation‖ of the
        district. The ―base evaluation‖ is the assessed value of a district determined by the South
        Dakota Department of Revenue at the time the district is created by the city
        administration. As the property taxes for the property are paid, those portions of the
        taxes paid on the ―base evaluation‖ continue to go to those entities (City, County, School,
        etc.) which levy property taxes. In succeeding years when the assessed valuation of the
        district increases, the total property taxes paid by the owners of the property in the district
        will increase accordingly. That increase in taxable valuation is the ―increment.‖ When
        the tax bills are paid, only that portion of the tax bill, which results from the ―base
        valuation,‖ is paid to the taxing entities. The remainder of the tax bill, known as the Tax
        Increment, is deposited in a special fund. There must be a plan that determines how these
        accumulated funds will be used. It should be noted that based on statute, an additional
        tax is levied against all property within the School District’s jurisdiction to make up for
        the School District’s share of the increment. Thus the School District continues to
        receive tax revenue based on the full valuation of the property within the district. A TIF
        district was utilized in Aberdeen, SD as part of a housing project developed by HAPI, a
        nonprofit organization. Contact information is listed in the resources section. The South
        Dakota Municipal League should also be able to provide information about TIF districts.

3.      Another option would be for the ag program at school to build homes. This program
        could be modeled after the program in Elkton, which has used three different methods:

           To build a home for a particular person. In this case, the party buys all materials and
            they are charged $6.75/sq. ft. for labor. All materials must be purchased locally,
            which works well for every part of the economy. The electrical and plumbing is also
            done locally.
           To build a spec house using school funds. After it is completed, an auction would be
            held and whatever is left over from production cost would go to the FFA program.
            This usually comes out to be a better deal for the FFA program than the first option.
           To build the home for the local economic development corporation, who in turn sells
            it to someone.

     According to Dennis Brenden, Ag Ed program director for Elkton, this project is great for
     both the community and the school. They have added about $1,000,000 to the tax base in
     Elkton over the years. The kids love it and the parents love it even more. They usually make
     $12,000 to $20,000 per year building these houses, and they use those funds for all their FFA
     activities and to buy equipment, etc. for the Ag Ed Program. The problem is getting someone
     willing to take on the project – as it is a huge undertaking. There may be someone in Clear
     Lake willing to supervise the project, if those in charge of the Ag Ed program don’t feel
     comfortable taking it on by themselves.




                                                   103
                                          Housing
                                           Spec Housing
4. The SDHDA administers a HUD program that offers ―HOME‖ funds. This funding may be
   used for site acquisition and infrastructure development for housing projects. The funds
   must be repaid, but can be an excellent source of capital investment to get a project going.

5. USDA Rural Development’s Sec. 524 Site Development loan is made to public or private
   non-profit organizations to buy and develop building sites. The current interest rate is 6%
   and the term is for 2 years – or when the house is sold, whichever occurs first.

6. Fannie Mae has a community development division called the American Communities Fund
    (―ACF‖). The funds can be made available to a municipality or other governmental entity
    to support housing development in the community. The financing is provided in the form o f
    a short term (3-5 years) interest bearing loan or line of credit, repayment of which is
    guaranteed by the municipality’s general fund. The municipality can re- lend the money to
   developers, or can use it directly to support housing development in the community.

 Resources:

 Governor’s Houses
 Jim Becker
 NESDEC/NESDCAP
 414 3rd Avenue East
 Sisseton, SD 57262
 605-698-7654

 South Dakota Municipal League
 214 E. Capitol Ave.
 Pierre, SD 57501
 Phone: 605-224-8654
 Fax: 605-224-8655
 www.sdmunicipalleague.org
 yvonne@sdmunicipalleague.org

 Todd Meierhenry, Counsel
 (Has provided bond counsel services for many Essential Function Bond transactions and Tax
 Increment Financing)
 Danforth, Meierhenry & Meierhenry
 315 So. Phillips Avenue
 Sioux Falls, SD 57102
 605-336-3075
 todd@meierhenrylaw.com

 Dennis Brenden
 Ag Ed Program
 Elkton High School
 dennis.brenden@k12.sd.us




                                               104
                                          Housing
                                          Assisted Living
  Resources: Continued

  USDA Rural Development
  Darlene Bresson, RD Manager
  810 Jensen Ave SE, Ste 2
  Watertown, SD 57201
  Phone: 605/886-8202, Ext 4
  Website: www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd

  South Dakota Housing Development Authority
  PO Box 1237
  Pierre, SD 57501
  Phone: 605/773-3181
  Website: www.sdhda.org

  Fannie Mae’s American Communities Fund
  South Dakota Partnership Office
  101 N. Main, Suite 309
  Sioux Falls, SD 57104
  Phone: 605-782-2540
  www.fanniemae.com




SUB THEME:        Assisted Living



  Challenge:     1) Develop additional assisted living facilities to meet demand

  Recommendation:

   Assisted Living:
  Assessing the need for assisted living is the first step to determine if there is sufficient
  demand to merit a separate or expanded assisted living facility. A taskforce could be
  developed to further research the issue and make recommendations to community leaders and
  local government. Be sure the taskforce includes elderly individuals and those involved in
  elder care in the community, particularly Hidewood management.

  Another option to consider would be a congregate living facility. The benefit of this option
  is that it may open up some more homes in your community as these elderly residents
  relocate and make their previous homes available. This type a facility might qualify to take
  advantage of USDA’s Community Facility loan program. You would need to clarify this
  further with USDA Rural Development. There is also a program through HUD, called the


                                               105
                                          Housing
                                          Assisted Living
Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program, which helps to expand the supply of affordable
housing with supportive services for the elderly. It provides capital advances to finance the
construction or acquisition and rehabilitation of structures that serve as supportive housing
for the very low-income elderly persons and provides rent subsidies for the projects to help
make them affordable.

Two funding program available to assist in developing assisted living are HUD’s Assisted
Living Conversion program and also USDA’s Community Facilities Program. The Assisted
Living Conversion Program provides private, nonprofit owners of eligible developments with
a grant to convert some or all of the dwelling units in the project into an Assisted Living
Facility (ALF) for the elderly. The facility must be lice nsed and regulated by the State.

There must be sufficient community space to accommodate a central kitchen or dining
facility, lounges, recreation and other multiple-areas available to all residents of the project,
or office/staff spaces in the ALF. Funding for the supportive services must be provided by
the owners, either directly or through a third party, such as Medicaid, SSI payments, State or
Area Agency on Aging, etc.

Resources:

Assisted Living:
Department of Housing and Urban Development- Assisted Living Conversion Program
2400 West 49th Street Suite I-201
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57105
Phone: 605-330-4223
Fax: 605-330-4465
http://www.hud.gov/local/index.cfm?state=sd

USDA Rural Development
810 Jenson Avenue, SE, Suite 2
Watertown, SD 57201-5256
605-886-8202
www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd




                                               106
                                              Other
                                               Daycare




                                        OTHER
SUB THEME:       Daycare


   Challenge: Although regular, full- time daycare seemed to be adequate in Clear Lake, there
   is a need for part-time and temporary daycare, as well as evening and weekend care.

   Recommendation: The first step in resolving this issue is to identify the specific needs.
   The current daycare providers can assist in identifying the needs, along with a survey of the
   community.

   Questions such as the following could be asked:
           Is your family in need of daycare?
           How many hours a week do you need daycare?
           Are you in need of evening or weekend daycare?
           If you are currently taking your children outside of Clear Lake for daycare, would
              you consider using a provider in Clear Lake if there was one available?
           Is the lack of daycare keeping you from working outside the home?
           Do you need financial assistance in paying for daycare?

   Once the need is identified, then you need to decide how it will be met. Perhaps one or more
   of the current daycare providers would be willing to offer part-time or non-traditional hours,
   if it’s economically feasible. Possibly for evening and weekend hours youth could assist –
   either as an assistant for an adult provider or as an in- home provider. Again, survey the
   youth to determine the number interested, and then provide a training session for them. This
   could resolve two concerns – providing daycare and providing jobs for your youth so they
   don’t have to go out of town for work.

   Two resources that could be utilized in this process is the Head Start program and the after-
   school program offered by the Clear Lake School.

   Other ideas for non-traditional daycare:
             Parent Babysitting Cooperative involves a group of families sharing child care.
              Instead of money, ―points‖ are assigned for services based on number of children,
              hours of care, etc. Everyone in the co-op must follow agreed upon guidelines and
              share the record keeping responsibilities.
             Play Group is similar to co-op babysitting. Parents take turns providing activities
              with a group of children, including their own. Most play groups meet once or
              twice a week for two to three hours. This arrangement can free the parent’s time,
              as well as provide playmates for their children.


                                                107
                                            Other
                                             Daycare
          Retired people may be interested in working with children and have the sort of
           scheduling freedom that could meet these needs.

Because operational costs, such as wages, food, utilities, etc., absorb what you will be ab le to
charge in childcare fees, it would be difficult to build a new facility for part-time or non-
traditional hours daycare. Therefore, it’s best if you can use the resources already available.

Some possible sources of assistance:

          Dept of Social Services – Child Care Services. Responsibilities include:
              o Funding and technical assistance for Out-of-School Time programs.
              o Child care facility development in response to local community needs.
              o Health & safety continuous grant funding cycle to help child care
                  programs meet licensing requirements.
              o Direct child care assistance payments for qualifying families
              o Training and education.
              o Licensing and registration of child care programs.
              o Website: http://dss.sd.gov/childcare/

          First Children’s Finance – provides loans and technical assistance for child care
           and early education providers. Loans may be used to:
               o Expand or start child care and early education businesses – in homes,
                   centers and schools.
               o Improve the quality of facilities – new buildings, additions, remodeling
                   and upgrades
               o Purchase supplies and equipment – toys, computers, playgrounds, child-
                   friendly furnishings…
               o Fulfill licensing requirements – egress windows, fences, bathrooms…
               o Help manage cash flow
               o Strengthen and grow child care businesses
               o Website: www.dcc-corner.com/

          The National Child Care Information Center (NCCIC) provides comprehensive
           information on fundraising, financing from Federal Funding sources, National
           organizations with child care funding information, and foundation and private
           funding. Their website is: http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov/poptopics/funding-
           opportunities.html

          USDA Rural Development’s Community Facilities program provides low-interest
           loans to non-profit or City governments to build, enlarge, or remodel daycare
           facilities. The website is: http://rurdev.usda.gov. or call the Watertown office at
           605/886-8202, ext 4.




                                              108
                                        Other
                                         Daycare
          South Dakota Housing Development Authority markets small, ranch style homes,
           ―Governor’s house,‖ which can easily be converted to a daycare. Their website
           is: www.sdhda.org or call Paul Kostboth, Director of the Governor’s House at
           605/773-2466.

Resources:

South Dakota Department of Social Services-Child Care Services
Technical Assistance, Funding, Licensing and Education
Out of School Time Programs
Rosemary Hayward, Program Specialist
700 Governors Drive
Pierre, SD 57501
605-773-4766
http://www.state.sd.us/social/CCS/CCShome.htm

South Dakota Department of Education-Child and Adult Nutrition
Child Care Food Programs, Funding
Melissa Halling, Education Program Specialist
700 Governors Drive
Pierre, SD 57501
605-773-3566
http://doe.sd.gov/oess/cans/index.asp

National Child Care Information Center
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
243 Church Street, NW 2nd Floor
Vienna, Virginia 22180
800-616-2242
http://nccic.org/
http://nccic.org/poptopics/starting.html

For facility financing:
South Dakota Housing Development Authority
Governor’s House Daycare Program
http://www.sdhda.org/Homebuyer/gh_daycare.htm

For a Governor’s House in Deuel County, contact:
Jim Becker
NESDEC/NESDCAP
414 3rd Ave E
Sisseton, SD 57262
605-698-7654




                                          109
                                             Other
                                              Attitudes
  Resources: Continued

  USDA Rural Development
  810 Jensen Ave SE, Suite 2
  Watertown, SD 57201
  605-886-8202, Ext 4
  www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd
  e-mail: Darlene.Bresson@sd.usda.gov

  Rural Electric Economic Development, Inc.
  Matt Hotzler
  H-D Electric Cooperative
  423 3rd Ave
  Clear Lake, SD 57226
  Phone 874.2171
  www.eastriver.coop/About_East_River/Partnerships_Alliances/REED.htm




SUB THEME:        Attitudes


  Challenge: Keeping and promoting positive attitudes in Clear Lake so that the community
  members can work together effectively. Winston Churchill said, ―Attitude is a little thing
  that makes a big difference.‖ This will prove to be true as you move forward to the action
  and planning portions of this community assessment process.

  Recommendation: The fact that Clear Lake actively participated in an assessment in such
  high numbers speaks volumes for the community. The good news is the residents of Clear
  Lake repeatedly said the people are their greatest asset. It’s also important to show
  newcomers to the community the kindness of Clear Lake’s citizens. If people feel welcome
  they are going to be involved and return to Clear Lake. Friendly needs to be applied beyond
  immediate family, relatives, and traditional groups. Get to know the people in your
  community, talk to people wherever you go. This will make people feel more welcome in
  the community and consequently they will be more inclined to become involved.

  Priority-setting and having a vision for the future are important. As you begin to select
  community priorities, be sure to involve as many citizens as possible. If citizens are active in
  prioritizing community projects, leadership and volunteerism will increase and attitudes will
  improve. Throughout this process it is important to keep the lines of communications open
  to foster a positive and safe environment for working. As leaders in the community it is your
  duty to utilize the individual talents of volunteers, and recruit new volunteers, and keep the
  communication lines open. As community volunteers it is your responsibility to voice your
  opinions and ideas to the people in charge and discuss issues as they arise. Many projects
  start out strong and quickly run out of steam. Everyone needs a reminder and revival of the


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reasons they started a project and the energy they had at the commencement. Every person
can play a vital role in keeping up the morale throughout the process and don’t forget to let
the community know what has been accomplished through the volunteers work, publish
articles in the local newspaper giving credit where credit is due.

There is a poster I hang up on my desk that was given to me by a great leader. This leader
was the director of an organization I worked for where staff morale was always high and
everyone I knew worked really hard and worked together. I want to share this motivational
poster with you because I believe it can be a source of morale throughout your work. This is
one example of something you can share with volunteers to boost spirit and reinvigorate their
spirit of service throughout the projects implementation.

           Life Lessons: How to be an idealistic leader and create positive change.

    Strive to be DELIGHTFUL! People who constantly exceed expectations are not only
                     delightful; they are ALWAYS the most successful.

   ENERGIZE those in your presence. Positive energy creates positive energy. Almost
 anyone can identify problems and weaknesses, learn to identify so lutions and take positive
                                        action.

   Keep your EYES ON THE PRIZE. Remember your community. Results matter more
   than anything else. You many never have another opportunity to do such meaningful
                                        work.

  CHALLENGE CYNICISM wherever you encounter it. You must have faith that positive
  change is possible, and actively work to make it happen. Never, ever doubt that you can
                                   help change the world.

         MOCCASIN the lives of others. Imagine life in someone else’s moccasins.

     Learn to be GRATEFUL. No one in this world makes it on her or his own. Seek
  opportunities to express gratitude. Always thank people, and remember that hundreds of
      people have given time, money and other resources to make our work possible.

 HAVE FUN! Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be. Attitude
                  is everything. Decide to laugh and be happy.


Once the assessment results have been put into action by the community, it is important to
keep the community updated on the plans and progress of those plans. Continually post
progress reports in the local paper and on the radio. Talk about what is going on with your
projects frequently at the grocery store, sporting events or wherever you have the
opportunity. This will give people an idea of what is going on and possibly prompt action
among more community members.



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  Finally, celebrate successes throughout and give credit where it is due. This recognition of
  accomplishments and hard work will continually revive the volunteer base. It is the sum of
  the parts of the project participants who will be successful in its completion. Remember the
  words of Voltaire, ―We are rarely proud when we are alone.‖




SUB THEME:        Main St. Revitalization / Beautification


  Challenge: To increase business activity and set in motion a beautification program on the
  Main Street of Clear Lake to make it an attractive destination.

  Recommendation: One of the first steps is to form a Main St. Action Committee consisting
  of Main Street business owners, the Commercial Club, and representatives from your many
  industries. This group will then strategize on what it would like to accomplish and set
  priorities and timelines to achieve those goals and make changes. This committee should
  also discuss what businesses or services are needed or would complement their business and
  how to recruit that business. Consider surveying the businesses of Clear Lake to see what
  their needs and issues are. An outside representative may best facilitate this so that it does
  not seem like a personal attack on any one particular business.

  Common Goals of Main St. Action Committees
     Attracting and recruiting new businesses
     Signage improvements
     Developing a Main Street theme
     Planting flowers
     Painting
     Cleaning of empty lots and seeding to grass or landscaping
     Lighting improvements
     Event planning
     Providing tax incentives for improvements
     Offering cost-share for clean- ups
     Developing shopping campaigns
     Improving window front displays
     Benches for people to sit on

  The Main Street Action Committee should also organize volunteers to help with the
  improvement efforts, youth or service organizations would be a good place to start. The
  committee should also begin planning community events like ice cream socials, band
  concerts, harvest festival, etc. downtown during the summer to bring people into the area (not
  just from Clear Lake, but surrounding communities as well) for entertainment and shopping.

  Currently, Planning and Development District III is providing information on main street
  revitalization, and would be a good first contact to begin improvements. They also have the


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capability to provide you with a visual picture of how improvements would look if
implemented on your Main Street. Following is a list of resources that may be able to assist
with Main Street beautification efforts:

Resources related to the rehabilitation of historic structures include:
    National Trust of Historic Preservation, National Main Street Program helps
       communities with commercial district revitalization. The National Main Street
       Center’s technical services group offers comprehensive revitalization program
       development assistance to downtowns of smaller cities and rural communities.
       Technical assistance includes areas such as organizing your program, economic
       development, preservation planning, marketing your commercial district, and small
       town programs.
    The State Historical Society’s Rehabilitation Tax credit program promotes the
       rehabilitation of historic buildings (built before 1936) by providing federal tax
       incentives based on the rehabilitation costs. Any work on the interior or exterior of
       the building qualifies for the tax credit. The South Dakota Legislature has also
       provided for certain property tax benefits for the rehabilitation of historic structures in
       SDCL-19A-20. If a historic building qualifies for the tax benefit, an eight-year
       moratorium is placed on the property tax assessment of certified improvements.
       Property tax assessments may not be increased due to certified rehabilitation of the
       building.
    Preserve South Dakota provides technical assistance services, in addition to various
       financial assistance programs such as the Historic Preservation Revolving Loan Fund
       and the Façade Easement Program.
    Also contact Chamber of Commerces and Main St. Action Committees around South
       Dakota to see what has worked for them.

Although these efforts will take time and resources, they will ultimately help to attract new
businesses and new customers to the downtown area, by giving the impression that existing
business owners care about their property and are customer oriented.

Resources:

Doris Roden
Downtown Brookings, Inc.
308 Fourth Street
Brookings, SD 57006-1918
Phone: 605-692-1554
jdroden@brookings.net

Main Street Center – National Trust for Historic Preservation
1785 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-588-6219
http://www.mainstreet.org/




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Resources: Continued

South Dakota State Historical Society
900 Governors Drive
Pierre, SD 57501-2217
Phone: 605-773-3458
Fax: 605-773-6041
sdshswebmaster@state.sd.us
www.sdhistory.org

Preserve South Dakota
PO Box 113
105 S. Pierre St.
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: 605-945-0409
info@preservesd.org
www.preservesd.org

Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED)
Contact: Steve Watson
2329 N. Career Ave.
Sioux Falls, SD 57107
Phone: 605-367-4518
Fax: 605-367-4519
Email: steve.watson@state.sd.us

Main Street Sioux Falls, Inc.
122 S Phillips Avenue, Suite 110
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57104
Phone: 605-338-4009

Planning and Development District III
1808 Summit Street, PO Box 687
Yankton, SD 57078
Ph: 605-665-4408 or 800-952-3562
Email: districtiii@districtiii.org

Spearfish Downtown Business Association
Sherin Neva – The Book Trader
605-622-6952
Cory Brost – Common Grounds
642-9066




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Resources: Continued

Vermillion Downtown Action Committee
Lori Whitman
DooWop Shake Shop
605-624-7077




                                          115
               LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                   Issues & Challenges

Responses to the Question: What are the major issues and challenges facing the
community of Clear Lake?

         Hear from youth, not much to do in the evenings.
         Need more activities to steer youth away from drinking, etc.
         CL is so close to Watertown and Brookings, business goes to bigger towns (2)
         Trying to deliver goods and services at competitive prices
         Keeping main street going (2)
         Population is moving from rural to urban
         Leased farm ground (to non-county/city residents)
         Lack of industrial development
         Need better paying, local jobs
         Surrounding communities are ―bedroom‖ towns to Watertown
         Need more value-added (wind power)
         City has large amount of debt that needs to be addressed
         Need building, park, infrastructure updates (2)
         Valuable lake property, but cost of development is prohibitive for city
         Lack of cooperation, common goals among community residents
         Negative attitudes impact good projects/future development
         Residents don’t know CL assets
         Maintaining population in Duel County (2)
         Keeping young people in CL
         Keeping young people involved in agriculture
         Challenge to find employees (low unemployment in county/state)
         Road is too close to lake, reduces property available to development
         Wealth is changing hands, migrating out of the area
         Communication between orgs
         Pass
         Day care issue not enough
         Pass
         Day care issues, its hard to find daycare
         Pass
          Have to go to other towns to find activities to do
         Need more communication between groups
         Need more activities for youth
         Ditto a place for youth to hang out
         Ditto
         Ditto
         Ditto
         Keep main st. flourishing
         Ditto
         Ditto, want to keep and support current businesses, we need to stay here and shop
          locally


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         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                               Issues & Challenges
   Our future, we need to shop locally to support our businesses so we don’t loose
    them
   We need more choices for taking quest out to eat
   Need to be loyal to our community and the businesses that are here
   Need more people to get involved instead of the same 10 people
   Main ST. businesses are needed
   Ditto
   More activity to keep youth here, and to make them stay here after they graduate,
    need to get them involved
   Need to spread the joy! Always the same 10 people volunteering , we need to
    attract more young families
   Businesses need to offer more, we need more variety
   Streets need to be improved
   Curb and gutter needs to be put in through out the community and sidewalks
   Underage drinking
   Not a lot of places to eat and shop
   Boredom
         o Ditto with kids
   Hospital lacking appropriate equipment
   Gossip,
   Lack of places to work
   Cops don’t to their jobs right
         o ditto
         o ditto
   Rundown buildings
   Lack of trade with other towns
   Community gathering functions
   Town is filthy
   Nothing to do
   Ditto, so everyone goes to Watertown
   Too many bars, need things
   Place for kids to hang out
   Support for arts programs
   Not enough Jobs for youth
         o ditto
   Too much support for sports, not enough for arts and music
   Lack of diversity
   Not open to new ideas
   Intimidated by growth
   Development is difficult do to low property values, and high infrastructure costs
   Worried about bringing in low level jobs, and fear of the costs involved in that
    work force, i.e. drinking
   Educate adults in community growth, and town problems
   No Small animal clinics


                                     117
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                               Issues & Challenges
   Fixing up city parks for younger children
   People are not taking care of their own homes, to improve the overall appearance
    of Clear Lake
   Poor response by police to accidents
   Worried about reaction time for EMTs
   Parents trying to live through their kids
   Road infrastructure
   Nothing to keep kids in Clear Lake after they grad uate
   Loss of gifted program
   Challenges for higher level students
   Activities for seniors and people who are alone, a group to get them together and
    be social, be with people, does not need to have age limit, for singles also
   Space for used furniture for people to donate
   Survival mentality of small community
   Motivation issues
   Need a vision, lack of a vision, do people know the vision? Does the community
    have a common vision
   Need to equip the people, community members to be leaders in the community
   Aging population, possibly declining church congregations
   Who is going to take care of the growing elderly population
   Declining class sizes, hard to bring in families
   Affordable housing
   Retail is struggling, need to be competitive
   Cannot keep doctors at the hospital
   Money from city to the hospital is an issue, not going to the nursing home also
   More city sales tax for heath care, cannot keep up with competitive wages which
    makes hiring tough at nursing home
   Need something to rally behind together
   All of the same volunteers and leaders are tapped over and over
   Fight for survival, use more industries
   Need to fill building on main st. (nine vacant buildings)
   Need more funding sources to meet foundation of the problems
   Attracting qualified personnel at the hospital, also need to replace retiring dentist,
    how do you attract a young dentist to Clear Lake? (2)
    No interest of younger people to carry on comm. Service organizations and
    politics
   Banking problems, recruiting qualified personnel, about half of good workers at
    the bank commute and do not participate in the community after bank hours
   Qualified personnel for ambulance, makes response time bad because most of
    them live out of town
   People don’t understand that bigger is not always better, the healthcare services
    here are quality and people need to know that
   Hispanics, no id, don’t have resources to meet their language needs
   More staff at sheriff dept, no compensation for overtime


                                       118
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                               Issues & Challenges
   SIGNAGE Four speed limit signs in town, need to be all one speed limit (one way
    you can go 5 MPH faster than the other way), warning signs for fire truck
    crossing to lessen danger (won’t cut Kelly a break if speeding HA)
   Volunteerism, younger ones (2)
   What are the young people looking for? We may not have what they need
   Need to keep existing businesses on main st.
   Have problems trying to stay on top of all state and federal regulations
   More stringent EMT tests will impact their ability to attract new EMT’s
   Don’t always have the ability to make good decisions because of limited funding
   Need more active citizens for law enforcement to get information from
   Need to stop feeling scared the hospital is going to close
   Decline in # of retail stores, people want to go to Watertown to buy
   Trying to keep up with larger towns, want to build an industrial park,
   Need to increase in sales to keep businesses open
   Need to finish drudging the lake, would like to have people build cabins along the
    lake
   Being able to keep the young people in the community, or have then come back
    after college (3)
   Tough to keep good workers when they can make more money in Watertown
   Main street is dying more everyday (3)
   Economic development, can’t stop at what has happened, need to continue to add
    businesses, diversity in manufacturing and telemarketing, retaining businesses
    that are here so young people can stay here
   Lake recreational property needs to be improved/developed
   No processing or their own products, they all have to go elsewhere to be
    processed
   Need more community involvement, people need to step forward to work to wards
    their ideas, need to agree to an overall plan (2)
   Get more homes and businesses, bad infrastructure if for a growing town
   Keep youth in town for weekend activities
   Set aside historical differences that have existed
   How farming does business has changed and need to catch up to that
   Not enough big fish in the lake! Ha
   Federal deficit, will effect us on a local level eventually, as a small community we
    need to be working with congressmen on a national level, fiscal responsibility
    need to come to rest with the community members
   Farm economy on a local level, need to keep up with and take advantage of those
    changes
   Younger families need to step up and invest in the community
   Leaders are getting close to retirement, who is going to replace these ―nitch‖
    people in the community?
   Need to change, in a global market
   ―need a good latte in Deuel county! someone needs to catch on that the rest of the
    world is keeping that good stuff‖



                                      119
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                               Issues & Challenges
   Trying to find qualified people to work for the businesses that are here, especially
    jobs that need professionals with high skills
   People want to do things for the community, but don’t have enough time in a day
   Don’t have any men’s clothing available for purchase in town ―sometimes my
    butt gets hungry and eats my shorts and there is no place in town for me to buy
    anything here anymore.‖
   Need to keep young families here and provide services they enjoy
   Electricity is one way of getting away from gas
   Main roads are problems
   Growth, manageable growth,
   Need optimism
   Need to see that everyone has different needs, most important thing is quality of
    life
   Underage consumption of alcohol
   Price of crops –lack of profit margin
    Outsourcing of production
   No processing of ag products
   Missing opportunity to develop niche market
   Loss of young people due to pay scale and lack of jobs
   Cash rent and land prices too high
   Sale of land to non- farmers
   Lack of economy of scale (grain elevator)
   Struggle to keep ag businesses in town/county
   Lack of opportunity for young people in agriculture
   Smaller operations need to keep going – support public policy to keep small
    farmers
   Don’t want to lose ownership of land to chemical companies
   Declining school enrollment
   State funding problem for education
   Impossible for young farmer to get started
   Hard to maintain family farms – lack of off- farm employment
   Self-serving attitudes – ie., processing plant wanted, but not in my back yard.
   Attitude that young farmers don’t need modern equipment
   Price of land stops young farmers
   No railroad
   Finances, people don’t have the $ to fix the streets, curb, gutter, upgrades (3)
   Streets need work (2)
   Main st. needs a face lift, sidewalks
   Drainage problems, curb and gutter (3)
   Coordination of efforts, people need to know what different efforts are happening
   Small town electric co-op, cost of wire is expensive and has gone up, metal has
    doubled in price, can’t replace as much line because of cost increases
   Buying equipments at today’s cost is very expensive
   Water problems (2)


                                      120
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                 Issues & Challenges
   Housing, more lower income housing, affordable housing, one level housing for
    the elderly
   Cost for st. oil, fuel for trucks, big problem
   Lack of funding! And when there is funding, who coordinates it? Cooperation of
    the people in spending this funding, not bumping heads
   Prioritizing projects
   Condition of some buildings




                                    121
                LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                     Strengths & Assets

Responses to the Question: What are the major strengths and assets of Clear Lake?

•   The lake
•   Communications
•   Community Center (2)
•   Fire Hall
•   Water Tower
•   School (brand new library, good administration, improved test scores)
•   School/city/business teamwork to complete playground
•   Hospital
•   Nursing Home
•   Smaller businesses that add valuable goods and services
•   Location (close to bigger towns, MN, Cities, 1-29) (2)
•   Small town atmosphere, safe
•   Infrastructure
•   Many recreation opportunities
•   Hunting/fishing
•   Snowmobiling
•   Strong, active 4-H clubs, improved fair barns
•   Zoning keeps consistency in neighborhoods
•   Golf course
•   Many active community clubs (ED, Lions, Kiwanis)
•   County seat
•   Airport (2)
•   Attractive community (2)
•   Swimming pool
•   Residents are always looking to improve assets
•   Local employment opportunities (2)
•   Room for expansion in all directions (2)
•   People (work ethic, great ideas, motivated)
•   Active Economic Development Corporation
•   Food
•   School really looks out for the youth, support for students great (academically and
    socially)
•   Technology (laptops) in schools
•   After school program at school is good for kids
•   Small community watches out for each other, support each other (3)
•   Industry
•   Community support for the school is great!
•   More active churches than open bars is a good thing.
•   Good for raising children
•   Mixes rural and town life really well
•   Still able to get necessities in town, don’t have to go to larger town
•   Pride in buildings and yards, property (2)




                                             122
                LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                        Strengths & Assets
•   Have a dentist, florist, bakery, hospital, hotel, golf course, grocery store, park, lake,
    camping, (5) recreational advantages, proximity of…
•   Golf course (good family activity) (2)
•   Safety and security for kids (except for semi’s on parade day!)
•   Variety of businesses on main st.
•   Activities that do go on in town (parades, games)
•   Advantages / convenience of knowing people
•   Crystal Springs Rodeo
•   Bible study, a group to welcome new ―transplants‖
•   Great customer service (local hardware store delivered paint to her, but didn’t paint HA)
•   Community center is beautiful and helpful to community
•   Great wellness center at the hospital, good start
•   50’s + group at wellness center
•   Small town atmosphere, attitudes, retired folks moving in, politeness of kids,
•   Ecumenical nature, respect for other faiths, attending faith based events
•   County seat with the school
•   People
•   Ditto
•   Students take note of the service organizations, respect from students, peace poster
    contest, willingness to work with the kids
•   Nursing home, good Samaritan home, townhouse,
•   Industry,
•   Residential area
•   People concern and compassion toward others
•   School system
•   Nursing home
•   ITC telephone company
•   Very friendly town, people willing to help, dependable neighbors
•   Lake natural beauty
•   Parks and park shelter
•   Natural beauty of the city
•   Camping facilities
•   Electrical and water facilities in town
•   Recreational fields
•   Crystal Spring Rodeo
•   4H building
•   Hospital, with emergency facility
•   Buses
•   City mobile units
•   Chiropractor
•   Cemetery
•   Volunteer Fire Dept and EMTs
•   Dentist
•   Professional services
•   Tech Lord, HD electric, Gopher Sign
•   500 Week long vacation with the Rodeo



                                             123
                LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                     Strengths & Assets
•   Wildlife, hunting, fishing,
•   Camping Shelter
•   Swimming Pool
•   Golf Course
•   2 Car dealers
•   C-stores
•   Grain Elevator, fertilizer plant
•   New school – high technology within the school
•   Bakery
•   Oratory contest and boys state
•   Cooperation between service organizations and students/children
•   New community center
•   Key Club
•   FFA
•   4H
•   Scout organization
•   Active church youth groups
•   The health care providers and our schools
•   Ditto, we have a lot of good employers
•   Swimming pool, library
•   The young families
•   Businesses and industry are a good thing and we are lucky to have them
•   We have a good Vet clinic, elevator, and chemical company
•   I like to community, city is currently working on the sewer city and is continuing to
    update it.
•   Community rallies together to achieve goals
•   We have hospital and healthcare we need, it a nice size community
•   Hard working
•   Banks
•   Structurally we have what we need, golf, bowling alley, lake, summer rec for kids, great
    educational community, we are progressive, churches, healthcare, DR’s, businesses,
    hardware store, ect.
•   Small enough that we take care of each other, we don’t lock our doors, we watch out for
    each other and help each ouster out, the rodeo is also an asset
•   Very talented people in this community, we built a new community center and fire hall,
    we get things done
•   Good location – ease of travel, Watertown, Brookings
•   New high school
•   Not a lot of violence
          Ditto
          Ditto
          ditto
•   Good for raising kids
•   A lot of friendly people
•   Community is involved in the school, sports, and activities
•   Good hunting and some fishing


                                             124
                LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                     Strengths & Assets
         Ditto
         ditto
•   Tourism
•   Everyone knows everyone
         ditto
•   Nice golf course
•   Library
•   Diversity in religious affiliations
•   Rodeo and hot dog days
         Attracting people for out of town
•   Motel and the Lanes
•   Diversity in School programming
•   Summer sports programs
•   Kind of a clean environment
•   Laptops in school
•   County seats
•   Nice athletic complex
•   New school playground
•   The new parking lot at the school
•   Good teachers wanting children to learn
•   Good superintendent
•   Activities inviting younger kids to participate
•   Hospital, emergency response
•   Variety of gas stations
•   Community involvement volunteer work
•   Nursing home
•   Don’t have to worry about big city problems
         Get things done quickly
•   Swimming pool
•   Summer programs for younger kids
   Art club, swimming lessons, cooking class
   Churches, active youth groups, good school, Sunday school, churches help out children
            (2)
   Churches have vision, and pursue it
   Churches hold services in nursing home, good nursing home for elderly
   Already have leaders in the community
   Large number of young people, maybe need an organization to get them to associate with
            each other, and a large number of small children
   Retired people moving to community that have never lived here before
   A lot of new families here, growth factor
   Industries, jobs so that not as many people have to drive 30 miles to work in Brookings or
            Watertown (because then they may move there instead)
   Minimal additions to hospital
   Great Nursing home, shared services with the hospital, working together, choices
   Continued growth, easy to sell your home if need be because town is growing



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                 LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                         Strengths & Assets
   Growing, salary up, employment up
   Good activities for kids, scouts, fishing
   Industries are adding jobs
   Food pantry, churches, people… need to keep these good things going
   Angel Tree at Christmas time
   Very good ambulance service and good fire dept. (Don’t have to respond to accidents
            with a hurse!)
   Good at growing our own, there are already good people in place
   Really good work ethic in this area of the world
   Home health, assisted nursing, hospital, nursing home, EMT
   The physical environment of eastern SD
   Access to utilities, reliable phone service (lack for nothing in the essentials for supporting
            a healthy lifestyle) (beautiful part of the state, recreation, physical environment,
            golf course, baseball field, electronic scoreboards, nice hunting area) (2)
   Emergency services really keep up their equipment well, retained 911 operation here
   Good funding decisions being made
   County seat
   Consolidated school district
   Group of people volunteering in the community
   Structure is here, just need to staff and maintain it
   Willingness to improve
   Industries provide jobs,
   Retaining services and not having to send people to Watertown or Brookings for
            everything
   A number of churches, good selection of religions
   Celebrating multiculturalism, Germans and Irish…
   Motel!
   Wellness center, good for small community
   Location, major hwy’s and proximity to larger cities and interstate
   the employment in the community
   city employees, good workers
   Tech-ord, Empi, and other businesses to (2)
   organizations try and do a lot of things
   people try and work together, help each other out,
   can get anything you want in Clear Lake, besides specialty items (2)
   recreational facilities, baseball, city parks, soft ball, tennis courts, basketball, skateboard
            park
   airport
   tight community
   good school,
   good city, good state, good hunting, fishing, good people, good agriculture lately
   people work together
   good customer service
   community center, fire hall, hospital addition


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               LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                       Projects

What Projects would you like to see accomplished in Clear Lake In the next two, five,
ten, and twe nty years?

         Keep growing
         Identify needs of different population segments
         New economic development opportunities (2)
         Better job opportunities (wages) (2)
         Need immediate upgrades to sewer system
         New bleachers in ball fields
         Power to camp sites
         Upgrades to city buildings
         More chairs for senior center
         Highchairs for community center
         Digital time, temp, event sign (2)
         More parking
         Upgrades to parks, bath house
         Walking/bike path around lake and or city (2)
         Upgrades to streets
         Elimination of city debt
         New main street businesses
         City equipment
         New industrial park w/ new businesses
         Modular home park
         Curb and gutter throughout CL (2)
         Additional lakeside development (2)
         Expand city park
         Need more affordable housing (need more community acceptance)
         Economic development trust fund
         Create planning commission and long term plan for development
         City/school/county/business joint projects (2)
         Consider annexation of outlying areas
         Spec. building for businesses
         Continued city/ED partnership on development projects
         Growing to be a bigger, more progressive community
         Continue to enhance main street
         Combine school/city library resources (books, computers)
         Use library as an after school place for children
         Work with other communities in county
         Consider countywide approach for economic development
         Youth activity center or program
         Special event/promotion person to market community center (2)
         Need more young people involved in community development
         Extend business hours to capture $ from ―after 5‖ workforce


                                         127
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                     Projects
   More vocal support for livestock development
   Support ag community (local development, renewable energy)
   Continue to upgrade school facilities/standards to remain competitive
   Improve Hwy 15 surface (rough road to travel, need to put on state radar) (2)
   Handyman service for older residents (2)
   Create volunteer network (2)
   Continue to clean lake (dredging, need source of funding)
   New streets, curbs, gutter (4)
   School to flourish in many different aspects
   Park in town, needs bathroom that is open when pool is closed (so you don’t have
    to run up the hill when potty training a child!)
   Shower house @ camping by the lake, expand this camping park to bring in
    campers and fisherman, new playground equipment there (it’s not safe) (2)
   Walk, bike path (4) kids need a place to ride, from town/school to football fields
    and ball park so they don’t have to ride on the highway
   Outdoor hockey rink in winter
   Business park
   Youth center (and one that is ―cool‖) so that it is attractive to all ages of youth and
    something they would want to use
   Better play equipment at playgrounds
   More spec houses built in the next two years
   Area by creek needs to be developed, with bridge, something for k ids to do there
    too
   Older population needs something to do, senior center (2) (they were teaching
    bridge, still going on?)
   Solution to daycare problems
   More variety in retail, (dairy queen, pizza hut, pamida, department store, better
    weekend hours and will help tax base)
   List for seniors to put their home on, to open up house for younger families
    (shopping in the obituaries)
   More space at kids in motion for stay at home moms to come and meet, for their
    kids to play together
   Try and bring new families into town, draw more people to want to live here
   Place for seniors to go for winter walking
   Like to see a youth center built
   Development and affordable housing
   Ditto, old houses need to be reconditioned
   Bike trail around the lake
   Ditto
   Need new restaurant, club and community center
   Bike trail
   Sidewalks, curb and gutter
   A good place to go to eat
   We have great people in our town,


                                       128
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                     Projects
   Increase membership in clubs, Kiwanis, it’s the same 10 people
   Need to develop the lake and the recreation
   Need to fill and renovate vacate buildings
   Need to improve main St. make it more interesting to visitor to make them stop
   We need to encourage new Entrepreneurs
   Feature a business in a the paper
   Restaurant, and some place to shop
   Movie theatre
   More funding for school activities
   And cleanup the city
   Marquee at entrances to the town
   Preparation for kids and adults in growing the community
   See the town grow
   Better maintenance of the golf course
   Clean up the town and rundown houses, main street
         o ditto
   Better shooting range
   Fill empty spaces
         o Ditto
         o museum
   Clean up the lake
   Clean up around the lake
   Better vet clinic
   More things for kids to do
   Job opportunities for kids in town
   More smaller businesses to develop things to do and diversity
   More summer activities for older kids
   Taco Johns
   Drive- in theatre for kids to hang out
   Stoplight by the school
   Get cops to do a better job
   Community cleanup
   Maintain the extracurricular activities
   Use the unused buildings on main street for kids to do
   Bring back gifted program
   Fundraising for equipment for sports
   Improve campgrounds and playgrounds for rodeo
   Better Law enforcement
   Build a Mall, restaurants, etc. (Taco Johns, Dairy Queen)
   Support forensics
   Improve attention for other programs
   More support for oral interp
   Value added agriculture development i.e. ethanol plant
   Boys and girls club


                                     129
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                    Projects
   Airport use
   Building homes around the golf course, and increased use of the golf course
   Eating places downtown with afternoon coffee
   More retail business
   Removal of older unused rundown town
   Curb and gutter throughout the town
   Ditto
   Housing by the lake
   Sewer system renovation
   Underground power lines, and phone lines
   Take advantage of proximity to the interstate, attracting them to clear lake
   More jobs for youth to keep them in clear lake
   Theatre
   People to put money back into the community
   Improvement of the museum, and advertising the museum
   Something to draw parents and grandparents into the school more, volunteering,
    to work with teacher
   Use their life skills to interest the students in the school
   Sharing of life experiences
   Utilizing other mediums for advertising events
   Financial help for hospitals to keep doctors here and get better equipment
   Would like another paramedic
   Explore common union, work with other entities to get things done,
   Find ways to get people to not only live, but invest of themselves in the
    community (bodies is not a strength, but need people to ―live‖ here and call it
    home)
   Be more inviting to people, new comers (2)
   Get people to promote this community, positive attitude ―spread the good news
    about Clear Lake‖ (2)
   Lake development, shoreline, recreation, to bring in outside people who will
    spend money here
   In home daycare, overnight, or evening daycare (2)
   More activities for kids (hockey, ice skating, roller skating, find out what they are
    into if not into school activities, movie night) (2)
   Utilize the community center more to provide activities for families and kids,
    non-profits, community groups, too expensive to use
   Affordable pre-school program for more students
   Low interest housing loans available for families so they buy a house (instead of
    renting which yields less investment into the community)
   Partnership in community wide healthcare
   Something to remind people of all the wonderful things that are going on here
   Want to do a scholarship of some kind
   Groom young people to ride along for future profession and volunteer with
    them…


                                       130
         LISTENING SESSION RESPONSES
                                     Projects
   ACTIVE Community health board, put/keep together to help health issues
   Fill empty businesses on main st.
   Attract a dentist 5-10 years from now, utilize state program to get one here, fund
    set up so the community can raise $$$ to match state funding
   Would like to see the 911 system grow more, sheriff dept. wants to grow in
    personnel
   Get younger generation involved in ambulance service and fire dept. (2)
   20 EMT’s who all volunteer on an equal basis
   Condition of Hwy. 15 – improvement, needs more shoulder so it is very difficult
    to have cars pulled over or keep traffic moving when there is an accident
   Finish, maintain and move forward with what we have started
   Money for hospital projects
   Want a CT machine at the hospital (2)
   Something for the young people to do, the kids need to e in charge of this because
    ―adults don’t know anything‖
   Change the mindset, don’t think of yourself as a losing town, (ie. ―we are not
    going to lose the hospital and this is a common misconception)
   More adult education classes at the school (computer classes again)
   Add law enforcement log to local paper

   Curb and gutter, council needs to work together on community planning
   Bring new businesses to town, then they need housing, more business for other
    businesses, more services being used, housing development
   Better planning in development of residential areas, think of people who will be
    coming because it makes it easer for utilities planning in the future
   Move on the possibility of an industrial park, time is of the essence when people
    are looking to build in the park, spec building up
   Sewer, sewer, sewer project completed, which would also help the streets come
    together, curb and gutter (3)
   Development of the lake, it is a big asset, lake property is becoming more and
    more scarce in E. SD, it is going to take a lot of development planning, and
    someone to invest in this, needs to be done in a planned manner (would bring in
    tax dollars) (2)
   A coordinator, go – between, to look into $$ that is available to coordinate these
    projects, some type of comm. Planner (2)
   Need to work with main st. to update, keep businesses there and attract new ones
   Some activities for the young
   Older people need housing,
   How can we sell the houses in town that are for sale?
   Assisted living (2)
   Nice to tie in an industry with their strength of the agricultural economy
   Make the lake area residential
   Affordable housing, maybe more mobile home park needs new plumbing, make
    the trailer park nicer, larger lots



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                                    APPENDIX A
                         Key Points to Effective Strategic Planning

                  And Moving Forward After a Community Assessment.


1) Broad based decision making: Include as many people as part of the process as possible. You
   have already involved much of the community as part of the Assessment listening sessions.
   Continue to keep them engaged as you implement your goals and objectives.

2) Broad Goals: The objectives in your plan should cover a broad range of perspectives and
   topic areas, as identified in the Assessment. This helps your community to understand that
   community, business and economic development are not mutually exclusive – but instead
   they are highly dependent on each other.

3) Action-Oriented: To reach your goals, you must have a series of actionable steps to
   accomplish. You will begin to flesh these out during your town-hall follow up meeting at the
   completion of this assessment. These will need to be further defined by your
   ―Implementation Mechanism‖ detailed below. The assessment report will be a resource for
   developing these action steps.

4) Roles: A good plan assigns and distributes roles among various organizations, entities, and
   individuals in the community so that everyone understands what they should accomplish and
   be held to these standards. Recruit a list of interested volunteers to help execute each portion
   of the plan. You might establish sub committees for each objective where there is not a
   single organization that is willing or able to take the lead on a particular objective.

5) Deadlines: Deadlines are necessary to make sure that progress continues to be made on each
   of the goals and objectives.

6) Resources: You must determine how you will pay for various projects and to whom you can
   look to for technical assistance. Some projects will have loan and grant programs associated
   with them that you might be able to tap into. Others will not and will rely exclusively on
   local fundraising or through local governmental participation through the regular budgeting
   process. Again, the assessment report and the resources listed therein will be a reference
   point for you.

7) Implementation Mechanism: This is where many communities get hung up. You must have
   a mechanism to implement and this mechanism must be broad based and involve all relevant
   organizations and entities in the community. You need to assemble a Visioning Taskforce
   that consists of one to two appointed representatives from each community entity (city,
   county, development corporation, chamber, school, youth, senior, churches, social services,
   healthcare, major employers, agriculture, etc). The purpose of this group is to flesh out the
   Vision coming out of the assessment, evaluate and refine the objectives and action steps,
   come to consensus on who or what organization is going to take the lead in moving each
   objective forward, refine the deadlines assigned to various action steps, etc. This group
   should meet regularly until the Vision is completely refined and released to the public. From




                                             132
    then on, it is probably sufficient to meet quarterly to bring everyone up-to-speed with what
    has been accomplished and what is yet to come.

8) A Community Champion: There must be a person that is willing to coordinate
   implementation of your Vision in your community. This person helps keep people on task,
   keeps communication open, and coordinates various meetings.

9) Communication with the Public: This is another area where many communities fall down. If
   the community doesn’t hear anything, they simply assume that nothing has been
   accomplished. It is imperative that you continue to provide updates to the community on
   what has been accomplished on a regular basis. The newspaper is crucial to these efforts.
   Celebrate what you have done. Organize a yearly or semi-annual banquet where
   organizations in the community provide updates to the public on what they have
   accomplished to make your Vision a reality over the last year.

10) Adopt A Can-Do Attitude and Embrace Success as Well as Failure: This is the most difficult
    component to gauge, but successful communities always have a positive outlook and attitude.
    It is a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you think you can’t do something, then you won’t. But if
    you think you can, you will find a way to get it done. You also need to understand that
    failure is part of the process. Learn from it, but don’t let it drag you down. It is okay to fall
    down as long as you fall forward. Just because something didn’t work before doesn’t mean
    that it won’t work at another time under different circumstances. Welcome peoples’ input
    and work at all times to engage as much of the public as you can in all of your efforts.

11) Begin implementation of your plan. Plan your work and work your plan.

12) Track your progress over time. Share this with the community. This will keep people
    interested and build momentum over time as you start to see the successes of your efforts.

13) Evaluation: This is often the most overlooked part of the process, but it must be taken into
    account. When you meet annually to review what has been accomplished – don’t forget to
    also evaluate the success or lack of success regarding various projects. Let these evaluations
    help guide any changes that you make to your community’s vision over time.

14) Remember to celebrate the accomplishments, even small ones, to keep the motivation
    continuous.




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