Real Estate Marketing Postcards Kentucky

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					PORTFOLIO ID   PORTFOLIO NAME                     KNOWLEDGE AREA CODE




           10 Environment and Natural Resources                     123




           10 Environment and Natural Resources                     123




           10 Environment and Natural Resources                     123




           10 Environment and Natural Resources                     123




           10 Environment and Natural Resources                     123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources     123




10 Environment and Natural Resources     123




10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123




10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123

10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
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10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources     123


10 Environment and Natural Resources     123


10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
10 Environment and Natural Resources     123




10 Environment and Natural Resources     123




10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

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10   Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123


10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
10   Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources     123




10 Environment and Natural Resources     123




10 Environment and Natural Resources     123


10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123

10 Environment and Natural Resources     123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123




10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123
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10 Environment and Natural Resources   123


10 Environment and Natural Resources   123

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KNOWLEDGE AREA NAME




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources

Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources




Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources


Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
Management and Sustainability of Forest Resources
PROGRAM NAME




Natural Resources and Environmental Management




Natural Resources and Environmental Management




Natural Resources and Environmental Management




Forestry and Wildlife




Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Agriculture and Environmental Sustainability




Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment




Missouri Woodland Steward
Missouri Woodland Steward

Missouri Woodland Steward




Missouri Woodland Steward




Missouri Woodland Steward

Missouri Woodland Steward

Missouri Woodland Steward

Missouri Woodland Steward




Forestry and Wildlife
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living

Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living

Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Natural Resources and Environment

Natural Resources and Environment


Natural Resources and Environment


Natural Resources and Environment

Natural Resources and Environment
Natural Resources and Environment




Natural Resources & Environment




Forest Stewardship
Forest Stewardship




Forestry Logging and Milling




Forestry Logging and Milling




Forestry Logging and Milling




Forestry Logging and Milling




Youth Agriculture




Youth Agriculture
Youth Agriculture




Youth Agriculture

Natural Resources and Environment

Natural Resources and Environment
Natural Resources and Environment




Agricultural and Environmental Quality
Agricultural and Environmental Quality




Agricultural and Environmental Quality




Natural Resources and Environment
Natural Resources and Environment




Natural Resources and Environment




Natural Resources and Environment
Natural Resources and Environment

Management of Rangeland and Forestry Resources
Management of Rangeland and Forestry Resources




Agriculture and Environmental Sustainability




Natural Resources


Natural Resources
Natural Resources and Environment




Forestry and Forest Products




Developing Tools for Decision-Making

Natural Resources Management and Utilization
Natural Resources Management and Utilization




1. Sustain, Protect, and Manage Hawaii's Natural Resources and Environment




1. Sustain, Protect, and Manage Hawaii's Natural Resources and Environment




1. Sustain, Protect, and Manage Hawaii's Natural Resources and Environment




1. Sustain, Protect, and Manage Hawaii's Natural Resources and Environment
1. Sustain, Protect, and Manage Hawaii's Natural Resources and Environment




Economic Prosperity of Productive and Sustainable Food and Fiber Systems
Economic Prosperity of Productive and Sustainable Food and Fiber Systems

Forestry Natural Resources and Preservation




4.1 Natural Resource Management

4.1 Natural Resource Management




4.1 Natural Resource Management
4.1 Natural Resource Management




4.1 Natural Resource Management


4.1 Natural Resource Management

4.1 Natural Resource Management
4.1 Natural Resource Management

4.1 Natural Resource Management


4.1 Natural Resource Management

4.1 Natural Resource Management




4.1 Natural Resource Management


4.1 Natural Resource Management




4.1 Natural Resource Management


4.1 Natural Resource Management


4.1 Natural Resource Management

4.1 Natural Resource Management


4.1 Natural Resource Management

4.1 Natural Resource Management




Sustainable Forest Management

Sustainable Forest Management




Sustainable Forest Management
Sustainable Forest Management

Sustainable Forest Management


Sustainable Forest Management




II. URBAN FORESTRY AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT




II. URBAN FORESTRY AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Small Island Agricultural Systems
Production Forestry - Timber Management and Wood Utilization

Production Forestry - Timber Management and Wood Utilization

Production Forestry - Timber Management and Wood Utilization
Production Forestry - Timber Management and Wood Utilization
Production Forestry - Timber Management and Wood Utilization




(SMRR) Natural Resource Conservation and Management




(SMRR) Natural Resource Conservation and Management
(SMRR) Natural Resource Conservation and Management




(SMRR) Natural Resource Conservation and Management




(SMRR) Natural Resource Conservation and Management




(SMRR) Natural Resource Conservation and Management


Urban Forestry




Urban Forestry
Urban Forestry

Urban Forestry




Forestry and Wildlife




Forestry and Wildlife




Natural Resources Management and Utilization




Natural Resources Management and Utilization
Natural Resource-Based Economic Development

Natural Resource-Based Economic Development

Natural Resource-Based Economic Development

Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living
Environmental Education - Sustainable Living

Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems

Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems


Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems
Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems

Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems




Natural Resources




Natural Resources
Sustainable Management of Natural Resources

Sustainable Forest Management




Natural Resources and the Environment and Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering




Forestry, Wildlife, and Natural Resources
Small Island Agricultural Systems




Natural Resources and Environment




Natural Resources and Environment

Program in Natural Resource Sciences

Program in Natural Resource Sciences

Program in Natural Resource Sciences
4.1 Natural Resource Management




Soil, Water and Natural Resources




Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment
Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment

Natural Resources & Environment
Natural Resources & Environment
Natural Resources & Environment
Natural Resources & Environment
Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment




Natural Resources & Environment


Environmental Science

Natural Resource Systems and the Environment

Natural Resource Systems and the Environment
Natural Resources and Environmental Systems-OARDC Led


Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems




Natural Resources and Environmental Systems-OARDC Led
Sustainable Management of Natural Resources


Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems




Forestry, Wildlife, and Fishery Systems

Natural Resources and the Environment

Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife


Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife


Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife

Forestry and Wildlife




Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife
Forestry and Wildlife




A quality Environment and Effective Natural Resource Management
Enhancing the Use of Natural Resources and Restoring Ecosystem Integrity




Forestry: Sustaining Natural Resources




Forestry: Sustaining Natural Resources
Overall Program

Natural Resource Systems and the Environment

Forestry, Wildlife, and Natural Resources

Sustainable Agriculture (Extension)

Sustainable Agriculture (Extension)

Sustainable Agriculture (Extension)


Sustainable Agriculture (Extension)

Sustainable Agriculture (Extension)

Sustainable Agriculture (Extension)
Assisting Small-Scale Farmers and Landowners to Manage Change in Agriculture




(SMRR) Natural Resource Conservation and Management




Management & Sustainability of Forest Resources (Extension)


Management & Sustainability of Forest Resources (Extension)


Management & Sustainability of Forest Resources (Extension)

Management & Sustainability of Forest Resources (Extension)

Natural Resources and Environmental Systems-OARDC Led




Natural Resources and Environmental Systems-OARDC Led


Natural Resources and Environmental Systems-OARDC Led
Forestry
Forestry
Forestry




Natural Resources, Water and the Environment




Soil, Water and Natural Resources




Soil, Water and Natural Resources
Natural Resources and Environment




Forestry and Wildlife




Forestry and Wildlife
Geographic Information - AFES




High Latitude Soils- AFES




High Latitude Soils- AFES




Management of Ecosystems- AFES




Management of Ecosystems- AFES
Management of Ecosystems- AFES




Forestry: Sustaining Natural Resources




Forestry: Sustaining Natural Resources




Forestry: Sustaining Natural Resources


Supporting and enhancing economic opportunities and self-empowerment for families and communities


Supporting and enhancing economic opportunities and self-empowerment for families and communities


Supporting and enhancing economic opportunities and self-empowerment for families and communities
Supporting and enhancing economic opportunities and self-empowerment for families and communities


Ecosystem and Environmental Quality and Management

Ecosystem and Environmental Quality and Management




Management of Ecosystems- AFES




Management of Ecosystems- AFES


ECOSYSTEMS AND BIODIVERSITY

ECOSYSTEMS AND BIODIVERSITY




ECOSYSTEMS AND BIODIVERSITY




Geographic Information - AFES
Enhancing Stewardship of Natural Resources and the Environment




Enhancing Stewardship of Natural Resources and the Environment
Enhancing Stewardship of Natural Resources and the Environment
Enhancing Stewardship of Natural Resources and the Environment
Sustainable Management of Natural Resources
Sustainable Management of Natural Resources
Forest Management




Forest Management




Forest Management

Forest Management


Forest Management




Forest Management
Forest Management

Forest Management

Aquaculture

Aquaculture




Forest Management


Aquaculture

Aquaculture
Aquaculture

Aquaculture




Forest Management


Natural Resources and Environment
Natural Resources and Environment
Natural Resources and Environment
INSTITUTION NAME 1                   INSTITUTION NAME 2




University of the Virgin Islands




University of the Virgin Islands




University of the Virgin Islands




University of Connecticut - Storrs




University of Connecticut - Storrs
University of Connecticut - Storrs
University of Vermont




University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas




University of Missouri
University of Missouri

University of Missouri




University of Missouri




University of Missouri

University of Missouri

University of Missouri

University of Missouri




University of Connecticut - Storrs
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
Purdue University

Purdue University


Purdue University


Purdue University

Purdue University
Purdue University




University of Arkansas




West Virginia University
West Virginia University




West Virginia University




West Virginia University




West Virginia University




West Virginia University




West Virginia University




West Virginia University
West Virginia University




West Virginia University

Purdue University

Purdue University
Purdue University




University of Kentucky     Kentucky State University
University of Kentucky                          Kentucky State University




University of Kentucky                          Kentucky State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University

University of Puerto Rico
University of Puerto Rico




University of Vermont




University of Maine


University of Maine
Montana State University




Louisiana State University




University of Massachusetts

University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota




University of Hawaii




University of Hawaii




University of Hawaii




University of Hawaii
University of Hawaii




University of Maryland   University of Maryland - Eastern Shore
University of Maryland    University of Maryland - Eastern Shore

Alcorn State University




Cornell University        NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University        NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Cornell University        NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
Cornell University        NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Cornell University        NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University        NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University        NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Clemson University   South Carolina State University

Clemson University   South Carolina State University




Clemson University   South Carolina State University
Clemson University                    South Carolina State University

Clemson University                    South Carolina State University


Clemson University                    South Carolina State University




Southern University and A&M College




Southern University and A&M College
College of Micronesia
West Virginia University

West Virginia University

West Virginia University
West Virginia University
West Virginia University




University of Wyoming




University of Wyoming
University of Wyoming




University of Wyoming




University of Wyoming




University of Wyoming


University of the Virgin Islands




University of the Virgin Islands
University of the Virgin Islands

University of the Virgin Islands




University of Maine




University of Maine




University of Minnesota




University of Minnesota
University of Massachusetts

University of Massachusetts

University of Massachusetts

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine

University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University
University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Missouri




University of Missouri
New Mexico State University

Clemson University            South Carolina State University




Iowa State University




Auburn University             Alabama A&M University
College of Micronesia




Pennsylvania State University




Pennsylvania State University

Washington State University

Washington State University

Washington State University
Cornell University            NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Michigan State University




University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire


Lincoln University of Missouri

Utah State University

Utah State University
Ohio State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




Ohio State University
New Mexico State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University

University of Illinois

University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire


University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire


University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire




University of Nebraska
University of Massachusetts




Oregon State University




Oregon State University
University of Wisconsin

Utah State University

Auburn University         Alabama A&M University

Ohio State University

Ohio State University

Ohio State University


Ohio State University

Ohio State University

Ohio State University
Tuskegee University




University of Wyoming




Ohio State University


Ohio State University


Ohio State University

Ohio State University

Ohio State University




Ohio State University


Ohio State University
Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University




Prairie View A&M University




Michigan State University




Michigan State University
Montana State University




University of Rhode Island




University of Rhode Island
University of Alaska




University of Alaska




University of Alaska




University of Alaska




University of Alaska
University of Alaska




Oregon State University




Oregon State University




Oregon State University


Auburn University         Alabama A&M University


Auburn University         Alabama A&M University


Auburn University         Alabama A&M University
Auburn University           Alabama A&M University


Oklahoma State University

Oklahoma State University




University of Alaska




University of Alaska


University of Delaware      Delaware State University

University of Delaware      Delaware State University




University of Delaware      Delaware State University




University of Alaska
Washington State University




Washington State University
Washington State University
Washington State University
New Mexico State University
New Mexico State University
University of Idaho




University of Idaho




University of Idaho

University of Idaho


University of Idaho




University of Idaho
University of Idaho

University of Idaho

University of Georgia       Fort Valley State University

University of Georgia       Fort Valley State University




University of Idaho


University of Georgia       Fort Valley State University

University of Georgia       Fort Valley State University
University of Georgia       Fort Valley State University

University of Georgia       Fort Valley State University




University of Idaho


University of Puerto Rico
University of Puerto Rico
University of Puerto Rico
INSTITUTION NAME 3   INSTITUTION NAME 4   STATE CODE STATE NAME




                                          VI         Virgin Islands




                                          VI         Virgin Islands




                                          VI         Virgin Islands




                                          CT         Connecticut




                                          CT         Connecticut
CT   Connecticut
VT   Vermont




AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas




MO   Missouri
MO   Missouri

MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri

MO   Missouri

MO   Missouri

MO   Missouri




CT   Connecticut
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
IN   Indiana

IN   Indiana


IN   Indiana


IN   Indiana

IN   Indiana
IN   Indiana




AR   Arkansas




WV   West Virginia
WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia
WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia

IN   Indiana

IN   Indiana
IN   Indiana




KY   Kentucky
KY   Kentucky




KY   Kentucky




VA   Virginia
VA   Virginia




VA   Virginia




VA   Virginia
VA   Virginia

PR   Puerto Rico
PR   Puerto Rico




VT   Vermont




ME   Maine


ME   Maine
MT   Montana




LA   Louisiana




MA   Massachusetts

MN   Minnesota
MN   Minnesota




HI   Hawaii




HI   Hawaii




HI   Hawaii




HI   Hawaii
HI   Hawaii




MD   Maryland
MD   Maryland

MS   Mississippi




NY   New York

NY   New York




NY   New York
NY   New York




NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York
NY   New York

NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York




NY   New York


NY   New York




NY   New York


NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York




SC   South Carolina

SC   South Carolina




SC   South Carolina
SC   South Carolina

SC   South Carolina


SC   South Carolina




LA   Louisiana




LA   Louisiana
FM   Micronesia, Fed States
WV   West Virginia

WV   West Virginia

WV   West Virginia
WV   West Virginia
WV   West Virginia




WY   Wyoming




WY   Wyoming
WY   Wyoming




WY   Wyoming




WY   Wyoming




WY   Wyoming


VI   Virgin Islands




VI   Virgin Islands
VI   Virgin Islands

VI   Virgin Islands




ME   Maine




ME   Maine




MN   Minnesota




MN   Minnesota
MA   Massachusetts

MA   Massachusetts

MA   Massachusetts

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine

TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee




MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri
NM   New Mexico

SC   South Carolina




IA   Iowa




AL   Alabama
FM   Micronesia, Fed States




PA   Pennsylvania




PA   Pennsylvania

WA   Washington

WA   Washington

WA   Washington
NY   New York




MI   Michigan




NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire


MO   Missouri

UT   Utah

UT   Utah
OH   Ohio


TN   Tennessee




OH   Ohio
NM   New Mexico


TN   Tennessee




TN   Tennessee

IL   Illinois

NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire


NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire


NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire




NE   Nebraska
MA   Massachusetts




OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon
WI   Wisconsin

UT   Utah

AL   Alabama

OH   Ohio

OH   Ohio

OH   Ohio


OH   Ohio

OH   Ohio

OH   Ohio
AL   Alabama




WY   Wyoming




OH   Ohio


OH   Ohio


OH   Ohio

OH   Ohio

OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio


OH   Ohio
MS   Mississippi
MS   Mississippi
MS   Mississippi




TX   Texas




MI   Michigan




MI   Michigan
MT   Montana




RI   Rhode Island




RI   Rhode Island
AK   Alaska




AK   Alaska




AK   Alaska




AK   Alaska




AK   Alaska
                      AK   Alaska




                      OR   Oregon




                      OR   Oregon




                      OR   Oregon


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama
Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama


                      OK   Oklahoma

                      OK   Oklahoma




                      AK   Alaska




                      AK   Alaska


                      DE   Delaware

                      DE   Delaware




                      DE   Delaware




                      AK   Alaska
WA   Washington




WA   Washington
WA   Washington
WA   Washington
NM   New Mexico
NM   New Mexico
ID   Idaho




ID   Idaho




ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho


ID   Idaho




ID   Idaho
ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho

GA   Georgia

GA   Georgia




ID   Idaho


GA   Georgia

GA   Georgia
GA   Georgia

GA   Georgia




ID   Idaho


PR   Puerto Rico
PR   Puerto Rico
PR   Puerto Rico
OUTCOME MEASURE

After attending non-formal education programs, one hundred and fifty (150) people or more
will adopt recommended landscaping practices, incorporate native plants into their
landscapes, protect and/or enhance soil resources for agriculture, construction, and
landscaping.




Direct and indirect contacts will cause over (1000) adults and students to adopt practices that
protect native plants and their habitats because of their increased understanding of the
human effects on native ecosystems.




Five hundred (500) Virgin Islands youth will increase their awareness of VI natural and
cultural resources, and careers in environmental management and ecotourism. At least
fifteen (15) individuals will be trained as ecohiking guides.




Increased (%) qualified tree wardens appointed




Municipal Shade Tree Ordinances Developed
Stewardship Plans Developed
number of forest owners who plan for long term disposition of woodlands




Number of refereed journal publications




Number of landowners indicating an increased knowledge of forest management for wildlife




Number of clientele who adopt GIS and GPS for natural resource management, watershed
characterization, and general map making and spatial analysis




50 percent of participants will increase their knowledge of forest ecology.
50 percent of participants will increase their knowledge of forest management.
50 percent of participants will contact a natural resource professional for follow-up
consultation.




30 percent of participants will have a management plan in place after six months.




30 percent of participants will have engaged in at least one forest improvement practice after
six months.

50 percent of participants who complete crop tree release will see increased forest growth.
50 percent of participants who complete wildlife habitat improvement practices for a
targeted species will see increased numbers of those species.
50 percent of participants who complete forest or wildlife habitat improvement practices will
see a corresponding increase in the population of target species.




Increased (%) GIS database usage by towns
Adopt appropriate practices
Adopt environmentally sound practices
Conduct community service or outreach
Create and sustain effective partnerships and collaborations
Develop a sense of belonging to a community
Develop environmentally sound technologies and practices
Make better decision regarding natural resource management

Protect or conserve biodiversity and habitat including native plant and animal species
Support and mentor others in leadership roles
Use new technologies
Use services of natural resource professionals
Demonstrate effective practices in leadership roles
Demonstrate how to identify native flora and fauna.
Demonstrate how to identify non-native invasive species
Demonstrate how to use technology
Demonstrate leadership skills
Describe aspirations to contribute to ecological health and biodiversity
Describe ecological principles
Describe effective group work and leadership

Describe resources available from, and services provided by, natural resource professionals
Describe the ecosystems where they live
Describe the laws of ecology
Describe ways to observe, explore, and experience nature
Acres managed as wildlife habitat
Adopt appropriate practices
Adopt appropriate technologies
Adopt new crop
Conduct community service or outreach
Develop a marketing plan
Develop marketing tools
Demonstrate how to evaluate the potential of new and non-traditional crops and varieties for
profitable production in Maine
Grow trialed plants
Increase purchase of Maine products
Make better decision regarding natural resource management
Make better decisions using science and technology skills

Protect or conserve biodiversity and habitat including native plant and animal species
Reduce pesticide use
Test new production techniques
Use new technologies
Use services of natural resource professionals
Access relevant UMaine Extension web-based resources
Demonstrate appreciation of wildlife in home landscape
Demonstrate basic business management skills
Demonstrate how to analyze records for decision making
Evaluate the potential of new and non-traditional crops and varieties for profitable
production in Maine
Demonstrate how to locate Extension web-based resources
Demonstrate how to test new production techniques
Demonstrate project-related science or technology skills
Describe practices that improve efficiency, reduce inputs, or increase profitability
Describe wildlife habitat components
At least 15 percent of the tree care providers in Indiana will be certified arborists.
Number of professional natural resource advisors who have the skills necessary to assess the
health of the wildlands

Owners of 15 percent of wildlands will have a relationship with knowledgeable professional
natural resource advisors and have developed and implemented a management plan
Natural resource professionals and wildland owners who have developed and implemented
management plans will work with an additional 20 percent of landowners to develop and
implement management plans.
Percentage of owners of wildlands who will have assessed the health of their lands and
developed and implemented management plans
Number of certified arborists maintaining their certification




Number of acres impacted by Natural Resources & Environmental educational efforts




Workshop participants will have increased knowledge about forest managements
opportunities.
Worshop participants will change behavior.




Increased knowledge of BMP requirements and why they are required (80% of adult
participants will increase knowledge).




Increased application of BMP on forest operations by participants.




80% of participants will have increased knowledge of alternative harvesting systems and
where they are appropriate.




10% of participants will try a new harvest system component in their operations.




80% of participants in Meat Quality Assurance Programs will increase knowledge from pre- to
post-test.


Meat Quality Assurance-trained youths will produce animals that will contribute food
products.
Youth Meat Quality Assurance participation will generate earnings for the youth participants
and other community organizations.




10% of the youths enrolled in 4-H Animal Science projects will identify project/life skills
learned through participation in the program.

Number of landowners with knowledge of proper tree planting and management techniques

Number of participants who increased their knowledge of natural resource management
Number of woodlot owners who improved their management skills




Number of individuals adopting practices that protect water quality.
Number of people utilizing forest management practices.




Number of individuals adopting one or more practices related to conserving, sustaining
and/or protecting soil resources.




Number of individuals with increased knowledge of best management practices in forestry or
agriculture
Number of individuals adopting at least one improved management practice toward
achieving sustainability




Number of individuals adopting one or more sustainable landscape managment practices




Number of mills reporting increased profitability, improved safety indicators, or improved
efficiency
Number of agricultural or forest acres with improved management practices
Number of persons that adopted one or more practices on natural resources and forest
conservation.
Number of acres in improved pastures.




number of studies describing the sustainability of biofuels production in Vermont

Number of public school children and other visitors to the area using a checklist for birds for
the Dwight B. Demeritt Forest in Orono/Old Town, Maine, and a checklist for birds for the
Penobscot Experimental Forest in Bradley/Eddington, Maine
Number of Internet-accessible databases containing what may be the largest and most
complete set of ecological and physiological data on a wide variety of songbirds from North
America.
FORESTRY: Participants will learn steps for selling timber and what resources are available to
them for assistance; receive information they can use to meet their individual forest
stewardship objectives; develop a plan and implement activities that will enhance the
sustainability of their forests; will manage their forests to meet their objectives and so the
forests lands continue to provide environmental, economic and social benefits to all.




Percentage of clientele adopting recommended practices




Accurate research made available and shared
Informed land owners will manage a significant number of acres of Minnesota land
effectively. (Target expressed as number of acres.)
Landowners, woodland owners and farmers will increase their planting of woody perennial
and other crops to diversify their agricultural landscapes. (Target expressed as number of
individuals who state an intention to diversify.)




Increased awareness and understanding of the issues




Number of people completing non-formal education programs




Number of agency professionals, including extension agents who actually implement or
install demonstration or similar programs for clientele education




Number of people who actually adopt one or more recommended practices
Total dollar value of grants and contracts obtained.




2. Community Resource Development: Number of: business people, advisory groups,
development agencies, rural leaders interested in developing ANR businesses and having
access to knowledge.
5. Alternative Crops: Number of: farmers showing an increased knowledge of alternative
crops and enterprises; alternative crops being implemented; new businesses established.

% decrease of soil erosion

Documented instances in which impl. of natural resources mngmt. practices and/or land use
policies lead to increased open space preservation, enhanced or protected natural resources,
enhanced biodiversity, and/or incr. alternative land use. (4.1.3f)
Increased local economic activities attributable at least in part to enhanced natural resources
management and/or increased alternative land uses. (4.1.3g)

Documented instances in which implementation of natural resources management practices
by individual consumers, residents, and/or private landowners lead to increased open space
preservation, enhanced or protected natural resources, enhanced biodiversity. (4.1.4d)
# of youth documented to have chosen natural resources-related careers. (4.1.6e)
Documented instances in which implementation of natural resources management practices
by agricultural/natural resources producers or other businsess persons lead to increased
open space preservation, enhanced/protected natural resources, biodiversity and/or land
use. (4.1.1d)

# of agricultural/natural resources producers and business representatives who demonstrate
knowledge gains about managing natural resources and/or biodiversity. (4.1.1b)
# of organization and business representatives who demonstrate knowledge gains about
managing natural resources and/or biodiversity. (4.1.2b)
# of local government officials and community leaders who demonstrate knowledge gains
about managing natural resources, open space preservation, alternative land uses and/or
biodiversity. (4.1.3b)
# of consumers, residents, and landowners who demonstrate knowledge gains about natural
resources management and/or biodiversity. (4.1.4b)

# of teachers and youth professionals and volunteers who demonstrate knowledge gains
about natural resources management and/or biodiversity. (4.1.5b)
# of youth who demonstrate knowledge gains about natural resources management and/or
biodiversity. (4.1.6b)

# of agricultural/natural resources producers and business representatives documented to
have modified existing practices or technologies and/or adopted new management practices
to protect/enhance natural resources and/or enhance biodiversity. (4.1.1c)
# of organization and business representatives documented to have modified existing
practices or technologies and/or adopted new management practices to protect/enhance
natural resources and/or enhance biodiversity. (4.1.2c)

# of local government officials and community leaders documented to have modified existing
practices or technologies and/or adopted new management practices to protect/enhance
natural resources and/or enhance biodiversity. (4.1.3c)

# of producers, businesses, local governments, organizations, landowners, and individuals
collaborate to develop and implement natural resources management strategies. (4.1.3e)
# of consumers, residents, and landowners documented to have modified existing practices
or technologies and/or adopted new management practices to protect/enhance natural
resources and/or enhance biodiversity. (4.1.4c)
# of teachers and youth professionals and volunteers who incorporate natural resources
management and/or biodiversity knowledge into curriculum. (4.1.5c)

# of youth documented to have modified existing practices and/or adopted new practices to
protect/enhance natural resources and/or enhance biodiversity. (4.1.6c)
# of youth introduced to variety of environmental and natural resources career options.
(4.1.6d)




Number of people reporting increased knowledge

Number of people practicing skills learned




Number of landowner acres impacted.
Number of acres with 25% increase in productivity

Landowner contacts by master landowners


Number of loggers completing logger education




1. Percent of clients who gained new knowledge/skills, awareness and/or changed attitudes.




2. Percentage of adoption rate for recommendations by clients.
Number of program participants adopting recommended practices.
Adoption of BMP management and harvesting procedures %
Ability to more accurately predict yields of OSB, Paralam and additional wood species from
measures on standing timber - new models
Development and adoption of field based, computer assisted systems to aid optimal bucking -
 use %
Process for commercial production of a high quality, oak OSB panels
Increased use of timber harvest residue. - %




Increase public knowledge and appreciation of natural resources and public awareness of
sustainable natural resource utilization is raised. Target is number of participants reporting
outcome.




General public understands the impact of resource use and management on the quality and
quantity of the resources (i.e. water, rangeland, wildlife, viewsheds). Target is number of
participants reporting outcome.
Raise the understanding of the interaction of natural resource use of Wyoming's economy.
Target is number of participants reporting outcome.




Citizens will make better-informed decisions on natural resource issues and topics. Target is
the number of participants reporting outcome.




Greater public consensus of management of private and public lands resulting in less
litigation and burden on the system. Target is number producers reporting outcome.




To provide unbiased information that will reduce conflict and contribute to the economic and
ecological sustainability of Wyoming communities.Target is number of TV spots developed.

Number of residents, landowners, policymakers will become more aware of the potential
economic, social, and environmental contributions of the urban and suburban forest




Number of landowners and residents will expand entrepreneurial opportunities from the
urban and suburban forest resources
Number of residents and landowners, public and private agencies, and nonprofit
organizations will increase their knowledge of the care and management of the urban forest
Number of homeowners, landowners, municipalities will actively reduce, reuse, and recycle
yard waste
Acres managed as wildlife habitat
Protect or conserve biodiversity and habitat including native plant and animal species Make
better decision regarding natural resource management
Adopt appropriate practices
Improve cover or shelter for wildlife
Improve food availability for wildlife
Improve water availability for wildlife

Increase use of Maine-produced natural resources
Make better decisions using science and technology skills
Test new production techniques
Use new technologies
Start viable alternative enterprises based on sustainable use of natural resources (forest,
marine, agriculture)
Increase use of Maine-produced natural resources
Increase purchase of Maine products
Use services of natural resource professionals




Recycling of paper products will be assisted by the development of relevant paper industry
technologies.




Conflict between stakeholder groups involved in natural resource management will be
mitigated through integrated natural resource management research.
Natural Resource-based businesses and landowners adopt practices that ensure economic
viability
Natural Resource-based businesses and landowners adopt practices that protect land and
water (marine and inland) resources
Natural Resource-based businesses and landowners acquire knowledge and skills to ensure
ecological sustainability
Protect and enhance Maine's natural resources and environment through sustainable
stewardship.
Demonstrate sustainable living principles and practices
Describe forest ecosystem processes
Describe management strategies for forest ecosystems
Describe styles of leadership and their appropriate application
Create demonstration model

Increase the economic and social viability and sustainability of Maine communities.
Protect and enhance Maine's natural resources and environment through sustainable
stewardship.
Demonstrate how to evaluate the credibility of scientific information
Demonstrate how to locate information in multiple ways
Demonstrate observation skills
Demonstrate sustainable living principles and practices
Describe forest ecosystem processes
Describe management strategies for forest ecosystems
Describe principles of wildlife habitat management
Describe wildlife survival needs
Increase use of Maine-produced natural resources
Start viable alternative enterprises based on sustainable use of natural resources (forest,
marine, agriculture)
Use relevant UMCE web-based resources
Enhance the economic and environmental sustainability of Maine agriculture and
aquaculture.
Agroforestry for Underserved Landowners: Number of underserved landowners who planted
riparian buffer strips along waterways.
Agroforestry for Underserved Landowners: Number of underserved landowners who are now
alley cropping with annual crops and high-value hardwoods.
Agroforestry for Underserved Landowners: Number of underserved landowners who began
pursuing forest farming operations of high-value speciality crops such as herbs, medicinal
plants or mushrooms..
Forest Landowner Education: Number of landowners who now understand the ecology of
forest development and succession (using forest management plans or contacting a
professional forester.)
Forest Landowner Education: Number of landowners who improved profitability (marketing)
of forest ownership.




Develop new techniques for study of ecosystems and constituent communities and species.




Develop direct solutions to problems related to the human-natural resource interactions.
# of research publications

Number of landowners regenerating after harvest




Number of Iowans that participate in programming directly focused on the adoption of
practices that protect natural resources including woodlands, wildlife, energy, and
community resources.
Each ACES employee is required to provide a success story on the program activity which
they felt best demonstrates the impacts of their work. These success stories contain the
following elements:
Why: Explain the reason the program was done, or the situation or problem that the
program addressed
What: Specifically what was done and how it was done.
When: If this was a one-time event, the date it occurred. If it is was a series of events, or an
on-going program, when it began.
Where: Specific location-- the county or counties involved.
Who and how many: The "who" includes both who did the program and who
were the clients of the program, as well as how many people were served.
So what: This is the part that gives the real meaning to "success". The basic
question to be answered in this part is "what difference did this program make".
The difference may be measured in terms of dollars, or in changes in habits, lifestyles or
attitudes. Whenever possible use numbers to show the effect of the program. If it is not
possible to use numbers, provide a qualitative measurement like client comments or another
type of testimonial about the program.

Since this program area is very broad in scope and contains multiple Extension Team Projects
Number of persons with increased knowledge on appropriate production technologies.




Number of participants who were evaluated and demonstrated increased knowledge and
skills related to enhancing water quality and sustainability of private forest lands




Number of participants who were evaluated in a follow up and who implement/adopt
practices related to enhancing water quality and sustainability of private forest lands

graduate students and post-docs trained

Percent increase in research support

New personnel in research positions
Gourmet and Medicinal Mushroom Production for Forest Farming in the Northeast




Number of research programs to determine how wildlife responds to ecosystem
management decisions in forest and agricultural systems.




Peer Reviewed Publications




Number of Graduate Students trained




Number of Undergraduate students trained and/or performing investigations
Number of presentations/posters at regional, national or international conferences or
workshops




Number of Grant submissions

Number of agencies better informed about amphibian habitat needs
Number in audience of meeting presentations
Number of resources managers addressed
Number of workshops held
Number of trade publications




Foresters learning about methods to reduce spread of invasive species




CZM manager, environmental resource groups/individuals




Dissemination of results to land ure planners

Environmental sustainability
Improved quality of life
Number of program participants who gain knowledge on natural resource systems and the
environment.
Number of program participants who implement positive natural resource systems and the
environmental practices.
(c) increase the production of oak and reduce maple to eventually achieve a balance
equivalent to forest with natural fire regimes
Scientists potentially employing our findings on forest health, including resilience to drought
stress, and the role of beneficial soil organisms in modeling environmental changes to
drought.




(d) meet federal and state needs for research data related to Ohio forest systems as the
demand arises
# of Extension publications


Chestnut re-establishment




Environmental physiology of Tennessee tree species

Program participants will report/demonstrate KASA changes.
Number of acres of forest management plans meet or exceed NH forest stewardship
standards
Number of forest owners who receive federal or state financial incentives for implementing
conservation practices
Number of new landowners engaged with a forester or natural resources professional for the
first time or for the first time in 10 or more years
Number of volunteers in conservation work in NH communities as a result of training and
continued work by UNHCE primarily in the Coverts and Community Tree Stewards programs
Percent of of NH licensed foresters trained by UNHCE in each of the two-year licensing period
for CEUs
Number of people who influence the forest environment in NH with increased working
knowledge about forest resource management through workshops, seminars, or educational
events annually
Number of NH communities engage in natural resource inventories or natural heritage
assessments to identify natural assets

Number of acres landowners develop conservation easements on in NH acres each year
Number of licensed foresters who increase business opportunities through 300 referrals from
UNHCE staff - thereby sustaining a cadre of private sector licensed foresters offering services
to the public
Number of Tree Steward and Coverts who volunteer each year beyond the required 40 hour
commitment
Number of NH women who improve forest business management as a result of the Women
and the Woods program
Number of professional loggers in NH who increase their knowledge and market forest
products to Sustainable Forestry Initiative companies requiring certified loggers through the
Professional Loggers Program with NH Timberland Owners Association and the UNH
Thompson School
Number of forest owners who receive federal or state financial incentives for implementing
conservation practices

Number of acres of forest management plans that meet or exceed NH forest stewardship
standards.

Number of new landowners engaged with a forester or natural resources professional for the
first time or for the first time in 10 or more years.

Number of people who influence the forest environment in NH with increased working
knowledge about forest resource management through workshops, seminars, or educational
events annually.

Number of NH communities engaged in natural resource inventories or natural heritage
assessments to identify natural assets

Number of acres landowners develop conservation easements on in NH acres each year.

Number of NH licensed foresters trained by UNHCE in each of the two-year period for CEU's

Number of licensed foresters who increase business opportunities through 300 referrals from
UNHCE staff – thereby sustaining a cadre of private sector licensed foresters offering services
to the public.

Number of professional loggers in NH who increase their knowledge and market forest
products to Sustainable Forestry Initiative companies requiring certified loggers through the
Professional Loggers Program with NH Timberland Owners Association and the UNH
Thompson School of Applied Sciences.
Number of volunteers in conservation work in NH communities as a result of training and
continued work by UNHCE primarily in the Coverts and Community Tree Stewards program.

Number of Tree Steward and Coverts who volunteer each year beyond the required 40 hour
commitment




Nebraskans will gain increased awareness and knowledge of natural resources including
wildlife, forest resources and rangeland and the relationship between natural resources
stewardship, sustainability, economic viability and the environment.
Accurate research on woodlot management made available and shared




Percentage of landowners attending Extension Forestry programs that report using new
knowledge.




Percentage of landowners attending Extension Forestry programs that report acquiring new
knowledge.
Outcome measures for this work are both qualitative and quantitative. We will rely on
feedback from stakeholder groups, advisory boards, and individual constituents, as well as
from UW Extension teams on the relevance, importance and impact of our research program.
 The output measures listed earlier will also serve as outcome measures in that patents
graduate degrees, and publications all include an element of critical review and assessment
of uniqueness, originality, contribution to the science and knowledge base, or other
performance criteria. Finally, we will use the Thomson ISI Essential Science Indicator for
agricultural science as a measure of impact of our research program. Our target for this
outcome measure is to be ranked in the top 5 institutions in the United States. We will
continue to develop impact statements for individual projects which have shown exemplary
and significant impact.
Publications:
Percent of permitted acres maintained at appropriate land conditions and water and air
standards.
A major outcome will be the increase in active, viable county forestry and wildlife
committees.
Increase the sustainable agriculture knowledge and skills of Extension Agents, NRCS staff and
other ag professionals in Ohio
Increase the use of the SARE program and resources among farmers, Extension agents, NRCS
staff, and other ag professionals in Ohio

Improve the practices of the farmers of Ohio to include sustainable agriculture approaches}

More Educators will become knowledgeable about sustainable practices, such as cover crops,
organic fruit & vegetable production, sustainable beef production, direct marketing.

More Extension educators will conduct a greater number of programs on sustainable ag topics

Ohio farms will become more economically, environmentally, and socially sustainable
Participants will increase knowledge about crop management, marketing opportunities, and
better environmental management




Through research develop improved management systems for rangeland and forest
resources. Target numbers are management systems developed.
Our major goal is for our client base to make informed decisions about the management of
their natural resources. One way that we accomplish this is to help to connect them to the
resource people who can help them to develop management plans which help them to set
and accomplish goals.
One of the things that we would like to see is an increase in the number of folks who have
and implement woodland management plans. Currently only about 3% of Ohio woodland
owners have management plans.
Also, timber harvesting has a lasting impact on the forest resources. This impact can be
positive or negative, and currently only about 17% of woodland owners seek professional
assistance.
We would like to see an increase in the percentage of folks who have management plans and
utilize professional assistance.
(b) improve the flow of forest raw materials to the extent it meets the needs of Ohio
industries within ten years

‚• Advance research knowledge, both basic and applied, in the areas of silviculture and
horticulture to existing and emerging industry and consumer demand regarding forest
genetics, forest biology, seed production, nutrition, and related topics
(e) and increase the flow of environmental services through conservation actions
commensurate with regional demand, i.e. Buffer zones in forest riparian zones, reforestation,
CREP, carbon sequestration in forests and grassland biomass
Number of timber producers adopting new technologies and practices.
Number of forest producers increasing profitability of their forest operations.
Number of producers improving their environmental stewardship.
Program participants are expected to benefit from the educational training programs,
workshops, and technical assistance offered by extension service personnel. This will be
measured by:

Number of farms adopting best management practices

Number of conservation plans developed

Number of farms with forest management plans

Number of farms adopting new management techniques




Number of adult participants with increased knowledge in management and sustainability of
forest resources.


Number of youth participants with increased knowledge in management and sustainability of
forest resources.
SHORT TERM

Forestry
<div>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<big><big>&bull;</big></big>
    Participants will learn the necessary steps for selling timber and what resources are
available to them for assistance.
<div>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<big><big>&bull;</big></big>
    Attendees will receive information they can use to meet their individual forest
stewardship objectives.
Small Acreages
<div>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<big><big>&bull;</big></big>
    Producers and small acreage landowners will become aware of insect, weed and disease
infestations as they are developing so they can make management decisions in a timely
manner.
<div>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<big><big>&bull;</big></big>
    Applicators will learn the risks associated with applying pesticides and safety precautions
recommended to mitigate those risks, while at the same time, learn techniques in applying
chemical appropriately.
<div>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<big><big>&bull;</big></big>
    Producers will learn to use the GPS in locating weed or other problem areas.
Environmentally Sensitive Management Systems
<div>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<big><big>&bull;</big></big>
    Producers will understand the current rules and regulations relative to animal feeding
operations and how to evaluate their own operation. This also applies to forestry plans,
grazing land plans and any other plans appropriate to the individual operation.
<div>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<big><big>&bull;</big></big>
    Producers will learn to identify and manage their particular IPM issue or natural resource
concern.




Increased (%) GIS database usage by towns




Stewardship plans developed
Number of data sets successfully merged with GINA.




Number of public and private land managers using these models and publications.




Number of land managers that change their practices in response to our research.




Changes in land-use patterns that will support sustainable development




Adoption of models for ecosystem management.
Adoption of criteria for effective conflict resolution




Percentage increase in net profit from land owned and/or managed by participants (Base =
2005).




Change in family-owned forest acres under a systematic plan (base = 2005)




Maximum change in ownership of private forest property as measured by number of acres
statewide changing ownership class.
High school graduation rate (88.8% AL Dept. Educ. 2004-2005, from drop-out rate = 11.18%).
Improvements in community and family integrity should increase this (medium term
outcome).
Educational attainment (post secondary) (AL Dept Educ., Fall 2005, 55.8% of all high school
graduates were enrolled in AL colleges). Success of this program should increase this (long-
term outcome).
The number of small businesses should increase with success of this program. In 2001, US
Bureau of Labor states that 229.7 (in thousands) 'non-employer' firms were existent in AL
(medium term outcome).
AL Dept. Health notes that 4 of Alabama's 67 counties have fewer than 3 physicians per
10,000 residents. Success of this program should increase this (medium term outcome).


Peer-reviewed publications
Number of acres applying BMPs (including prescribed burning) for Ecosystem restoration of
native preiries, shrublands and forests




Regulatory agency and private sector adoption of soil and wetlands criteria for Alaska




Reduce instances of surface water contamination related to resource development
Increased number of farmers and other land managers adopting integrated approaches to
pest management for insects, weeds, alien invasive plants, and plant pathogens in
agricultural and natural ecosystems.
Increases in the amount of agricultural and suburban land where wildlife habitat has been
restored or enhanced.
Ecosystem restoration: fundamental research on ecosystem processes will provide evidence
of the full range of ecological, water quality, and economic benefits associated with
sustaining and enhancing natural ecosystems such as wetlands, forests, riparian corridors,
and tidal marshes, and lead to greater restoration and expansion of areas important for
wildlife habitat and biodiversity.




Number of curricula adopted.
Number of acres (public or private) on which forest or rangeland management was improved
as a result of Extension programming or due to partnerships between Extension and other
agencies and organizations.




Estimated dollars saved or earned by forest, range, fish and wildlife-based income generating
enterprises resulting from Extension programming and/or partnerships between Extension
and other organizations and agencies.
Percentage of program participants that report learning new techniques that may lead to
improvement in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, enhanced forest and rangeland stewardship,
more effective pubic policy, control of invasive species, reduced ecosystem fragmentation,
and/or increased economic opportunities for natural resource-based industries.
Percentage of program participants that apply at least one new technique that may lead to
improvement in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, enhanced forest and rangeland stewardship,
more effective pubic policy, control of invasive species, reduced ecosystem fragmentation,
and/or increased economic opportunities for natural resource-based industries.
% of people adopting NMSU recommendations
Successful natural resource management policies implemented
O: Family forest owners planning to implement specific improved management practices
(e.g., monitor for insect, disease, or animal damage; thin forest trees; complete a forest
management plan; etc.).I: Numbers of family forest owners indicating they

O: Loggers increased awareness, and knowledge related to forest ecology, silviculture, and
forest water quality.I: Number of loggers completing LEAP / percentage increase in loggers'
awareness and knowledge related to forest ecology, silviculture and forest water quality.




O: Loggers planning to implement specific improved forest management practices (e.g.,
monitor for insect, disease, or animal damage).I: Numbers of LEAP Update participants
indicating they will adopt specific improved forest management practice
O: Loggers earning continuing education hours that can be applied to logging credentials.I:
Number of continuing education hours provided to loggers.

O: Loggers enrolled in the Idaho Pro Logger program.I: Number of additional loggers enrolled
in the Idaho Pro-logger program.
O: Natural resource professionals increased knowledge related to specific science and
technology.I: Number of foresters and other natural resource professionals completing
Extension forestry programs / percentage increase in knowledge related to specific forest
science technology.
O: Foresters and other natural resource professionals earn continuing education hours that
can be used for forester credentials.I: Number of continuing education hours provided to
foresters and other natural resource professionals.
O: Other scientists are aware of our research findings.
 I: Number of refereed scientific journal articles.

Number of invited presentations by faculty as a direct result of the success of this program.
Percentage of program participants reporting an increase in skills proficiency in aquatic
animal management and apuatic production systems.




O: An increase in the number of trained graduate students prepared to enter the workforce.
 I: Number of M.S. and Ph.D. candidates relevant to this topic team.
Number of additional direct extension contacts made by volunteers, staff, or county agents
not receiving federal funds as a direct outcome of the work of federally funded faculty
associated with this planned program.
Percentage of program participants who indicated a plan to adopt one or more of the
practices recommended for proper aquatic management.
Number of pond acres in catfish production in Georgia reported annually.
Increase in the farm gate value of catfish production in Georgia. Reported annually in millions
of dollars.

O: Family forest owners' increased awareness, knowledge, and skills related to forest
ecology, silviculture, and forest management.I: Number of family forest owners completing
program / percentage increase in awareness and knowledge of specific fore
Number of stakeholders gaining knowledge on natural resources management, dry forest
ecology and management, microirrigation scheduling, and other soil enhancement and
water conservation practices
Number of persons adopting practices that prevent dry forest fires
Number of fires reported on dry forests
OUTCOME TYPE        KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 EXTENSION        KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 EXTENSION




Condition Outcome                                    25




Condition Outcome                                    25




Condition Outcome                                    25




Action Outcome                                       40




Action Outcome                                       40
Knowledge Outcome   40
Action Outcome       4




Knowledge Outcome   25




Knowledge Outcome   25




Action Outcome      25




Knowledge Outcome   45
Knowledge Outcome   45

Knowledge Outcome   45




Action Outcome      45




Action Outcome      45

Condition Outcome   45

Condition Outcome   45

Condition Outcome   45




Knowledge Outcome   40
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10

Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10

Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20

Knowledge Outcome   20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20

Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20

Action Outcome      20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   14

Knowledge Outcome   14


Action Outcome      14


Action Outcome      14

Condition Outcome   14
Action Outcome      14




Condition Outcome   25




Knowledge Outcome   90
Action Outcome      90




Knowledge Outcome   80




Action Outcome      80




Knowledge Outcome   80




Action Outcome      80




Knowledge Outcome    2




Action Outcome       2
Action Outcome       2




Knowledge Outcome    2

Knowledge Outcome   14

Knowledge Outcome   14
Action Outcome      14




Action Outcome      16   0
Action Outcome      16    0




Action Outcome      16    0




Knowledge Outcome   10   10
Action Outcome   10   10




Action Outcome   10   10




Action Outcome   10   10
Action Outcome      10   10

Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20




Knowledge Outcome    4




Knowledge Outcome


Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   20




Action Outcome      45




Knowledge Outcome

Action Outcome      50
Action Outcome      50




Knowledge Outcome    5




Action Outcome       5




Action Outcome       5




Action Outcome       5
Knowledge Outcome    5




Knowledge Outcome   10   10
Knowledge Outcome   10   10

Condition Outcome        30




Condition Outcome    5

Condition Outcome    5




Condition Outcome    5
Condition Outcome    5




Knowledge Outcome    5


Knowledge Outcome    5

Knowledge Outcome    5
Knowledge Outcome    5

Knowledge Outcome    5


Knowledge Outcome    5

Knowledge Outcome    5




Action Outcome       5


Action Outcome       5




Action Outcome       5


Action Outcome       5


Action Outcome       5

Action Outcome       5


Action Outcome       5

Action Outcome       5




Knowledge Outcome   50   50

Action Outcome      50   50




Condition Outcome   50   50
Condition Outcome   50   50

Action Outcome      50   50


Knowledge Outcome   50   50




Knowledge Outcome        10




Condition Outcome        10
Action Outcome       2
Action Outcome

Action Outcome

Action Outcome
Condition Outcome
Action Outcome




Knowledge Outcome   10




Action Outcome      10
Action Outcome      10




Condition Outcome   10




Condition Outcome   10




Condition Outcome   10


Condition Outcome   20




Condition Outcome   20
Condition Outcome   20

Condition Outcome   20




Action Outcome      20




Action Outcome      20




Action Outcome      50




Knowledge Outcome   50
Action Outcome      25

Action Outcome      25

Knowledge Outcome   25

Condition Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Action Outcome      10

Condition Outcome   20

Condition Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20
Action Outcome      20

Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20

Condition Outcome   20

Action Outcome      38   38

Action Outcome      38   38


Action Outcome      38   38
Knowledge Outcome   38   38

Action Outcome      38   38




Condition Outcome




Condition Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   22

Condition Outcome   50   50




Action Outcome       8




Condition Outcome   30   30
Knowledge Outcome    2




Knowledge Outcome   10




Action Outcome      10

Action Outcome

Action Outcome

Condition Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   5




Condition Outcome   8




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome

Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome


Condition Outcome        5

Knowledge Outcome   20

Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      25


Condition Outcome   38   38




Action Outcome      25
Knowledge Outcome   22


Knowledge Outcome   38   38




Knowledge Outcome   38   38

Knowledge Outcome    5

Action Outcome      60

Knowledge Outcome   60

Knowledge Outcome   60
Action Outcome      60

Knowledge Outcome   60


Knowledge Outcome   60

Action Outcome      60

Action Outcome      60


Knowledge Outcome   60

Action Outcome      60

Knowledge Outcome   60




Knowledge Outcome   60
Action Outcome   60
Action Outcome      60




Knowledge Outcome    1
Knowledge Outcome




Action Outcome      80




Action Outcome      80
Condition Outcome

Condition Outcome   20

Condition Outcome   30   30

Knowledge Outcome   10

Knowledge Outcome   10

Action Outcome      10


Knowledge Outcome   10

Action Outcome      10

Condition Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome        10




Action Outcome      10




Knowledge Outcome   30


Action Outcome      30


Action Outcome      30

Action Outcome      30

Knowledge Outcome   25




Knowledge Outcome   25


Action Outcome      25
Action Outcome      45
Condition Outcome   45
Condition Outcome   45




Knowledge Outcome        20




Knowledge Outcome    8




Knowledge Outcome    8
Condition Outcome   20




Condition Outcome   40




Condition Outcome   40
Knowledge Outcome   0




Knowledge Outcome   0




Knowledge Outcome   0




Knowledge Outcome   0




Knowledge Outcome   0
Knowledge Outcome    0




Condition Outcome   80




Action Outcome      80




Knowledge Outcome   80


Action Outcome


Condition Outcome


Action Outcome
Action Outcome


Action Outcome      15

Action Outcome      15




Knowledge Outcome    0




Knowledge Outcome    0


Action Outcome      15   15

Action Outcome      15   15




Condition Outcome   15   15




Knowledge Outcome    0
Condition Outcome   30




Condition Outcome   30
Knowledge Outcome   30
Action Outcome      30
Action Outcome      22
Condition Outcome   22
Knowledge Outcome   90




Knowledge Outcome   90




Action Outcome      90

Condition Outcome   90


Action Outcome      90




Knowledge Outcome   90
Condition Outcome   90

Action Outcome      90

Action Outcome      12   12

Action Outcome      12   12




Action Outcome      90


Knowledge Outcome   12   12

Knowledge Outcome   12   12
Condition Outcome   12   12

Condition Outcome   12   12




Knowledge Outcome   90


Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome
Condition Outcome
KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 RESEARCH        KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 RESEARCH   PLAN START YEAR




                                                                                 2007




                                                                                 2007




                                                                                 2007




                                50                                               2007




                                50                                               2007
50   2007
 3   2007




25   2007




25   2007




25   2007




     2007
     2007

     2007




     2007




     2007

     2007

     2007

     2007




50   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007

10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007

10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007

20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007

20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007

20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
14   2007

14   2007


14   2007


14   2007

14   2007
14   2007




25   2007




     2007
2007




2007




2007




2007




2007




2007




2007
         2007




         2007

14       2007

14       2007
14       2007




10   0   2007
10    0   2007




10    0   2007




10   10   2007
10   10   2007




10   10   2007




10   10   2007
10   10   2007

          2007
          2007




 3        2007




 9        2007


 9        2007
     2007




45   2007




15   2007

50   2007
50   2007




 0   2007




 0   2007




 0   2007




 0   2007
 0        2007




10   20   2007
10   20   2007

     30   2007




 5        2007

 5        2007




 5        2007
 5        2007




 5        2007


 5        2007

 5        2007
 5        2007

 5        2007


 5        2007

 5        2007




 5        2007


 5        2007




 5        2007


 5        2007


 5        2007

 5        2007


 5        2007

 5        2007




50   50   2007

50   50   2007




50   50   2007
50   50   2007

50   50   2007


50   50   2007




     10   2007




     10   2007
  0   2007
100   2007

100   2007

100   2007
100   2007
100   2007




 10   2007




 10   2007
10   2007




10   2007




10   2007




10   2007


     2007




     2007
     2007

     2007




20   2007




20   2007




50   2007




50   2007
     2007

     2007

     2007

10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007

20   2007

20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007

20   2007
20   2007

20   2007

41   2007

41   2007


41   2007
41        2007

41        2007




14        2007




14        2007
10        2007

50   50   2007




 8        2007




          2007
 0   2007




10   2007




10   2007

15   2007

15   2007

15   2007
 5   2007




 7   2007




18   2007




18   2007




18   2007
18       2007




18       2007

18       2007
18       2007
18       2007
18       2007
18       2007




18       2007




18       2007




18       2007


     5   2007

20       2007

20       2007
25   2007


41   2007




25   2007
10   2007


41   2007




41   2007

20   2007

     2007

     2007

     2007
2007

2007


2007

2007

2007


2007

2007

2007




2007
2007
    2007




1   2007
3   2007




    2007




    2007
12   2007

20   2007

     2007

10   2007

10   2007

10   2007


10   2007

10   2007

10   2007
     2007




10   2007




30   2007


30   2007


30   2007

30   2007

25   2007




25   2007


25   2007
45   2007
45   2007
45   2007




     2007




 7   2007




 7   2007
     2007




35   2007




35   2007
30   2007




20   2007




20   2007




15   2007




15   2007
15        2007




          2007




          2007




          2007


15   15   2007


15   15   2007


15   15   2007
15   15   2007


 9        2007

 9        2007




15        2007




15        2007


15   15   2007

15   15   2007




15   15   2007




30        2007
2007




2007
2007
     2007
10   2007
10   2007
25   2007




25   2007




25   2007

25   2007


25   2007




25   2007
25        2007

25        2007

 0   12   2007

 0   12   2007




25        2007


 0   12   2007

 0   12   2007
 0   12   2007

 0   12   2007




25        2007


10        2007
10   2007
10   2007
                       1862 EXTENSION    1890 EXTENSION    1862 RESEARCH
QUANTITATIVE TARGET    OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE




                  200 y




                  200 y




                  100 y




                      5y




                      5y
 10 y
  0y




 30 y   y




300 y   y




 50 y   y




  0y
   0y

   0y




   0y




   0y

   0y

   0y

  45 y




  10   y
  40   y
1520   y
 260   y
  20   y
 180   y
  20 y
  55 y

  20 y
     y
 110 y
     y
  25 y
  60 y
  10 y
 110 y
     y
  20 y
1720 y
1720 y

  25 y
2435 y
2435 y
1730 y
     y
 220 y
  50 y
     y
  40 y
     y
     y

  20 y
     y
  10 y
 140 y
 100 y

 120 y
 150 y
     y
     y
 240 y
     y
 120 y
     y
     y

     y
     y
  10 y
   50   y
   10   y
  240   y
   15   y

    0y      y


    0y


    0y

   15 y
      y




35000 y     y




    0y
   0y




 240 y




  30 y




 150 y




  10 y




  50 y




5000 y
10000 y




   25 y

      y

      y
      y




23000 y   y
 3800 y       y




25000 y       y




  500 y   y   y
   250 y   y   y




200000 y   y   y




    10 y       y
 50000 y     y

   150 y
  1500 y




         y   y




150000       y


     0       y
        y




   65 y




    0       y

60000 y
 20     y




200 y   y




 25 y   y




  2y    y




 12 y   y
250000 y   y




   750 y
 300 y

  15




  75 y   y

   0y    y




2500 y   y
   0y    y




   0y    y


   0y    y

   0y    y
    0y    y

    0y    y


    0y    y

    0y    y




 2000 y   y


  200 y   y




  200 y   y


    0y    y


 3500 y   y

  750 y   y


 1250 y   y

20000 y   y




 2000 y

 1200 y




10000 y
1000 y

  20 y


  10 y




  70     y




  40     y
1200 y   y
   5     y

   0     y

   0     y
   0     y
   0     y




 500 y




 100 y
100 y




100 y




  0y




 10 y


300 y




 10 y
600 y

100 y




    y




    y




        y




        y
       y

       y

       y

   0   y
  40   y
  50   y
  40   y
  25   y
   0   y

   0y

   0   y
 100   y
 100   y
 120   y
  20   y
  20   y
 570   y
 360   y
 240   y
  30   y

  10 y
 610 y

   0y

1200       y

1200       y


1200       y
1800 y   y

1800 y   y




   0         y




   0         y
   5         y

  10 y




1000 y       y




   6y
2400 y   y




4000 y   y




2000 y   y

   5     y

   5     y

   1     y
     y




 0   y




15   y




26   y




27   y
  52     y




   9     y

   3     y
1000     y
   5     y
  10     y
  10     y




6000     y




  25     y




   0     y


   0

7740 y

3870 y
    0     y


    0     y




    0     y
    3y


          y




          y

18700 y

20000 y

   40 y

   50 y
  500 y

   80 y


 1000 y

   10 y

10000 y


  100 y

   25 y

   50 y




  250 y
y
     y




5000 y   y
 0     y




50 y




90 y
160         y

 65 y       y

 30 y   y

  0y

  0y

  0y


  0y

  0y

200 y
     y




3        y




0y


0y


0y

0y

0        y




0        y


0        y
2000 y       y
1600 y       y
 800 y       y




  75     y




1149 y




 379 y
4000 y




  10 y




  10     y
1000   y




   5   y




   5   y




   1   y




   1   y
  2     y




  2y




 10 y




  3y


 89     y


 56     y


230     y
      0         y


     12 y       y

1000000 y




      0         y




      0         y


      0y    y

      0y    y   y




      0y    y   y




      1         y
  10000 y




1000000 y
85 y
35 y
40 y
 0y
 300 y




  40 y




 230 y

2000 y


  35 y




 150 y
2000 y

   1y

   2     y

  75     y




   2         y


 700 y

  65     y
2300 y

   0y




 400 y


  50         y
0   y
3   y
1890 RESEARCH
OUTCOME MEASURE   ACTUAL AMOUNT




                                  60




                                   0




                                   2




                                   5




                                   5
 10
  0




 27




406




 45




275
 275

 275




 275




 220

 200

 210

   0




  10
1127
1259
2093
 661
 699
   12
   11

   17
  120
  671
  101
   72
  143
  221
  530
 1814
 1783
 1657
  502

  412
 2536
 2631
 1862
  118
 1127
  106
  228
 2093
   45
   35

   85
    8
  100
   11
   80

   17
    2
   47
  671
  101
86972
   34
   20
   37

   18
  178
   12
    104
    107
     57
      0

     53


      0


    162

      0
    254




1650000




    131
  70




 200




 300




 150




   5




   0




2688
12000




  207

 1300

   14
   24




22877
     3911




    24728




y   14000
y    1000




    50000




       10
80000

  278
  174




    1




  600


    0
375




  0




  0

  0
  2




196




120




  3




 85
264270




  1572
y   857

y     0




     28

      0




    777
      0




      0


      0

      0
     0

     0


     0

     0




   601


   286




   402


     0


  8825

   689


  2303

  8531




  2892

  1092




154380
    1000

       9


     247




y     70




y     45
345
  0

  0

  0
  0
  0




500




100
150




  0




  0




 30


  0




  7
328

 13




  0




  0




  0




  0
    4

  600

 2240

    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0

    0

    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0

    0
37825

    0

    1

    0


    0
 1148

  354




    0




    0
   55

    1




46060




    0
1900




6190




2111

   5

   5

   1
 0




 3




17




28




29
       49




       15

        1
        0
        0
        3
        0




       15




        0




        0


y       0

    20562

     3659
    0


    0




    0
   23


    0




    0

    0

29339

  141

  115
  470

  234


 6353

   25

12500


  483

  144

   25




  423
0
   0




5138
 0




74




97
182

 60

  0

113

 67

 20


113

246

 25
76




 1




 0


 0


 0

 0

 0




 0


 0
3765
3012
1506




  81




1057




 327
 0




10




 1
25




 5




 0




 1




 6
      2




      2




     16




      2


y    89


y    56


y   230
y    0


    15

     0




     1




     0


     0

y    0




y    0




     3
  24560




5450000
82
56
 0
 0
255




 52




164

  0


 82




570
   0

   0

   2

   2




   3


1708

   0
2708

   5




   0


 120
5
0
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - ISSUES


Developers, engineers, architects, businesses and property owners requested technical
information to protect landscapes and the environment and to comply with the VI
government permitting requirements for building.




Many educators, students, environmental groups and the general public want to increase
their understanding of V.I. ecosystems and the effects of human alterations to natural
ecosystems.




For nearly a century Connecticut state law has mandated that each city and town appoint a
Tree Warden and that this public official is then responsible for all municipal trees. However,
Connecticut state law does not specify what skills and knowledge Tree Wardens must posses.
 To protect both the public and the urban forest resource, Tree Wardens need knowledge of
tree biology, tree care, hazard tree assessment, public participation, tree law, and meeting
management.


Connecticut is the fifth most densely populated state yet retains fifty-nine percent forest
coverage. This extreme population density causes factors that not only shorten the lives of
municipal trees (along streets, in parks, around schools, for example) but also creates
hazardous ones. In spite of being a wealthy state, Connecticut municipalities typically do not
adequately fund municipal forestry/tree care operations thereby undermining the health of
public and jeopardizing public safety. Volunteers who receive quality and timely community
forestry education and training are able to augment community forestry efforts.
Connecticut's 1.8 million acres of forest provide raw material for over 350 forest products
processing and manufacturing firms, which employ 3,600 citizens and contribute over $450
million annually to the state's economy. They also clean the air and water, provide habitat for
wildlife, and provide recreational opportunities for nearly a million citizens each year. Almost
85% of Connecticut's forest is privately owned. Research shows that Connecticut is losing
some 6,000 acres of commercially harvestable forest annually to development and
fragmentation, and that the average forested parcel size has declined 34% over the past 20
years.




Arkansas has 18.9 million acres of forest owned by more than 200,000 individuals. Arkansas'
natural resources contribute to more than 250,000 jobs and more than $17 billion in value-
added to Arkansas' economy. Research publications report knowledge created that enhances
the sustainability and productivity of Arkansas' natural resources and protects the ecosystem
services that provide clean air and water necessary for the health and welfare of the entire
state population.

Arkansas has 18.9 million acres of forestlands owned by >200,000 landowners. Arkansas'
natural resources provide >250,000 jobs and generates approximately $17 billion annually in
value-added to the states economy. Wildlife science creates knowledge that ensures the
sustainability and enhances the productivity of Arkansas' forestlands and world-renowned
wildlife populations, including waterfowl, black bear, white-tailed deer, and wild turkey.




Landowners and natural resource managers make decisions that effect not only the lands
they manage but resources of adjacent and downstream lands. New technology in the form
of GIS and GPS can assist theses managers in more accurate acreage estimates, producing
high quality maps and as a tool for making decisions based on the best available data.
However many of the decision makers are not aware of the technology and its uses or the
data that is available to guide their decisions.
Natural resource managers want their clients (i.e., landowners) to take ownership for the
management of their woodlands. For that to happen, the client needs to have a basic
understanding of plant growth as it relates to both the individual tree and the larger forest
stand.
Natural resource managers want their clients (i.e., landowners) to take ownership in the
management of their woodlands. Not only do landowners need to understand basic forest
ecology principles, but they must also have a basic knowledge of simple forest management
principles and practices in order to communicate effectively with their resource professionals.
Natural resource managers want their clients (i.e., landowners) to be motivated and
comfortable with contacting them.


Natural resource managers want their clients (i.e., landowners) to implement the
management plan that is developed and not let it rest on a shelf or in a filing cabinet.




Missouri's woodlands need attention now, not when we can "fit it into our schedules."
Healthy forests tomorrow require action today.




Landowners care because they are interested in seeing the results of their planning and labor.




Conservation commissions in the Quinebaug-Shetucket National Heritage Corridor (QSHC)
known as the Last Green Valley, are responsible for maintaining an inventory of all natural
resources and open spaces in their communities and providing advice for the protection of
resources to the regulatory land use boards and commissions in each town. Prioritizing
resources for the purpose of land protection can be streamlined using Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) but conservation commissions in small towns often do not have
staff or members with GIS expertise necessary to conduct prioritization analysis.
Providing households, nutrient applicators, landowners, farmers, and natural resource
professionals the tools and knowledge necessary to implement sustainable natural resource
management is a key goal of this program. An estimate of the acres actually impacted by our
efforts helps stakeholders and the agency gage success.




Given the crucial role that forests play in water quality issues and in the economic support of
about $4 billion they bring to the state, providing forestry education to private landowners
has the potential to facilitate sustainable forestry practices and improve the economic well-
being of forestland owners. The goal is to improve WV citizen‚'s knowledge of forests and
natural resources through education, demonstration, and research.
Local extension agents help commercial businesses and private landholders improve
themselves, their property, and their investments through forestry stewardship.




Given the crucial role that forests play in water quality issues and in the economic support of
about $4 billion they bring to West Virginia, providing forestry education and outreach to
those involved with forest harvesting and its associated activities has the potential to
facilitate sustainable forestry based businesses while maintaining or improving our natural
environments.




Sustainable forestry based businesses can be maintained and improved if they take
advantage of research-based best management programs.




Providing forestry education and outreach to those involved with forest harvesting and its
associated activities has the potential to facilitate sustainable forestry based businesses while
maintaining or improving our natural environments.


Providing forestry education and outreach to those involved with forest harvesting and its
associated activities has the potential to facilitate sustainable forestry based businesses while
maintaining or improving our natural environments if participants are willing to try new
harvest systems in their operations.

West Virginia youth/adults need to gain a greater awareness of the food, fiber, and natural
resources systems and its role in the economy and society. With technological advances and
increased urban/non-farm populations, individuals are now several generations removed
from actual working knowledge of agricultural production. The public (youth and adult) are
not prepared to make informed decisions that ensure quality and adequate food and fiber
while also maintaining the environment.
The agricultural knowledge of West Virginias youths and adults, including knowledge of meat
quality, needs to be enhanced so that they will have the ability to make informed decisions
related to the production of food and fiber while maintaining a high-quality educational
environment.
The agricultural knowledge of West Virginias youths and adults, including knowledge of meat
quality, needs to be enhanced so that they will have the ability to make informed decisions
related to the production of food and fiber while maintaining a high-quality educational
environment.




Youth need to increase life skills development through involvement in 4-H agricultural and
natural resources subject matter programming.




The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) requires the restoration of
post-mining land-use capability to a level "equal to or better than" that which preceded
mining. The majority of coal-mined lands in Appalachia were forested prior to mining;
however, most mined lands are reclaimed to pasture. Reasons for this is that reclamation
practices tend to inhibit tree growth: 1) excessive compaction of the spoil, 2) unsuitable or
sometimes toxic rooting material, and 3) competition for nutrients and water by aggressive
and often invasive herbaceous species
Kentucky is a heavily forested state (47% of land area). These forests provide an estimated
economic impact of more than $6 billion annually. Unfortunately, our forests have
experienced numerous abuses and attacks. These include exploitive timber harvests, forest
fires, insects, diseases, and invasive plants to name a few. In order to better address these
issues woodland owners need information about forest management and its vital role in
ensuring the future sustainability of Kentucky's woodlands and the important role they play.




Kentucky has more miles of navigable river than any other state in the country. Kentucky
rivers, streams, lakes and reservoirs are not only used for drinking and recreation, but also for
an expanding food production, food processing and landscape plant production industry.
Kentucky's limited water supply is threatened by pollution and overuse. According to the
Kentucky Division of Water, education and outreach are key elements in the effort to prevent
pollution and to conserve water.

Sixty-one percent of Virginia is forested (15.8 million acres). Between 2001-2004, this
acreage decreased by 26,000 acres a year. Current estimates predict Virginia will lose over a
million acres of forestland in the next 25 years. Of the 15.8 million acres of forestland, 13.0
million acres is privately owned. The single largest category of owners is the 384,000
individuals or families who own in excess of 10.1 million acres. While family ownership
ranges from a few acres to a few thousand acres, most parcels are relatively small. About half
of the land owned by families is in parcels of 75 acres or less. Many of these owners have
little or no experience with forest management, however proper management is essential to
the health and productivity of Virginia's forests, and needed to ensure a sustainable stream
of forest-related products.
Threats to Virginia's forests, waterways, and wildlife have raised concerns about enhancing
the conservation and management of our natural resources. Public involvement is needed to
expand our natural resource agency workforce to complete more projects to maintain,
restore, and monitor natural resources and to educate adults and youth about woods,
wildlife, and water.




Agricultural land uses in Grayson County account for 46% of total land use including animal
agriculture, Christmas trees, and pumpkin production. Due to the elevation and steep slopes,
much of the land is highly erodable. Negative impacts of erosion on water quality have been
well documented. Less emphasized is the lower productivity of eroded soils due to nutrient
loss. One best management practice often suggested is continuous no-till practices for corn
grown for livestock and on land used for pumpkins. The goal of this system is to limit bare
earth exposure. Most farmers adopting this system have noted productivity improvements
with little explanation why. Also, producers seek ways to improve systems to lead to greater
agricultural and environmental sustainability.




In 2007, Virginia's forests contributed $30 billion annually to the economy, and supported the
single largest manufacturing industry in the state, ranking first in employment, wages and
salaries. In addition to the direct economic impact, Virginia's forests contribute to the state in
other ways, including protection of water quality. Virginia's logging contractors are essential
to providing raw materials to Virginia's forest industry as well as protecting water quality
during forest harvesting. Many Virginia forest products companies require logging
contractors to complete Sustainable Harvesting and Resource Professional (SHARP) Logger
training as a condition of a wood supply business relationship.
Current research indicates a loss of Virginia forestland to land use changes at an estimated
26,000 acres per year, and Virginia farmland at over 80,000 acres per year. Nottoway County
is ranked fourth in the state for total stumpage harvest value income of over $7,250,000
annually. The Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program (VFLEP) developed a short-
course in 2006 entitled "Forest and Farmland Conservation Strategies" to assist landowners
and community leadership with decisions related to prevalent change in land use to
development. Land use concerns remain a common theme in Extension situation analysis and
have been observed as a constant news item that citizens expect local leadership to take
action on.




Biomass energy sources can reduce energy usage impacts on the environment. The
production of electricity and fuels from biomass resources reduces pollution, greenhouse
gases, energy usage and dependence on foreign energy. Vermonts agricultural economy is
causing some traditional dairy farms to look at diversifying towards enterprises such as
organic farming, and nursery and bedding crops. Energy produced from crops such as hay,
corn soybeans or canola could keep Vermont agricultural viable.
Forests are an important resource because they provide things like clean water, timber
products/sales, recreation, and wildlife habitat. In many cases however, forests need
management in order to provide these benefits. A written forest management plan will
provide the blueprint for landowners to manage their property appropriately and obtain the
goals they have established




Forestry faculty worked on problems relevant to carbon storage of forests and the effect of
large disturbances. Other research included the hydrological effects in forests, native plants
that show medicinal properties, and the biological basis of growth and stand relations,
factors affecting long-term productivity, and optimizing the recovery of lumber from logs.
Forest products faculty worked to improve production and marketing of lumber and
composite wood products and assisted with safety during harvesting. Research included the
utilization of virgin and recycled wood fiber for new products.




Private woodland ownership dominates ecosystems in many eastern states, yet the majority
of owners do not have management plans or seek professional advice before making
decisions. The importance of greater public benefits from these lands warrants improved
methods to appeal to a larger segment of the landowner population than has been
heretofore "reached" with a conservation message through traditional means such as county
foresters, conventional extension programming, and promotional means such as Tree Farm.
This study will assess the potential use of a locally relevant and interactive Internet tool (with
interactive spatial information, links to other sources of information, and opportunities to
submit questions, and read the answers and discussion of others) to reach woodland owners
with information about forest management and the potential for cooperation at scales
greater than their own properties, which is important for ecosystem function and resulting
greater public services.
In the mid-1980s, around 1.6 million acres of grasslands and wetlands were planted/restored
in the mid-continental U.S. under the Conservation Reserve Program and similar state
programs. Much of this land was, however, planted to a few non-native grasses or cultivars
as a cost-effective means of protecting soil from erosion. While these programs initially were
motivated by concerns over soil loss and water quality impairment, they soon became
recognized as the first potential opportunity for landscape-scale habitat restoration
worldwide.




Land owners interested in: productive efficiency and sustainability of forest and range
production systems; reforestation with native hardwoods; reduce or minimize the impact of
invasive species on forest and rangelands; interplant crops with native hardwoods to provide
a source of income; landowners with exotic hardwoods looking for economically viable
options. Food waste generators with disposal problems and pig farmers faced with high cost
of feed.
Land owners interested in: productive efficiency and sustainability of forest and range
production systems; reforestation with native hardwoods; reduce or minimize the impact of
invasive species on forest and rangelands; interplant crops with native hardwoods to provide
a source of income; landowners with exotic hardwoods looking for economically viable
options. Food waste generators with disposal problems and pig farmers faced with high cost
of feed.
Land owners interested in: productive efficiency and sustainability of forest and range
production systems; reforestation with native hardwoods; reduce or minimize the impact of
invasive species on forest and rangelands; interplant crops with native hardwoods to provide
a source of income; landowners with exotic hardwoods looking for economically viable
options. Food waste generators with disposal problems and pig farmers faced with high cost
of feed.
Land owners interested in: productive efficiency and sustainability of forest and range
production systems; reforestation with native hardwoods; reduce or minimize the impact of
invasive species on forest and rangelands; interplant crops with native hardwoods to provide
a source of income; landowners with exotic hardwoods looking for economically viable
options. Food waste generators with disposal problems and pig farmers faced with high cost
of feed.
Land owners interested in: productive efficiency and sustainability of forest and range
production systems; reforestation with native hardwoods; reduce or minimize the impact of
invasive species on forest and rangelands; interplant crops with native hardwoods to provide
a source of income; landowners with exotic hardwoods looking for economically viable
options. Food waste generators with disposal problems and pig farmers faced with high cost
of feed.




**Note-The Marketing measures are consolidated into this measure for this year.
Rural Maryland is rapidly changing with increase pressure for development and a major influx
of new residents. Maryland AGNR businesses are under pressure to diversify and explore
alternative income options to assist their businesses become more competitive and
profitable.
Local land use ordinances, at times create a barrior to new and innovative business ventures
for the AGNR community. Research and educational programs need to be developed to
assist local policy makers make wise land use decisions that will assist AGNR businesses
become more profitable in the future.
The majority of farms in St. Mary's County County, Maryland are considered small farms, with
the average farm size of 62 acres and gross income of $33,906.00. The majority of these
farmers relied on tobacco as their chief source of income. In the year 2000, the state of
Maryland initiated a tobacco buyout program which resulted in 86% of eligible Maryland
producers exiting the tobacco industry. In addition, the general population base has
increased by 37% in the last 15 years. The rural landscape is irrevocably changing, leaving
new, beginning and transitioning small farmers searching for enterprises to sustain their small
farms. Due to the increased demand for locally produced wine and wine grapes in Maryland,
transitioning farmers expressed interest in raising grapes; however numerous questions
arose as to the feasibility of the crop including growing techniques, profitability, risk
assessment, labor requirements, and cash flow projections. An extension program was
created to educate small farmers regarding the potential for grape production. A research
vineyard was established to evaluate varieties and as a teaching tool. Numerous education
events were conducted including twilight tours, workshops, on-farm demonstrations and
individual site consultations. The extension program collaborated with the regional
Agricultural Development Commission to develop a matching grant program for purchase of
grape vines. Over 600 new or transitioning small farmers received information on grape
growing. A grape growing association has been formed and 29 operators participated in the
grape grant program with 12 new vineyards planted or planned for 2007-08. When asked to
evaluate the overall quality of a 1 day Beginning Grower Workshop attended by 85 small
farmers on a scale of 1-10 (1=not worth my time, 10-excellent meeting), participants
responded with an average rating of 9.33. In addition, 98.3% of the respondents indicated a
4 or 5 rating using a 1-5 Likert scale when asked to rate the specific topics presented.
Small farmers and limited resources farmers are interested in controlling their erosion
problems.
There is a need for participants to use best management practices learned in sustainable
management of forest systems and other natural resources
There is a need for participants to use best management practices learned in sustainable
management of forest systems and other natural resources.


There is a need for participants to use best management practices learned in sustainable
management of forest systems and other natural resources.
There is a need for participants to use best management practices learned in sustainable
management of forest systems and other natural resources.
There is a need for participants to use best management practices learned in sustainable
management of forest systems and other natural resources.

There is a need for participants to use best management practices learned in sustainable
management of forest systems and other natural resources.




Urban forests and their effects on society and the environment were increasingly recognized
and important, yet little was known about this resource. To have a comprehensive and
integrated urban forest resource management system, urban planners need to utilize the full
range of technological resources at their disposal to mitigate the effects of air quality,
ultraviolet (UV) radiation loads, carbon dioxide, loss of
green space and wildlife, urban pest, storm water runoff, rising utility costs, etc. In 2005,
hurricanes Katrina and Rita seriously impacted Louisiana leaving them with large amounts of
tree residues in addition to lost trees. Also, plant biosecurity issues came to the forefront for
both research and extension.




Urban forests and their effects on society and the environment were increasingly recognized
and important, yet little was known about this resource. To have a comprehensive and
integrated urban forest resource management system, urban planners need to utilize the full
range of technological resources at their disposal to mitigate the effects of air quality,
ultraviolet (UV) radiation loads, carbon dioxide, loss of
green space and wildlife, urban pest, storm water runoff, rising utility costs, etc. In 2005,
hurricanes Katrina and Rita seriously impacted Louisiana leaving them with large amounts of
tree residues in addition to lost trees. Also, plant biosecurity issues came to the forefront for
both research and extension.
At PCC-CRE, planting materials of root crops were distributed to farmers to increased their
food production capacity and biological control agents were released in farms infested with
insects that were affecting the growth and development of their crops. These activities
hopefully would improve their productivity and yield in their farms. Ways to test, clean and
decontaminate rainwater catchments are now available to the school children and the public.
 The dry litter waste management project has served as a model for swine farmers to
promote water conservation and prevent environmental pollution.

At CMI-CRE, recent studies have stated that one of the leading causes of death for
Micronesians is diabetes. Therefore, it is important that people begin eating and living
healthy. Bacterial tests have indicated that 50% of the previous water tests indicated that
the communities' collected rain water were not safe for drinking and cooking.

At COM-FSM-CRE, about 30 youths and adults have started establishing their farms and
gardens, cultivating different varieties of banana, colocasia taro, sweet potato and noni. Nine
youth teams (78 youths) were taught environmental science through water testing and later
shared their information with adult members in the communities.




Wyoming's tremendous natural resources support an abundance of recreational
opportunities but they also provide the basis for a number of industries that are very
important to the state's economy. Forty-eight percent of the land area in Wyoming is publicly-
owned and is managed by government agencies. Private lands are also important to
watersheds, wildlife habitats and other values significant to all citizens. Despite the many
natural resource-related opportunities, many Wyomingites are not directly tied to natural
resources and agriculture. This results in a lack of knowledge and experiences regarding
natural resource systems, their management and the industries they support.

Wyoming's tremendous natural resources support an abundance of recreational
opportunities but they also provide the basis for a number of industries that are very
important to the state's economy. Forty-eight percent of the land area in Wyoming is publicly-
owned and is managed by government agencies. Private lands are also important to
watersheds, wildlife habitats and other values significant to all citizens. Despite the many
natural resource-related opportunities, many Wyomingites are not directly tied to natural
resources and agriculture. This results in a lack of knowledge and experiences regarding
natural resource systems, their management and the industries they support.
Wyoming's tremendous natural resources support an abundance of recreational
opportunities but they also provide the basis for a number of industries that are very
important to the state's economy. Forty-eight percent of the land area in Wyoming is publicly-
owned and is managed by government agencies. Private lands are also important to
watersheds, wildlife habitats and other values significant to all citizens. Despite the many
natural resource-related opportunities, many Wyomingites are not directly tied to natural
resources and agriculture. This results in a lack of knowledge and experiences regarding
natural resource systems, their management and the industries they support.

Wyoming's tremendous natural resources support an abundance of recreational
opportunities but they also provide the basis for a number of industries that are very
important to the state's economy. Forty-eight percent of the land area in Wyoming is publicly-
owned and is managed by government agencies. Private lands are also important to
watersheds, wildlife habitats and other values significant to all citizens. Despite the many
natural resource-related opportunities, many Wyomingites are not directly tied to natural
resources and agriculture. This results in a lack of knowledge and experiences regarding
natural resource systems, their management and the industries they support.

Wyoming's tremendous natural resources support an abundance of recreational
opportunities but they also provide the basis for a number of industries that are very
important to the state's economy. Forty-eight percent of the land area in Wyoming is publicly-
owned and is managed by government agencies. Private lands are also important to
watersheds, wildlife habitats and other values significant to all citizens. Despite the many
natural resource-related opportunities, many Wyomingites are not directly tied to natural
resources and agriculture. This results in a lack of knowledge and experiences regarding
natural resource systems, their management and the industries they support.

Wyoming's tremendous natural resources support an abundance of recreational
opportunities but they also provide the basis for a number of industries that are very
important to the state's economy. Forty-eight percent of the land area in Wyoming is publicly-
owned and is managed by government agencies. Private lands are also important to
watersheds, wildlife habitats and other values significant to all citizens. Despite the many
natural resource-related opportunities, many Wyomingites are not directly tied to natural
resources and agriculture. This results in a lack of knowledge and experiences regarding
natural resource systems, their management and the industries they support.




As urban communities continue to grow and expand as the population increases, tree
populations usually suffer as a result. Either through outright removal, severe pruning or
damage due to construction, trees and tree parts are delivered to the landfill for disposal.
The landfills are already overburdened and these organic materials can be recycled and/or
reused in many ways and can generate economic opportunities for residents.
Because trees appear to exist without much care, home owners, maintenance crews and
others residents assume that they don't need attention. It isn't until a limb suddenly crashes
to the ground or the tree suddenly falls over exposing decaying roots that most resident
realize that trees need attention. Urban trees in particular need even more attention as they
are in close proximity to pedestrians.




Habitat Stewards: As Maines forests and former agricultural lands are increasingly developed
for housing and business uses, their ecological values are largely lost. Lawns dominate and
invasive exotic plant species thrive. Water and air quality suffer, soil erosion increases,
wildlife presence lessens, and peoples experience of nature is limited to vacation excursions.

Maple Syrup Value-added Products: Maple syrup production in Maine has increased by nearly
50 percent in the last decade. Maine ranks second in syrup production nationally and has the
largest producing county in the nation. Ninety-five percent is sold as bulk syrup, two percent
is sold wholesale by the gallon, and three percent is sold direct to consumers. Since bulk
syrup is the least profitable product, profits could be maximized by converting a portion of
the crop to value-added products, such as maple candy and maple cream.




Recycling paper products has increased as the potential impact of the volume of waste
products on the environment is better understood. Water-based acrylic pressure sensitive
adhesives are used in the paper industry, and making these soluble so that they can be
recycled is of interest to all those involved in recycling.




Prior to this MAES research on using stocking charts for ruffed grouse management, foresters
were presented with an either/or scenario of either managing for trees (conifers) or
managing for grouse habitat (aspen.)
Massachusetts relies on its forests, soils, waters, and scenic landscapes to provide the much-
needed employment, income, products, recreation and ecosystem services that meet its
citizens' needs and drive its healthy local economies. Maintaining a healthy local economy is
a major concern for many communities in Massachusetts and the value of their natural
resources serves as a major incentive for their conservation. Natural resource-based
businesses (agriculture, equine industries, forest based businesses, fishing, shellfish, outdoor
recreation and tourism, horticultural green industries, and turf) can have a substantial,
positive impact on the health of local economies and are important tools for maintaining
open space.
Forestry ecology research is used to determine the influence of factors such as herbivores,
fragmentation and fires on natural communities of plants, mammal and insect populations.

Scientists investigate new alternatives for capturing benefits from woody plant production
systems. Work is underway to evaluate the potential for using short-rotation poplars as a
source of biomass and as a method of sequestering carbon on floodplain sites in the lower
Midwest.

There is a need for participants to use best management practices learned in sustainable
management of forest systems and other natural resources.




The public places a high value on natural resources. Fishing, hunting, and other wildlife-
related activities alone directly contribute over $110 billion annually to the U.S. economy.
Forestry industries contribute hundreds of billions of dollars more in timber value alone, let
alone recreational values. Management of those resources in the public trust and in private
hands is, then, a high priority for Extension Ag and Natural Resource Programs.




Alabama is experiencing growth in population and a shift from rural to urban-based
population. This pusts increasing pressure on natural resources, expecially water. Water
quality and quantity are two issues that are of great importance to everyone in the state.
School children, youth, farmers and officials from government agencies had increased
knowledge and awareness on importance of conservation and preservation of different
varieties of root crops in Palau, use of tissue culture technique as method for the rapid mass
propagation of taro, control of pest of crops using IPM techniques with the aim of preserving
environmental health. They also became aware of new ways to control animal waste that
flows down to water sources and protects the environment and rainwater catchments.

The program educated and provided awareness to young and old, farmers and non-farmers,
government and private businesses, health and environmental agencies in order to protect or
preserve our plant genetic resources, and the pristine natural resources of the island. There
is now continuous availability of information related to current technologies in agricultural
science, promotion of clean water conservation, and prevention of animal waste and
contaminants from polluting our water sources and environment. In addition, the Dry Litter
Waste Management Project was adopted and constructed for demonstration to swine
operators on Palau because the traditional swine operation uses lots of water to clean the
pens that washes away the animal waste to the water sources and the environment. This
project promotes water conservation and prevents animal waste contaminants to the
environment and water sources.

At CMI-CRE, food security and water quality and quantity have always been important issues
that needed to be addressed. Extension staffs have worked hard as a team to find




Over 500 watershed organizations have formed around the state in response to local water
resources and land-use issues, but most are in desperate need of education and training on
best management practices related to watersheds.




Sixty percent of the land area of PA is forests and contributes watershed to both the
Chesapeake Bay and Mississippi watersheds. PA water resources are extremely challenged
due to mining and other abuses. More than 50 percent of the over one million water
supplies in PA fail to meet at least one drinking water standard. The water resources
originating in Pennsylvania forests affect not only PA citizens, but other states as well.

There is a strong demand for MS and PhD level graduates by various employers.
Results are important to state and government, landowners and other environmentally
concerned stakeholders.
Results are important to state and government, landowners and other environmentally
concerned stakeholders.
Forest farming, including production of specialty forest mushrooms, is an economically and
ecologically sustainable agroforesty system, well suited to the Northeast, with demonstrated
potential for improving the value of forest resources through production of food, medicinals
and ornamentals, while providing incentives for effective private forest management and
environmental conservation. Forest log-grown Shitake mushrooms sell for two to eight times
more per pound than the more widely available version grown in commercially prepared
wood products.




The project goal is to develop a better understanding of wildlife-habitat relationships as
influenced by natural and managed wildlife habitat disturbances. Results will aid wildlife
managers and researchers to make more effective natural resources decisions to conserve
wildlife populations, communities, and habitat.




College and University administration, the scientific community, other funding agencies and
proposal reviewers.

Graduate students, the college and university, and future employers are interested in a
strong graduate program that produces well trained graduates that can fill positions in
government, industry and academia.
Undergraduate students, the college and university, graduate schools and future employers
are interested in a strong undergraduate research program that produces graduates that are
well prepared for graduate school and/or who can fill positions in government, industry and
the private sector.
It is primarily other scientists in the discipline and some industry researchers that attend
scientific conferences to learn about new and ongoing research and recent discoveries.
Workshops are generally attended by end-users interested in application of research results.




The project PI, AES, college and university administration, other funding agencies.
Wildlife and conservation biologists, agencies resposible for wildlife, wetlands and land
managment as well as citzens of the state.
This data is not available
This number is not available




Professional foresters, landowners, NH Dept of Env. Services, USDA Forest Service.
Coastal zone managers, land use managers, conservation groups, and individuals as well as
the members of the other target audienced identified on the "Activities" page for this
planned prrogram are interested in the Natural Resource management issues that have been
addressed by many of the projects.

Land use planners are one sector of the target audiences for many of the projects in this
Planned Program. They are interested in the impacts of various management practices,
invasive species, accuracy of forest vegetation maps and may of the other project results.
Ecosystems science must integrate multiple variables to understand cause, effect, and impact
in management for select species, ecological communities, commodities and ecosystem
services




1. Large tracts of southern Ohio forests are federal and state owned. Timber management on
these lands impact birds populations, both song and game birds. Both have substantial
positive economic and ecological impacts thus forest management must include
management of birds in their overall management plans.
2. Due to decades of steep population declines, Cerulean Warblers have been receiving
tremendous national and international attention. The Ohio Hills are thought to contain the
highest global concentration of Cerulean Warblers; this has placed Ohio in the national
spotlight for Cerulean Warbler conservation.




Efforts continue to improve chestnut trees for re-establishment in forest ecosystems.
Forests are impacted by changing environmental factors, many of these the result of the
increasing influence of human populations. The effects of elevated temperature, and of soil
chemical and physical properties on the growth and physiology of tree species native to
Tennessee is being studied.
UNH Cooperative Extension motivates private landowners to actively manage their land for
long-term stewardship of natural resources. Extension programs in forestry and wildlife,
agriculture, and water resources bring a comprehensive approach to solving problems and
protecting resources through an extensive network of partners within the natural resources
community. Long-term memoranda with the NH Division of Forests and Lands and the NH
Fish and Game recognize Extension's lead role in educational programming. The Society for
the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, Audubon Society of New Hampshire, NH
timberland Owners Association, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Farm Service
Agency, U.S. Forest Service, NH Office of State Planning, Conservation Districts, NH
Department of Environmental Services, regional planning commissions and county
governments are all active partners.

Forests landowners hold the key to protecting NH's environment. 70% of NH, or 3.2 million
acres, is privately owned. The average size woodlot is just under 40 acres and it is these
family forests that help define our state.
Nebraska natural resources are critical to sustaining the state's population and economy.
Approximately 50% of the state's land is pasture or rangeland and nearly 40% is crop land
which is the foundation for a $12 billion agricultural economy (2006) and a rapidly expanding
ethanol industry. The water resources sustain production on 50% of the cropland resources.
The land and water resources also support a myriad of biological resources critical to outdoor
recreation.
Private woodland ownership dominates ecosystems in many eastern states, yet the majority
of owners do not have management plans or seek professional advice before making
decisions. The importance of greater public benefits from these lands warrants improved
methods to appeal to a larger segment of the landowner population than has been
heretofore "reached" with a conservation message through traditional means such as county
foresters, conventional extension programming, and promotional means such as Tree Farm.
This study will assess the potential use of a locally relevant and interactive Internet tool (with
interactive spatial information, links to other sources of information, and opportunities to
submit questions, and read the answers and discussion of others) to reach woodland owners
with information about forest management and the potential for cooperation at scales
greater than their own properties, which is important for ecosystem function and resulting
greater public services.




Managing a private woodland is not easy. Landowners face a multitude of ecologic,
managerial, economic, and legal choices that affect both the land and the owner's future.
What landowners do today will also have impacts on other people and future generations.
Understanding the complex issues associated with land ownership leads to well informed
decisions that benefit the landowner and the public.


Women are increasingly gaining a role as primary land managers of family forestlands, yet
they often lack the confidence and knowledge to make informed decisions regarding their
forestland management. A study of forestland owner offspring showed that 83% of women
sampled were currently involved in making decisions regarding forestland mangement.
The Wisconsin AES has a broad list of stakeholders who potentially benefit from the research
and Extension/outreach from the Wisconsin Formula Research program. This list of
stakeholders includes:
  * General agriculture
  * Food processing and marketing industry
  * Animal and dairy related agriculture
  * Plant and cropping system interests including vegetables
  * Green industry (turf, ornamentals, etc.)
  * Biotechnology
  * Bio-energy and Bio-economy groups
  * Sustainable and organic food producers
  * Environmental groups and interests
  * Consumer and non-traditional groups
  * Governmental agencies and officials
  * Scientific community
Small-scale producers, their families, and their communities face a lack of resources, lack of
marketing opportunities, low profitability, and other production challenges. Emphasis is
placed on crop management, forest land management, and marketing opportunites. Also,
home owners interested in home gardens and pest control are in need of the same
opportunities.




Timber harvesting can potentially impact above and below ground forest c pods. Two
dominant coniferus forest species exist in Wyoming - Ponderosa and lodge pole pine.
Many forest landowners do not have a forest management plan to use in reaching their
management goals.




The conservation and management of land and other natural resources in rural communities
is important to their survival.




In one example, the Munising District office of the Hiawatha National Forest contacted MSU
Extension to assist in the facilitation process of examining the feasibility of starting new
businesses in the area of hard wood production in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Schools and other organizations have identified that youth need to learn about Michigan
forest history, forest products, wildlife biology, forest use, and photosynthesis in order to
better better environmental stewards.
Citizens, scientists, resource managers, and decision-makers require ready access to accurate
and current geospatial data. These data and the technology required to use them are
constantly changing. The Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Specialist (GES) is creating an
effective and efficient system of web access to geospatial data for Rhode Island. The GES is
administering training activities to educate Citizens, scientists, resource managers, and
decision-makers on the availability and application of contemporary geospatial data and tools.




Stewardship plans require that communities and landowners have the capacity to value
ecosystem services from farm and forest lands and be able to convert those values to
potential revenues. Identifying targets for stewardship requires setting priorities for land
protection and subsequent to generate an efficient use of private and public resources.
The Normalize Burn Ratio (NBR) is being applied routinely by the USGS to map burn severity
in National Parks and National Wildlife Refuges throughout Alaska. It is also being applied in a
large national program aimed at monitoring trends in burn severity.


Most Alaskans desire sustainable management and development. Information gathered by
researchers help inform managers and the concerned public.




Black spruce soils: environmental engineers, road and land planners, or any who must deal
with permafrost issues; Controlling Soil N Availability: farmers and producers; scientists.




State and private forest managers benefit from the Forest Inventory of Alaska (FIASKA).




Alaska Dept of Natural Resources and the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service use
ecosystem models to make informed decisions about management and influence policy
decisions. State and local researchers and state and national policy decision makers
concerned about climate change requested this information.
Recently the ADFG has developed several successful collaborative wildlife management plans
in interior Alaska that involve everyone from well-to-do urban sport hunters and
environmentalists to poor rural Native subsistence hunters. The research supported by this
project was adopted by the ADFG and made a substantial contribution to the success of these
planning efforts.

Currently, the forest sector contributes $12.8 billion to Oregon's total industrial output, the
largest contibutor from the natural resource sectors. Natural resource enterprises are critical
to both rural and urban economies, but expected growth in businesses and net profit in this
sector will likely be in the value-added sector usually located near the markets in urban areas.
 Christmas tree production continues to be a one of these key businesses. Dominance of
national Christmas tree markets is held by Oregon producers.




Family forestland owners have a positive impact on the economy through timber production
as well as providing a broad array of forest structures, ages, and species mixes that serves
important wildlife habitat. These owners nearly always lack formal training in forest
management, and many have only limited practical experience managing woodland
properties. Yet they face complicated decisions that will have long-term implications not
only on their financial well-being, but on the productivity and sustainability of their forested
ecosystems.


Oregon and the nation are confronting a sea change of land ownership transfers in the farm
and forest community. Approximately 50% of the small forestland owners in Oregon and the
nation are 65 or older. A significant portion of forest lands will change hands in the next
decade or two. Unplanned transfers can often result in a loss of working forest land through
forced property sales, land fragmentation and conversion to other uses.
Publication of research results in peer review journals is the main method of validating
research results and disseminating the information to other professionals.




The Alaska Regional Office of USGS is using this data for a preliminary estimate of the soil
carbon status in Alaska. Based on current climate models, the permafrost under the black
spruce forest will gradually thaw and the soil will be warmer and drier.




The State of Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS), and the Salcha-Delta Soil & Water Conservation District and concerned users
of Harding Lake in interior Alaska. This model gives managers an idea of the magnitude of
past lake level fluctuations and an indication of what to expect in the future under various
assumptions of weather and management actions.




Undergraduate and graduate students and faculty in the School of Natural Resources and
Agricultural Sciences. This research contributes to the development of curricula.
Land management in Washington State is critical to the economic viability of natural
resource-based industries such as forestry and livestock production. In addition, most of the
watersheds of the state are composed of forests and rangeland. These resources are at risk
of competition from invasive species, wildfires, erosion, floods and other destructive factors
associated with improper management. WSU Extension programs seek to remediate the
root causes of these challenges through education and application of research-based
solutions across the state.




Remediation of the impacts of mismanagement and invasive species is costly to private land
owners and the general public. Prevention is far more efficient than dealing with the
aftermath of wildfires and the invasion on non-native species.
Natural resources management ultimately affects every resident of Washington. Our ability
to address critical issues related to the environment begins with the transfer of science-based
knowledge to those that own, manage and oversee our lands and waters. WSU Extension
monitors the degree to which learning is achieved in these critical training sessions.
Behavior change among those that control and manage natural resources in Washington
State is a necessary precursor to positive change in condition. Land owners, land managers,
and decision-makers need to not only understand science-based solutions, but they also must
move forward to broadly apply the solutions in order to set the stage for environmental
improvement.
not measured
not measured




Volcanic ash-influenced soils are the most productive forest soils in the Inland Pacific
Northwest region. However, relatively little comprehensive information exists about either
the distribution of or management effects on these soils. Compilation of existing
management information can provide a major resource for forest managers and scientists, as
well as identifying knowledge gaps and new research questions.
Tropical dry forests in Puerto Rico are facing new environments related to the introduction of
exotic species that change disturbance regimes and patterns of forest succession. The
introduction of non-native grass species in pasture systems has changed fire dynamics in
forest ecosystems. Fires have become an increasing problem in dry forests and research that
focuses on conservation of natives species and evaluates various management techniques is
needed by forest managers.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - WHAT WAS DONE

Through phone consultations, publications and site visits, clients were provided with
information about environmental landscaping, use of native plants, and erosion control. CES
has been increasing and maintaining its contacts with professionals who are involved with
various aspects of construction site planning and earth change operations.
Through direct and indirect methods CES delivered information about how native plant
habitats are impacted by humans and the consequences of these impacts. The Conservation
Data Center (CDC) and CES produced and distributed a book, "Island Peak to Coral Reef - The
Plant and Marine Communities of the Virgin Islands", with the goal of raising awareness
about the importance of VI ecosystems and the negative anthropogenic effects on these
unique systems

The effort to train youth for careers in ecotourism focuses on St. Croix. On St. Thomas, CES
has supported ecotourism by working closely with the Nature Conservancy (TNC) and VI
Ecotours. However, the high costs of maintaining trails and qualified tour guides made
ecotourism ventures by TNC and VI Ecotours unsustainable on St. Thomas. Upon request, CES
provided information about VI natural and cultural history to taxi drivers and individuals
interested in leading nature tours in St. Thomas, St. John, and Water Island.


An annual Tree Warden School and Certification Program was created to provide Tree
Wardens with a voluntary educational opportunity to acquire this knowledge. Tree Wardens
were educated in tree biology, tree care, hazard tree assessment, public participation, tree
law, and meeting management during six half-day sessions, one day per week in the fall. An
annual event, the Tree Warden School each year provides up to 30 Tree Wardens, Deputy
Tree Wardens, chief elected officials, tree board members and others with the knowledge
and skills required to perform and/or understand Tree Warden duties and responsibilities.


The Meskwaka Tree Project was created to provide urban and community forestry
educational opportunities and programmatic support. Volunteers are educated in urban and
community forestry including tree biology, tree care, fundraising, media relations,
community affairs, meeting management, tree law, and marketing. An annual event is
designed to provide municipal volunteers with basic educational background and contacts to
either initiate new or support existing urban and community forestry programs, either in
their municipality or on a state-wide basis.
Educational program target Connecticut's 115,000 private forest landowners with the goal to
enhance their knowledge about good forest stewardship, and to increase the forested
acreage under long-term stewardship plans by moving as many owners as possible through
the stages of stewardship planning practice adoption. The underlying educational model
draws on diffusion of innovations principles by seeking out, training and supporting opinion
leader volunteers who lead by example in their communities, and who assist with local
educational efforts. 1,744 people attended educational tours of the managed forests
belonging to program volunteers. 54 formal indoor forest and wildlife stewardship workshops
and/or presentations arranged and/or presented by program volunteers to 2,065 attendees.
Organized and/or taught youth education programs to 312 young people. Also, there were 99
published newspaper, newsletter and periodical articles.




Current research is establishing the quantity, quality, and value of ecosystem services such as
water quality, wildlife habitat/populations, and carbon sequestration. Research in the
application of fertilizers and herbicides to enhance productivity while protecting water and
soil quality monitors and improves application methods. Biofuel feedstock production from
in-forest, agriculture, and urban forest residues have been determined.

Wildlife research in Arkansas is currently dealing with issues relevant to the conservation and
management of the states natural resources. Scientific tools are currently being developed
(e.g., estimating population size of black bears in the Ouachita National Forest using hair
capture, DNA profiling, and mark-recapture analysis) and the knowledge is being created
(e.g., survival and causes of mortality of bull elk) to support sound natural resource
management.
Workshops that teach the uses of GIS software are conducted throughout the year and
across the state. Introductory and advances courses are held in different venues, a wide
variety of entities take advantage of theses courses. GPS training is also offered to a wide
range of potential users from landowners, natural resource managers, teachers and students.
These sessions are also offered across the state and throughout the year depending on the
need. In both the GIS and GPS training courses the availability of data and its sources are
discussed to allow users the potential to reach the rich source of data available free in
Arkansas.




Short course was delivered across 14 sites to 275 private landowners.
Short course was delivered across 14 sites to 275 private landowners.

Short course was delivered across 14 sites to 275 private landowners.




Short course was delivered across 14 sites to 275 private landowners.




Short course was delivered across 14 sites to 275 private landowners.


It has been only one year since the management practice was employed, so it is too early to
assess condition change.




To assist conservation commissions with their land and resource prioritization planning, the
Green Valley Institute developed a Co-occurring Resources Inventory analysis. The analysis
model can be adapted to meet the needs and reflect the priorities of each individual town.
Co-occurring Resources analysis maps can be used to identify those areas in a community
with multiple natural resources which may require protection. The may also provide
information about the best tools for protection such as a Riparian Overlay Zone used to
buffer resources along a pristine river corridor.

GVI has conducted Co-occurring Resources Analysis in eight QSHC Towns with conservation
commissions or open space committees.
Various programs are delivered at county, state and regional levels. County agents and
University faculty held over 400 natural resource education meetings, short-courses,
workshops, field days, and demonstrations for households, landowners, farmers, natural
resource professionals, and other stakeholders. Topics included wildlife habitat restoration,
hardwood and pine management, wildlife food plots, nutrient management, best
management practices, GIS/GPS applications, and storm water management.


Six counties conducted forest stewardship outreach programs in 2007.
2. Six counties held walks in the woods or non-timber forest product workshops.
Extension agents reported 1600 indirect contacts and 196 direct adult contacts about forest
stewardship.
3. 20 forest stewardship workshops and other educational programs were provided
Six counties conducted forest stewardship outreach programs in 2007.
2. Six counties held walks in the woods or non-timber forest product workshops.
Extension agents reported 1600 indirect contacts and 196 direct adult contacts about forest
stewardship.
3. 20 forest stewardship workshops and other educational programs were provided.


1. Six training sessions and other communications that reached more than 142 direct
contacts.
2. Ten educational programs taught by the Extension specialist that reached 338 adults and
youth in this program area reaching an additional 6200 indirect and direct contacts.
3. This year attempts were made to improve the visibility of this program though the
distribution of the timber market report to each county office.


1. Disseminated directories connecting wood by-products producers and users.
2. Disseminated fact-sheets and newsletters including laws and regulations pertaining to WV
loggers to loggers throughout the state and state legislators.
4. Managed the Appalachian Hardwood Centers website that provides access to over 225
documents.
5. The WV Timber Market Report is sent to every licensed logger, forest consultants, and
government forestry representative in the state on a quarterly basis.
Educational programs on:
1. Portable sawmill
2. CEOS WV trees program
3. Shiitake mushroom production
4. Woody plants in the winter

Educational programs on:
1. Portable sawmill
1. CEOS WV trees program
2. Shiitake mushroom production
3. Woody plants in the winter




Began in 2008


Animals that the youths were trained to produce were harvested and the meat product
entered the food chain.
Animals that the youths were trained to produce were harvested and the meat product
entered the food chain.




Project workshops
Farm visits
Field days
Judging programs
Livestock exhibitions
Livestock auctions
Camps and overnighters
4-H club programs




Researchers at the University of Kentucky have discovered that reforestation of these sites is
possible using low compaction techniques (i.e. loosely dumping 6 to 8 feet of fresh spoil on a
stabilized area). To date, this practice has not received widespread implementation due to
unsubstantiated concerns over stability, sediment runoff, and aesthetics. Weathered
sandstone materials, mixed with surface soils, are known to be excellent materials for use in
constructing surface soils on coal surface mines being prepared for reforestation. However,
such materials may not be available and/or economically retrievable at a given mine. The
primary goal of this project is to determine which mine spoil (shale; brown weathered
sandstone; gray unweathered sandstone; or a mixture of shale and sandstones) is most
suitable for the rapid development of a soil medium capable of supporting plant life.
The Woodland Owners Short Course (WOSC) was developed to provide an enhanced
educational opportunity for the more than 423,000 woodland owners of Kentucky. The
WOSC is a statewide program consisting of a series of full-day forestry educational programs
spread out across Kentucky. The University of Kentucky co-sponsors this program along with
several state forestry and water resource agencies. County Extension Agents share
significant roles with Extension specialists and researchers including program planning,
presentations, and logistics.

The FY07 WOSC was held in Hart, Bell, Crittenden, and Fayette counties. Individual segments
addressed Timber Management and Harvesting, Managing Woodlands, Ponds, Pines, and
Roads, Wildlife, Water, and Non-Timber Crops, and Woodland Recreation and Invasive
Species. More than 160 woodland owners representing 46,723 acres attended the 2007
WOSC; the average woodland owner owned 292 acres. Participants indicated they would use
information from the program on a total 45,980 acres.




In 2007, the Cooperative Extension Service worked with the Kentucky Water Resources
Research Institute to train Water Pioneers. The Water Pioneers were high-school
sophomores from 28 eastern Kentucky counties. These students received a week of intense
water education from natural resource experts in the College of Agriculture. Pre- and post-
tests and showed an 87% increase in content knowledge. The Water Pioneers were
challenged to return to their respective counties and design and implement a community
project based on their week-long training.




To ensure these forest parcels are well-managed and provide a sustainable stream of needed
forest resources, the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program's Short Course Series was
developed. The five courses in this series provide in-depth information on woodland
management, wildlife management, financial assistance, sustainable timber harvesting and
marketing, and forest and farmland conservation strategies. The target audience for these
courses were non-industrial private landowners with little or no forest management
experience. Short courses range from 6-12 hours of classroom instruction with a field tour to
apply concepts.
The Virginia Master Naturalist program, a corps of well-informed volunteers provide
education, outreach, and service dedicated to the beneficial management of natural
resources and natural areas within their communities for the Commonwealth of Virginia. In
2007, the program expanded from 10 chapters to 21 chapters in communities around the
state. Each chapter recruits and trains volunteers and works with partners to create and
coordinate volunteer service opportunities. The training consists of a minimum of 40 hours
of classroom and field time covering a core set of curriculum objectives in ecology, natural
resource management, basic natural history of animals and plants of Virginia, and skills for
teaching and field research. To become a certified Virginia Master Naturalist, each volunteer
must also complete 40 hours of service in education, citizen science, or stewardship.




Virginia Cooperative Extension partnered with the New River Soil and Water Conservation
District and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service to demonstrate no-till cropping.
The demonstration included residue crimping as an emerging alternative to herbicide
treatment of winter cover crops. The first demonstration was conducted in early May on
corn grown for dairy cows. The second occurred in June on a commercial pumpkin farm. A
portion of the first workshop included a comparison of soils subjected to a rainfall simulation
under either continuous tillage or no tillage.




The Virginia SHARP Logger Program provides training to Virginia's loggers in sustainable
forestry, workplace safety, and environmental protection. In addition to the three part core
program that loggers must attend to complete the initial training, loggers must attend 12
hours of continuing education every three years to maintain their current SHARP Logger
status.
Virginia Cooperative Extension partnered with the Old Dominion Resource Conservation and
Development Council to offer a short course entitled "Forest and Farmland Conservation
Strategies." A Conservation Planning committee was created consisting of both the Regional
and Assistant Regional Foresters in Region 4, the Old Dominion RC&D forester, the VFLEP
coordinator, and the Coordinator for Old Dominion RC&D. Although the course was
specifically designed for landowners in mind, the committee offered the program to the local
Board of Supervisors, County planning commissioners, CPA's, natural resource professionals,
educators and interested citizens. Over 425 letters were mailed to this group and the
program was announced in four area newspapers and the state FLEP mailing list for the
region around Nottoway. The public was invited to attend.




UVMs Center for Sustainable Agriculture conducted an ecological and economic assessment
of a biodiesel industry to determine the feasibility and impact of Vermont farmers producing
feedstock crops. They examined the:
•	 economic, environmental, and social sustainability of biomass crops production;	
•	 pros and cons of various feedstock crops; 	
•	 social barriers to production of non-food crops; and 	
•	 economic impacts of a bio-refinery industry, in particular upon potential feedstock
producers.
Three programs offer forest owners opportunities to learn or update information they need
to manage their properties. The Montana Forest Stewardship program helps non-industrial
private forest landowners develop a forest management plan. The Master Forest Stewardship
program offers in-depth information on specific topics related to forest management. The
Forestry Mini-College provides a mechanism for landowners to stay updated on current
issues and trends related to the forest industry




Spatially-referenced data on forests and soils were collected and the spatial distribution of
biosphere and pedosphere carbon was mapped at the watershed scale. Dendrochronology
studies were conducted to aid in determining the biological response of wetland forests to
hydrological changes. The medicinal qualities of native plants were determined. X-ray
scanning of logs combined with virtual sawing technology was employed to improve sawing
technology. Continuing education needs were satisfied with workshops on various client-
driven topics held throughout the state
We developed and launched the massacorn (http://massacorn.net/ ) web site on 13 October
2006. This was followed by a variety of marketing efforts to make the target audience aware
of its presence. We used direct mail of postcards to more than 8,000 private woodland
owners in the target area of the Deerfield and Westfield River watersheds. We used four
different direct mail post card messages based on preliminary survey work determining
different ownership goals held by woodland owners, and assessed site visitation to assess
which messages resulted in greater visitation. We posted signs and posters in locally relevant
and public places (e.g., post offices, coffee shops, general stories, town buildings). We mailed
posters and other web site information to every town clerk in towns in the target area, as
well as to local community conservation volunteers. We gave talks about the acorn project at
local watershed association meetings. We ran print ads in local newspapers, distributed press
releases, and published letters-to-the-editor in local papers announcing the site. We
displayed information at booths at local and county fairs. We informed other local
organizations of the presence of massacorn.net, and got them to post links to our site on
their websites, thereby improving our visibility to search engines. We held a meeting of our
In 1988 MAES researchers initiated a longitudinal study in the southern prairie pothole
region, the glaciated terrain in Minnesota and adjacent Iowa and South Dakota that once was
a complex of tall grass prairie and freshwater wetlands, now predominantly corn. This study
has tracked 64 restored wetlands and adjacent grasslands. The final survey was conducted in
2007.

Revegetation patterns over the first 12 years led the researchers to predict that many
restorations were unlikely to continue to recovery, even though they are very dissimilar to
their unaltered counterparts. The growth of a few aggressive species, including some that
were deliberately planted, as well as the inefficiency of unplanted native species to
immigrate from remnant natural areas appear to be primary factors contributing to stalled
recovery.




Demonstrations of proper thinning operations on collaborators property, presentations,
workshops, week-long field based course on forest restoration, field days, publications,
posters, websites, research, one on one consultations. A project was initiated to collect and
compost food wastes with a composting machine to produce feed for pigs. A bioreactor to
treat waste water generated by a dairy was put on demonstration.

Demonstrations of proper thinning operations on collaborators property, presentations,
workshops, week-long field based course on forest restoration, field days, publications,
posters, websites, research, one on one consultations. A project was initiated to collect and
compost food wastes with a composting machine to produce feed for pigs. A bioreactor to
treat waste water generated by a dairy was put on demonstration.

Demonstrations of proper thinning operations on collaborators property, presentations,
workshops, week-long field based course on forest restoration, field days, publications,
posters, websites, research, one on one consultations. A project was initiated to collect and
compost food wastes with a composting machine to produce feed for pigs. A bioreactor to
treat waste water generated by a dairy was put on demonstration.

Demonstrations of proper thinning operations on collaborators property, presentations,
workshops, week-long field based course on forest restoration, field days, publications,
posters, websites, research, one on one consultations. A project was initiated to collect and
compost food wastes with a composting machine to produce feed for pigs. A bioreactor to
treat waste water generated by a dairy was put on demonstration.
Demonstrations of proper thinning operations on collaborators property, presentations,
workshops, week-long field based course on forest restoration, field days, publications,
posters, websites, research, one on one consultations. A project was initiated to collect and
compost food wastes with a composting machine to produce area,for pigs. Aabioreactor to
Maryland Cooperative Extension has expanded its role in this feed by hiring new AGNR
treat waste water generated by a the "Framework"demonstration. entitled, Maryland Rural
Marketing Specialist and creating dairy was put on for a new center
Economic Development Center. This center pulls upon existing extension and University
resources to provide assistance in business and market plan development along with
intergenerational transfer of assests (Estate Planning). In the future, functions will expand
into policy related analysis and community resource development topics such as leadership
development for local communities.
For now, The Maryland Cooperative Extension Marketing Program supports for farm, food
and forestry enterprises through professional assistance in marketing and business
development plans and programs. The Regional Extension Specialist for Agriculture and
Natural Resource (AGNR) Marketing is charged with enhancing the economic prosperity of
producers and businesses by encouraging entrepreneurship, developing new AGNR value-
added enterprises, and identifying markets, with a focus on local markets, including but not
limited to: Farmers markets, farm stores, road side stands, pick-your-own, local produce
sections of big box stores, consumer supported agriculture, restaurant sales, internet sales,
small retail stores and home deliveries.

The Regional Extension Specialist for AGNR- Maryland Cooperative Extension Marketing
services a state-wide audience of agricultural and natural resources based entrepreneurs
ranging from "new farmers" to the needs of maturing agricultural businesses. This Specialist
also provides one-on-one client assistance as well as seminars and networking opportunities
designed to enhance the economic viability of all Maryland agriculture and natural resources-
based enterprises.

The Marketing Specialist will seek to develop strong working relationships with other county
agriculture economic development specialist, the Department of Business and Economic
Development (DBED), the Maryland & Resource Based Industry Corporation (MARBIDCO), the
Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA), and USDA-Rural Development.
A wine grape research vineyard was established at the Upper Marlboro Experiment Station.
The vineyard was comprised of 27 varieties. A volunteer vineyard team consisting of
interested area producers, extension educators and specialists, and other interested
organizations was formed to aid the care and management of the vineyard. The research
vineyard also served as an excellent teaching and outreach tool as volunteers became
involved in viticultural practices in the vineyard.
A joint collaboration was formed with the Southern Maryland Agricultural Commission to
offer a matching grant program for purchase of vines. Extension developed a set of criterion
for evaluation of each applicant, evaluated each applicant, conducted site visits, organized
the vine order and provided the educational training component.
The program helped to initiate and continues to support a regional Southern Maryland Grape
Growers and Winery Association. This association works to promote the grape and wine
industry in the region and serves as a networking and teaching opportunity.
Hosted and taught educational activities:
Twilight Tour (3),1 day Beginning Grape Growers Workshop, Farm Walking Tours (5), 2
vineyard tours for policy makers,
Field visits and individual on-site consultations, and local/regional conferences.

Teaching Methods:
Numerous teaching methods were employed including conferences, workshops, twilight
tours, demonstration tours, individual consultations, and field visits. New growers first
received a "getting started" list of with suggested references and literature to review. New
growers were invited to participate in the work at the research vineyard as part of the

This phase of research has not been initiated.
Over 114 educational programs were conducted. 18,380 additional acres were impacted this
year through the Master Naturalist program. Over 1,000 acres were reported with 25%
increase in productivity. Approximately 136,000 additional acres were under conservation
forestry in the Lowcounty Forest Conservation Initiative.
84 conservation management plans were written.

Of the 2,892 persons gaining knowledge, 1,092 persons reported that they actually practiced
skills that they learned.
18,380 additional acres were impacted this year through the Master Naturalist program.
Over 1,000 acres were reported with 25% increase in productivity. Approximately 136,000
additional acres were under conservation forestry in the Lowcounty Forest Conservation
Initiative.
Over 114 educational programs were conducted reaching over 3,023 people.
Twenty-three Master Tree Farmer/Master Woodland Owner programs reached over 190
persons.

TOP Logger education programs were conducted. A course on Ethics for Natural Resource
Professionals was offered as an on-line course to foresters and wildlife biologists.


Some research and experiments conducted during the year were in the areas of quantifying
the impacts of biobased plant and residues on nutrient management and growth, and on
Geographic Information System-Remote Sensing (GIS-RS) supported nonpoint source
pollution management. Other research activities were quantifying environmental benefits of
urban forests, carbon sequestration, urban forest effects on air quality, and quantifying urban
forest effects on Ultra-Violet (UV) exposure in relation to proper vegetation design. Research
activities and results were communicated to clientele and potential users through program
staff via publications, conferences, workshops, field days, home/office visits, demonstrations
and other educational resources. Educational programs such as, hibiscus and tree field day,
Arbor Day, and Earth day were organized. A biosecurity conference is scheduled for FY
2007/2008. Also, a collaborative project with Arkansas and Mississippi to preserve wildlife
habitat and native grasses started during the year. And, ongoing collaboration with forestry
universities in China continued.


Research and experiments conducted during the year were in the areas of quantifying the
impacts of biobased plant and residues on nutrient management and growth, and on
Geographic Information System-Remote Sensing (GIS-RS) supported nonpoint source
pollution management. Other research activities were quantifying environmental benefits of
urban forests, carbon sequestration, urban forest effects on air quality, and quantifying urban
forest effects on Ultra-Violet (UV) exposure in relation to proper vegetation design. Research
activities and results were communicated to clientele and potential users through program
staff via publications, conferences, workshops, field days, home/office visits, demonstrations
and other educational resources. Educational programs such as, hibiscus and tree field day,
Arbor Day, and Earth day were organized. A biosecurity conference is scheduled for FY
2007/2008. Also, a collaborative project with Arkansas and Mississippi to preserve wildlife
habitat and native grasses started during the year. And, ongoing collaboration with forestry
universities in China continued.
At PCC-CRE, planting materials of root crops and biocontrol agents were given to farmers.
School children were taught how to test, clean, and decontaminate their rainwater
catchment's systems at home and in school. The dry litter waste management project also
served as a showcase to farmers, school children and government officials on a very efficient
way of preventing environmental pollution, conserving water resources and having a good
source of compost material for crop production.

At CMI-CRE, planting materials and demonstrations on composting have been provided to
interested farmers who have already identified space for their garden. Visits to homeowners
and communities were made to explain to them about their test results and to provide
demonstrations on how to clean their water catchments.

In the FSM, a market survey sponsored by Island Food Community of Pohnpei (IFCP)
indicated an increase of sales of Vitamin A rich banana varieties. Extension staffs have been
collaborating and working closely with the IFCP and other NGOs.




CES Extension Educators as members of the Sustainable Management of Rangeland
Resources (SMRR) initative team have developed from 2003 - 2007 over 150 video segments
which are aired twice weekly on KCWY-TV in Casper, Wyoming which reaches over 2/3 of the
state. Topics for the segments have been diverse ranging from "how sagebrush has adapted
to our harsh environment" to "why burning can promote aspen growth". In addition to being
aired twice weekly on TV, the segments have been assembled into a DVD which has been
distributed to Wyoming Extension offices. The SMRR team contributes articles to newpaper
supplements in an effort to reach the general public on natural resource topics.




UW CES extension educators and specialists conducted 38 educational programs on topics
such as water management, range monitoring, forages, and mitigation after wild fires.
Newsletters, newspaper inserts, TV and radio and one-on-one contacts with clientele are
methods to reach the audience.
Educational programs delivered by UW CES educators focused on natural resources and the
economy - these included property management planning, High Plains Ranch Practicum ( a 5
session course); Master Cattleman course (8 sessions); Estimating stock rates/carrying
capacity for range leases; basic management classes.




Educational programs, weekly TV spots, other media efforts including radio, newspaper,
newsletters, range tours and applied research.




CES educators serve as facilitators with Federal and State agencies managing public lands
(BLM, Forest Service) and agriculture producers. Educational programs focus on research
based information and assisting with setting common goals for producers and agencies
involved in management of land.




The SMRR initative team developed and produced 30, 60-second TV spots aired twice weekly
on a commercial television station in Casper, Wyoming which reaches approximately 2/3 of
the state in coverage.




Poster presentations were developed highlighting the potential uses and reuses of tree.
Twenty-three (23) woodworkers and residents attended a marketing class for wood products.
In an effort to utilize the skills and knowledge acquired, a public Expo was created whereby
local woodworkers could both display wood art and provide demonstrations of how tree
parts can be turned into art and furniture.
Lectures, workshops, and demonstrations have been the major avenues for the
dissemination of tree care information. Junior and senior high students and home owners
that visit the office and demonstration garden were given poster presentations and
interactive question and answer sessions. Landscape crews from hotels, city municipalities,
and private businesses along with homeowners participated in workshops designed to
provide them with the rudiments of tree care and community tree management.




Our wildlife habitat education programs aim to restore the settled landscape to ecological
productivity and reverse negative trends. Fact sheets, consultations, and workshops guide
people to manage their landscapes differently. Since 2003, our volunteers have expanded
outreach in southern Maine, the most populated and developing area of the state. Habitat
Stewards™ is a program of the National Wildlife Federation® and, in Maine, is a joint effort
with UMaine Extension.

UMaine Extension, the UMaine Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and the
Maine Maple Producers Association partnered in a research project to determine the
acceptability of maple value-added products to consumers and the subsequent development
of a maple value-added products school to help Maine producers maximize profits. The work
was partially funded by a Maine Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Resources
development grant.




One MAES research study has been focused on discovering the technology and science
necessary to produce environmentally benign pressure sensitive adhesives. Researchers have
clearly identified which pressure sensitive adhesive and paper facestock properties govern
the fragmentation of the adhesive.




The stocking chart study shows that foresters can integrate management for ruffed grouse
into management for conifer forests. That is a conceptual advance to forest wildlife
management.
The University of Massachusetts serves a primary role in delivering education to target
audiences, informing policy decisions, and generating applied research critical to the health
of natural resource based businesses in Massachusetts and their associated public benefits
Concerning herbivores, researchers evaluated an 8-year data set of American ginseng to
establish the overall effect of deer on this forest species. Both deer browsing and harvesting
are problematic, particularly if harvesting is indiscriminate and if deer populations are great.
Projections from out data indicate that it may take 15 years for a seedling to produce enough
seeds to replace itself.
A project was designed to measure carbon balance and eco-physiology. An eddy covariance
flux tower will be installed for measuring ecosystem-level mass and energy exchange. The
tower measures net carbon dioxide fluxes over a large area. Independent measures of
biomass accumulation through traditional growth monitoring and soil respiration
measurements are also being conducted.


One-on-one contact and consultations were made with landowner.

Fifteen Forestry Field Days attracted 858 Iowans to learn about woodland management.
Master Woodland Manager, Community Tree Steward, and other forestry workshops and
presentations reached another 4,874 adults. Master Conservationist, NatureMapping, and
other wildlife and fisheries workshops and presentations reached over 2,600 Iowans. The
School Tree Program and Community Tree Program for Youth together reached 10,940 young
Iowans. Indirect contacts through newsletters, emails, and phone calls exceeded 25,500
contacts in FY 2007.




Development of programs to education the general public about water quality and related
resources. Training of the general public in water monitoring techniques which empowers
people to watch over their water resources.
At PCC-CRE, farmers, school children, government officials were briefed on programs dealing
with conservation of plant genetic resources, integrated pest management, water quality
education and dry litter waste management during their visits to the R&D Station and also
during civic activities. Thus, they learned new developments and technologies in agricultural
science.

The CMI-CRE agriculture staff conducted workshops, made presentations at meetings, and
visited homes and established demonstration plots to showcase cultivation of certain food
crops.

In the FSM, vegetable variety trials were conducted to identify preferred and adapted
varieties. Collection of local and imported germplasm of banana, sweet potato and taro is
continuing and different types of media formulation and preparation for tissue culture has
been developed for multiplication of these varieties of crops. A survey was conducted to
identify and document plant parasitic nematodes affecting crops in Micronesia.




Research-based educational programs for these groups have been implemented, along with
programs for the general public. One program, the Master Naturalist, is designed to establish
a pool of knowledgeable individuals that can extend extension's expertise.




Research knowledge on watershed protection and preservation of local drinking water
sources has been translated into best practices that have been delivered through
Cooperative Extension programming to a wide variety of local watershed organizations (over
500) throughout PA The Master Naturalist is a program designed to establish a pool of
knowledgeable individuals that can extend the expertise offered by CE.

Continue to aggressively seek research funding to support graduate education.
A variety of research on cougars, pigmy rabbits, mule deer and water quality has been
completed.

Attempted to hire a new faculty member.
This project examines methods for increasing the reliability and profitability of forest
mushroom production by developing best management practices involving selection of
suitable fungal species, appropriate wood substrate species and cultural practices for
mushroom production.




Research was undertaken to address quantifying wildlife use of forest and agriecosystems,
including evaluating white-tailed deer, elk, snowshoe hare, and eastern massasauga
rattlesnake movements, population dynamics, and habitat selection patterns in response to
land cover and use patterns.




Results of the projects have been published in seventeen peer reviewed publications, 4
books, 3 MS theses, and numerous symposium abstracts.


Graduate students were involved in 12 out of the 19 projects and in most cases, the project
research was the focus of the students MS thesis.

Twenty-nine undergraduate students were involved in 8 of the 19 projects.
Forty-nine conference and workshop presentations were made.

PI have been encouraged by NH AES and college administration to use AES funding to address
immediate issues in agriculture and to conduct research that will increase their ability to
attract additional funding for synergistic studies from other sources.
The results have been presented at several symposia and at a NH State Government
workshop on vernal pools.




Field studies to assess the impact of glossy buckthorn, an invasive shrub that is has spread
through New England forests. Land management strategies and recommendations were
developed. Field studies were conducted in early successional habitats to determine site
characteristics that affect vulnerability to invasion by alien shrubs.
Results were presented at regional and national meetings and a workshop was run for
professional foresters and landowners.


The Activities page of the Natural Resources and Environment Planned Program summarizes
what has been done.

Virtually all of the projects are or should be relavant to land use planning. Project results
have been widely disseminated and have either directly or indirectly reached land use
planners.
OARDC scientists investigated the impacts of the various shelterwood harvest intensities on
forest structure, and how this influences the quality of bat habitat.




1. OARDC scientists have investigated the regenerating of clearcuts in southern Ohio and
impacts on shrubland birds.
2. OARDC scientists have conducted comparative studies of the Cerulean Warbler in both
Ohio and in wintering grounds in South America as a means of informing international
conservation efforts regarding this species.


Hybrid chestnut from two seed sources were established in cleared rows in a young loblolly
pine plantation to evaluate competitive ability relative to pines and planted oaks.

We have determined that ground cover of around 25-75% is optimal for the establishment of
seedlings of several important species of hardwood trees to return surface-mined lands to
productive forest.
Forest Resource Extension Educators, three statewide Extension Specialists, a Land and
Water Conservation Educator and Community Forestry Volunteer coordinator provide
technical expertise and information about managing forest and community resources to
people in each county across the state. Target audiences include non-industrial private forest
owners (NIPF), municipal and other forest landowners, natural resource professionals,
communities, volunteers, NH forest-based industries and the public.
The Community Tree Steward Program educates volunteers in community and urban
forestry. Tree Stewards participate in a course that meets once a week for 11 weeks with
optional Friday field trips. The goals are to strengthen communities, promote social change,
and enhance urban ecosystems. In return, they spend 40 hours volunteering in their
communities, although many volunteer many more hours.

During FY 07, Tree Stewards worked on a wide variety of natural resource projects in several
communities around the state. As graduates many developed networks and formed
partnerships with residents, community officials and organizations, as well as with
Cooperative Extension staff and other natural resource professionals. Volunteer activities
with greatest amounts of time included:
- Natural Resource Committee
- Land Conservation
- Community landscaping projects
- The NH Big Tree Program
- Youth Education
- Water Quality
- Forest and Land Management
- Invasive Species Management and control

The New Hampshire Coverts Project trains volunteers to promote wildlife habitat
conservation and forest stewardship. The goals of the project are twofold: 1) To enhance,
restore, and conserve habitat for the rich diversity; 2) To increase the amount of New
Hampshire's public and private land managed with a stewardship ethic

A "covert" (pronounced "cover" with a "t") is a thicket that provides shelter for wild animals.
Modeled on similar Coverts Projects in other states, the name of the NH program symbolizes
the Project's focus on wildlife habitat.

Extension sponsors a range of educational opportunities. Agriculture targeted programs
include topics such as carbon sequestration, organic agricultural systems, invasive species
control, participation in the Conservation Security Program, and range fire recovery.
Youth/Teacher targeted programs include festivals/field days addressing water, environment,
range, and other issues. General public programs address sustainable agriculture for
acreages, wetlands, and green energy and conservation.
We developed and launched the massacorn (http://massacorn.net/ ) web site on 13 October
2006. This was followed by a variety of marketing efforts to make the target audience aware
of its presence. We used direct mail of postcards to more than 8,000 private woodland
owners in the target area of the Deerfield and Westfield River watersheds. We used four
different direct mail post card messages based on preliminary survey work determining
different ownership goals held by woodland owners, and assessed site visitation to assess
which messages resulted in greater visitation. We posted signs and posters in locally relevant
and public places (e.g., post offices, coffee shops, general stories, town buildings). We mailed
posters and other web site information to every town clerk in towns in the target area, as
well as to local community conservation volunteers. We gave talks about the acorn project at
local watershed association meetings. We ran print ads in local newspapers, distributed press
releases, and published letters-to-the-editor in local papers announcing the site. We
displayed information at booths at local and county fairs. We informed other local
organizations of the presence of massacorn.net, and got them to post links to our site on
their websites, thereby improving our visibility to search engines. We held a meeting of our




A diverse collection of Extension trained volunteers, publications, workshops, and other tools
helps landowners help themselves. One such tool earning a reputation for motivating
landowners to action is Tree School. In 2007, three, one-day events featured concurrent
educational classroom and field experiences, offering topics designed to increase knowledge,
improve skills and change practices of family forest owners.

During 2007, 188 women participated in 14 workshops and tours around the state. There are
currently six county-based Women Owning Woodlands Network (WOWnet)groups. A
WOWnet listserv and website has been developed where members can establish personal
profiles, ask the group questions, post their own events, upload files or photos, or ask for
help on projects, and even collaborate on the purchase of equipment.
Each year through a competitive, investigator-driven, peer-reviewed process, the Wisconsin
AES funds approximately 160 research and integrated activity projects focused on national,
regional and local issues and priorities linked to stakeholder interests. In addition to serving
stakeholder needs through these competitively funded projects, which address critical
applied research as well as basic science questions, this program sets a priority on training
our next generation of applied and science based professionals through its graduate-student
training mission.
Technical assistance and workshops were provided on vegetables, fruits, nuts, forestry,
conservation (EQIP), home garden, and home prest control management. In addition,
marketing assistance and information were provided to producers, one-on-one or through
workshops.




Four ponderosa pine stands (unmanaged even aged habitat, uneven aged harvest and heavy
harvest) were studied.
Mississippi State University's Extension Forestry program secured funds from the American
Tree Farm System as well as the Mississippi Sustainable Forestry Initiative-State
Implementation Committee to conduct Tree Farm programs at County Forestry Association
meetings across the state. These programs stressed the importance of having a management
plan, how to have one developed, and how to become a Tree Farmer.




Extension developed a series of workshop designed to assist landowners in rural
communities to conserve their surroundings and help the environment.




Over a seven year period and a series of meetings, feasibility studies, and trainings -
community businessess decided to invest into hardwood production.

MSU Extension has partnered with the Michigan Forest Resource Alliance to deliver forestry
education training workshops around the State of Michigan. The main project goal was to
train a cadre of volunteers to deliver a pair of programs to elementary students.
Organized 2007 RI GIS Conference, a mix of presentations and tutorials. Attended by 180
people representing nonprofit, educational, state & local government, and industry. RI GES
organized an Introduction to Remote Sensing seminar attended by 57; hosted an Introduction
to LiDAR Technology workshop at URI; attended by 60.

Delivered a geospatial metadata session at the 2007 Northeast Arc Users Group conference.
The National Geospatial Technology Extension Network (NGTEN) and the eXtension
Map@Syst initiative continue to be part of the GES' ongoing professional initiatives.




This project works in conjunction with NRCS creates stewardship opportunities by creating an
experimental market connecting grassland nesting bird habitat values from farm and open
space to the residents of a nearby exurban community. A survey of stated preferences was
completed that examined willing to pay for invasive plant control and restoration of nesting
habitat and stated-preference for funding mechanisms.
This research clearly shows that this remotely sensed index is influenced substantially by
factors other than fire severity including topographic effects due to relative low solar
elevations at high latitudes. The use of different pre-fire images substantially changed the fire
severity estimates, most likely due to changing plant phenology and solar elevation.

Publications, workshops, Congressional testimony, briefings, seminars both at the university
and in local towns and villages,field trips, website, scientific collaborations, and agency
partnership are all used to inform stakeholders of research findings.




Black spruce soils: Investigation of the soil carbon of permafrost lands through soil analysis;
and investigations; Controlling Soil N Availability: Soil was tested from a field experiment with
smooth bromegrass treated with several fertilizer treatments.




The 191 Permanent Sample Plots (PSP)we have established is the only system of remeasured
forest stands in Alaska.




Mathematical models were developed to predict the growth of floodplain white spruce along
the Yukon River and the Kuskokwim River. Data continues to be collected on Long-Term
Ecological projects at Bonanza Creek Experiment Forest for entry in the LTER database.
Cooperative work was done with the French Polar Research Institute. A USGS group was
hosted on the floodplain and an International Disturbance Dynamics in the Boreal Forest field
trip visited a number of research sites in upland locations.
A survey was developed to assist in measuring the extent to which the public has been
empowered by a given public involvement technique. The instrument has been tested and
will soon be applied to community mapping projects to assess their impact on the
participants. For example, the survey considers whether the participants in these efforts are
more likely to attend public meetings and hearings, more likely to vote, and/or feel more
capable of influencing public policies following their experience with the project.


A three-year study on plant growth hormones to control leader growth was completed. A
24C label for leader control in Christmas trees via a hormonal growth compound, Sucker
Stopper, was granted by the Oregon Department of Agriculture for official use. Over 150
Christmas tree growers attended technoloby transfer meetings and field tours to help them
understand use of this new growth control method.


A one-session "crash" course was utilized to introduce participants to the elements of a
management plan, to stress its usefulness, and to outline a process by which woodland
owners could either construct their own plan or employ the services of professional foresters
to create one on their behalf. The program utilized reference materials and a website where
person could access electronic versions of the management planning template and the class
work forms, find additional information on management plans, and seek out professional
assistance for consultants and agency professionals. Course participants responded to a
follow-up survey conducted one month after completion of the program.

The "Ties to the Land" project is a collaboration between Oregon State University and local
private and public partners. OSU Extension Forestry initiated and directed the project and
worked with the OSU Austin Family Business Program, a national leader in family business
eudcation, to bring this information to a focused audience. Workshops were developed and
delivered, a workbook with companion DVD was distributed, a website was developed, and
an impacts assessment was designed.
Research scientists submitted manuscripts to be published in peer review journals, books and
meeting procedures.




One aspen and two black spruce sites were sampled. Soil descriptions from these and other
plots will permit results of both studies to be tied together. In the northern region, many
aspen and birch stands occur as islands occupying high knobs and terraces in black spruce
forests. Most of the mixed to pure stands grow in well to somewhat excessively drained soils
formed in coarse to medium textured glacial deposits, such as eskers, kame terraces,
outwash, or residuum from fractured bedrock.




Winter lake level data was obtained to isolate a net groundwater flow component from the
overall rate of loss. A spreadsheet of a monthly lake water balance model was run using
precipitation, pan evaporation, and runoff data from nearby weather and runoff stations for
the time period 1950 - 2007. The simulation was calibrated with 2 measured lake levels, from
1978 and 2006. The ground water coefficient was the main calibration parameter.




GIS A370/NRM 394 - Remote Sensing for Natural Resources and NRM 312 Range
Management Research.
Statewide and locally-focused programs were developed and delivered to improve forest
stewardship leading to development of land management plans and healthier forests and
greater fire protection. Biological control mechanisms were also initiated to control invasive
species such as diffuse knapweed and Dalmatian toadflax.




Two major programmatic foci have been initiated by WSU Extension faculty to move critical
land to a more sustainable level of management. These employ two basic strategies. First,
forest health is restored by proper thinning and other management practices enhancing fire
resistance and improving the health of the land and watersheds. Secondly, invasive species
are controlled by release of environmentally friendly insects leading to effective biological
control of invasive species.
The WSU Extension Natural Resources program conducted over 400 seminars, workshops,
tours, and other educational venues in 2007. Each was designed to facilitate transfer of
knowledge that could in turn be applied to enhance the quality and sustainability of the
natural resource base of the state. Evaluation of change in learning was assessed at
appropriate venues and summarized to aid in program effectiveness.
Several approaches are used by WSU Extension educators to initiate behavior changes.
Natural resources educational programs tend to be very 'hands-on' allowing individuals to
recognize problems in a natural, real world setting. Additionally, the consequences of
inaction are clearly documented. These can be catastrophic in the cases of wildfire or
invasive species (both terrestrial and aquatic). In general, the programs leverage the desire
among Washingtonians to do what is best for the environment. This passion is also leveraged
through large volunteer networks such as Master Gardeners, Beach Watchers and Shore
Stewards. These networks extend the knowledge base of educators and allow for more labor
intensive enterprises such as surveying invasive species and creosote logs in Puget Sound.
We collaborate with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to examine
formation and properties of volcanic ash-influenced soils in the cool, dry environment at
Craters of the Moon. We have developed a new model of soil formation that describes the
transformation from bare lava to lava that supports scattered plant communities. This
information was presented at a field day at Craters of the Moon in June, and we are currently
writing a manuscript to be submitted to a research journal.
We have conducted a preliminary study of burn intensity by using calorimeters; set up an
experiment to determine tree species susceptibility to fire; set up 100 seed traps to
determine the difference in seed rain from burned to intact sites; planted 160 trees in a
tropical dry forest restoration project; and disseminated project results. Two graduate
students and three undergraduate research assistants have learned techniques in fire ecology
measurement and reforestation.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - RESULTS

More developers, engineers, and architects are regularly requesting CES technical
information about native plants, native habitats, habitat restoration, and erosion control.
More native plants were selected for landscaping on construction sites. Clients' technical
knowledge of native plant species and native habitats increased.
The CDC/CES book "Island Peak to Coral Reef..." was increasingly endorsed and used by
university professors and environmental agencies as a text book to promote an increased
understanding of the human effects on native ecosystems. Teachers, students and
environmental groups propagated, planted or protected native trees to restore native
ecosystems, and property owners became more interested in preserving natural ecosystems
in their home landscapes.




Tour guides incorporated information provided by CES into their tours.

In nine years, 237 Tree Wardens, Deputy Tree Wardens and others have gained new
knowledge concerning Tree Warden duties and responsibilities through the Tree Warden
School. This means that Certified Tree Wardens are now better able to make informed and
responsible decisions about the care and preservation of public trees while protecting the
public from hazardous ones. Chief elected officials have begun appointing more qualified
people to the Tree Warden position. These people often are foresters or arborists who then
attend the Tree Warden School to fill-in gaps in their expertise and obtain certification.


Since 1992 over 287 urban and community forestry volunteers have been trained.
Participants have come from 77 Connecticut communities and three states. Since 1992,
volunteers have been the initiator or participant in the following example outcomes: 43
communities have written and passed shade tree ordinances; 30 shade tree commissions
have been established; about 6,333 new public trees have been planted; twenty-two cities
and towns have conducted volunteer organized shade tree inventories; three nonprofit
community forestry organizations have been founded; and seven municipal memorial tree
programs have been created.
5,104 acres of new or updated stewardship plans; habitat improvement, timber stand
improvements implemented on 2,001 acres; knowledge and information gained by at least
936 additional forest landowners, who began new stewardship programs or enhanced
existing stewardship programs on at least 2,727 acres.




New guidelines for herbicide and fertilization application have been developed in Arkansas.
Markets for carbon sequestration for working forests in Arkansas have been established and
landowners are receiving payments. Biomass feedstock estimates have determined that
forest residues can supply biomass in sufficient amounts to displace between 20-30% of
Arkansas' gasoline consumption. Urban-wildland interface issues have been identified and
are being addressed by university-driven public policy discussions. Dynamics of habitat and
wildlife populations continue to result in improved management guidelines resulting in
sustained biological diversity and increased recreational opportunities throughout the state.

Understanding the dynamics of wildlife populations, such as black bears, elk, and quail,
continue to result in improved management guidelines resulting in sustained harvest
management and increased recreational opportunities throughout the state. Wildlife
research results are made available to forest landowners in a variety of formats, including:
public workshops, field days, websites, fact sheets, radio and TV media, outdoor/nature
magazine articles, and restaurant placemats.

Natural resource managers and landowners are exposed to the rich data available to them.
The GIS software allows them to make more informed decisions and to accurately determine
acreage and to delineate watersheds and other tasks that previously would not have been
possible. GPS training has also helped in capturing data and helping with theses decisions and
in creating better maps that describe these decisions and help the technical activities be
correctly applied on the ground. Teachers and students trained to use the technology will
help prepare the students to be better able to apply this technology.


Impact was assessed by observing a 1.5-point increase in pre- and post-course self-
evaluations (Likert scale 1-5).
Impact was assessed by observing a 2-point increase in pre- and post-course self-evaluations
(Likert scale 1-5).
Impact was assessed by observing the results of the six-month, follow-up survey. Of the 275
participants, 220 indicated they had contacted a local forester.

Of the 220 participants who contacted their local forester or private land conservationist,
only 138 were actually able to receive assistance. The most frequent reason given for not
servicing a landowner request was the professional did not have the time.

Impact was assessed by the fact 200 landowners (62 of whom did not have the luxury of a
forester's input) performed crop tree release (Crop tree release is the process of reallocating
sunlight, water and nutrients to a designated crop tree from neighboring, competing trees.
The crop tree can be any tree that meets the woodland owner's objective[s]; be it a timber
tree, an acorn-producing tree for wildlife, or a colorful maple for fall foliage.) on 10,000 acres.
The projected measurable economic impact from the Woodland Steward Program is an
increased net present value of $8.9 million ($885/acre) over the option of no forest
management.


It has been only one year since the management practice was employed, so it is too early to
assess condition change.




Each of the participating towns has adopted the Co-occurring Resources Inventory as an
additional planning tool in the town Natural Resource Inventory. The Towns of Scotland and
Thompson have developed comprehensive Open Space plans for the protection of significant
resources in their communities. Brooklyn and Eastford have identified and prioritized key
open space parcels for acquisition and protection including a 127 acre parcel on the
Quinebaug River identified as "highest priority wildlife and riparian corridor land." The Town
of Chaplin recently accepted its first open space set-aside through the use of Open Space
Subdivision regulations and, utilizing the Co-occurring Resources Analysis, the Conservation
Commission was able to assist the developer and the Planning and Zoning Commission with
recommendations for the highest conservation value, resulting in protection of 10 acres and
1000 feet of frontage on the Natchaug River. Four communities have completed state-of-the-
art, digital town-wide resource inventories and utilized those inventories to enhance
community planning and land conservation efforts.
2,400 landowners received seed to establish wildlife food plots on 1,403,638 acres through
the Acres for Wildlife Program, a partnership program between the Arkansas Game and Fish
Commission and the UA, Division of Agriculture.

Over 380 commercial and private nutrient applicators were trained regarding pollution
prevention and water quality protection.

17,000 residents in eight urbanized areas identified as Phase II areas (including 48
cities/towns and 13 unincorporated areas in 13 counties) were educated about stormwater
runoff mitigation, illicit discharge detection and elimination, runoff control, and pollution
prevention.

70 workshops and four field days were conducted that focused on forest management topics
including hardwood establishment and management, pine management, timber taxation,
wildlife enterprises, carbon credits, GPS technology, and timber marketing. Over 2,470
landowners, farmers, and natural resource professionals attended these events.




131 stewardship workshop participants increased their knowledge about forest management
opportunities.
1. 70 changed their behavior with regard to forestry stewardship that resulted in
improvement in their property or their investments as a result of attending a county-based
workshop.
2. Six articles or fact sheets were published.




1. 134 participants improved their understanding and knowledge in the program area, but
may have not changed their practices.


1. 168 individuals indicated that they changed behaviors, including application of BMPs, as a
result of this programs activities.
2. The total number of visitors to the website has been 689,508 since the website re-launch.
This includes thousands of visitors that are accessing the site from countries all over the
world (595 from Bulgaria and 862 from Japan).


1. Participants gained the knowledge of the history and present importance of WV forestry.
2. Participants gained insight into alternative forest products.
3. Participants developed hands-on skills in the inoculation of hardwood logs with shiitake
mushroom spores.




No results reported.




A total of 531,747 pounds of meat product entered the food chain from youth market animal
projects.
1.$2,094,790 generated from 4-H and FFA livestock sale proceeds.
2.$286,851 returned to community groups and organizations from youth project livestock
sales. This included such groups as county scholarship funds, county 4-H foundations, county
FFA foundations, fair boards, 4-H leaders associations, community organizations, and others.

Project workshops
Farm visits
Field days
Judging programs
Livestock exhibitions
Livestock auctions
Camps and overnighters
4-H club programs

An article entitled A Path to Resolution Regarding the Show Lamb Tail Docking Controversy
was published in the August, 2007 issue of the Journal of Extension.

A poster session was conducted at the 2007 NAE4-HA Conference, October 23, 2007 in
Atlanta, Georgia, Does participation in the beef, swine, or sheep 4-H project help develop life
skills?




The results of this project are critical to the Office of Surface Mining's Appalachian Regional
Reforestation Initiative. Efforts are undertaken to re-educate mining companies and
regulatory authorities regarding what constitutes good forestry reclamation practices. These
efforts will also assist in determining the appropriateness of spoil type for reforestation. This
result can have significant economic implications for mining firms and the reforestation of
mined lands. Additionally, landowners and the public can benefit from the capability of
mining firms to restore lands that will support productive forests.
As a result of this program, participants have reported increased income from their
properties through on-farm enterprises. As a result of positive evaluations the WOSC will
continue in FY08 on a regional basis, giving more woodlot owners access to the program. The
long-term impacts from the WOSC will result in increased revenue earned from timber sales
for those using a professional forester, improved wildlife habitat, increased woodland
productivity, and improved woodland health.

Seven months later, each of the Water Pioneers reported making an impact on their
community. Many of the Pioneers worked with young elementary students, passing along
water education, water quality and conservation information and practices they had learned
earlier. Others made a direct impact on their community by working with business such
convincing local restaurants to switch to water-friendly cleaning products which are more
environmentally friendly. Others created more awareness of water quality issues and
conservation practices by working with the local media.




In 2007, 466 students, owning over 4,000 forested acres, attended one of 11 short courses
coordinated through the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program. These students
stated these courses would help them earn over $300,000 additional dollars from forest
management activities. Additionally, over 65% indicated they would seek professional forest
management assistance in the future. A one year follow-up evaluation is being developed to
determine how many students follow through on these actions.
In 2007, Virginia Master Naturalist chapters held 23 basic training courses. Currently there
are more than 600 Virginia Master Naturalist volunteers, 84 of whom have completed the
requirements to become Certified Virginia Master Naturalists. By the end of 2007, these
volunteers accomplished approximately 10,000 hours of education, citizen science, and
stewardship service, valued at $186,900 (Independent Sector Report for Virginia, 2005).
Their educational programs reached more than 9,000 youth and adults, and their on-the-
ground efforts have positively impacted many acres of land and miles of trails. Some specific
projects accomplished by Virginia Master Naturalist volunteers included leading nature-based
4-H clubs and other educational programs for youth, developing interpretive trails,
conducting tree surveys, monitoring frog, bird, and other wildlife populations, and removing
invasive plant species from public lands.

Attendees learned how tillage practices contributed to soil erosion through the loss of
organic matter. Attendees learned that no-till practices minimize organic matter and nutrient
losses, and that by preventing these losses, soil productivity could be improved. One farmer
stated that adopting no-till practices was not a choice, but a necessity on steep farm land.
Farmers also evaluated the practicality of the crimper-roller for controlling winter cover crops
prior to spring planting. It was found to be more viable for pumpkins than corn. Because
these farms were above 2,600 feet elevation, the growing season did not allow winter cover
crops such as rye or wheat to be mature enough for effective control with the crimper-roller
on corn land. It was also significantly more time consuming than herbicide treatment. The
crimper-roller showed promise on pumpkin land because pumpkins are planted a month later
than corn, giving winter cover crops more time to mature, which is critical for effective
control. This practice was used on a trial basis by one large commercial pumpkin grower,
eliminating herbicide treatment in the trial area.
Since the program began in 1996, over 3,000 individuals have completed the core program to
become SHARP Loggers. These trained loggers represent the vast majority of wood produced
in the state. In 2007, the three part core SHARP Logger program was offered in four locations,
and 46 continuing education classes were offered throughout the state. One thousand forty-
five individuals attended at least one program to receive SHARP logger credit during 2007. In
total these individuals received nearly 9,000 hours of SHARP Logger training in 2007.

Programs such as the SHARP Logger have had a great impact on safety, productivity, and
profitability. In other VCE programs, over 1,200 individuals participated in events to increase
the economic vitality of Virginia. Another 5,000 individuals indirectly increased their
awareness of the importance of the forest products industry to Virginia. Over 225
community leaders were impacted and increased their awareness of opportunities for
Virginia. At least nine new businesses were created or expanded due to these efforts
resulting in over 1.5 million dollars in additional revenue for the businesses. One major wood
produtcs employer has the potential to add over 1,000 jobs in southside Virginia by the year
2010.
The seven hour workshop held at the Blackstone Southern Piedmont Research Station had 30
participants representing local leadership and conservation groups. The participants indicated
on a pre-course evaluation the following: 31% had owned land for 0-5 years, 23% from 6-10
years, none in the 11-25 bracket, less than 1% from 25-49 years, and 38% owning the land for
over 50 years. This is typical of rural farmland ownership statistics. The largest farm was
1,900 acres and the smallest four acres with the average farm 268 acres. Comments from
participants on exit evaluations included:"Excellent presentation of options and resources,
thank you."; "Increased my knowledge of zoning and land use issues"; "Course was well
planned and informative"; "..will be able to provide information to the citizens"; "Great job!";
"Great information!"; "Best workshop I have attended"; "..helped me further knowledge of
resources and contacts"; "Excellent job of packing a wealth of information into a day-long
course, competent presenters and a good oration." Participants were given comprehensive
resource notebooks at the course.

For other programs offered, over 650 individuals indicated they implemented at least one
new practice due to the training and it is estimated that over 42,000 acres were impacted,
resulting in over one million dollars earned or saved due to changes in land management




Ethanol from corn and biodiesel from oilseeds were identified as economically feasible in the
current economic context. Due to concerns about the environmental efficiency of ethanol
from corn, the simulation model analyzed the economic feasibility and ecological, economic,
and social impacts of biodiesel production, assessing profitability, macroeconomic impact,
potential changes in Vermont land use, green house gas emissions, and energy utilization.
Results indicate a private biodiesel plant would not be feasible. However a growers
cooperative would benefit from a facility using Vermont-grown soybeans, with the meal used
for dairy feed.

Benefits included the development of a renewable fuel source, a potential reduction in
greenhouse gas emissions, and reduced air pollution. Disadvantages included significant
environmental impact, including increased soil erosion, groundwater depletion, groundwater
and soil contamination, and increased fertilizer applications to increase yields.


600 checklists were distributed at the Association of Field Ornithologists' meeting I held on
campus last July
In 2007, 12 plans were reverified for 3,000 acres. Over 135 people attended the Forestry
Mini-College to stay current on forestry issues such as conservation easements, noxious
weed control in forests, laws & rules related to forestry, obtaining healthy grasses in forested
areas, computer applications in forest stewardship, forest health - insects/disease, and
logging systems. In order to become certified as a Master Forest Steward, participants must
complete 7 core and 3 elective in-depth courses. Forty people took courses to become
certified. Core courses are Forest Stewardship Planning Workshop, Wildfire Hazard
Reduction, Insect/Disease ID and Management, Understory Plant/Range ID and
Management, Noxious Weed Management, Harvesting practices/sales, Estate Planning,
Wildlife Habitat ID and Management. Elective Courses are Riparian Area Assessment, Road
Assessment/Design, GPS Applications, Soil Evaluation/Protection, logging equipment, Wildfire
Restoration and Business Management


The carbon assessment on Louisiana's forests has been completed, helping resource
managers in developing long-term carbon sequestration strategies. Hurricane Katrina was
found to damage 60% of the total forest land in the Lower Pearl River Valley. Beyond
assessment of Katrina's damage, this study elucidates the usefulness of remote sensing in the
assessment of large-scale risks of hurricanes to coastal forests. Several native species of
plants have shown bioactivity. For example, sweetgum fruit is active against human prostate
cancer, and Louisiana coastal plants sea rocket and American beauty bush both have anti-
tumor activities. Extension activities have also influenced clientele. Many reported that they
have adopted new practices after attending our workshops. Two Louisiana-focused forest-
sector websites were developed that promote economic development. TOPSAW (training
and optimization for sawing logs) is a real-time sawing optimization software developed in
the School. We have generated industrial interest in wood plastic composites, leading to a
new manufacturing plant in Louisiana
Since site launch, we have averaged 5 visits/day, with a mean visit duration of 2:15 minutes
and 2.0 page views per visit. This compares favorably to national statistics on web site
visitation (e.g., national average of duration of a web page viewed in October 2007 = 46
seconds (Nielsen NetRatings)). Our marketing efforts combined with monitoring indicate that
direct mail is not as successful for our Massachusetts target audience as it has been with our
Vermont target audience. This may be due to the higher proportion of absentee ownership in
the Vermont study area, and people being more interested in using the intent to learn about
their land, whereas more owners are resident in the Massachusetts study area, and may be
less interested in using the internet to learn about the land out their back door. No single
marketing seems to be more effective than another, with the exception that print media, and
especially letters-to-the-editor in local newspapers resulted in a strong pulse of visitation.
Our focus groups last summer indicated that the most popular aspect of the site is the ability
to view and use spatial data online to view land and the surrounding area. Additional
results/feedback indicated that the overall design of the site was pleasing, and that it had a
great deal of content, but that there were navigation issues to address. We are using Google

This goal was not measured this year. In 2008, different measures were chosen.
The results of this research has given researchers insights to aid in optimizing a network of
restorations so plant species can migrate from their existing locations in remnant natural
areas in response to climate change. In addition, researchers now better understand the
extent to which certain species chosen to be the founding community can either help or
hinder others from establishing. With increasing size of restoration, there is a tendency to
introduce fewer species to launch the restoration, so developing an effective "founder
strategy" is crucial to large-scale restoration. The insights from this long-term study are being
applied to a new large-scale restoration effort on the Upper Mississippi and Minnesota rivers.


The jointly produced book "Traditional Trees of Pacific Islands" had an initial printing of 2000
copies are close to being sold out in less than a year. Websites had over 77,000 persons
visiting during the reporting period and over 2500 downloads of web pages. Many forestry
professionals from Hawaii and the Pacific Islands learned about reforestation techniques for
native tree species and especially Acacia koa, thinning techniques and principles, invasive
species management, and other subjects. Small land owners were made aware of the
potential value of native hardwoods when grown for 13 years and made into bowls and other
products.
Pig farmers have been made aware of a local option for feed either as a supplement or for
their total feed source using local food wastes composted by a composting machine. Dairies
and other generators of waste water were made aware of the bioreactor as an
environmentally friendly wastewater treatment system.




Wood turners on the Big Island transformed raw native wood grown in a demonstration plot
into beautiful bowls and other wooden art objects bring prices of over $200 a piece. About
45,770 acres of native hardwood forests are now under management options that include
thinning and fertilizing as a result of workshops held by CTAHR workers.




Three extension workers have installed one or more demonstration plots involving forestry
or agro-forestry projects.




Eighty five landowners have adopted one or more practices, involving 45,772 acres now
being managed using techniques and information provided through the educational offerings.
The jointly produced book, "Traditional Trees of Pacific Islands‚‚" initial printing of 2000
copies are close to being sold out in less than a year. Websites had over 77,000 persons
visiting during the reporting period and over 2500 downloads of web pages.
Many forestry professionals from Hawaii and the Pacific Islands learned about reforestation
techniques for native tree species and especially Acacia koa, thinning techniques and
principles, invasive species management, and other subjects.
Small land owners were made aware of the potential value of native hardwoods when grown
for 13 years and made into bowls and other products.
Pig farmers have been made aware of a local option for feed either as a supplement or for
their total feed source using local food wastes composted by a composting machine. Dairies
and other generators of waste water were made aware of the bioreactor as an
environmentally friendly wastewater treatment system.
As a result of the establishment of the MD Rural Economic Development Center, several new
programs have been developed.
1)Curbside Consulting

This program provides one-on-one consultation for business development and market
planning in an open-discussion, non-threatening situation. People are often hesitant to
discuss their business ideas or ask questions about business development in front of a crowd.
 This program facilitate their business assessment and resulting follow-up support by allowing
them to explore their ideas with a business and marketing development specialist.

This program is delivered by a variety of outlets:

1.Clients calling the Specialist with questions or to request information
2.. One day a month, determined by the county educator, with sign-up times within a
county for scheduled meetings with interested clients. This county visit might also include a
group
marketing presentation and educational program.
3. The use of the Centra system to deliver consultation and support to counties that organize
a sign-up day and schedule the consultation and/or marketing presentation electronically.
Virtual office hours.

The Specialist has already provided one-on-one consultation on business assessment,
business plan development, and marketing.

Phone support4 clients3 counties
Farm visits5 clients3 counties
Assistance to Agents 7 Agents    7 counties
The Extension program resulted on over 600 new or potential small growers receiving
information regarding this new crop. Attendees not only received information but also hands-
on training that is essential to beginning a vineyard. The matching grant program attracted 28
applicants over 2 years, of which 15 were approved. 12 of the 15 chose to plant vines. Many
of the program participants were able to more effectively evaluate the work and dedication
required to grow grapes after attending the MCE programs and decided against planting new
vineyards. The growers were able to select appropriate varieties and rootstocks with the
Extension assistance. The research vineyard provided essential information to grower's on
which variety to select (or not select) and growing techniques to use. The program also was
successful in dispelling any "romanticized" notion of grape growing and ensured new growers
understood the labor requirements and financial risks involved. As a result of workshops and
on-farm tours, local policy makers are more informed of the needs of new grape growers and
have dedicated $500,000.00 in funds for the development of a new local winery
cooperative.

Impact Statement:
The Beginning grape growing program resulted in 26 acres of new grape production in the
region, with interest in more in future years. Over 600 new or potential growers received
information on grape production through a variety of formal and non-formal teaching
methods. New growers have the information need to start a vineyard including for variety
selection, vineyard establishment, and pest management. The Southern Maryland Grape
Growers and Winery Association is actively meeting and is in the process of creating a winery
cooperative for members.


Since this phase of research has not been initiated, there are no results to report.
Approximately 96% of the participants reported knowledge gained and reported that the
knowledge gained helped save $75,000 and earn $375,000.

Approximately 96% of the participants reported knowledge gained.


Approximately 96% of the participants reported knowledge gained and reported that the
knowledge gained helped save $75,000 and earn $375,000.
Over 1,000 acres were reported with 25% increase in productivity.

Nine landowner contacts were made by master landowners.

Over 247 loggers completed the training and all reported knowledge gained. All received a
certificate of completion.




At the hibiscus and tree field day, Arbor Day, and Earth day citizens gained new knowledge
and awareness of issues affecting our environment and some remedial practices that they
could utilize. About 90 percent of the participants at the hibiscus and tree field day requested
for trees and more information on how to plant and care for trees. All participants received
hibiscus seedlings to plant in their yards. At the Arbor day, 87 percent of the participants
gained new knowledge, skills and awareness on the proper ways of planting and caring for
trees. Researchers have identified some tree species suitable for absorbing and reducing
some effects of UV, carbon dioxide, and other greenhouse gases.




Collaboration with the private sector, such as "Nature's Best, Inc." and other arboricultural
companies promoted the utilization of wood waste, especially, the urban wood waste in
Louisiana. The last assessment indicated that more than 65% of the homeowners and 85% of
the businesses in Louisiana are utilizing some sources of biobased plant residue as mulching
materials in their landscaping projects. Research has refined and added new knowledge in
the processing of Agricultural production operations carried out in the proximity of urban
areas without protection of soil and water resources can result in nonpoint source pollution
(NPS). Agriculture, forestry, grazing, septic systems, recreational boating, urban runoff,
construction, physical changes to stream channel, and habitat degradation were investigated
as potential sources of NPS. The severity of these problems depends on the types of
operation, site characteristics, weather conditions and the practices employed.
At PCC-CRE, farmers now have the assurance that they can successfully grow crops every
year thru tissue culture and micropropagation techniques.

At CMI-CRE, it was observed that farmers are maintaining their gardens and looking forward
to harvesting time. Homeowners have followed the advice of extension agent and cleaned
their catchments and roof gutters from debris, which was the reason the water tested
positive for coliforms. People are also beginning to boil their water rather than drinking it
straight from the catchments.


The availability of Vitamin A-rich produce in the market is a good indication of program
participants adopting recommended practices. All participating households in a targeted
village on nutrition program started to use more local food including yellow-flesh banana and
swamp taro varieties and vegetables. Four families in a resource poor community in Yap are
producing vegetables through appropriate hydroponics and composting systems.




The TV segments which are in their 4th year of production reach approximately 30,000
homes. Feedback through referrels, office contacts, and e-mail indicate the segments have
raised awareness with the public on natural resource issues.




Formal evaluations were conducted at approximately 10 educational programs. Evaluation
results show 100 program participants plan to or have made practice changes as a result of
educational programs.
Agriculture producers participating in classes reported 100% increase in understanding of the
interaction of natural resource use of Wyoming's economy. Over 50% of participants
identified energy related use of natural resources as a concern.




This is a long term impact, no report the first year of the program.




This is a long-term outcome. No results for 2007.




To date over 150 TV spots have been produced over a four year period. Success of this effort
can be documented through external funding received to sponsor the segments. Clientele
frequently call CES offices requesting additional information or seek follow-up answers on
segments. Educators document interaction with the public on these spots. This is a long term
outcome, which at this stage is raising awareness with the general public on natural resource
issues.




Thirteen (13) individuals reported that they were able to use some of the skills learned in the
marketing class to improve the quality of their displays and make some money.
Approximately 2800-3000 residents witnessed the poster presentations and the hands-on
demonstrations of recycling and reusing of felled trees through wood turning, wood carving
and furniture making. The woodworkers have also organized themselves and are planning to
become lobbyists for tree conservation, preservation and responsible recycling of felled trees.
A large majority of the students, and home owners had never had any formal or experiential
educational training in tree care and management. Ninety-five (95) percent of the
participants indicated that they had learned more about trees at the lectures and garden
tours than at any other educational opportunity. There was a definite heightening of
awareness and increase in knowledge amongst that group. Of the participating landscape
crews, sixty-five (65) percent had some experiential education in tree care but the majority,
eighty-five (85) percent, had never had any formal training in tree care and management.
Crew members reported a definite increase in knowledge and a confirmation of some things
learned by experience and to the contrary the repudiation of some word-of-mouth
information they had received over the years. A small group of the homeowners have used
their newly obtained knowledge to serve as watchdogs when there is tree pruning taking
place in their community. We have had periodic calls from homeowners, and private
landscape firms for consultations after being approached by a resident that has taken the
training classes.




More than 170 recent participants have reported that they are managing 3,865 acres as
wildlife habitat as a result of Extension programs. Improved management practices include
using native Maine plant species and removing exotic invasive plant species, planting species
for native pollinators, decreasing or eliminating the use of pesticides, planting fruit-bearing
shrubs and evergreens, and retaining snags and down woody material. Program graduates
have offered their knowledge as volunteers within their communities, working more than
700 hours during 2007 to improve ecological productivity.

During 2007, 12 maple producers from Maine and New Hampshire participated in a multi-day
workshop that included lessons in sugar chemistry, product development, production
techniques, testing processes, food safety, and product evaluation. All participants plan to
incorporate these new techniques into their production during the 2008 spring season,
increasing their profit potential by approximately 440 percent for the portion of their crop
that they dedicate to producing and selling value-added products.

Researchers have given results of their research to the paper industry, providing clear
strategies for making pressure sensitive labels for which the pressure sensitive adhesive is
removed efficiently via unit operations used by paper recyclers. The findings have been used
to design several new commercial products. Also the findings have been used to help
promote initiatives at the state and federal level for mandates requiring recycling compatible
formations to be used with paper products.

The researchers work with many state and federal agencies and private stakeholders
regarding forest wildlife habitat management is based on the concept of adaptive
management. The processes that the research has developed to achieve changes in action by
land management agencies has already resulted in a change in the way parties with
conflicting interests are approaching their interaction with federal and state agencies.
Program participants have developed and maintained operations resilient to changing
economic, ecologic and social conditions of Massachusetts.
Results of studies yield both basic ecological information and applied management
recommendations. Data from our findings have contributed to the USDA Eastern Forest
Region conservation assessment and USDI FWS CITES export permit applications policy.




Results will be useful for policy makers involved in greenhouse gas emission decision-making
and for producers searching for alternative crops.


One landowner reported thinning.




Natural resource knowledge and its application on the land as a result of these efforts is
difficult to measure short-term. The results are measured in long-term changes in human
behavior and management of these critical resources. Clearly, with the numbers of people
attending these educational sessions, the value is high.




Wolf Bay Watershed has been monitored by AWW volunteers for 10 years and this has led to
it being upgraded to 'Outstanding Alabama Water' classification. One volunteer was able to
resolve a leaking sewer line in a matter of weeks through bacteria monitoring. Alabama
Water Watch has received a grant for phase 1 implementation of a nine-year plan to clean up
a polluted creek in the Auburn/Opelika metropolitan area, and aThe Third Annual State of
Our Watershed Conference—The Tallapoosa River Basing was held in April and was attended
by about 70 people including business representatives, environmental citizen groups, post-
secondary education-research personnel, and representatives from municipal, state and
federal agencies, real estate and public schools. Professionals who attended educational
programs ranked them as very useful and indicated an interest in related programs in the
future.
In Palau, school children, youth and farmers are now aware of new developments and
current technologies in agricultural science. Students who have participated in the water
quality education campaign are now aware and knowledgeable with the water contaminants,
water maintenance and the value of water sources to the islands. The students are more
conscious about the contaminants that can be found in their drinking water. Government
agencies that deal with regulating environmental issues including water are now referring
clients to PCC-CRE for awareness and adoption of the Dry Litter Waste Management System
and Rainwater Catchments system maintenance. Swine farmers who have visited the
demonstrations showed interest to adopt the model and they want to tell their fellow
farmers to adopt this model. Several farmers and school farms are also in the process of
adopting the model for their piggeries.

At CMI-CRE, clients asked for information on gardening, composting, water testing and
sanitization, and pest managements, so this information was provided via a weekly radio
program. Through an established partnership with the Ministry of Resources & Development
and the RMI Environmental Protection Authority, programs and resources have been shared
to achieve our shared mission and goals.

At COM-FSM-CRE, thirty-four varieties of banana, twelve varieties of sweet potato and one
variety of taro have been inoculated for micropropagation and conservation. More than
10,525 elite seedlings of different varieties of banana, taro and sweet potato were produced


Two hundred and eighty five participants at pond management programs indicated that they
increased their knowledge about water. After water conservation programs, five participants
demonstrated an increased knowledge about water. Five hundred and fourteen participants
in private water supplier and Master Owner Network programs indicated an increase in
knowledge about water. Two hundred and twenty-one participants indicated that they had
increased their knowledge about water after watershed management educational programs.

Three hundred forty-eight participants indicated that they implemented a recommended
action or Best Management Practice related to water quality after attending pond
management programs. Five participants implemented recommended action or Best
Management Practice related to water quality. After private water suppliers and Master
Owner Network programs, 529 participants indicated that they implemented recommended
action or Best Management Practice. One hundred and sixty-five participants implemented a
recommended action or Best Management Practice after watershed management
educational programs.

Number of degrees conferred has relatively static due to research funding constraints.
Notable examples have been a changes in cougar hunting laws in the state as have fishing
regulations on selected lakes.

Search for new faculty member failed.
Based on experimental data analyzed in the fall of 2007, we are able to draw the following
tentative conclusion / recommendations: 1) During the first growing season Shiitake
mushrooms fruit well on red oak, red maple, and beech, but not at all on aspen; 2) Moisture
loss was least for red oak and aspen, and almost twice as great from red maple and beech;.3)
The failure of Shiitake to grow on aspen is notable, and if it holds up during the 2nd fruiting
season, it will be an important recommendation (avoid aspen).;4) While mushroom
production on red maple and beech is comparable to red oak, greater moisture loss suggests
that red maple and beech will not perform as well during subsequent growing seasons. These
conclusions and recommendations will be presented at several workshops during spring
2008. In addition, a web site is under development to foster communication and information
among growers and those who aspire to develop gourmet forest mushroom business.
Researchers have quantified how different factors (e.g., socioeconomic, demographic,
geographic, and ecological) interactively affect wildlife habitat across human-influenced
landscapes. These findings have been disseminated and will aid wildlife managers and
researchers in making more effective natural resources decisions to conserve wildlife
populations, communities, and habitat.

A new population estimation technique (an aerial survey) was developed to quantify the elk
population size in Michigan and provided to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources
(DNR).

A habitat suitability model and a population viability model for the eastern massasauga
rattlesnake have been developed and shared with the DNR and others to help conserve the
species.

Researchers provided the DNR with estimates on deer population dynamics and quantitative
descriptions of how landscape patterns and land ownership influence space use to help
managers plan more effective habitat and population management practices. Results from
the this project have also been disseminated to the public via the southcentral Michigan
website, available at: http://www.fw.msu.edu/deer/.


Peer reviewed publications represent new knowledge. In addition to disseminating new
knowledge to the scientific community and other stakeholders, publications are one
indication of research productivity. They enhance the reputation of the NH AES and increase
the competitiveness of research proposals for further studies.

The graduate students whose MS thesis research was based on the project have become
experts in the issues addressed. They are likely to have a continued interest in the issue and
may pursue additional related studies in the PhD work and future professional studies.

In most cases, the student developed a research report and prepared a presentation for the
UNH Undergraduate Research Conference. In some cases, the work was used to prepare an
undergraduate honors thesis.
The audiences gained up-to-the-minute knowledge in their respective disciplines.

Submission of proposals to competitive programs in the USDA and other funding agencies is a
way of leveraging AES formula funds. It has allowed us to find additional resources to solve
issues that are central to the mission of the AES.

NH State agencies are better informed about the importance of vernal pools.




Number not tracked. Total number of non-peer reviewed publications was 28.




Many more people are aware of the presence, spread and impact of invasive shrubs. Local
foresters and landowners have adopted recommended practice to control spread.


Results have been detailed in Outputs, State Defined Outputs and in the responses to the
other State Defined Outcomes.
As a result of the NH-AES projects land use managers have greater awareness and knowledge
of the effect that managment practices might have on species diversity, environmental
quality, ecosystem function, invasive species impacts, resource conservation, public
perception, and public health.
This research examined the effects of two retention harvests (50% of stocking and 70% of
stocking) aimed at regenerating oak species on bat populations in southern Ohio oak-hickory
forests. The overall response of the bat population to these harvests was positive. Activity
rates were much higher in harvested versus unharvested areas. Between the two harvests,
there was no difference in the amount of bat activity suggesting the preferred treatment for
restoring oak species be determined by the success of oak regeneration. Bats generally
preferred a less cluttered, open understory for ease of flight and prey capture. Examination
of individual species also displayed a preference to the retention harvests. Big brown, silver-
haired, and red bats were detected most in habitats suited to their morphology and
echolocation call design. Myotis species and eastern pipistrelles displayed a more generalist
nature, suggesting an appreciation for multiple habitats.


As presently worded, this outcome is too vague, and will be replaced by others.
1. OARDC wildlife researchers have shown that the regenerating clearcuts in southern Ohio
provides evidence that shrubland birds avoid habitat edges and, to a lesser extent, may be
area-sensitive. Thus, small or narrow harvests may not provide optimal habitat for this suite
of declining species, and managers should consider options to minimize edge and provide
larger patches of shrubland habitats. Recent work also demonstrates that regenerating
clearcuts are used heavily by mature-forest birds during the post-breeding period. Not only
were most species known to breed in surrounding mature forests captured in regenerating
clearcuts during the post-breeding period, but many species commonly regarded as "forest
interior" or "area sensitive" were among the most numerous captures. These results highlight
an important opportunity for forest management and suggest thast forested landscapes
containing a mosaic of successional stages may hold the most conservation promise for
forest birds.
2. . In the first study to focus both on breeding (Ohio Hills) and non-breeding grounds
(Venezuelan Andes), OARDC scientists have (1) identified key features that Cerulean
Warblers require for successful breeding, showing that "old forest" features promote nest


The field studies will define critical genetic silvicultural parameters needed for restoration of
American chestnut to eastern forests when resistant genotypes are available for planting.


Recommendations for tree species, seedling characteristics, and compatible ground covers
will result in approximately 10% increase in survival of trees planted on reclamation sites.
Data is reported under the more specific outcome indicator/measure that was added to this
planned program report.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.
See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.


See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.


See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.

See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.




See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.
As a result of the individual and workshop-based activity, Extension foresters referred over
400 landowners owning 35,000 acres to licensed foresters who wrote forest stewardship
plans on over 29,000 acres. This represents $435,000 of direct economic activity as well as
improved management and timber harvesting. Over 25% of New Hampshire's private forest
land is managed according to an integrated forest stewardship plan.

New Hampshire licensed foresters attending Extension workshops manage an estimated
650,000 acres of private forest land resulting in improved practices. 80% of attendees
reported that attendance had a positive influence on their land management practice.

Improved timber harvesting emphasizing the use of best management practices (BMPs) and
minimizing negative impacts on water quality has been a focus of Extension programming
with a variety of audiences. An Extension evaluation of BMP effectiveness demonstrated that
in New Hampshire, BMPs are being used effectively during timber harvesting resulting in soil
stability 77% of the time at crossing structures; 80% at approaches outside 50' buffer and
76% at approaches inside the buffer.

Minimizing Fragmentation and Sprawl through Community Conservation Planning and
Permanent Land Protection: 12 communities completed natural resource inventories as a
prelude to conservation planning and identifying important lands to permanently protect.
Over 6,000 acres of forest and field have been permanently protected as a result of
assistance provided by the Extension Land and Water Conservation Educator.
The Community Tree Steward and Coverts Projects ask volunteers to serve 40 hours doing
outreach on wildlife and forestry topics each year. In FY07, Coverts volunteers averaged 105
hours of volunteering on behalf of forest stewardship or wildlife habitat issues. These hours
reflect the volunteers' involvement in many different wildlife and conservation groups, and
reflect the intense dedication of Coverts volunteers.

The aim of the NH Coverts Project is to find people who are already volunteering in wildlife or
conservation projects, who are well-connected and community-minded, and then to give
them new tools, knowledge, and connections so they can volunteer in a more effective and
knowledgeable way. The on-going stories collected about the efforts of Coverts volunteers
around the state indicate that they are indeed "right" people. They are movers-and-shakers,
and as a result of the Coverts training, we also know that they have good training, correct
information, and contacts with resource professionals at their disposal.

Several Community Tree Stewards hold leadership positions in important NH
agencies/organizations, i.e. Vice President of the NH Landscape Association, Executive
Director of the Strafford Rivers Conservancy, the only town-paid Land Protection
Administrator in NH, Vice President of the Southeast Land Trust of NH, and President of the
Souhegan Valley Land Trust. Many Community Tree Stewards also hold positions on
conservation commissions, planning boards, tree committees, watershed associations, and
other land trusts throughout New Hampshire. One dam project taken on by a Community
Tree Stewards exceeds state of NH standards, and they have been the advisors to the
Planning & Zoning Boards for 4 major developments that resulted in resulting in stopping a
large gas station complex to be built on the aquifer, and a major mining expansion effort of
140 acres.

In 2007, 69 programs provided 5139 learners with 13,500 learner-hours of education.
Outcomes include expanded student appreciation and awareness of career opportunities in
environmental and agricultural fields, expanded hands-on opportunities for teacher
application in science classes, expanded knowledge of CSP cost-share opportunities to reduce
water use in the Republican River basin, and 733 certified professions for on-site wastewater
system installation and maintenance.
Since site launch, we have averaged 5 visits/day, with a mean visit duration of 2:15 minutes
and 2.0 page views per visit. This compares favorably to national statistics on web site
visitation (e.g., national average of duration of a web page viewed in October 2007 = 46
seconds (Nielsen NetRatings)). Our marketing efforts combined with monitoring indicate that
direct mail is not as successful for our Massachusetts target audience as it has been with our
Vermont target audience. This may be due to the higher proportion of absentee ownership in
the Vermont study area, and people being more interested in using the intent to learn about
their land, whereas more owners are resident in the Massachusetts study area, and may be
less interested in using the internet to learn about the land out their back door. No single
marketing seems to be more effective than another, with the exception that print media, and
especially letters-to-the-editor in local newspapers resulted in a strong pulse of visitation.
Our focus groups last summer indicated that the most popular aspect of the site is the ability
to view and use spatial data online to view land and the surrounding area. Additional
results/feedback indicated that the overall design of the site was pleasing, and that it had a
great deal of content, but that there were navigation issues to address. We are using Google

Attendees reported the following behavior changes as a result of their Tree School
educational experiences:
1) 1/3 of attendees have successfully reforested land
2) 20% of attendees have thinned their forest using information specifically learned at Tree
School, with an average project size of nine acres
3) 21% of attendees have harvested timber successfully, using information learned at ths
event. Median project sizes were about 10 acres and harvested about 200,000 board feet of
timber volume -- including values of nearly $100,000 per landowner
4) 28% of attendees reported having saved money or increased the profitability of their
forest operations by using information learned at Tree School. The average financial gain
reported was approximately $5,000 per landowner


97% of the WOWnet participants report the knowledge gained in the program and related
supporting activity has lead to 1) collaborative problem solving and networking, 2) learning
how to use tools and other technical skills appropriately, and 3) working with forestry
professionals to achieve land use goals and management practices.
For FY2007, Wisconsin AES Hatch funded projects resulted in 182 publications, 6 patents
disclosures and 1 patent, and 62 graduate students trained. The Wisconsin AES also tracks
the Thompson ISI Essential Science indicator as a measure of impact. Our goal is to remain in
the top five and we were ranked first in the last published ranking. Examples of
representative impacts resulting from individually funded projects within our portfolio are
described, to the extent possible, in the Summary of this Annual Report.
Results were: increased profits for vegetable producers; increased knowledge in vegetables,
fruits, nuts, forestry, home gardens, and pest control; and better environmental
management through EQIP practices. More specifically,
(1) 30,000 collard plants in Lowndes County had higher yields of 5,700 bunches of collards
(after adjusting for survival rate and home consumption). Collards were sold at $2.50-$3.00
per bunch, yielding between $14,250-$17,100.
(2) A vegetable project in Macon County, under plastic culture, yielded $60,000 for
watermelons and $50,000 for all other vegetables--a total of $110,000. Conventional
product would have yeilded 75% less (i.e., $82,500).
(3)Producers who learned proper techniques of planting trees and shrubberies were able to
save a substantial amount, because they did not have to replant them.
(4) A producer in Barbour County obtained 1,000 bunches of collards from 0.25 acre plot and
was able to sell it to a Black-owned resturant in Eufaula for a better income of $2,000 at
$2.00 per bunch.
(5) One hundred and fifteen (115) families participated in home gardening in Montgomery
County; they saved about $300 to $500 per family in expenditures on fruits and vegetables,
and at the same time provided nutritious and fresh vegetables for their families.
(6) Ninety (90) timber contracts were developed for landowners, which provided them,

The value of managed forest land expands beyond income defined from sale of timber and
potentially the sale of carbon. Results in healthier stands with greater resistance to withstand
disease attack as well as succeptibility to wild fir. The average amount of carbon stored in
ornamental stands was approximately 1 lb./acre whereas carbon storage in the intensively
managed stand averaged 9 lb./year.
Twenty eight programs were conducted across Mississippi for 1,089 participants. Of these,
120 applied to join the Tree Farm program, resulting in 120 new forest management plans
developed affecting thousands of acres of Mississippi Forest Land. This is just one example of
the adoption of new technologies and practices resulting from this program.




Eight-one participants adopted best management practices that help to improve the
environment and conserve the natural resources in their rural communities.


This project resulted in the development of business expansion into hardwood markets
among at least six small sawmill operators with an estimated increase in business revenues of
$10,000. Based on the increased capacity of these mills, a larger hardwood sawmill
developed a system for including small volumes of undried hardwood lumber from smaller
mills into their production line, creating a new, viable marketing option. The following
evaluation of the MSUE educational effort includes evidence of hardwood knowledge
increase among participants. 97% of respondents indicated "some" to "very high" knowledge
increase. Behavioral changes include 72% of respondents indicating increased sawmill
business profits based on their participation in the program, 59% of respondents indicating
improved skills as a sawmill employee and 78% of respondents indicating "somewhat" to
"very much" improved contacts with other small sawmill businesses.




In 2007, 385 students were trained with approximately 85% of the youth showing knowledge
gains in wildlife biology, forest use, and photosynthesis.
By continuing to enhance existing online web services, creating new web-based services, and
organizing educational opportunities, the Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Specialist is
supporting the use of geospatial technologies in Rhode Island. The activities of the GES
support both new and experienced users of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote
sensing, and the Global Positioning System. The hands-on computer courses focus on uses of
GIS for effective forest stewardship practices, as well as open space planning and acquisition.
Access to the URI-National Geodetic Survey Cooperative Continuously Operating GPS
Reference Station has continued smoothly. Together, these resources continue to be crucial
to sustaining the use of geospatial technology to support natural resource management
decisions in Rhode Island.

The study uncovered results indicating that homeowners are more willing to pay to help
restore idled fields to productive hayfields and for removing invasive plants than to pay
specifically for the range of bobolinks (a grassland nesting bird) that might be supported.
Willingness to pay differences were found under stated choice methods but there appeared
to be no statistically significant difference in the relative preference of differetent attributes
of farm management for grassland nesting birds.
This research clearly shows that this remotely sensed index is influenced substantially by
factors other than fire severity including topographic effects due to relative low solar
elevations at high latitudes. The use of different pre-fire images substantially changed the fire
severity estimates, most likely due to changing plant phenology and solar elevation.
Therefore the use of NBR to monitor fire severity in either time or across regions requires
extensive field data to calibrate NBR threshold values which would change substantially
during the fire season.




A more informed clientele.

Black spruce soils: The study documents a basic difference in carbon accumulation
mechanism for the boreal forest compared to the arctic tundra. In addition to surface
accumulation, arctic tundra soils accumulate carbon through cryoturbation and, thus, store
carbon deep within the profile.
Controlling Soil N Availability: The project will provide tools for fertilizer recommendation for
crop production in Alaska, and for assessing enhanced nitrogen mineralization in natural
ecosystems under climate change scenario. The will help us to improve nutrient management
in arable land of Alaska, and to understand nitrogen dynamics in natural ecosystems.
The PSP data provide useful insights for foresters and forest managers and is critical for
empirical modeling of forest growth.This data stream becomes more useful over time as the
plots are remeasured. The periodic remeasure provides a snap shot of the site, while
repeated site visits provides the more valuable long-term information. This data enables
modeling of forest dynamics, such as growth and yield. FIASKA can also be used to monitor
and predict the effects of climate change on boreal forests. The new LOGS remeasurement
helps land managers to make better cost effective prescriptions for tree regeneration and
plantation.

A wave of tree mortality and forest health problems above the typical level was detected.
Most of the major factors responsible are triggered or intensified by warmer temperatures. If
this continues a forest health crisis involving upland white spruce and possibly other species
is highly likely in the next 15 -30 years. Testimonies were provided to the U.S. House of
Representatives, the Committee on Science and Technology, and the Select Committee on
Energy Independence. Seminars were presented to resource managers, state and county
legislators, national policy makers, Alaska professional foresters, elementary school classes
across the U.S. and Alaska.
Randy Rogers, Wildlife Planner, ADF&G said Dr. Todd shows ability to design and implement
teaching strategies and projects that excite and motivate students about projects. The
Fortymile Caribou Herd Recovery Team's work led by Dr. Todd was widely recognized as a
hallmark achievement in Alaska wildlife management planning and received special
recognition from the Alaska Land Managers Forum. He uses Dr. Todd's dissertation
"Designing Effective Negotiating Teams for Environmental Disputes: An Analysis of Three
Wolf Management Plans" is his primary guide to establishing collaborative citizen-based
wildlife management planning teams. Susan has a high degree of sensitivity to cultural
differences and an ability to work in a congenial manner with persons of diverse backgrounds
and viewpoints. Her experience in negotiating solutions with indigenous Native people and
other interests has helped ensure that less-advantaged groups are always involved in
planning efforts




Potential annual savings to the Oregon Christmas tree industry for this new innovation are up
to $1.5 million per year. Growers will be surveyed in future years to measure degree of
adoption of the new technology and to calculate an actual monetary impact.




All respondents (44% of participants) indicated they intended to develop management plans.
58% of respondents indicated they had already initiated development of mananagement
plans and taken important first steps to completing their plans, such as walking their property
to identify resources, obtaining aerial photos and maps, identifying their management goals
and objectives, and compiling legal and location information about their property. They
attributed these actions to having completed the basic management planning class.




The evaluation will be implemented in 2008.
More than 15 manuscripts were published during the year.




The soil carbon study documents a basic difference in carbon accumulation mechanism for
the boreal forest compared to the arctic tundra. In addition to surface accumulation, arctic
tundra soils accumulate carbon through cryoturbation and, thus, store carbon deep within
the profile. In the upland boreal forest, the main mechanism of carbon storage is through
surface deposition of forest vegetation litter and mosses and lichens, with storage mainly in
the forest floor. There is less carbon storage in the lower soil horizons than in arctic soils. In
the past two years all soil sampling associated with the Permanent Sampling Plots was in
cooperation with the USDA National Soil Survey Center and all their soil analyses are
complete. Based on field and these data, the PI and coauthors have initiated a manuscript
describing the soil carbon status across the boreal forest of Alaska.


This is the fourth year of monitoring lake levels and represents the first year of data after the
divergent feeder stream was re-directed to the lake. Operational problems, including channel
icing, caused much of the runoff to by-pass the control structure and result in a small but
unknown contribution to the lake. The lake level data do verify that, in contrast to the
previous 3 summers, the lake did not decline this summer. On the more general level, we
found a good statistical relationship between mean monthly Kt (ratio of measured global
radiation to extra-terrestrial radiation on a horizontal surface) and mean monthly sky cover,
by including an index of optical air mass for each month. This relationship holds well for a
wide variety of locations in the United States and should help expand estimates of global
radiation and therefore evapotranspiration to areas without primary radiation data. This is
particularly significant in Alaska with its sparse data network.




This curricula and research findings are dessiminated through the AgroBorealis, the Research
Magazine of SNRAS/AFES and through the following websites:
http://www.uaf.edu/salrm/afes/pubs/index.html;
http://www.uaf.edu/salrm/faculty/harris/html.; http://reindeer.salrm.uaf.edu
After attending Coached Planning Forest Stewardship planning sessions....
- 40% indicated that they planned to thin their forests
- 70% indicated that they would assess insect damage
- 70% have developed land management plans
- A net benefit study by the University of Washington indicates that fuel reductions on lands
under land management plans developed with the assistance of WSU Extension will result in
future net savings of $5.3 million derived from the reduced wildfire risk on these critical
lands.
Invasive weed control programs in NE Washington and along the coast have generated the
following impacts....
- The spread of Dalmatian toadflax across over 1 million acres has been checked by biological
control agents released in a cooperative venture led by WSU Extension faculty.
- Herbicide application on rangeland has been reduced saving $35 per acre on 138,000 acres
in NE Washington resulting in savings to agencies of approximately $4.8 million.
- Rapid response resulting from rangeland monitoring has allowed for early control of
invasive species on 8156 acres and protecting an additional 10,000 adjacent acres.
- Over 16,000 acres of Spartina infested tidelands in Willapa Bay and Puget Sound were
treated with a new, safer, more cost effective, and more effective herbicide as the direct
result of research conducted by a WSU Extension specialist. Spartina populations have

Outcomes and Impacts
- Forest health has been restored on 3600 acres in critical areas as a direct result of WSU
Extension programs. This led to a reduction of the risk of wildfire and an expected savings
state and federal agencies of $180 per acre or $650,000 annually.
- Herbicide application on rangeland has been reduced by utilizing biological control
mechanisms. This saved $35 per acre on 138,000 acres in NE Washington or $4.8 million
annually.
Numerous educational programs were delivered related to natural resource stewardship.
These addressed critical issues such as forest and range management, coastal and marine
issues, watershed management, control of invasive species, and forestland entrepreneurship.
 Samples of documented learning include the following.
- 70% of adults utilizing Master Gardener volunteer delivered services indicated that their
knowledge of environmentally sustainable gardening practices was increased.
- Among participants in Water-wise Gardening and Landscaping workshops, 60% increased
knowledge about plant groupings; 52% increased knowledge about water-wise plants:; and
50% increased knowledge about how to reduce turf size in yards and gardens.
- 100% of private landowners attending forest stewardship workshops indicated that they
had learned sound forest management practices.
- 100% of private landowners indicated that they gained increased knowledge about where
to find critical resources supporting future land management decisions.
- Over 92% of classroom teachers indicated that their students had a positive learning
experience as an outcome of Master Gardener led "Plants Grow Children" programs.
- 75% of Sustainable Small Farming and Ranching course participants indicated that they had
increased their awareness of current issues and concerns related to land management.
- 77% of participants in the Living on the Land program indicated significant changes in their
knowledge levels.
Numerous behavior changes have been documented that lead to improvement in the quality
of the natural environment in Washington State. For example:
- 53% of new Beach Watcher volunteers provide service on a monthly basis and 10%
volunteer weekly.
- Beach Watcher volunteers conducted surveys in the Puget Sound that will lead to future
removal of new Spartina (invasive aquatic plant) and removal of 200 tons of creosoted
materials by the Washington Department of Natural Resources.
- The City of Tacoma is marketing Targo mulch and potting mix - derived from biosolid waste
materials. These products were developed in partnership with WSU Extension faculty.
- Statewide, 40% of participants in the Coached Planning program developed plans to thin
forestlands.
- Statewide, 85% of FireWise program participants produced and began implementing a plan
to fire proof their properties.
- In Spokane County, 33% of horticulture education program participants have reduced water
use, 44% have reduced pesticide use, 38% have used proper plant placement, and 23% have
initiated low maintenance landscaping.
- Volunteers mapped 9.4 nautical miles of shoreline along the Juan de Fuca Strait for
eelgrass.
- In King County, 65% of past class participants reported implementing recommended forest
practices on their land.
- Three counties and four municipalities have adopted the Low Impact Development
Technical Guidance Manual develop by a WSU Extension faculty member.
- 98% of King County participants in the Acting Food Policy Council's "Eat Local for
Thanksgiving" campaign indicated that they included locally-grown foods on their holiday
menu.
- 80% of attendees at the Pend Oreille County "Sense of Place Program" have taken steps to
protect homes from wildfire, conserve water, and enhance wildlife habitat.
- The percentage of landowners practicing the 10 "Puget Sound-friendly" practices 60-100
In FY 07, 482 owners of nearly 47,000 private forest acres attended Extension workshops and
other educational activities in the Idaho panhandle; and 94 owners of nearly 23,000 private
forest acres attended Extension workshops and other educational activities in the NCIA. In
most program evaluations, fewer than half of participants indicated previous involvement in
various forestry education or assistance programs. Participants indicated knowledge
increases ranging from 18% to 115%, with an un-weighted average of 77%. Based on
evaluation results:
204 N. Idaho family forest owners will monitor for insect, disease, or animal damage;
166 will thin forest trees;
177 will manage to favor larch and pines;
44 will contact a forester for additional assistance
33 will complete a forest management plan;
110 will reduce vegetation competing with tree seedlings;
15 will pursue additional information on conservation easements;
17 will reduce fuels in the home ignition zone
16 will make their home easier for firefighters to access
40 will purchase a GPS receiver
76 will use a GPS receiver for forest management
35 will look into GIS to manage their forest
17 will use internet data sources to manage their forest
34 will apply adaptive silviculture concepts
40 will attend additional forestry education programs;
32 will prune forest trees;
40 will use safety equipment when thinning


Graduates of the LEAP program demonstrate that they have acquired the requisite
knowledge to be certified to sell their logs to a sawmill in Idaho (all of which require LEAP
certification to purchase logs).

One-hundred sixty-four loggers attended LEAP Updates. As a result of 2007 LEAP Updates:
117 loggers increased their understanding of variable retention harvesting;
159 loggers will work more safely around power lines;
131 loggers will identify and respond to spruce budworm;
149 loggers will use a GPS unit more effectively; and
145 loggers increased their understanding of basic forest measurements.




Enrollment indicates a change in condition, as loggers have adopted a behavior to seek out
and apply new information about natural resources and environmental management.
In cooperation with the US Forest Service, a comprehensive document of management of
volcanic ash soils was published in 2007. This document examines the characteristics of
volcanic ash soils using a large regional National Soil Survey Center Soil Characterization
database and describes current state-of-knowledge of management and restoration in the
Inland Northwest Region. Our research into the landscape distribution of volcanic-ash
influenced soils is aiding the various soil mapping projects throughout the region. A better
understanding of the distribution and properties of these soils can provide a basis for
development of management strategies that ensure long-term sustainability of the region's
forests. The new model that we have developed for soil and plant community evolution at
Craters of the Moon impacts the manner in which these lands are being mapped and
inventoried. While previously considered non-soil, our work documents the importance of
these areas for wildlife habitat. This information is being incorporated into the soil survey of
the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve.
Calorimeter data suggest that fires in grass-dominated dry forest areas are patchy in both
extent and intensity, despite appearing to be relatively uniform in cover. Closed canopy dry
forests, even if dominated by fire intolerant species, help to minimize grass cover and to
reduce mortality of saplings after a fire. After a fire, stems and branches of saplings in closed
canopy areas tend to survive and releaf even if leaf loss is total. Stems in open areas are
killed to ground level and post-fire survival is attained by resprouting from the root collar.
Second fires that occur within 1.5 years of the first fire result in much greater mortality.
These results are informing forest managers about the role of wildfire and tree response.
This will lead to more informed damage and impact assessments following future wildfires.
We are currently developing ways to provide this information to public users of the forest
through a series of interpretive activities and signage.

				
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