Overview of Farm Anaerobic Digesters

Document Sample
Overview of Farm Anaerobic Digesters Powered By Docstoc
					              Overview of 
        Farm Anaerobic Digesters 
  Opportunities in Manure Management 
        and Renewable Energy 


                    CH 
                      4




                    CO 
                      2 




Manure Digester Summit 
   January 13, 2009 
             Flows in an Anaerobic Digester System 



                                            biogas




                animal 
               housing 




                                              screw 
 return 
                                            separator    liquids 
activated 
 sludge                                 solids           holding 
              receiving     digester                     lagoon 
                tank 
  Digester Heating Circuit – Engine or Boiler Sources 



                                                     Extra 
                                                   Thermal 
          Digester                                   Use 
                                                    Device 


Backup Boiler?



                                                     Dump 
                                                    Radiator 


                                     Circulator 

              Engine      Heat 
Biogas       Generator  Exchanger 
           What is Anaerobic Digestion?


•  A process of using naturally occurring microorganisms 
   to degrade and break down organic materials in the 
   absence of air. 

•  Characterized by optimal process temperature: 
   •  Psychrophilic                  o 
                        less than 68  F 
   •  Mesophilic        95 ­ 105°F 
                                ° 
                             105 
   •  Thermophilic      125 ­ 135°F 
                              135 ° 
                 Anaerobic Digestion Process 

                                    Complex Organic Matter 
                                  carbohydrates, proteins, fats 
hydrolysis 
                                  Soluble Organic Molecules 
                                sugars, amino acids, fatty acids 

fermentation 

                                         Volatile Fatty Acids 


acetogenesis              Acetic Acid                            H  and CO 
                                                                  2       2 


methanogenesis 
                                            CH  and CO 
                                              4       2 




              methanosarcina barkeri
           Complete Mix Anaerobic Digester 



•  Primarily used for manure in a range of 3 ­ 10% solids 

•  Digester can be above or below ground 

•  General Characteristics: 
   •    Temperature control with complete mixing (paddles or props) 
   •    Typical retention times (15 ­ 30 days) 
   •    Can be operated at mesophilic or thermophilic temperatures 
   •    Capital cost can be somewhat higher than plug­flow systems
        Vir­Clar Farm 
           Fond du Lac 
            mesophilic 
       complete mix, 340 kW 
Biogas Nord GmbH / Energies Direct
Crave Brothers Farm 
    Waterloo, WI 
     mesophilic 
 complete mix,  250 kW 
  American Biogas Co.
            Plug­Flow Anaerobic Digester 


•  Primarily used for high solids manure (> 8%) 
   •  Material moves through digester as a plug 

•  Rigid covers for gas collection (e.g., concrete) 
•  General Characteristics: 
   •    Temperature control with limited mixing 
   •    Typical retention times (20 ­ 30 days) 
   •    Typically operated at mesophilic temperatures 
   •    Solids deposition may be a problem for sand/grit or if the 
        solids content changes substantially (summer use of 
        sprinklers) 

•  Mixed plug­flow systems are available
Quantum Dairy 
 Weyauwega, WI 
   mesophilic 
modified plug­flow 
     300 kW 
   GHD, Inc.
Emerald Dairy 
  Emerald, WI 
   mesophilic 
modified plug­flow 
  pipeline CH 4 
   GHD, Inc.
                         Biogas Composition 
               Component                    Percentage 
         Methane, CH 
                    4                         55% ­ 65% 
         Carbon Dioxide, CO 
                           2                  35% ­ 45% 
         Hydrogen Sulfide, H  S 
                            2                 0.1% ­ 3% 
         Nitrogen, N 
                    2                          0% ­ 5% 
         Water Vapor, H  O 
                       2                    less than 1.5% 


         Typical Primary Composition

         60% CH 
               4 

                              Biogas 
         40% CO 
               2 


                                                  3 
Heating Value = approx. 600 btu per cubic foot (ft  ) 
                                   Uses for Biogas 

  pipeline                      vehicle 
  methane                        fuel                            absorption            water 
                                                                  chilling            heating 
                                             engine 
                                            generator 

              CH 
                4 
                                                                                       H  O 
                                                                                        2 


                           dehumidification 
                               chiller 
                                                          CH 
                                                            4    +  CO 
                                                                      2 
  CO 
    2 

 carbon 
 dioxide 
scrubber 
                                                                            space 
                                               H  S 
                                                 2 
                                                                           heating 
                                            scavenger 
                                           iron sponge 


                                    liquid water 
                                    condensate 
               digester                return 
       Engine Generators Considerations

• High first costs 
• A backup biogas boiler for digester heating may be a good idea 
• Maintenance costs 
• Operational issues   e.g., nuisance tripping off­line 
• Operation at low loading (60% or less) is inefficient 
• Electric buyback rates 
• Smaller generators can be less efficient than larger generators 
• Smaller sized equipment (less than 80 kW) choices are limited 
• Many smaller engine­generators are not designed to resist the 
  effects of biogas 
• Three­phase line extensions are expensive 
                Biogas Boiler Considerations 

GOAL:  Obtain a blue, compact and stable flame indicating complete 
combustion. 
Biogas needs less air than most other fuels and requires a specific burner 
and/or air control design.  This design usually involves: 
• 2 to 4 times expanded injector cross section to increase gas flow 
  to maintain pressure drop and exit velocity 
• modified controls for reducing combustion air supply 
                                          o 
• operated a sufficient temperature (> 260  F) to prevent condensation of 
  water leading to corrosion 
• avoidance of components containing copper and steel 
• dual fuel burners are typically used for propane/LP and biogas 
• reduced hydrogen sulfide content of biogas 
• stainless steel pipes are utilized 
• reduced moisture content of biogas
Liquid­Solid Separator
Value­Added Products from Biosolids
 Phosphorus 
in Wisconsin 
    Soils 


     Separators 
     can recover 
  up to about 30% 
    phosphorus 
 without flocculants 
          … 
% removed depends 
on separation system 
 used and settings
 used and settings 
                                                                Digested Liquids 
             Digester System                                        Irrigated 
               Includes CHP, 
                Gas Cleanup 
               and Separator 




                                                        Digested 
                                                                      Digested 
                                                        Liquids 
                                                                      Liquids 
                                                         Pond 1 
                                                                       Pond 2 



                                                     Reduced              Additionally 
                                                      N,P&K                Reduced 
Digested Solids                                                             N,P&K 
  for Animal 
   Bedding                  Digested 
                             Solids                               Digested Liquids 
                                                                Incorporated in Soil 
 Digested Solids 
       for                               Reduced N,P&K 
 Off­Farm Uses                           Slurries Utilized 
                                           per Nutrient 
                                        Management Plan
Liquid Digester Effluent Soil Injection
 Having Nutrients Does Not Mean You Can Use Them


The nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium are available in 
fresh animal manure. 
Much of the total nutrient content of manure is not immediately 
available for plants because they are in the organic form. 
Roots require inorganic (mineralized) forms of nutrients to pass 
their cell membranes for plant uptake. 
Organic nutrient break­down may take several years during which 
about half of the nitrogen may be lost as gas to the atmosphere. 
Up to 50% of the nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium may be lost 
to leaching and runoff. 
Nutrients will be in more readily available if the manure is 
digested before being applied to the soil. 
      Know How to Utilize Digester Nutrients 

Develop and implement an annual field­specific nutrient 
application plan. 

The timing of nutrient applications for various crops is 
critical. 
For example, corn takes up nitrogen rapidly beginning about 6 
weeks after planting and continuing until 10 to 12 weeks after 
planting. 


Practice precision nutrient application when possible.

Apply digester nutrients when the plants can utilize 
them and there is no forecasted rain for several days. 
    Nutrients amounts removed from the soil by corn 
  (stover and grain at a yield level of 150 bushels/acre)



     Nutrient         Grain, lb/acre    Stover, lb/acre    Total, lb/acre 
Nitrogen (N)                 120              51                171 
Phosphorus (P)               24.8             6.1               30.9 
Phosphorus                   57               14                 71 
(P  O5) 
  2 
Potassium (K)                30.8            125               155.9 
Potassium (K  O) 
            2                37              150                187 

Source: UW­Extension 2004 
          Advanced Nutrient Removal Methods 
                 ­­­ liquid digestate fractionation ­­­ 
  Anaerobic Digester 
  Influent  =  Effluent 
mostly  N = N        more 
organic  P = P  inorganic
         K = K 
                  screw 
                                 screen      ultra­        reverse 
                  press 
                                           filtration      osmosis 


                                                                        water 




                                P: ­10%     NH             P and K 
               P: up to ­30%                    4 
                                N: ­13%     strip        concentrate 
               Filtration Type Particle Rejection 


Size,                                                    10 to                             100 to 
micrometers 
(µm)           ≤ 0.001  0.001 to  0.01 to  0.1 to  1 to   100                               1000 
                 µm  0.01 µm  0.1 µm  1 µm  10 µm  µm                                        µm 
Materials 
                salt and              viruses                    bacteria 
Size 
               metal ions 
                                      colloidal 
                                      particles

Separation  reverse                     ultra­                                particle 
Type        osmosis                  filtration                              filtration 

                         nano­                       micro­ 
                       filtration                  filtration 
            What Benefits Will a Farm 
         Anaerobic Digester Provide? – Part 1 
Reduced Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) 
The quantity of oxygen used in biological and non­biological oxidation 
of materials in water.  For anaerobic digestion, COD is an indicator of the 
ability to convert the volatile solids in manure to methane. 

Reduced Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD)


          Animal Type            Total Manure              COD 
                               lb. per animal­day    lb. per animal­day 
     Dairy Cow – Lactating            150                   18 
     Dairy Cow – Dry                  83                    9.7 
     Dairy Cow – Heifer               48                    7.5 
     (approx. 970 lb) 
    Source: ASAE D384.2 March 2005 
 Benefits of an Anaerobic Digester System – Part 2

• Reduced odors 
• Provides high­quality fertilizer = high quality nitrogen 
  availability for plants 
• Quality animal bedding and high­P digested solids for sale 
• Reduced surface and groundwater contamination 
• Reduced pathogens and weed seeds 
• Reduced emissions of methane from manure decomposition 
• Produces renewable energy and lessens fossil fuel use 
• Job creation ­ design, operation, and manufacture of systems 
             Performance Assessment 
         of Farm Digester Energy Systems 
• Green Valley Farm, Shawano County, WI 
• UW­Green Bay performed sampling and analysis 
• Badger Laboratories performed laboratory sample analysis 
• Chemical, biological & energy parameter measurements of 
  influent and effluent taken every two weeks for one year: 
  August 2007 – July 2008 
      ­ gas flow and electricity produced 
      ­ quantity of influent 
      ­ nutrients N, P and K 
      ­ solids 
      ­ volatile solids 
      ­ COD 
      ­ fecal coliform and fecal streptococcus 
      ­ pH
                                Green Valley Dairy 
                         Shawano Co., WI     2,500 dairy cows 
The manure flow rate to the digester approximately 80,000 gallons per day. 


                                                                               Pounds 
                                  Average       Average          Destruction  Removed 
            Parameter             Influent      Effluent  Units  or Change     per Day 
Total solids                          7.3         5.1       %       30.14%     15,578 
Total volatile solids                85.4         79.5      %       34.96%     15,184 
Chemical oxygen demand              52,710       32,295    mg/L     38.73%     13,621 
Soluble chemical oxygen demand      16,247       7,833     mg/L     51.79%     5,251 
Total volatile acids                 3,370        500      mg/L     85.16%     1,915 
Total Kjeldahl nitrogen              2,768       2,563     mg/L     7.41%       137 
Ammonia nitrogen                     1,132       1,297     mg/L     ­12.72%     ­110 
Total phosphorus                     379          310      mg/L     18.21%       47 
Soluble phosphorus                   222          184      mg/L     17.12%       25 
Fecal coliform                     2,856,771     29,759    CFU/g    98.96% 
Fecal streptococcus                2,311,146    147,131    CFU/g    93.63% 
pH                                    7.7         7.7               0.00% 
            Performance Assessment 
        of Farm Digester Energy Systems


The methane content was found to be at 53.6%, and the 
carbon dioxide content was 43.8%. 


There were 7,656 hours during the duration of the sampling 
period.  The capacity factor of the engine was 73%; that 
would yield approx. 3,353,000 kWh 
Parameter                    With Anaerobic Digestion 
Odor                         •  Substantial reduction 

Greenhouse Gas               •  Methane ­ substantial reduction 
Emissions                        (2.32 tons per cow­yr on a carbon 
                                 dioxide equivalent basis) 
                             •  Carbon dioxide ­ 1.33 tons per cow­yr 
                                associated with the reduction in fossil 
                                fuel use to generate electricity 
Ammonia Emissions            •  No significant reduction 

Potential Water Quality      •  Oxygen demand ­ substantial 
Impacts                         reduction  (5.1 lb per cow­day) 
                             •  Pathogens ­ substantial reduction 
                                  ­ Fecal coliforms:  >99% 
                                  ­ Fecal streptococcus:  >90% 
                             •  Nutrient enrichment ­ no reduction 

                           AgSTAR­EPA 
                       Gordondale Farm Study 
                  http://www.epa.gov/agstar/resources.html
Wisconsin’s Anaerobic Digester Projects 

                22 ­ Operating Farm Digesters 

                          9 – Farm Digesters 
                               Under Construction 
                                   3 – New Industrial or 
                                       Municipal Digesters 
                                       Under Construction




                                         January 1, 2009 
          Larry Krom 
­­­ Wisconsin’s Focus on Energy 
             ’ 
    Wisconsin 
 Renewable Energy Program ­­­ 
   608.588.7231      888.476.9534 
     LK@wisolarelectric.com 
   www.focusonenergy.org
   www.focusonenergy.org 
NOTICE: 

This presentation is the property of the Public Service Commission 
of Wisconsin and was funded through the Focus on Energy Program. 

Material in this presentation does not imply a recommendation 
or endorsement of any product or service, by the Public Service 
Commission of Wisconsin, the Focus on Energy Program or any 
subcontractor of the Focus on Energy Program. The Public Service 
Commission of Wisconsin, the Focus on Energy Program, or any 
subcontractor of the Focus on Energy Program, is not responsible 
for inaccurate or incomplete data in this presentation.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Stats:
views:129
posted:9/15/2010
language:English
pages:35
Description: Aerobic exercise anaerobic exercise is relatively speaking. During exercise, the body's metabolism is accelerated to speed up the metabolic needs more energy. The body's energy through the body of sugar, protein and fat catabolism come. When not in the exercise, such as jogging, playing badminton, dancing, etc., the body's supply of energy mainly from aerobic metabolism of fat. To fat as the main supply of energy aerobic exercise aerobic exercise is what we say. When we engage in very intense exercise, or the rapid outbreak, such as weightlifting, 100 m sprint, wrestling, etc., then the body needs a lot of energy in an instant, and in normal circumstances, aerobic metabolism can not meet the body at this time demand, so the conduct of anaerobic metabolism of sugar, to rapidly produce large amounts of energy. This state is anaerobic exercise.