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					                                                                                        Country Brief

                                                                                      MAURITIUS
                                                                                        August 11, 2010


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Mauritius has successfully diversified its economy away from sugar, which once dominated economic
activity. Tourism, property development, financial services, information and communication technologies,
and the textile sector are now the main pillars of the economy. The government has identified a number
of high priority areas for foreign investment including ethanol, renewable energy, medical tourism, bio-
medical research and higher education. In addition, it continues to enact polices to make the country into
a regional transportation and financial services hub.
Geography and Demographics

Mauritius is an island nation roughly half the
size of Rhode Island (the smallest state in
the US), that is located in the Indian Ocean,
805km east of Madagascar. It has a tropical
climate. February is the warmest month.
The bulk of the rainfall occurs between
January and March. The population is
1,294,104 and the population density is
637.5 per sq. km. Port Louis is the capital,
the main port, the commercial center and
the largest city. It has a population of
149,000. Arable land accounts for 44.3% of
the country, 41.8% of the population lives in
urban areas, 18.0% of the country is
covered by forests, there are 220 sq. km of
irrigated land (irrigated land accounts for
20% of agricultural land), there are 177km of
coastline and 2.0% of the land area is
devoted to permanent crops. The median
age is 32.3 years, the birth rate is 14.2 per
1,000 live births, the death rate is 6.6 per
1,000 people, the fertility rate is 1.80
children per female, 22.2% of the population
is under 15, 30.9% is 25-44 and 7.2% is 65
and older. The population growth rate is 0.62% (UN estimate for 2010-2015). The time zone is four hours
ahead of Greenwich meantime. Mauritius is a former British colony that became independent on Mach
12, 1968.

Mauritius is a multi-lingual and multi-ethnic country. The official language, the language taught in schools,
the language of road signs and the language of the National Assembly is English. French can be used in
the National Assembly and dominates most of the media. Around 80% of the population speak Creole.
The second most spoken language is Bhojpuri, which is an amalgamation of several Indian dialects.
Other languages spoken include Hindi, Urdu and Hakka (a Chinese dialect). Most Mauritians are at least
bilingual. Indian Mauritians account for 68% of the population, Creole 27%, Chinese 3% and French 2%.
About 52% of the population is Hindu, 28% Christian, 17% Muslim and 3% Buddhist.




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SECTION SUMMARY AND TREND

Political Environment - Government & Civil Liberties                                   Trend

 There are regular elections that are deemed to be free and fair. Freedom of
 expression, the press, religion, assembly, association, movement and academic          Positive
 freedom are respected. The judiciary is independent of the executive branch.

Economic Overview                                                                      Trend

 Infrastructure
 The road network is in good condition and most of it is paved. The international      Positive
 airport is being expanded and modernized. There is almost universal access to
 improved water and sanitation facilities.
 Energy Sector
 Mauritius has no indigenous sources of coal, natural gas or oil. In 2009, coal
 generated 39.4% of electricity, diesel and fuel oil 36.4%, hydropower 4.7% and
 wind 0.1%. The remainder was generated by biogas, mainly from the byproducts of       Stable
 sugarcane. The government has ambitious plans to develop alternative energy to
 reduce its dependence on imported fossils fuels. There is almost universal
 electrification.
 External Accounts
 Mauritius has a large trade deficit because it has to import all of its petroleum
 requirement and much of its food and capital and consumer good needs. Textiles        Stable
 are the main export. Tourism is an important source of services income that helps
 to partially offset the large trade deficit.
 External Debt
 As of the end of June 2009, the external debt was Rs17.666 bn. This was equal to      Positive
 just 6.4% of GDP. The IMF has characterized the external debt as “sustainable.”
 Agriculture Sector
                                                                                       Negative
 Sugar once dominated the economy but its importance has declined. Mauritius
 imports about 70% of its food requirement.

 Informal Economy
                                                                                       N/A
 There is very limited public information about the informal economy.

Business Environment                                                                   Trend

 Openness to Foreign Investment
 The investment framework is very liberal. There are no legal distinctions made        Positive
 between foreign and domestic companies. No restrictions or limitations are imposed
 on the repatriation of profits and dividends. The corporate tax rate is a flat 15%.
 Financial Sector
 The financial sector was not undermined by the global financial downturn. The         Positive
 banking system is liquid, profitable and well-capitalized. There is a large foreign
 presence in the banking sector.
 Corruption
 Mauritius is ranked 42 of 180 nations in Transparency International’s 2009            Positive
 corruption perception index. It has the highest ranking in the index of any sub-
 Saharan nation except Botswana.



                                                                                                   2
 Human Capital                                                                                Trend

  Mauritius ranks 81 of 182 in the 2009 UNDP HDI. The infant mortality rate is 11.9
  per 1,000 live births, the probability of dying before the age of 40 is 5.8%, the
  maternal mortality rate is 15 per 100,000 live births, the adult literacy rate is 87.5%,    Stable
  the life expectancy is 74.3 years and the per capita income is $7,605 (IMF estimate
  for 2010).

 Economic Outlook                                                                             Trend

  Mauritius has successfully diversified its economy away from its heavy dependence
  upon the sugar sector.        Tourism, property development, financial services,
  information and communication technologies, and the textile sector are now the
  main pillars of the economy. Foreign investment has been a main spur of economic            Positive
  growth as it is attracted by a low tax environment, a stable political climate and a
  good infrastructure. The economy successfully weathered the global recession and
  the IMF estimates that growth will average 4.8% a year between 2010 and 2015.


I. Political Environment

 Index                                                       Rank                Score
                                                                                 Political Rights: 1.0/7.0
 Freedom House Index 2010                                    Status: Free
                                                                                 Civil Rights: 2.0/7.0
 Bertelsmann Transformation Index 2010                       18/128              7.94/10.00
 Fund for Peace - Failed State Index 2010                    46/177              88.7/120.0
 World Bank Gov Indicator 2009, Political Stability          75.6 Percentile     0.84

1. Government

The chief of state is President Sir Anerood Jugnauth. He has held the position since October 7, 2003.
The head of government is Prime Minister Navinchandra Ramgoolan who has been in office since July 5,
2005. Cabinet members are appointed by the president on the recommendation of the prime minister.
The president and the vice president are elected by the National Assembly for a five-year term and are
eligible for a second five-year term. The last election was conducted in September 19, 2008 and the next
one will be held in 2013. The prime minister and deputy prime minister are appointed by the president
and are responsible to the National Assembly. In the 2008 balloting, President Jugnauth was elected by
a unanimous vote. The President is a largely ceremonial position. Executive authority rests with the
prime minister.

There is a unicameral National Assembly that has 70 seats of which 62 members are elected by popular
vote and 8 are appointed by the election commission to give representation to various ethnic minorities.
Members serve a five-year term. Suffrage is 18 years. The last election was held on May 5, 2010 and
the next one will be in 2015. The Alliance of the Future has 41 seats and the Mauritian Militant Movement
has 18 seats. Turnout in the 2010 voting was 77.8% of registered voters. The observer mission of the
Southern African Development Community characterized the voting as free and fair.

2. Civil Liberties

Freedom House has designated Mauritius as “free” and has assigned it a rating of 1 out of 7 for political
rights and 2 out of 7 for civil rights. The lower the rating the higher the degree of political and civil
liberties. Mauritius is ranked 18 of 128 nations in the Bertelsmann Transformation Index. It is ranked 46
of 177 in the Fund for Peace Failed State Index (the lower the ranking the higher the degree of economic

                                                                                                             3
and political dysfunction) and is ranked at the 75.6 percentile in the World Bank’s Political Stability
Governance Indicator.

Mauritius is a parliamentary democracy. Freedom of speech and the press are guaranteed by the
constitution. The state-owned Mauritius Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) operates radio stations and the
only television network. It reflects government viewpoints. There are a few private radio stations but the
MBC dominates the broadcast sector. Private newspapers and magazines express a diverse range of
opinions and are often critical of both government and opposition politicians. Libel laws though have been
used to restrain criticism of political leaders. The government does not interfere in the use of the internet.
It also does not monitor e-mail correspondences and chatrooms and it does not block websites. Internet
use is fairly pervasive. Freedom House ranks Mauritius 58 of 196 in its Freedom of the Press survey for
2010 and characterizes the press as "free.” Mauritius is only 1 of only 5 sub-Saharan nations that
Freedom House assigns a “free” rating for press freedom.

Freedom of religion, assembly, movement, association and academic freedom are respected. NGOs are
allowed to operate without government interference. The constitution and law prohibit torture but there
have been examples of police abuse of detainees.

The judiciary is independent of the executive branch. It is undermined however by a backlog of cases.
The legal system is an amalgam of French and British traditions. There is a supreme court but final
appeals are made to the Privy Council in London. Arrest warrants must be based on “sufficient evidence”
and issued by an authorized official of the court. The accused must be read his or her rights when
arrested, including the right to remain silent and the right to an attorney. Defendants have the right to
legal counsel. Indigent detainees are provided an attorney at state expense. There is a functioning bail
system. Juries are only used in murder trials. Defendants enjoy a presumption of innocence, and have
the right to confront or question witnesses against them, present witnesses and evidence on their own
behalf, examine government-held evidence relevant to their cases, and to appeal a verdict.

With the exception of police and government personnel, workers can form and join trade unions. In 2009,
there were 337 unions representing around 107,000 workers. About 20% of the labor force is unionized.
Collective bargaining is allowed. Although strikes are lawful, a complex mediation procedure must be
exhausted, which can last up to three months, before a strike can be called. Workers are forbidden from
calling strikes over “general economic policy issues” and the Prime Minister has the authority to request
the Supreme Court to prohibit a strike for “life, health and personal safety reasons” and refer the dispute
to arbitration. A minimum level of service must be maintained in many sectors of the economy in the
event of a strike. In 2009, about 65,000 foreign workers were employed in 404 export processing zones
(EPZs). The International Trade Union Confederation has criticized the government for restricting labor
rights of foreign workers. The unionization rate in the EPZs is 10%.

II. Economic Overview

Mauritius has grown rapidly since independence. Between 1990 and 2009, real GDP advanced at a 4.9%
annual rate. Of the nations in sub-Sahara Africa, only Equatorial Guinea, the Seychelles and Gabon have
a higher per capita income. The economy has been transformed from one based largely on agriculture
(mostly sugar) to one that is reliant on industry (mainly textiles and apparel), property development,
financial services, information, communication and technology and tourism. Although there is a strong
private sector, the government still plays a large role in the economy. It owns and operates the electricity,
water, wastewater, postal and broadcasting services while the State Trading Corporation controls imports
of rice, flour, petroleum products, and cement.

The economy held up relatively well to the turbulence of the global economic downturn. Growth was
3.1% in 2009. This was down from 5.1% in the previous year. A 9.1% rise in investment spending and a
1.3% increase in wholesale and retail trade helped to offset a 4.8% drop in the export of goods and
services. During the first quarter, the economy grew by 3.6% from the corresponding period of 2009. For
all of 2010, the government is forecasting an expansion of 4.2%. The prediction is predicated on a sugar
crop of 450,000 tons, up 2.3% from 2009, a 5.0% rise in construction, a 5.9% advance in financial
intermediation, a 1.9% advance in manufacturing and a 7.2% increase in the exports of goods and
services.
                                                                                                            4
Mauritius is a member of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). COMESA is a
preferential trading group consisting of 19 African countries; Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of
the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda,
Seychelles, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Nine of the member states (Djibouti,
Egypt, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Sudan, Zambia and Zimbabwe) formed a free trade area
(FTA) in 2000. Rwanda and Burundi joined the FTA in 2004 and Comoros and Libya became members in
2006. There are ambitious plans to ultimately form a monetary union and have a joint currency.

The government estimates that wholesale and retail trade will be the largest sector of the economy in
2010, accounting for 10.1% of GDP, banks and insurance will have a 9.9% share, transportation, storage
and communication will represent 9.4% and hotels and restaurants will be responsible for 6.5%. As of
March 2009, textiles employed 16.1% of the workforce, public administration, defense and compulsory
social security had a 13.3% share, manufacturing (including sugar but excluding textiles) accounted for
11.8%, hotels and restaurants represented 7.7% and wholesale and retail trade was responsible for
7.1%. The unemployment rate in the first quarter of 2010 was 8.4%. This was up from 8.0% in the year
earlier period. The government is forecasting an annual average unemployment rate of 7.5% in 2010. In
2009, it was 7.3%. About 42% of the people who are unemployed are under 25.

The economy rose at an annual average rate of 4.0% between 2000 and 2009. This compares to annual
increases of 1.2% for the Seychelles, 3.1% for Madagascar and 5.7% for the Maldives. According to the
IMF, the per capita income in 2009 was $6,838. This was 76.9% above the level of 2000 and it placed
Mauritius 68 of 180 nations and territories that the IMF compiles per capita data for.

Consumer prices advanced by 0.25% in July and were 2.0% above their year ago levels. This compares
to a 1.5% year on year rise in December 2009. In 2009, consumer prices increased at an average annual
rate of 2.5%. In 2008, there was a rise of 9.7% and in 2007, the increase was 8.8%. For 2010, the IMF is
predicting a 2.1% advance and for 2011, an increase of 2.4% is foreseen. The average annual inflation
rate from 2000 and 2009 was 6.0%.

The main crops are sugarcane, tea, corn, potatoes, tobacco, bananas, pineapples, potatoes, tomatoes,
cabbages and onions. Fish is the only major natural resource. Textiles, garments and apparel, food
processing, sugar milling, wood and paper products, chemicals, tourism, fishing, construction and
jewellery are the main industries.

The minimum wage varies by sector. It is adjusted every year by the inflation rate. The minimum wage
for an unskilled worker in the EPZs in 2009 was about $20 a week while the minimum wage for an
unskilled worker outside of the EPZs was $26 a week. Minimum wage laws are effectively enforced. The
standard work week in the industrial sector is 45 hours. Overtime is mandated at one and a half times
normal salary and work during public holidays is compensated at double the normal salary. Generally,
work and health and safety standards are enforced although in the EPZs there have been reports of
underpayment for overtime in the textile and apparel industries.

The law prohibits the employment of children below 16 and prohibits the employment of children between
16 and 18 in work that is dangerous and unhealthy. Child labor laws are enforced in the formal economy
but child labor exists in the street trading, small businesses, restaurants, agriculture and small apparel
workshop sectors.

1. Infrastructure

There are 2,208 km of roads of which 98% are paved. Driving is on the left side of the road. The road
network is generally in good condition but the US Department of Travel Advisory did note that “roads are
sometimes narrow and uneven with inadequate lighting, making night driving hazardous.” The main road
runs north to south.

Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam International Airport, is the only international airport. It is located 48
nautical miles southeast of the capital and is the main hub of Air Mauritius, which is 51% owned by Air
Mauritius Holding (a state entity), 20% by stockholders (it is listed on the stock exchange), 6.3% by the

                                                                                                        5
Port Louis Fund, 4.7% by the State Investment Corporation, 4.5% by the government, 4.3% by Rogers
and Company, 2.8% by Air France and 2.6% by Air India. In 2008, more than 2.6 million passengers used
the airport. On May 28, 2009 Aeroports de Paris, announced that it had won a contract to construct and
jointly manage with Airport of Mauritius, a state owned company, a new terminal that will have a capacity
of 4 million passengers a year. Among the airlines that use the airport are Air France, Air Madagascar,
Air Seychelles, British Airways, Emirates and South African Airway. There are flights to Bangalore,
Brussels, Budapest, Cape Town, Chennai, Djibouti, Dubai, Durban, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong,
Johannesburg, Kuala Lumpur, London (Heathrow), Melbourne, Milan, Mumbai, Munich, Nairobi, New
Delhi, Paris (Charles de Gaulle), Perth, Rome, Saint-Denis de la Réunion, Saint-Pierre de la Réunion,
Seychelles, Singapore, Sydney, Tananarive, Vienna and Zurich.

There is no railway.

The Mauritius Port Authority is the government agency responsible for operating the ports. The main port
is at Port Louis. It has an oil jetty, a cruise terminal that accommodated 25 cruise ships and 21,500
passengers in 2009, ship repair facilities and has a maximum depth of 12.2 meters.

There is almost universal access to water and sanitation facilities. Only 26% of the households are
attached to a public sewer network. The remainder use on-site wastewater disposal systems. The
government has established a target of 50% of households connected to a sewer system by 2013. There
are 17 waste water treatment plants.

Tourists are advised not to drink tap water unless it has been boiled, filtered or chemically disinfected and
not to use ice.

2. Energy Sector

Mauritius has no indigenous sources of coal, natural gas or oil. It also does not have an oil refinery and as
a result, all refined petroleum products including gasoline, jet fuel and kerosene have to be imported. Oil
imports are about 23,000 barrels of oil a day. In 2009, coal generated 39.4% of electricity, diesel and fuel
oil 36.4%, hydropower 4.7% and wind 0.1%. The remainder was generated by biogas, mainly from the
byproducts of sugarcane. The government has ambitious plans to develop alternative energy to reduce its
dependence on imported fossils fuels. It has set a goal of generating one third of electricity from biogas,
mostly derived from sugar waste, by 2015 and generating 40% from renewable energy sources (mainly
hydro-electricity, biogases and some solar) by the end of this decade. There are also plans to develop an
ethanol industry with ethanol being exported and cars running on an 80/20 mix of gasoline and ethanol.

The Central Electricity Board (CEB) is a government company established by the Central Electricity Board
Act of January 25, 1964. It comes under the authority of the Ministry of Public Utilities which appoints its
board. The CEB operates as a monopoly in the transmission, distribution and sale of electricity. In 2009,
it produced 41.8% of the power requirement from its 4 thermal power stations and 8 hydroelectric plants.
The remainder is purchased from independent power producers (including sugar estates).

The electrification rate is 99.4%. There is an adequate and reliable supply of electricity and as a result,
there are no power outages.

3. External Accounts

Mauritius has a large trade deficit because it has to import all of its petroleum requirement and much of its
food, capital and consumer good needs. Last year, the deficit fell 12.0% to Rs 56.519 bn ($1.77 bn at the
average annual mid-rate exchange rate). Exports (including re-exports and ship stores and bunkers)
dropped 9.1% and imports retreated 10.5%. The deficit has widened in 2010 with the shortfall increasing
by 32.3% to Rs 26.758 bn in the first 5 months from the corresponding period of 2009 as exports climbed
4.8% and imports surged by 17.3%. On an annualized basis, the deficit in the first 5 months was equal to
22.1% of projected 2010 GDP. Textiles, yarn, fabrics, apparel and clothing accessories was the largest
export in 2009 with a 42.2% share, fish accounted for 14.6% and cane sugar was 10.7%. The UK was the
largest export market (excluding ship stores and bunkers) accounting for 27.0%, France was responsible
                                                                                                           6
for 16.6% and the US had an 8.3% share. Food, live animals, beverages and tobacco accounted for
20.5% of imports, mineral fuels (mainly petroleum, petroleum products and coal) were 15.5% and road
vehicles had a 4.6% share. India was the largest source of imports at 18.0%, China has a 12.6% share
and France represented 11.7%.

Remittances are not an important source of transfer income. According to the World Bank, they totaled
just $2 mn in 2008 and a similar amount was estimated for 2009. There is an outflow of remittances from
guest workers at the EPZs. These outflows were $14 mn in 2008.

Tourism is a very important source of services income and employment. The global economic downturn
had a negative impact on the sector with the number of tourist arrivals in 2009 dropping by 3.1% to
901,356 and tourist earnings falling 13.4% to Rs 35.693 bn (equal to 13.0% of GDP). In the first quarter,
32.9% of tourist arrivals were from France and 13.0% were from the French territory of Reunion. The
government highlights the country’s natural beauty, fishing, beaches, sunny climate and eco-tourism to
attract tourists and it markets Mauritius as an upscale travel destination by encouraging the construction
of 4 and 5 star hotels, spas and resorts. Among the major international hotel chains that have properties
are Hilton, Taj (India), Oberoi (India), Sun Hotels (South Africa), Sagar Hotels (India), The Luxury
Collection (part of the Starwood Hotel Company), Four Seasons (Canada), Sheraton (part of the
Starwood Hotel Company) Movenpick (Switzerland), Sofitel (part of the Accor group which is
headquartered in France), Le Meridien (owned by Starwood Hotels) and Intercontinental (UK).

Mauritius is ranked 40 of 133 in the World Economic Forum’s Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Index.
According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, the travel and tourism sector represents 12.2% of
GDP (direct impact) and 14.2% of employment.

The current account deficit in 2009 dropped by 22.4% to Rs 21.442 bn ($672.5 mn) and was equal to
7.8% of GDP. A significant portion of the shortfall is financed by foreign direct investment inflows.
According to the Central Bank, FDI in 2009 was Rs 8.793 bn of which 26.5% came from France, 17.0%
from the UK, 7.7% from the US and South Africa accounted for 5.8%. In the first quarter, the current
account deficit widened 197.2% to Rs 3.867 bn.

Data from the Central Bank indicate that foreign exchange reserves at the end of June were $2.192 bn,
which was equal to six and two thirds months worth of imports (based on first 5 months 2010 imports).

4. External Debt and Budget Balance

As of the end of June 2009, the external debt was Rs17.666 bn. This was up by 41.9% from the same
period of 2008 and was equal to just 6.4% of GDP (full year 2009 GDP). The IMF has characterized the
external debt as “sustainable.” It estimated that debt servicing costs for 2010 would be just 4.0% of the
export of goods and services. The internal debt as of June 2010 was Rs 124.194 bn. This was equal to
42.7% of estimated 2010 GDP.

The budget for 2010 included measures to boost domestic demand by increasing spending on
infrastructure projects. It included Rs 13.5 bn for the modernization and expansion of the airport, Rs 15
bn to improve the road network, Rs 5 bn for the Bus Rapid Transit system, Rs 3.5 bn to improve port
facilities and Rs 2.5 bn to upgrade school infrastructure. Some of the tax cutting measures enacted in the
previous budget for the tourist, real estate and constructions sectors were extended to the end of
December. Tax benefits were also extended to encourage the use of solar hot water heaters. Effective
January 2010, civil service salaries were increased by 3.5 %, subject to a cap of Rs 420 per month.
Retirement pensions were raised by the same amount. The budget deficit for FY 2008/09 (ending in
June) was 3.0% of GDP and for FY09/10, it was estimated at 4.5% of GDP. The government has set a
target of reducing the shortfall to about 3.0% of GDP in 2012.

In 2010, the government changed its fiscal year to coincide with the calendar year.

The government relies heavily on goods and services taxes (including a VAT) to raise revenue. In FY
08/09 they accounted for 47.2% of all government receipts. Corporate income taxes were 16.6%,
                                                                                                        7
property taxes and income taxes were each responsible for 6.6% and grants had a 4.4% share. With
regards to spending, transfers and subsidies represented 46.0%, wages and salaries were 26.2%,
domestic interest payments were responsible for 14.3% and capital spending was 7.5%.

5. Agriculture Sector

Sugar once dominated the economy but its importance has declined sharply as the government has
moved to diversify the economy. As recently as the 1970s, sugar (crops and processing) accounted for
as much as 26% of GDP and in 1970, sugar was responsible for 90% of exports. The government
estimates that sugar (crops and processing) will account for just 1.5% of GDP in 2010. In 2009
meanwhile, cane sugar accounted for 10.7% of exports.

The sugar industry had been a major beneficiary of the Cotonou Agreement, which is a trade treaty
between the EU and 79 ACP (African, Caribbean and Pacific) nations. Under its terms, sugar exports to
the EU benefit from preferential treatment and high price supports. The sugar preferential provisions of
the Cotonou Agreement however will be phased out in 2015 because they are incompatible with WTO
regulations. The guaranteed price the EU pays for sugar from ACP nations has been reduced in stages
from €523.7 at the end of June 2009 to €335 per ton on October 1, 2009 while Mauritius’ duty-free export
quota of 500,000 tons has been cut. The 5-year Sugar Sector Strategic Plan (2001-05) restructured and
rationalized the sugar industry. The number of sugar mills was reduced from 14 to 7 and the labor force
was cut from 30,000 to 23,000 through a voluntary retirement program. The restructuring of the industry
has been partially financed by EU assistance.
About 70% of the sugar is grown on large plantations. Sugarcane is grown on around 90% of the
cultivated land area. Sugar production peaked in 1986 at 707,000 tons. Between 2003 and 2007, the
average production was 514,000 tons a year. In 2009, output was 467,234 tons.
Mauritius imports about 70% if its food requirement. Fish is the largest food import, accounting for 6.0% of
the total in 2009 followed by wheat and rice at 2.6% and dairy products and bird’s eggs represented
2.2%.

III. Business Environment

 Index                                                               Rank                 Score
 Economic Freedom of the World Index 2009                            16/141               7.62/10.00
 Heritage Foundation Economic Freedom Index 2010                     12/179               76.3/10.00
 World Economic Forum – Global Competitive Index 2009-2010           57/133               4.22/7.00
 Milken Institute Capital Access Index 2009                          N/A                  N/A
 UNCTAD – Inward Potential Performance Index 2005-2007               N/A                  N/A
 World Bank Ease of Doing Business 2010                              17/83                N/A
 World Bank Gov Indicator 2009, Regulatory Quality                   79.2 Percentile      0.95
 World Bank Gov Indicators 2009, Rule of Law                         78.9 Percentile      0.88
 Transparency International Corruption Perception Index 2009         42/180               5.4/10.00

1. Summary of Indices

Mauritius is ranked 17 of 183 in the World Bank’s 2010 ease of doing business survey. In the previous
year survey, it was ranked 24 and in the 2006 survey, it was 49th. It is ranked 10th for starting a
business, 36th for employing workers, 87th in getting credit, 66th in enforcing contracts, 66th in
registering property, 12th in protecting investors, 12th in paying taxes, 19th for trading across borders,
42nd for dealing with construction permits and 73rd in closing a business. With respect to the World


                                                                                                          8
Bank’s governance indicators, it is ranked at the 79.2 percentile for regulatory quality and at the 78.9
percentile for rule of law.

Mauritius is ranked 12 of 179 in the Heritage Foundation’s Economic Freedom Index, 16 of 141 in the
Freedom of the World Index and 57 of 133 in the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) 2009-2010
Competitiveness Index. It is not ranked in the Milken Institute Capital Access Index and the UNCTAD
Inward Potential Performance Index.

2. Openness to Foreign Investment

The government has streamlined and simplified many procedures to expedite starting a business and
obtaining necessary licenses and permits. Under the terms of the Business Facilitation Act of 2006,
businesses can begin operations within 3 working days of incorporation. Residence permits and work
permits for foreign investors, entrepreneurs, and professionals have been combined into an occupation
permit, which is also processed within 3 working days. There are no legal distinctions made between
foreign and domestic companies. Foreign companies can own 100% of a domestic company. The Board
of Investment (BOI) was established as a one-stop shop to facilitate business registration. Foreign
exchange controls were abolished in 1994. As a result, there are no limitations or restrictions nor is
approval required for the repatriation of profits, dividends, interest payments, royalties, capital and wages.
There are legislative guarantees against nationalization of property. No property has ever been
nationalized. The legal system is independent of the executive branch and is nondiscriminatory and
transparent. A Commercial Court was established in early 2009 to resolve commercial disputes.
Mauritius is a signatory of the International Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign
Arbitral Awards.

There are no performance requirements mandating exporting a certain percentage of production,
technology transfer, purchasing form local companies or investing in certain regions of the country. The
government though mandates that all profitable companies allocate 2% of their profits on Government-
approved activities/programs “which contribute to the social and environmental development or transfer
the funds to the Government to be used for social investment.” Approved areas of activities include
eradication of poverty, vocational training for vulnerable groups, promotion of human rights, support to the
disabled and the elderly, women empowerment, small enterprise development, support to vulnerable
children and youth, rehabilitation of drug addicts, protection and preservation of the environment, health
and nutrition, leisure and sports, and promotion of arts and crafts.

Foreign investors can acquire property with the prior approval of the Prime Minister. However, the Prime
Minister’s approval is not required when the property is acquired under a lease agreement not exceeding
20 years and when the investor has obtained approval from the BOI to acquire property for use in his/her
business. There are laws that protect copyrights, patents and intellectual property rights and they are
upheld. A trademark is initially registered for 10 years and may be renewed for successive periods of 10
years. A patent is granted for 20 years and cannot be renewed. Companies have successfully sued in
cases regarding counterfeit goods. The Customs Agency has seized counterfeit goods. Mauritius is
ranked 46 of 125 nations in the 2010 International Property Rights Index that is compiled by the Property
Rights Alliance. The regulatory process is transparent and non discriminatory.

3. Taxes

The government has set a flat 15% tax rate for corporate and personal income. The VAT is also set at
15%. Since 2006, the government has enacted tax reforms measures that have removed 36,000
individual income earners from the tax rolls. Only 7% of the working population now pays income taxes.
Dividends paid by a Mauritian resident company are exempt from income tax. Foreign dividends are
taxable at a rate of 15%. There is no capital gains tax. Losses can be carried forward for 5 years. Foreign
taxes paid can be credited against domestic taxes. There is a 15% withholding tax for interest and
royalties. There are no payroll taxes. Employers pay 6% of an employees’ basic monthly salary into the
social security fund and employees’ contribute 3% of their monthly salaries into the social security fund.
A national property tax is levied on residential property. There are no wealth, inheritance or estate taxes.


                                                                                                            9
The 2010 budget increased the tax on betting on foreign football matches to 8% from 2%, which is the
same rate that applies for horse racing.

4. Foreign Investment

Data from the UNCTAD indicate that FDI in 2009 was $257 mn. This was below the $357 mn level in
2008 and represented 11.7% of gross fixed capital formation. The total stock of FDI (book value) at the
end of 2009 was $1.889 bn, which was 176.6% above the level of 2000 and was equal to 21.8% of GDP.

Among the major foreign investors are Apollo-Blake, a joint venture between American (20%) and South
African (80%) investors which is involved in business processing outsourcing, MIC-US Inc, a subsidiary of
Millicom International Cellular, has a joint venture (50% shareholder) with local company Emtel Ltd in
cellular phone service, Ceridian (US) has a subsidiary specializing in software development and payroll
and human resource solutions, Nomad (Dubai) is involved in telecommunications, Chevron and Shell
have retail gasoline operations, Microsoft and IBM have regional distribution offices serving the Indian
Ocean region, KFC, Pizza Hut, and McDonald's have fast food restaurants, UPS, DHL and FEDEX are
involved in package delivery, Nestle in food, Accenture (incorporated in Ireland but headquartered in
Chicago), Orange Business Services (France), InfoSys (India), Hinduja (India), Huawei (China), and TNT
(U.K.) have business process outsourcing activities, call centers or software development operations,
Indian Oil Ltd. has built a 24,000 metric ton-fuel storage terminal, Mahanagar Telephone (India) provides
long distance, fixed phone, mobile phone and wireless internet services, BAT has tobacco operations,
Apollo Hospitals Group (India) has built a 200-bed hospital in a joint venture, Hewlett Packard, Oracle and
Cisco have operations in IT, Universal Breweries (India) has beer operations, French Telecom owns 40%
of Mauritius Telecom (the government, the State Bank of Mauritius, the National Pensions Fund and
employees of Mauritius Telecom own the remainder), Price Waterhouse, Deloitte, Ernst and Young and
KMPG are involved in consulting and shipping companies Maersk (Denmark), MSC (Italy), Mitsui (Japan)
and Evergreen (Taiwan) are using Mauritius as their transshipment hub in this region.

A Chinese consortium that includes Taiyuan Iron & Steel Group, the Shanxi Group, and the Tianli Group,
has plans to invest $770 million in the 521 acre Jin Fei Economic and Trade Cooperation Zone, which is
located about a ten minute drive north of the capital. This would be the largest FDI in the country. The
project, which is backed by the Chinese government, is expected to attract Chinese investors in
manufacturing, information technology, property development, tourism and health services. Work on the
project began at the end of 2009 and it is scheduled to be completed in 2016. The government projects
the Zone will create more than 34,000 direct jobs and generate about $215 million in export earnings a
year.

China State Construction Engineering Corporation Ltd is the building contractor for the expansion and
modernization of the airport.

There are no restrictions on capital outflows. Local companies have become active investors in nearby
countries opening hotels in the Maldives and Seychelles, apparel operations in Madagascar, banks in the
Seychelles, Maldives and South Africa, investing in the sugar industry in Mozambique, Tanzania, Ivory
Coast, Madagascar and Uganda and investing in telecommunications in Madagascar and the Seychelles.
At the end of 2009, the stock of outward foreign investment (book value) was $375 mn. This was up
184.1% from the end of 2000 and was equal to 4.3% of GDP.

5. Privatization

Despite the liberal investment framework, the government plays a major role in the economy through its
ownership of many companies. Among them are The Agricultural Marketing Board, Airports of Mauritius
(which operates the airports), the Central Electricity Board, Casino de Maurice (gambling), Central Water
Authority, Development Works Corp (construction), Mauritius Broadcasting Co., Mauritius Meat Authority,
Mauritius Port Authority, Mauritius Shipping Corp., Mauritius Sugar Authority, National Housing
Development, Sun Casinos (gambling) and the Tobacco Board. The government has controlling shares
in the State Bank of Mauritius, Air Mauritius and Mauritius Telecom (French telecom bought 40% of the
company for $261 mn in 2000).


                                                                                                        10
6. Financial Sector

Mauritius has a well-developed financial services sector and is a regional financial center. There are 18
licensed banks, the majority of which are foreign-owned locally incorporated banks or branches of foreign
banks. Among foreign banks are HSBC, Bank of Baroda (India), Habib Bank (Pakistan), Investec (UK),
PT Bank (Indonesia), Standard Bank (South Africa), Standard Chartered (UK) and Deutsche Bank. The
Banking Act of 2004 removed the distinction between domestic and offshore banks and provided for
banking to be conducted under a single banking license regime. All banks are free to conduct business in
any currency. The Mauritius Commercial Bank Ltd. and the State Bank of Mauritius Ltd (both domestically
owned) account for about 70% of commercial banking assets, which as of October 2009 totaled $23 bn.
The Mauritius Commercial Bank Ltd is the largest bank. It has established a presence in Reunion,
Madagascar, Seychelles, Mozambique, and the Maldives. It also has operations in France. The State
Bank of Mauritius has banking operations in India and Madagascar. Foreign banks are allowed to
establish either wholly-owned subsidiaries or branches and to form joint-ventures with local banks.
Several commercial banks offer credit and debit cards. Other facilities that are offered are phone, home
and internet banking. Many of the banks also engage in non-banking business through subsidiaries and
affiliates such as leasing, stock brokering, asset and fund management, investment and private banking,
insurance and portfolio and custodial management.

The Bank of Mauritius, the Central Bank, supervises and regulates the banking system. In 2007, the
Central Bank established a Monetary Policy Committee and assigned it the task of deciding interest rate
and exchange rate policy independent of the government. The Financial Services Development Act of
2001 brought all non-banking financial services under the authority of the Financial Services Commission
(FSC), which issues licenses to non banks. The Financial Services Act of 2007 streamlined the licensing
procedures and consolidates the regulatory and supervisory framework for non-banking financial
services. There are 19 insurance companies of which 2 are foreign owned and 1 is majority owned by the
government.

The IMF’s February 2010 Article IV Consultation Report noted that the “banking system withstood the
impact of the global financial turmoil. Banks conservative business practices and their strong balance
sheets have kept the financial system sound. Capital adequacy, liquidity, and profitability of the banking
system remain sound and the system appears resilent…banks remain well capitalized. They were not
holding toxic assets and fund operations through domestic deposits (two-thirds of total liabilities) rather
than large scale inter-bank foreign borrowing. A large share (one-third) of total deposits is held in liquid or
near-liquid assets.”

There is a stock exchange, which opened for trading in 1989. Foreign investors can buy and sell shares.
However, approval is required if a foreign company or individual seeks to gain management control of a
Mauritian company or wants to purchase more than 15% of a sugar company. Foreigners do not pay
capital gain or dividend taxes. There are 38 listed companies of which 5 are banks or insurance
companies and 3 are sugar companies. Market capitalization rose from $92 million in 1989 to about $4.6
billion in December 2009. As of August 10, 2009, it was $5.14 bn. The SEMDEX Index rose by 40.4% in
2009 (a 42.3% advance in US dollars). This brought the ten-year return to 281.2% (209.9% gain in US
dollars). In the year to date period ending August 10, the SEMDEX Index climbed by 5.1% (a 6.2%
retreat in US dollars). In November 2007, the SEMDEX was included in the new Morgan Stanley Capital
International (MSCI) Frontier Markets Indices

The Central Bank issues 91, 182 and 364 day Treasury bills and Treasury notes and bonds. At the
August 6 Treasury bill auction, the average yield for 91-day bills was 2.84%, for 182 day bills, it was
3.22% and for 364 day paper, it was 3.69%. Government notes were auctioned on July 21. The average
yields were 4.99% for two-year maturities, 5.57% for three years and 5.93% for four years. The last
auction for ten-year bonds was on July 7, 2010. The average yield was 9.66%.

The rupee is a freely floating currency. In 2009, it rose by 5.7% against the dollar and in the year to date
period ending August 10, it appreciated by 1.0%.




                                                                                                            11
7. Corruption and Transparency

Mauritius has ratified the UN Convention Against Corruption and has signed but not ratified the African
Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption. It is ranked 42 of 180 nations in Transparency
International’s 2009 corruption perception index. In the 2008 survey it was ranked 41 of 180 nations.
According to Transparency International, a score of less than 3.0 out of 10.0 indicates there is “rampant”
corruption. Mauritius’ score is 5.4. Mauritius has the highest ranking in the corruption perception index of
any sub-Saharan nation except Botswana.

There are laws that provide for criminal penalties for corruption. The Independent Commission Against
Corruption is the government agency authorized to investigate corruption. It has the power to seize
proceeds of corruption and money laundering.

The Bertelsmann Transformation Index Country Report noted that “misuse of power by office holders is
penalized by law and in principle, yet individual cases seem to offer considerable room to escape serious
ramifications. Some ministers have resigned due to corruption charges and even convictions. An
Independent Commission against Corruption was established in 2002, but personnel difficulties and
parliamentary feedback have produced too much political interference to let the body be really
effective…Corruption in customs is widespread…The World Bank has diagnosed substantial deficits in
corporate governance, noting that major companies are intertwined affiliates of the old oligarchy,
members of which also own and run the country’s auditing agencies.”

8. Standards Compliance Assessments

 IMF Dissemination Standard                                       Subscription Status
 Special Data Dissemination Standard                              Yes, a subscriber
 General Data Dissemination Standard                              No a subscriber


 IMF Assessment                   Standards Assessed                    Dates         Compliance Level
 Reports on Standards and         Anti-Money      Laundering and        12/11/08      Good
 Codes (ROSCs)                    Combating     the Financing of
                                  Terrorism
                                  Banking Supervision                   10/14/03      Out of Date
                                  Money        and          Financial   10/14/03      Out of Date
                                  Transparency
                                  Payments Systems                      10/14/03      Out of Date
                                  Data Dissemination                    8/14/08       Good
                                  Corporate    Governance     (World    10/2002       Out of Date
                                  Bank)
                                  Accounting and Auditing (World        4/2/03        Out of Date
                                  Bank)
                                  Insolvency and Creditor Rights        3/2004        Out of Date
                                  (World Bank)
 Financial Sector Assessment                                            12/123/08     Good
 Programs (FSAPs)                                                       (Update)


The IMF assessment for Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT)
noted that significant steps have been taken in recent years to “enhance the AML/CFT framework
including the establishment of a National Committee for AML/CFT and procedures have been set up to
revoke licenses of banks convicted of AML/CFT offenses." Banking Supervision, Money and Financial
                                                                                                          12
Transparency and Payments Systems were reviewed as part of the October 14, 2003 FSAP. The report
is out of date. An updated FSAP assessment released on December 23, 2008 said that the “financial
system has been resilient to the recent economic shocks and banks have adequate capital buffers
against a range of shocks to their credit portfolios and liquidity positions.” The report on data
dissemination indicated that “the legal framework for statistics is strong” and the professional integrity of
the staff of the Central Statistical Office and the Bank of Mauritius are high. The World Bank
assessments for Corporate Governance, Accounting and Auditing and Insolvency and Creditor Rights are
out of date.


IV. Human Capital
 Index                                                      Rank                   Score
 UNDP Human Development Index 2009                          81/182                 0.804

1. Social Indicators

Mauritius ranks 81 of 182 in the 2009 UNDP HDI. The infant mortality rate is 11.9 per 1,000 live births,
the probability of dying before the age of 40 is 5.8%, the probability of dying between birth and the age of
1 is 15 per 1,000 live births, 99% of births are attended to by a skilled health care professional, the under
5 mortality rate is 16 per 1,000 people, 98% of infants 12-23 months are fully immunized against measles,
the maternal mortality rate is 15 per 100,000 live births, there are 53.5 birth defects per 1,000 live births,
99.0% of infants 12-23 months have been immunized against diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough) and
tetanus, 99% of the population have access to clean drinking water, 91% of the population have access
to improved sanitation facilities, there are 40 births per 1,000 women between the ages of 15-19, the
probability of dying between the ages of 15 and 60 is 16.0%, the neonatal mortality rate is 7 per 1,000 live
births, 6% of the population is undernourished, 14% of babies are born with low birth weight, 42% of
females 15 and over are in the labor force, 11% of the work force has a tertiary education, the
immunization rate of 1 year olds for hepatitis B is 99% and for polio, it is also 99%, the survival rate for
females to 65 is 81% and for males, it is 67% and the life expectancy (2010 projections of the US Census
Bureau) is 74.3 years (70.8 years for females and 77.98 years for males).

There are 166 prisoners per 100,000 people, pretrial detainees are 29.9% of the prison population, 6.5%
of prisoners are women, 4.6% are foreigners, 0.9% are under 18 and the prison occupancy rate is
104.0%.

The average caloric intake in 2003/2005 was 2,883 (3,825 for the US). Wheat is the main staple food,
accounting for 25.7% of caloric intake, followed by rice at 20.7% and sugar with an 11.7% share.

2. Access to Technology

There are 287 mainline telephone lines and 814 cellular subscribers per 1,000 people. Internet use is
222 per 1,000 people. There are 176 personal computers per 1,000 people, there are 341.2 radios per
1,000 people, 96% of households have a television and 46.0% of internet subscribers have fixed
broadband service. There were 334,125 motor vehicles in 2007 (150 motor vehicles per 1,000 people) of
which 43% were cars, 43% were 2-3 motorized 2-3 wheelers, 7% were minibuses and vans with a
capacity of less than 20, 5% were trucks and 1% were buses. The per capita consumption of electricity is
1,683 kilowatt hours (in the US, it is 13,652 kilowatt hours).

Mauritius is ranked 53 of 133 in the 2009-2010 World Economic Forum’s Networked Readiness Index.

3. Health Indicators

There are 370 nurses and midwives, 110 physicians, 20 dentists, 20 community health care workers, 120
pharmacists, 20 environmental and health workers, and 330 hospital beds per 100,000 people.


                                                                                                           13
The prevalence of HIV/AIDS is 1.7% of the adult population (15-49 years old). This is below the 5.0%
average for sub Saharan Africa. In 2007, there were 13,000 people living with AIDS of which 3,800 were
women 15 and over. The prevalence of tuberculosis is 40.0 per 100,000 people (in the US, it is 2.5 per
100,000 people) and the tuberculosis death rate is 4.7 per 100,000 people. The prevalence of diabetes is
17.0% of the population between 20 and 79 (the average for Africa is 3.2%). According to the
International Diabetes Federation, there are 148,800 between 20 and 79 people with diabetes. The
prevalence of obesity is 5.6% for males and 13.7% for females, the prevalence of smoking for men 15
and over is 34.2% and for females 15 and over it is 0.9% and the prevalence of smoking for teenagers
13-15 is 20.3% for males and 7.7% for females. The per capita health expenditure in 2007 was $47 and
the total expenditures on health were 4.0% of GDP. There were 85 cases of tuberculosis in 2008 and 12
cases of measles. The number of road accident fatalities in 2007 was 140.

In 2004, cardiovascular diseases were responsible for 21.3% of all deaths and cancer had a 5.3% share.
The mortality rate for cancer in 2004 was 77.9 per 100,000 people, for diabetes, it was 42.2 per 100,000
people, for cardiovascular diseases, it was 383.8 per 100,000 people, for road traffic accidents, it was
16.0 per 100,000 people, for self-inflected injuries, it was 8.8 per 100,000 people, for prenatal conditions,
it was 11.1 per 100,000 people and for HIV/AIDS, it was 1.7 per 100,000 people.

The homicide rate in 2008 was 3.8 per 100,000 people (in the US, it was 5.2 per 100,000 people).

The US Department of State Travel Advisory noted that “Medical facilities are available, but more limited
than in the United States. Emergency assistance is limited.”

4. Education Indicators

Education is free, universal and compulsory to the age of 16. English is the language of instruction.
Primary school begins at 6 and continues for 6 years. Of the students who enroll in the first grade, 98%
continue to the last grade and 4% repeat grades. The pupil teacher ratio in primary school is 22:1.
Secondary education begins at age 11 and is completed in 7 years.

The literacy rate is 87.5% for those 15 years and older. For females, it is 84.8%. The average adult
literacy rate for sub-Saharan Africa is 62.1%. The net enrollment rate in primary school is 94% for girls
and 93% for boys. This compares to a regional average of 74% for girls and 78% for boys. The ratio of
primary school aged children who are not attending school is 7.0%. The primary to secondary school,
transition rate is 69.0%. The net enrollment rate in secondary school is 82% for girls and 81% for boys.
This compares to a regional average of 24% for girls and 29% for boys. Ten percent of students repeat a
grade in secondary school. The school life expectancy is 13.6 years. The regional average is 8.1 years.
The gross enrollment in tertiary school is 26.0%. This is well above the regional average of 6.0%. In
2008, public expenditures on education were equal to 3.6% of GDP and 12.7% of the budget.

V. Economic Data, Outlook and Credit Rating


 IMF Country Data Overview 2010 (Est.)

 GDP           GDP:         GDP        per   CPI:      Current Account      Budget         FDI
 Growth                     capita:                    as % of GDP          balance as     (UNCTAD
                                                                            % of GDP       2009)

 4.2% (govt    $9.816       $7,605           2.1%      -8.6%                -4.5% (govt    $257 mn
 estimate)     bn                                                           forecast for
                                                                            FY09/10)




                                                                                                          14
1. Latest IMF Consultation

The February 2010 Article IV Consultation report noted that the government was able to offset some of
the impact of the global economic downturn by adopting a simulative fiscal policy. It urged the
government though to take steps to contain the budget shortfall to prevent a further build-up of domestic
debt.

2. Economic Outlook

Mauritius has successfully diversified its economy away from its heavy dependence upon the sugar
sector. Tourism, property development, information and communication technologies, financial services
and the textile sector are now the main pillars of growth. The government has identified a number of high
priority sectors to further diversify the economy including ethanol, renewable energy, medical tourism, bio-
medical research and higher education. In addition, the government continues to enact polices to make
the country into a regional transportation and financial services hub of the Indian Ocean region. Helping
to underpin the economy in the near-term will be the huge investment by Chinese firms in constructing
the 521 acre Jin Fei Economic and Trade Cooperation Zone. This is clearly a vote of confidence in the
economic future of the country and as such is likely to ensure further strong FDI inflows. Foreign
investors will also be attracted to the government’s pro-business policies, low tax rates, stable political
environment, regulatory transparency, low level of corruption, good infrastructure and educated work
force. As a result, the economy is likely to continue to perform well in the near-term. The IMF is
forecasting an average annual growth rate of 4.8% between 2010 and 2015.

3. Country Credit Ratings

 Credit Rating                    Standard & Poor’s         Moody’s            Fitch Ratings

 (as of date of publication)      N/A                       Baa2/Stable        N/A


Mauritius has just been rated by Moody’s of the major credit rating agencies. It assigned it a rating of
Baa2/Stable. This is the same level as Kazakhstan and Tunisia.
For Moody’s an investment grade rating is Baa or above.


VI. Membership in international organizations

 Financial Action Task Force (FATF)                        Not a member

 International Center for Settlements of Investment        Entry into Convention on July 2, 1969
 Disputes (ICSID)

 International Federation of Accountants (IFAC)            An associate member

 Multinational Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)          Yes, a member

 United Nations Convention Against Corruption              Ratified on December 15, 2004

 World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)           Yes, a member

 World Trade Organization (WTO)                             A member since January 1, 1995




                                                                                                         15
VI. Sources for Mauritius
Geography
        th
2002 17 Commonwealth Games in Manchester, “Mauritius”
http://m2002.thecgf.com/Nations/Africa/Mauritius/default.asp

Bloomberg, “Mauritius Rate Likely to Be Unchanged, Governor Says”, July 14, 2010
http://noir.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=afRsipTKi2z0

Central Intelligence Agency, “The World Factbook - Country Report for Mauritius”
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/mp.html

Constitution of the Republic of Mauritius
http://www.gov.mu/portal/site/AssemblySite/menuitem.ee3d58b2c32c60451251701065c521ca/?content_i
d=4cb54555fc808010VgnVCM100000ca6a12acRCRD#assembly

Ethnologue.com, “Languages of Mauritius”
http://www.ethnologue.com/show_country.asp?name=mauritius

Mauritius Islander.com, “Languages in Mauritius”
http://www.mauritius-islander.com/culture_language.htm

Republic of Mauritius Portal, “Language”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/site/abtmtius/menuitem.42f3149f267522984d57241079b521ca

Tourism in Mauritius.com, “Climate in Mauritius”
http://www.tourisminmauritius.com/about/climate/

UN, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, Population Estimates and
Projections Section, World Urbanization Prospects, The 2009 Revision, Population of Capital Cities
http://esa.un.org/unpd/wup/index.htm

UN World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision Population Data Base
http://esa.un.org/unpp/index.asp?panel=2

US Census Bureau: International Data Base
http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idb/region.php

World Bank 2009 World Development Indicators
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator

Political Environment Table

Bertelsmann Transformation Index
http://www.bertelsmann-transformation-
index.de/fileadmin/pdf/Anlagen_BTI_2010/BTI_2010__Ranking_Table_E_web.pdf

Freedom House – “Freedom in the World 2010: Table of Independent Countries
http://www.freedomhouse.org/uploads/fiw10/FIW_2010_Tables_and_Graphs.pdf

Fund for Peace, “Failed State Index 2010”
http://www.fundforpeace.org/web/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=99&Itemid=140

World Bank, “World Governance Indicators”, 2009
http://info.worldbank.org/governance/wgi/index.asp




                                                                                                     16
Government

Angus Reid, Election Tracker for May 5, 2010, Mauritius National Assembly Elections
http://www.angus-reid.com/tracker/view/35474/mauritius_2010

Central Intelligence Agency, “The World Factbook - Country Report for Mauritius”
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/mp.html

Inter-Parliamentarian Union, “Mauritius Elections of May 5, 2010”
http://www.ipu.org/parline/reports/2209_E.htm

US Department of State Background Note, “Mauritius,” March 15, 2010
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2833.htm

Freedom House 2010 Country Report for Mauritius
http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=22&year=2010&country=7875

US Department of State, "Human Rights Report for Mauritius" March 11, 2010
http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2009/

Civil Liberties

2010 Annual Survey of Violations of Trade Union Rights Published by the International Confederation of
Free Trade Unions, Report for Mauritius
http://survey.ituc-csi.org/+-Mauritius-+.html

Freedom House 2010 Country Report for Mauritius
http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=22&year=2010&country=7875

Freedom House, “Freedom of the Press 2010”
http://freedomhouse.org/images/File/fop/2010/2010global_regional_ranking_tables.pdf

US Department of State, "Human Rights Report for Mauritius," March 11, 2010
http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2009/af/135966.htm

Economic Overview

COMESA.com
http://about.comesa.int/lang-en/overview

Central Statistics Office, “Agriculture and Fish Production for 2009”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei815/fish.pdf

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “Second Quarter CPI”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei842/cpi.pdf

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “National Accounts”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei840/toc.htm

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “First Quarter 2010 National Accounts”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei841/toc.htm

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “Labor force, Employment and Unemployment”,
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei836/toc.htm

Central Intelligence Agency, “The World Factbook - Country Report for Mauritius”
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/mp.html



                                                                                                     17
International Labor Office, “Common Market of Eastern and Southern Africa”
http://actrav.itcilo.org/actrav-english/telearn/global/ilo/blokit/comesa.htm

International Monetary Fund, “World Economic Outlook Database for April 2010”
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2010/01/weodata/weoselgr.aspx

US Department of State Background Note, “Mauritius” March 15, 2010
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2833.htm

US Department of State, "Human Rights Report for Mauritius" March 11, 2010
http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2009/af/135966.htm

Infrastructure

African Development Bank, “Mauritius Wastewater Master Plan Study”, January 2009
http://www.afdb.org/fileadmin/uploads/afdb/Documents/Project-and-
Operations/AR%20En%20Mauri01.pdf

Air Mauritius
http://www.airmauritius.com/

Airport of Mauritius Company
http://aml.mru.aero/

Center for Asian Pacific Aviation, “Air Mauritius”
http://www.centreforaviation.com/profiles/airlines/air-mauritius

Flightstats.com, ”Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam International Airport”
http://www.flightstats.com/go/FlightStatus/flightStatusByAirport.do?airport=%28MRU%29+S.+Seewoosag
ur+Ram.+Intl%2C+Mauritius%2C+MU&airportQueryDate=2010-07-19&airportQueryTime=-
1&airlineToFilter=&airportQueryType=0&x=31&y=11

MD Travel Health.com, “Mauritius”
http://www.mdtravelhealth.com/

Mauritius Port Authority
http://www.mauport.com/

Press Release of May 28, 2009 for Aeroports de Paris, “ADPM and ADPm and ADPI, Aeroports de Paris
subsidiaries, will develop and manage Mauritius International airport new terminal”
http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/ADP/Resources/2a7991ff-7122-431a-b398-3342527a8eab-
A%C3%A9roportsdeParis_Mauritius.pdf

US State Department, “Travel Advisory for Mauritius," April 14, 2010
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_967.html

World Bank, “World Development Indicators for 2009”
http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog

World Travel Guide.net, “Mauritius Transport"
http://www.worldtravelguide.net/country/169/internal_travel/Africa/Mauritius.html

Energy Sector

Central Electricity Board
http://ceb.intnet.mu/

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “Energy and Water Statistics”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei833/toc.htm

                                                                                                18
Energy Information Administration, “Mauritius Energy Profile”, May 18, 2010
http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/country/country_energy_data.cfm?fips=MP

Energy Information Administration, Petroleum consumption by country
http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/IEDIndex3.cfm?tid=5&pid=54&aid=2

Energy Information Administration, Coal consumption by country
http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/IEDIndex3.cfm?tid=1&pid=1&aid=2

Energy Information Administration, Coal imports by country
http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/IEDIndex3.cfm?tid=1&pid=1&aid=3

Energy Information Administration, Electricity generation by country
http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/iedindex3.cfm?tid=2&pid=33&aid=12&cid=&syid=2004&eyid=2
008&unit=BKWH

Energy Information Administration, Refined Petroleum product imports by country
http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/IEDIndex3.cfm?tid=5&pid=54&aid=3

International Energy Agency, “Electrification Rates”
http://www.iea.org/weo/database_electricity/electricity_access_database.htm

Reuters, “One Third of Mauritius Electricity to come from Sugar”, June 19, 2008
http://www.planetaazul.com.mx/www/2008/06/19/one-third-of-mauritius-electricity-to-come-from-sugar/

UNDP, "Bagasse Cogeneration in Mauritius”
http://un.intnet.mu/undp/downloads/energy_sector/2009-04_Bagasse_Cogeneration_In_Mauritius-
Policy_Lessons_For_Africa.pdf

External Accounts

Bank of Mauritius, ”June, 2010 Bulletin”
http://bom.intnet.mu/pdf/Research_and_Publications/Monthly_Statistical_Bulletin/June2010/Contents.htm

Bank of Mauritius,”2009 Annual Report”
http://bom.intnet.mu/pdf/Research_and_Publications/Annual_Report/AnnualRep2009/contents.htm

Business Standard, “Mauritius eyes Indian hotels”, February 20, 2008
http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/mauritius-eyes-indian-hotels/314342/

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “International Travel and Tourism for First Quarter 2010”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei829/tourism.pdf

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “National Accounts”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei840/toc.htm

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “Trade data”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/site/cso/menuitem.523f2ed1da054c45448852f8a0208a0c/ and
http://www.gov.mu/portal/site/cso/menuitem.dee225f644ffe2aa338852f8a0208a0c/?content_id=bcd98567
84e6c010VgnVCM1000000a04a8c0RCRD

Euromonitor Travel and Tourism for Mauritius, August 2009
http://www.euromonitor.com/Travel_And_Tourism_in_Mauritius

Four Seasons Hotel in Mauritius
http://www.fourseasons.com/find_a_hotel/



                                                                                                      19
Intercontinental Hotel in Mauritius
http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/intercontinental/en/gb/locations/mauritius

Mauritius.net, “Discover Mauritius”, Hotels in Mauritius
http://www.mauritius.net/where_to_stay/wheretostay.php

Onada.com, “Average Exchange rate data”
http://www.oanda.com/currency/average

Sheraton Hotels in Mauritius
http://www.starwoodhotels.com/sheraton/search/results/standard.html?localeCode=en&skinCode=SI&bra
nd=SI&searchType=city&searchAction=findRooms&sendRedirect=&favoritePropertyID=0&iATANumber=
&corporateAccountNumber=&ratePlanName=&postalCode=&address=&city=&stateProvince=&country=
MU&arrivalDate=07%2F29%2F2010&departureDate=08%2F30%2F2010&numberOfRooms=1&numberO
fAdults=1

The Luxury Collection Hotel in Mauritius
http://www.starwoodhotels.com/luxury/search/hotel_detail.html?propertyID=3216

Tourism in Mauritius, “Hotels in Mauritius”
http://www.tourisminmauritius.com/hotels/

World Bank Remittance Data
http://econ.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/EXTDEC/EXTDECPROSPECTS/0,,contentMDK:2112193
0~pagePK:64165401~piPK:64165026~theSitePK:476883,00.html

World Economic Forum 2009 Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Index
http://www.weforum.org/pdf/TTCR09/TTCR09_Rankings.pdf

World Travel and Tourism Council Data
http://www.wttc.org/eng/Tourism_Research/Economic_Data_Search_Tool/index.php

External Debt and Budget Balance

African Economic Outlook for Mauritius, “Macroeconomic Policy”
http://www.africaneconomicoutlook.org/en/countries/southern-africa/mauritius/

Bank of Mauritius, ”June, 2010 Bulletin”
http://bom.intnet.mu/pdf/Research_and_Publications/Monthly_Statistical_Bulletin/June2010/Contents.htm

Deloitte, “Mauritius Budget 2010 – On the Road to recovery”, November 18, 2009
http://www.deloitte-mu.com/NewsRoom/Budget2010/Budget2010.pdf

International Monetary Fund, “Mauritius: 2009 Article IV Consultation - Staff Report; Public Information
Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Mauritius”,
February 12, 2010
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2010/cr1037.pdf

Merrinews.com, “Fifth annual budget of Mauritius announced”, November 21, 2009
http://www.merinews.com/article/fifth-annual-budget-of-mauritius-announced/15788794.shtml

Agriculture

African Economic Outlook for Mauritius, “Structural Issues”
http://www.africaneconomicoutlook.org/en/countries/southern-africa/mauritius/

African Economic Outlook 2005-2006 for Mauritius
http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/33/46/36741476.pdf


                                                                                                           20
Business Day, “Mauritius sugar sector offers lessons for Kenya”, August 20, 2009
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/Company%20Industry/-/539550/643120/-/u7sg4vz/-/index.html

Central Statistics Office, “Agriculture and Fish Production for 2009”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei815/fish.pdf

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “National Accounts”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei840/toc.htm

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “Trade data”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/site/cso/menuitem.523f2ed1da054c45448852f8a0208a0c/ and
http://www.gov.mu/portal/site/cso/menuitem.dee225f644ffe2aa338852f8a0208a0c/?content_id=bcd98567
84e6c010VgnVCM1000000a04a8c0RCRD

Embassy of Italy in Pretoria, “Mauritius”
http://www.ambpretoria.esteri.it/Ambasciata_Pretoria/Sedi_accreditate/Mauritius/

FinFacts.ie, “EU farm ministers agree sugar price cut of 36%: Ireland to get compensation package of
310 million”, November 24, 2005
http://www.finfacts.ie/irishfinancenews/EU_farm_ministers_agree_sugar_price_cut_of_36_Irel_4050.shtm
l

International Labor Organization, “The Impact of Globalization and Macroeconomic change on
employment in Mauritius”, 2008
http://www2.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_emp/documents/publication/wcms_105075.pdf

Sacerdoti, Emilio, “Mauritius: challenges of sustained growth”,
http://books.google.com/books?id=QYKVNhXuv9kC&pg=PA15&lpg=PA15&dq=sugar+as+percent+of+G
DP+in+Mauritius+in+1980&source=bl&ots=nf5CvbXBfH&sig=SJDs8_GL0RsoceGxQLelrNplB-
w&hl=en&ei=XM1FTJv7JIW0lQey--
T3BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBUQ6AEwATgK#v=onepage&q=sugar%20as
%20percent%20of%20GDP%20in%20Mauritius%20in%201980&f=false

US Department of State Background Note, “Mauritius,” March 15, 2010
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2833.htm

World Trade Organization, “WTO dispute body adopts rulings on EC sugar export subsidies and on
Dominican Republic's cigarette measures”, May 19, 2005
http://www.wto.org/english/news_e/news05_e/dsb_19may05_e.htm

World Trade Policy Trade Review for Mauritius, October 13, 1995
http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tpr_e/tp15_e.htm

World Trade Organization Trade Policy Review for Mauritius, April 23 and 25, 2008
http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tpr_e/tp298_e.htm

Business Environment Table

2009 Fraser Institute Economic Freedom of the World Index
http://www.freetheworld.com/2009/reports/world/EFW2009_BOOK.pdf

Heritage Foundation Economic Freedom Index
http://www.heritage.org/index/Ranking.aspx

Milken Institute Capital Access Index
http://www.milkeninstitute.org/pdf/CAI2009.pdf

Transparency International Corruption Perception Index
http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2009/cpi_2009_table

                                                                                                  21
UNCTAD – Inward Potential Performance Index
http://www.unctad.org/templates/WebFlyer.asp?intItemID=2471&lang=1

World Bank Ease of Doing Business
http://www.doingbusiness.org/EconomyRankings/

World Bank Governance Indicators
http://info.worldbank.org/governance/wgi/index.asp

World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Index
http://www.weforum.org/pdf/GCR09/GCR20092010fullrankings.pdf

Openness to Foreign Investment

US Department of State, "Investment Climate Statement for Mauritius ", March, 2010
http://www.state.gov/e/eeb/rls/othr/ics/2010/138111.htm

International Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards
http://www.uncitral.org/uncitral/en/uncitral_texts/arbitration/NYConvention_status.html

International Property Rights Index for 2010
http://www.internationalpropertyrightsindex.org/

Taxes

Deliotte, “International Tax Highlights for Mauritius for 2010”
http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom-
Global/Local%20Assets/Documents/Tax/Intl%20Tax%20and%20Business%20Guides/2010/dtt_tax_highli
ght_2010_Mauritius.pdf

Deloitte, “Mauritius Budget 2010 – On the Road to recovery”, November 18, 2009
http://www.deloitte-mu.com/NewsRoom/Budget2010/Budget2010.pdf

Merrinews.com, “Fifth annual budget of Mauritius announced”, November 21, 2009
http://www.merinews.com/article/fifth-annual-budget-of-mauritius-announced/15788794.shtml

US Department of State, "Investment Climate Statement for Mauritius", March, 2010
http://www.state.gov/e/eeb/rls/othr/ics/2010/138111.htm

Foreign Investment

British American Tobacco in Mauritius
http://www.bat.com/group/sites/UK__3MNFEN.nsf/vwPagesWebLive/6C6A4E9498822269C1257336003
575F1?opendocument&SKN=1

Cisco, Cisco Networking Academy IT Education is Critical to Mauritius's New Economic Direction, June
15, 2009
http://newsroom.cisco.com/dlls/2009/ts_061509b.html

DHL in Mauritius
http://www.dhl.com/wrd/mu.html

Maresk in Mauritus
http://mauritius.usembassy.gov/american_companies.html

Marketwatch.com, “Tiny Mauritius lures China with talent, Africa know-how,” June 29, 2010
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/mauritius-sells-its-africa-expertise-to-lure-china-2010-06-29


                                                                                                       22
Mauritius Telecom, “About us”
http://www.mauritiustelecom.com/about_us/index.htm

Nestle in Mauritius
http://www.nestle.com/Common/Header/AddressDetail.htm?LTR=M&CTY=B0888E32-440E-40A9-B183-
888A7B6B7201

Nomad
http://www.nomad.mu/aboutus.html

Republic of Mauritius government portal, “Construction works for expansion of SSR International Airport
to kick off at the beginning of next year”, December 31, 2009
http://www.gov.mu/portal/site/Mainhomepage/menuitem.a42b24128104d9845dabddd154508a0c/?conten
t_id=fddc4b8be2fd5210VgnVCM1000000a04a8c0RCRD

Shell in Mauritius
http://www.shell.co.mu/home/content/mus/aboutshell/media_centre/news_and_media_releases/2010/co
mmunique_2010.html

UNCTAD, "World Investment Report 2009 - Country Fact Sheet: Mauritius”, July 22, 2010
http://www.unctad.org/Templates/Page.asp?intItemID=3198&lang=1

US Department of State, "Investment Climate Statement for Mauritius ", March, 2010
http://www.state.gov/e/eeb/rls/othr/ics/2010/138111.htm

US Embassy in Mauritius, “US Companies in Mauritius”, 2006
http://mauritius.usembassy.gov/american_companies.html

Privatization

African Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania, Africa Focus Bulletin, "Mauritius: Cyber-Island
Strategy”, June 26, 2008
http://www.africa.upenn.edu/afrfocus/afrfocus062608.html

US Department of State, "Investment Climate Statement for Mauritius," March, 2010
http://www.state.gov/e/eeb/rls/othr/ics/2010/138111.htm

World Trade Organization Trade Policy Review for Mauritius, April 23 and 25, 2008
http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tpr_e/tp298_e.htm

Financial Sector

Bank of Mauritius
http://bom.intnet.mu/

International Monetary Fund, “Mauritius: 2009 Article IV Consultation - Staff Report; Public Information
Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Mauritius”,
February 12, 2010
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2010/cr1037.pdf

The Stock Exchange of Mauritius
http://www.stockexchangeofmauritius.com/index.asp

US Department of State, "Investment Climate Statement for Mauritius," March, 2010
http://www.state.gov/e/eeb/rls/othr/ics/2010/138111.htm

World Trade Organization Trade Policy Review for Mauritius, April 23 and 25, 2008
http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/tpr_e/tp298_e.htm


                                                                                                           23
Corruption and Transparency

African Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption
http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/treaties/CAC/signatories.html

Bertelsmann Transformation Index Country Report for Mauritius
http://www.bertelsmann-transformation-index.de/en/bti/country-reports/laendergutachten/eastern-and-
southern-africa/mauritius/

Freedom House 2010 Country Report for Mauritius
http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=22&year=2010&country=7875

Transparency International Corruption Perception Index
http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2009/cpi_2009_table

US Department of State, "Human Rights Report for Mauritius," March 11, 2010
http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2009/

US Department of State, "Investment Climate Statement for Mauritius," March, 2010
http://www.state.gov/e/eeb/rls/othr/ics/2010/138111.htm

United Nations Convention Against Corruption
http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/treaties/CAC/signatories.html

Standards and Compliance

International Monetary Fund list of GDDS nations
http://dsbb.imf.org/Applications/web/gdds/gddscountrylist/

International Monetary Fund list of SDDS nations
http://dsbb.imf.org/Applications/web/sddscountrylist/

International Monetary Fund, Report on Observance of Standards and Codes
http://www.imf.org/external/np/rosc/rosc.asp

International Monetary Fund, “Mauritius: Report on Observance of Standards and Codes – FATF
Recommendations for Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism"
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2008/cr08318.pdf

International Monetary Fund, "Mauritius: Financial System Stability Assessment, including Reports on the
Observance of Standards and Codes on the following topics: Banking Supervision, Payment Systems,
Monetary and Financial Policy Transparency, and Anti-Money Laundering” Transparency Codes”,
October 14, 2003
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2003/cr03321.pdf

International Monetary Fund, “Mauritius: Report on Observance of Standards and Codes – Data Module,
Response by the Authorities, and Detailed Assessment Using the Data Quality Assessment Framework"
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2008/cr08277.pdf

International Monetary Fund, “Mauritius: Financial System Stability Assessment Update”, December 23,
2008
http://www.imf.org/external/np/fsap/fsap.asp

International Monetary Fund Financial Sector Assessment Programs
http://www.imf.org/external/np/fsap/fsap.asp

World Bank, Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes
http://www.worldbank.org/ifa/rosc.html


                                                                                                      24
World Bank, Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes, “Corporate Governance Country
Assessment, Mauritius”, October, 2002
http://www.worldbank.org/ifa/MaurROSC.pdf

World Bank, Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes, “Accounting and Auditing, Mauritius”,
April 2, 2003
http://www.worldbank.org/ifa/roscaa_mri.pdf

World Bank, Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes, “Insolvency and Creditor Rights,
Mauritius”, March, 2004
http://www.worldbank.org/ifa/Mauritius-ICR%20ROSC.pdf

Social Indicators

Food and Agriculture Organization Yearbook for 2007-2008
http://www.fao.org/economic/ess/publications-studies/statistical-yearbook/fao-statistical-yearbook-2007-
2008/d-consumption/en/

Kaiser Family Foundation, "Global Health Facts – Health Indicators"
http://www.globalhealthfacts.org/factsheets_custom.jsp#

Kings College London, Prison Brief for Mauritius
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/law/research/icps/worldbrief/wpb_country.php?country=33

March of Dimes Global Report on Birth Defects
http://www.marchofdimes.com/MOD-ExecutiveSummary.pdf

UN data for under 5 mortality rate per 1,000 births
http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?d=MDG&f=seriesRowID%3A561

UN data for percent of population undernourished
http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?d=MDG&f=seriesRowID%3A566

UN data for children under 5 who are underweight
http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?q=prevalence&d=GenderStat&f=inID%3A44

UN data for neonatal mortality rate
http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?q=united+states+of+america&d=SOWC&f=inID%3A145%3BcrID%3A186

UN data for low birth weight babies
http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?d=SOWC&f=inID%3A115

UNDP, "2009 Human Development Report for Mauritius
http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/countries/data_sheets/cty_ds_MUS.html

US Census Bureau: International Data Base
http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idb/region.php

World Bank, “2009 World Development Indicators”
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator and http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog

World Health Organization, “Global Health Observatory”
http://apps.who.int/ghodata/

World Health Organization, ”Mauritius Health Profile”
http://www.who.int/gho/countries/mus.pdf




                                                                                                       25
World Health Organization Statistics for 2010
http://www.who.int/whosis/whostat/2010/en/index.html and
http://www.who.int/whosis/whostat/EN_WHS10_Part2.pdf

Access to Technology

Africapedia, “Per Capita Electricity Consumption in Africa"
http://www.africapedia.com/wiki/index.php?page=PER%20CAPITA%20ELECTRICITY%20CONSUMPTI
ON%20IN%20AFRICA

Nationmaster, “Radio ownership per 1,000 people”
http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/med_rad_percap-media-radios-per-capita

Reuters Alertnet, “Standard of Living for Mauritius”
http://www.alertnet.org/db/cp/mauritius.htm

UN ICT Index
http://www.itu.int/ITU-D/ict/publications/idi/2009/material/IDI2009_w5.pdf

World Bank, "Information and Communications for Development 2009," May 2009
http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/DATASTATISTICS/0,,contentMDK:20459133~isCURL:Y~
menuPK:1192714~pagePK:64133150~piPK:64133175~theSitePK:239419,00.html

World Bank, “2009 World Development Indicators”
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator

World Economic Forum 2009-2010 Networked Readiness Index World Economic
http://www.weforum.org/pdf/GITR10/TheNetworkedReadinessIndexRankings.pdf

World Health Organization Road Safety Status Report, “Mauritius”
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_safety_status/country_profiles/mauritius.pdf

Health Indicators

HIV In site, “Mauritius, August 2009”
http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu/global?page=cr-01-00&post=2&cid=MP&submit=Create+Report

International Diabetes Federation Country Summary Table for 2010
http://www.diabetesatlas.org/map

Kaiser Family Foundation, "Global Health Facts – Health Indicators"
http://www.globalhealthfacts.org/factsheets_custom.jsp#

US State Department, “Travel Advisory for Mauritius," April 14, 2010
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_967.html

United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime, “Homicide Statistics”
http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/homicide.html

World Bank, “2009 World Development Indicators”
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator and http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog

World Health organization Country Cooperation Strategy report for 2008-2013
http://www.afro.who.int/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1043&Itemid=1919

World Health Organization Death Statistics
http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/estimates_country/en/index.html



                                                                                                  26
World Health Organization, ”Mauritius Health Profile”
http://www.who.int/gho/countries/mus.pdf

World Health Organization Road Safety Status Report, “Mauritius”
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_safety_status/country_profiles/mauritius.pdf

World Health Organization Statistics, 2010
http://www.who.int/whosis/whostat/2010/en/index.html and
http://www.who.int/whosis/whostat/EN_WHS10_Part2.pdf


Education Indicators

2009 Edition of UNESCO Global Education Digest
http://www.uis.unesco.org/template/pdf/ged/2009/GED_2009_EN.pdf

Education International, "Education Report for Mauritius”, June 18, 2007
http://www.ei-ie.org/barometer/en/profiles_detail.php?country=mauritius

UNESCO Education Database
http://stats.uis.unesco.org/unesco/TableViewer/document.aspx?ReportId=198&IF_Language=enEcong

Economic Data

Central Statistics Office of Mauritius, “National Accounts”
http://www.gov.mu/portal/goc/cso/ei840/toc.htm

Deloitte, “Mauritius Budget 2010 – On the Road to recovery”, November 18, 2009
http://www.deloitte-mu.com/NewsRoom/Budget2010/Budget2010.pdf

International Monetary Fund, “World Economic Outlook Database for April 2010”
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2010/01/weodata/weoselgr.aspx

UNCTAD, "World Investment Report 2009 - Country Fact Sheet: Mauritius”, September 17, 2009
http://www.unctad.org/Templates/Page.asp?intItemID=3198&lang=1

Latest IMF Consultation

International Monetary Fund, “Mauritius: 2009 Article IV Consultation - Staff Report; Public Information
Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Mauritius”,
February 12, 2010
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2010/cr1037.pdf

Economic Outlook

International Monetary Fund, “Mauritius: 2009 Article IV Consultation - Staff Report; Public Information
Notice on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Mauritius”,
February 12, 2010
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2010/cr1037.pdf

International Monetary Fund, “World Economic Outlook Database for April 2010”
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2010/01/weodata/weoselgr.aspx

US Department of State, "Investment Climate Statement for Mauritius ", March, 2010
http://www.state.gov/e/eeb/rls/othr/ics/2010/138111.htm




                                                                                                           27
Credit Rating

Fitch
http://www.fitchratings.com/corporate/sectors/issuers_list_corp.cfm?sector_flag=5&marketsector=1&detail
=&body_content=issr_list

Moody’s
http://www.moodys.com/moodys/cust/content/loadcontent.aspx?source=StaticContent/BusinessLines/Sov
ereign-SubSovereign/RatingsListGBR.htm&Param=ALL

Standard and Poor’s
http://www.standardandpoors.com/ratings/sovereigns/ratings-
list/en/us/?sectorName=Governments&subSectorCode=39&subSectorName=Sovereigns

Memberships

Financial Action Task Force
http://www.fatf-gafi.org/pages/0,3417,en_32250379_32236869_1_1_1_1_1,00.html

International Center for Settlements of investment Disputes
http://icsid.worldbank.org/ICSID/FrontServlet?requestType=ICSIDDataRH&reqFrom=Main&actionVal=Vie
wContractingStates&range=A~B~C~D~E

International Federation of Accountants
http://web.ifac.org/about/member-bodies

Multinational Investment Guarantee Agency
http://www.miga.org/quickref/index_sv.cfm?stid=1577

United Nations Convention Against Corruption
http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/treaties/CAC/signatories.html

World Intellectual Property Organization
http://www.wipo.int/members/en/

World Trade Organization Members
http://www.wto.org/english/thewto_e/whatis_e/tif_e/org6_e.htm




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