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Scouting With a Neckerchief

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					Leather Owl

                                     Cut out templates using the drawings below as a guide.

                                     Trace around templates onto leather or vinyl.

                                     Cut out owl body and wings.

                                     Cut slits in owl body for wings and slide wings into slits and
                                      glue.

                                     Glue on the eyes.

                                     Draw beak and feathers using the permanent marker.

                                     Overlap tabs on body behind owl and glue to make the ring
                                      for the neckerchief.


                      Materials                               Tools
         3"x7" Vinyl or leather              Sharp scissors
         6mm Wobble eyes                     Hot Glue
                                             Permanent marker




Paddle
                                         Carve this in one piece. Carve the wood to the size of
                                         the blade of the paddle, then carve the shaft down to
                                         the size of the hand grip. Finally, carefully carve out
                                         the paddle loom or shaft. Use notches to stop the wood
                                         from splitting all the way to the end.



                      Materials                               Tools
         Wood 1"x3"                          Knife
Rocket
                                     The clay is used for the nose cone. You could make it
                                     out of a 1" x 5/8" piece of dowel rod.

                                     Use red and gold tinsel for the flame coming from the
                                     rocket. These are available in craft stores.

                                    Shape the nose cone from either clay or wood and glue
                                     it into the PVC tube.

                                    Make the fins. Cut the square of foam in half making
                                     two rectangles. Cut the rectangles diagonally making
                                     four fins. (Note that you only need three fins - don't
                                     put a fin on the side that will be against your shirt.)

                                    Glue tinsel to make the flame. Trim to desired length.

                                    Glue on the fins.

                                    Glue the PVC ring to the back (the side where the fin is
                                     missing).
                                    Decorate the body of the rocket with the permanent
                                     marker.

                   Materials                      Tools
          3" tube of 1/2" PVC           Permanent Markers
          1" diameter ball of clay      Hot Glue
          2" x 2" Craft Foam            Scissors
          Tinsel
          PVC Ring



Sign Language


                                                Materials              Tools
                                                 Chenilles Hot Glue
                                               Craft foam Scissors
                                                 PVC ring 3"x3"x1/2" wood
                                                           Nails and hammer
Using the templates below, make bending jigs using wood and finishing nails. The small head on these
nails will make getting the chenille off the jig easier. Cutting the heads off the nails will also work.

For the small hand, use one thin chenille. Bend the chenille around the jig following the diagram. Hold the
jig as shown below.

Around 1, over to 2 and around it from the top, over 3, under 4 and 5, to the right of 1 and up around 6
from left to right, then below 7, above 8, below 9, above 10, below 11, above 12 and back down to the
right of 3.

Once the hand is formed, remove it from the jig and adjust its shape to make it look better. Bend the
two ends around the wires that cross them to make it more sturdy. Now bend the fingers to make the
letter you want. See this page for help on hand signs. Several small hands may be combined to spell out a
short word, initials, or name using sign language. The signs may be glued onto a piece of craft foam or
craft stick (pop-cycle stick). Glue a PVC ring to the back of the background material.

For the large hand, twist the ends of two thick chenilles together. Bend the chenilles around the jig
following the diagram. Once the hand is formed, you will notice that you have some extra chenille. We
will take care of that in a moment. First, remove the hand from the jig and adjust its shape to make it
look better. Now, take the extra chenille, and weave it in and out between the fingers. It should go in
front of the pointer finger, behind tall man, in front of the ring finger, and behind the pinky. Any that
remains wrap around to the other side of the hand to reinforce the palm. Bend the starting end around
the wire that it crosses.

With the large hand, you can bend the fingers into a letter (see hand signs), the Cub Scout or Boy Scout
sign, or "I love you" or thumbs up. Glue on a PVC ring to complete the project.




Template for Large Hand




                                                                                            Pattern

Template for Small Hand




Slingshot
                                           Get a "Y" tree branch about 4" in height. Cut to size
                                           and sand. Use knife to carve notches where rubber
                                           bands will attach to "Y". Punch holes in each end of the
                                           thin leather. Tie a rubber band onto each hole. Tie
                                           rubber band to "Y".
                                           Try it out - but be careful to not aim at anything that is
                                           alive. Tie PVC ring to handle using wetted leather lacing.
                                           Tie tight. As leather dries it will get tighter and hold
                                           more securely. Wrap extra rubber bands around handle.


                                                            Materials           Tools
                                                     "Y" tree branch Leather hole punch
                                                   2-3" rubber bands Knife
                                                1/2"x2" Thin Leather
                                                     1' leather lacing
                                                             PVC ring


Squirt
                             This is my favorite slide. The challenge of making this slide is
                             obtaining the thin tubing and the bulb. By making it this way, you can
                             have one bulb and many film canister slides. The film canister part is
                             interchangeable.
                             The film canister is easy to get at a photo store. The thick tubing is
                             used in aquariums and is about 1/4 inch outside diameter. The metal
                             tubing is the correct diameter to fit snuggly inside the thick tubing.
                             Pet stores that carry tropical fish supplies will have the tubing and
                             also connectors that can be used instead of the metal tubing. The
                             thin tubing can be found in nose sprays, pump hair sprays, and
                             perfume atomizers. The bulb can be found in two places. They can be
                             purchased as part of ear wax removal kits. They are also used to
                             clean out the noses of infants. You might try to locate a nurse who
                             could obtain several bulbs for you. By making this slide in two parts as
                             illustrated, you only need to find one bulb and can make as many
                             varieties of film canisters as you like.
                       Materials                               Tools
         Plastic film canister                 Knife
         2" thin tube                          Leather punch
         2" thick tube                         Paint/markers
         30" thick tube                        hot glue
         1" metal tubing
         1 bulb
                1 PVC ring
                foam or paper




                                      Inside the film canister
                                           Decorate foam or paper (treat paper with Thompson wood seal
                                           to water proof it). Some ideas are: a fish scene, "Smile if you
                                           want to be squirted", a beach scene, a whale, thunderstorm
                                           scene, clown, desert survival kit, "Reconstituted dehydrated
                                           dihydrogen monoxide", and "H2O". The trick is to have one
                                           place near the horizontal middle of the foam/paper that you
                                           can put a hole without it being too conspicuous. The hole could
                                           be hidden in a dark part of the scene, bubbles from the fish,
                                           blowhole of the whale, dot of the "i" in a text messages,
                                           clowns nose or mouth. If the hole is at the bottom of the
                                           scene the thin tube can be replaced by simply drilling a 3/64-
                                           inch hole.

Secure foam/paper to film canister using hot glue.

Using a leather punch of the correct size to make a tight fitting hole for the thin tube. Make the hole in
an inconspicuous spot near the middle of the foam/paper. The water will squirt out straight from this
point so if you put it off center it will shoot off to the side. Insert the thin tubing.

Attach the PVC ring with hot glue. Be sure to roughen up the ring and film canister before gluing.

Using the leather punch of the correct size to make a tight fitting hole for the thick tubing. Make the
hole to the right or left of the PCV ring. Insert the 2-inch piece of thick tubing. One trick is to cut the
end of the tubing at an angle so that it will slip into the hole more easily. You can also grab the tubing
with needle nose pliers and pull it through.

To make the bulb part of the slide, get the metal tubing wet and insert it into the end of the 30 inches
of thick tubing. Then insert the bulb into the other end of the tubing.

Only use this slide during the warm season as it tends to drip a little and both you and your victim will
get wet. Insert the metal tubing into the thick tubing in the film canister. Put the slide on your
neckerchief. (This is a fairly heavy slide when filled with water. You may want to use a rubber band to
secure the slide as described in the General Tips section). The tubing is concealed inside your shirt and
goes down over your belt and into a pocket where the bulb part is hidden. I use my left pocket for Cub
Scouts and the right pocket for Boy Scouts. That way I can squirt while shaking hands. It is important
that the tubing not be kinked or squeezed. Test without water to make sure air gets through the thin
tube; make any necessary adjustments. Fill film canister with water and you are ready for action.


Stack of BB's
                             Here is a fun one. You need 26 BBs, a background, and white glue for this
                             project. You can either buy a tube of BBs or get some spilt ones from
                             Webelos camps. Take a leather or foam background and glue the first layer
                             to the background and allow it to dry. Then glue on the second layer and let
                             it dry. Finally glue on the last BB. The layers should fit together very easily.
                             This is a natural alignment for the BBs, that is the BBs on an upper layer fit
                             into dimples of the lower layer. The drawing below illustrates the
                             arrangement. The stars in the 1st and 2nd layers indicate where the BBs on
                             the next layer are to be placed.




             Materials         Tools
     1 1/2" Leather circle     Glue
     26 BBs                    Hot Glue
     PCV Ring




Sticker Ball Spider
                                                   The sticker balls come from the sweet gum tree. You
                                                   can find them in the fall.

                                                      Glue sticker balls together. You can use thin
                                                       chenilles as antenna or if they have stems break one
                                                       off and glue it next to the other one.
                                        Cut chenille so 2 lumps are on each. Make three of
                                         these.

                                        Glue chenilles to bottom of sticker balls.

                                        Glue on eyes.

                                        Bend the legs.

                                        Glue on the PVC ring.



                       Materials                    Tools
               2 Sticker balls           Hot Glue
               1 Chenilles               Scissors
               2 3/8" Wobble eyes
               PVC ring



Square or Circle Burst
                           1. Cut out the piece of wood, sand the edges smooth.

                           2. tape the pattern to the piece of wood

                           3. put a nail at every point indicated by the pattern

                           4. remove pattern

                           5. straighten nails with pliers

                           6. paint (I prefer white because it makes most colors stand out.
                              Use whatever will look good. Let paint dry thoroughly.)

                           7. tie thread on first nail

                           8. follow pattern to complete design

                           9. tie thread on last nail

                           10. place a small drop of glue on knots to hold them tight

                           11. cut off excess thread

                           12. hot glue PVC ring on back



                  Materials                                Tools
      1/4 x3x3 inch wood                 Hot Glue
               5/8 inch nails                       Glue
               colored thread                       Scissors
               pattern                              hammer
               paint                                Paint brush
               PVC ring                             Drop cloth




The Circle Burst and Square Burst are very similar. The idea is to run a thread from one central
nail to every other nail in the project. A special case of the Circle Burst is where the central
nail is one of the nails in the circle itself.

Make sure that the thread is always kept tight. Looping the thread completely around each nail
will help to keep tension in the thread.

Start by tying (use a square knot) the thread to the central nail.

Put a drop of glue on the knot, let it dry and trim off excess thread.

Now you need to make a decision. There are two methods that can be used to finish the project.
These are described separately below.

In method 1, the pattern goes from one nail on the perimeter and continues around the
perimeter in one direction (1, 2, 3, 4, ...). This results in the thread going up the central nail in a
spiral.

Method 2 goes from one nail on the perimeter and alternates going clockwise with one then
counterclockwise with the next (12, 13, 11, 14, 10, 15, 9, 16, 8, 17, ...). This results in the thread
going up and down the central nail smoothly.

It does not matter which perimeter nail you start with. The thread goes from the central nail
to the perimeter nail, is looped once around the perimeter nail and goes back to the central nail
where it is looped around. Then proceed to the next nail (either in one direction for method 1 or
alternating directions for method 2).
You will want to push the thread on the central nail down toward the wood so that each new loop
is above all previous loops.

When you have made the loop around the last perimeter nail, run the thread back to the central nail, loop
it around the nail, and tie it to itself using a square knot and a drop of glue. Trim off excess thread.
Here are some variations to try:

      Use different colored string tied together.

      Use multi-colored string.

      Use metalic string.

      Use more than one nail in the center. Do the project completely around each nail using a
       different colored string for each layer/nail.

      Use more than one nail in the center and go around the closest nail. By using three nails in
       the center you could get a clover effect.

Slow Drip
                                      You've seen this one in stores before. It is like a liquid
                                      hourglass. The liquid slowly runs from the top bottle to the
                                      bottom one. I have not perfected this one yet. The liquid
                                      doesn't move as easily from the top to the bottom bottle as I
                                      would like and the liquid is a bit too runny. The ones I've seen in
                                      stores the liquid holds its shape more after it has fallen into
                                      the bottom bottle, mine almost immediately forms a puddle. It
                                      is also sensitive to temperature, flowing slower in cooler
                                      temperatures. If anyone comes up with something that works
                                      well, please let me know.

                                      This would be a good slide for the Webelos Scientist pin or
                                      themes relating to science. It could also be used as a humorous
                                      slide for that "Old Drip" or someone who is "slow as molasses."
                                      The bottles I found originally had the candy sprinkles that you
                                      put on cookies. I used only one of the screw on lids. If you can
                                      find plastic bottles with clear lids, it would look better.



                                     Materials                  Tools
                               2 bottles about 1"x2"   E-6000™ Glue
                               Kyro Syrup™             Toothpick
                               Food coloring           Drill
                         Popsicle stick            Sandpaper
                         PVC ring

      Drill a 1/2" hole in one of the lids. Sand the hole smooth if necessary.

      Glue the lid upside down to the top of one of the bottles using E-6000™. Make sure you
       do a good job of gluing because you don't want it to leak.

      Glue the PVC ring to the side of the lid.

      Fill the other bottle about 3/4 full with Kyro Syrup™.

      Using a toothpick, carefully put a small drop of food coloring into the syrup. Stir with the
       Popsicle stick. Keep adding food coloring until you get the syrup the right color.

      After the glue has thoroughly dried, screw the two bottles together. If you have trouble
       with it leaking, try using some Teflon tape (available in plumbing department of hardware
       store) on the threads of the bottle.

Turn the bottles upside down so the liquid can flow into the empty bottle. If it doesn't want to
flow, you may need to add a few drops of water to make the syrup less viscous.

Good luck!



Tube Art
                                 I got this idea from a piece of artwork in downtown Dallas.
                                 Collect various sized and colored tubes. Some ideas are straws,
                                 bottles, pencil lead containers, wire, tubing, and empty pen
                                 cases. Cut to various lengths and shapes. Glue together with hot
                                 glue and attach a PVC ring.



                                                   Materials             Tools
                                              Various tubes Scissors
                                                   PVC ring Hot Glue




Turk's Head Knot
                                    This makes a GREAT neckerchief slide. Once it is tied, it will stay
                                    tied and always looks neat.

                                    See the websites' of Troop 54 or Troop 266 for instructions on tying
                                    it. Tie it around three fingers to make it the right size for a
                                    neckerchief slide.

                                    Once you have tied one layer, you follow the rope to add a second,
                                    third layer, or more layers. Don't let the layers cross.

The photo above shows a two layer Turk's Head and took about 3 1/2' of 1/4" rope. A three layer Turk's
Head would take about 6 feet. The more layers, the looser the first knot must be in order to slide the
other layers between the loops.

When you have finished tying the knot, straighten it up and make the openings at the top and bottom the
same size. Then cut the ends off short and whip them or use the candle flame to fuse or melt the ends
of the rope. You may want to add a little hot glue to hold the ends in place.
You could also tie it using 3/16" cotton/poly clothesline rope or wire.


                                   Materials                     Tools
                           4' of 1/4" rope            Lighter
                                                      Candle
                                                      Knife
                                                      Hot glue

Turkey Neck Bone Wolf
                                    To get the turkey neck bone, start with a turkey neck. There are
                                    about seven bones in each neck. The neck has to cook a long time to
                                    get to the point where the meat falls off the bone. I like to make a
                                    soup while doing this.

                                    Soups are very easy since the ingredients and quantity used are very
                                    flexible. In a slow cooker or crock-pot put the turkey neck, about two
                                    quarts of water, carrots, celery, salt and pepper to taste. Cook for
                                    about 4 hours on high or 8 hours on low.
Pull all the meat off using a fork and your fingers and return meat to soup. You might find a toothbrush
helpful in removing the last bits of meat. Let the bones dry good.
Paint the bone brown and let it dry. Use white glue to attach the seed beads as eyes. A toothpick is
helpful in positioning the beads. Cut the red paper in the shape of a long tongue about 3/4" long. Glue it
inside the mouth with white glue. Hot glue the PVC ring to the back.

                                   Materials                     Tools
                           Turkey Neck Bone           Brown Paint
                           2 Yellow Seed Beads        Paint Brush
                           Red Paper                  White Glue
         PVC ring                Hot Glue
                                 Toothpick




Taco
                   Cut 4" diameter circle from tan craft foam for taco shell.

                   Cut thin strips of yellow craft foam for shredded cheese.

                   Cut irregular shapes of red craft foam for tomato.

                   Tear green paper into irregular shapes and wad up for
                    lettuce.

                   Fold taco shell in "U" shape.

                   Using hot glue, attach cheese to bottom, then tomato, and
                    finally lettuce on top.

                   Make sure sides of taco are held in place, if not put on more
                    hot glue.

                   Hot glue a PVC ring to the back.

               Materials                    Tools
         4" Tan Craft Foam       Hot Glue
         Red Craft Foam          Scissors
         Yellow Craft Foam
         Green Paper
         PVC ring




Wave Machine
                              Note: Be sure to get a bottle with a screw on lid.
                              Coin collector bottles for half-dollars work well.
                                              The bottle is worn horizontally with the lid at one
                                              end. The PVC ring is glued across the bottle at the
                                              middle. Foam is used as a background to make the
                                              wave show up better. This is a very heavy slide. To
                                              keep it in place, you can use a rubber band.

 1. Cut foam to cover half way around length of bottle.

 2. Glue in place or tie with thread at both ends with thread.

 3. Fill bottle 1/3 full with water.

 4. Add food coloring (using a toothpick) until desired color is achieved.

 5. Fill bottle almost to brim with mineral oil.

 6. Wrap bottle threads with plumbers Teflon tape.

 7. Secure lid.

 8. Glue long PVC ring to foam.

                         Materials                                 Tools
            3"-4" x 1" clear plastic bottle        Hot Glue
            with screw on lid                      Goop(tm) glue
            Mineral oil                            Toothpick
            Water
            Food coloring
            PVC ring (1" long)
            White craft foam
            Goop(tm) glue
            1" long PVC ring



Weight Lifter
                               1. Cut craft sticks at angle so that when glued together the
                                  cut is parallel to the ground. See illustration below.

                               2. Glue craft sticks together at angle shown using Aleene's
                                  Tacky Glue™.

                               3. Glue hinges to craft sticks, front of long stick, and back of
                                  short piece using Aleene's Tacky Glue™.
                4. Drill 1/16 inch hole in 1/4 inch dowels, glue onto ends of 1/16
                   inch dowel using Aleene's Tacky Glue™.

                5. Glue washers onto 1/4 inch dowels using hot glue or E-
                   6000™.

                6. Glue head onto longer craft sticks using E-6000™.

                7. Glue bead on top of head using E-6000™.

                8. Cut out shirt and pants (see patterns) and glue to craft
                   sticks using hot glue.

                9. Glue bar onto arms using Aleene's Tacky Glue™.

                10. Glue ring to back of craft sticks using E-6000™.

                11. Attach wire onto ring and twist into a figure eight pattern.

                12. Tie string to bar, run it through bead, and tie second bead
                    to other end of string. Put a drop of Aleene's Tacky Glue™
                    on the knots to lock them tight.

                13. Draw face.
                Hot glue can be used for all of the assembly if speed is important.
                However, a much more sturdy weightlifter can be made by using the
                glues indicated in the directions.
           Materials                            Tools
2 popsicle craft sticks           E-6000™ Glue
1 1/2 inch dowel, 1/8 inch thick Hot glue
2 Pony beads
2 3/4 inch washers
1 1/16 inch dowel, 3 inches long
2 1/4 inch dowel, 1/8 inch thick
1 string, 18 inches long
1 PVC ring
1 wire 10 inches long
Foam
Markers
2 Cloth hinges 1/4 inch by 1 inch
Whirligig
                                           The instructions are for a single bladed whirligig.
                                           For younger boys, the first four steps can be done ahead of
                                           time.

                                                             Materials           Tools
                                                         Pony Beads Knife
                                              4" of 1/16" dowel rod Hot Glue
                                                      Foam cutouts Drill with various bits
                                                   2" or longer Nail Hacksaw
                                                1 1/2" long PVC ring File
                                                                     White Glue & "C" clamp

                                       Place one pony bead in the "C" clamp. Using a drill bit smaller than
                                        the dowel rod, drill one hole all the way through the pony bead.

                                       Put the dowel rod partially in this hole. Re-clamp the bead so that
                                        the next hole you drill will be perpendicular to the first.

                                       Using a drill bit smaller than the diameter of the nail, drill a hole
                                        through one wall of the PVC ring about 1/3 down from the top.

                                       Cut the nail to size. The nail should go completely through the PVC
                                        ring and touch the backside. Outside of the ring, you need to leave
                                        just enough room for the two pony beads you will use. File off the
                                        sharp edges of the nail.

                                       Cut the dowel into four 1" long pieces. Hint: cut one piece then use
                                        it to measure the other three.

                                       Glue the sticks in to the bead using E-6000™. Make sure none of
                                        the glue or the dowel rod stick into the center hole of the bead.
                                        Hint: If something does get in there, carefully use a drill to get it
                                        out.

                                       Glue foam onto sticks using white glue. Tilt all of the foam pieces
                                        to the same side. The white glue should be thick enough to hold
                                        the foam in place without support. <>

                                       Allow time to dry.

                                       Put blade on nail, add another pony bead to nail.

                                       Tap the nail into the hole. Make sure blade can turn freely.

Use a thick walled 3/4" PVC ring.
Hint: Use some of the techniques you used to make the Pinewood Derby cars to make the whirligig turn
easier. Graphite really helps!

A two bladed whirligig can be made by simple adding an extra blade and some extra pony beads between
the blades so they don't hit. Tilt the foam on the second blade in the opposite
direction so the blade turns in the opposite direction. Make the second blade
larger than the first simply by gluing the foam so it sticks half off the blade. See
the illustrations below.




Drawing of bladed tilted in the opposite direction and blade half glued onto dowel rod



Leather Wolf
                                  Cut out template using the drawing below as a guide.

                                  Trace around template onto leather or vinyl.

                                  Cut out wolf.

                                  Glue on the eyes.

                                  Draw nose and inside of ears using the permanent marker.

                                  Glue the two ends of the tabs together to form a loop for the
                                   neckerchief.

                               

                  Materials Tools
              3"x3" Vinyl or Sharp scissors
                    leather Leather glue
               6mm Wobble Permanent marker
                       Eyes

Whistle

                                   The straw is a little less than 1/4" in diameter and 4" long. Cut a
                                   notch in the straw as shown below. A wooden end plug is used
                                   for the mouth end. Sand the top of it flat as shown. It should
                                   fit snugly in the straw with a small gap at the top. Slide the
                                   mouth piece dowel into the back end of the straw.




                                                 Side View of Whistle




                              Materials                      Tools
                         Drinking Straw        Scissors
                         Dowel wood            Sand paper
                                               Tape
Enlarged End View of Plug
Getting the whistle to make a sound without exerting too much force can take some experimenting.
There are three variables that influence it. First, the amount of space (caused by flattening one side of
the dowel) in the mouth piece dowel. Too much space and the whistle won't work, too little and it takes
too much pressure to make a sound.

The second is the position of the mouth piece dowel in the straw. For now place your finger over the left
end of the straw. Try sliding the mouth dowel further inside the straw or move it back towards the end.
Make a small adjustment, then try it again. Position it until it starts making a consistent sound.

Third, determine the length of the straw. Bend the straw at a right angle. The shorter the straw, the
higher the pitch, the longer the straw, the lower the pitch.
Experiment with different lengths until you find one you like.
Then tape the straw in place. You could also cut the end of the
straw off and just place a finger over the end when you blow.

This same process can be used to make a whistle out of wood.




                                                 You can also make a whistle with nothing more than a
                                                 blade of grass. Take a blade of grass about 4 inches
                                                 long and quarter to half an inch wide. You can tear it in
                                                 half the long way if you want. Take the smaller half
                                                 (the one without the center vein), hold it between your
                                                 thumbs as shown in the photo stretching it tight, and
                                                 blow gently. It takes some practice to stretch the
                                                 blade tight so that it makes a good, loud sound. You will
                                       be amazed at how loud it can be!
                                       Whistle using only a blade of Grass




                                    ARTIST
                            PAINTER'S PALETTE TIE SLIDE

                       MATERIALS:

                       SMALL PIECE OF LIGHT BROWN FUN FOAM, SMALL AMOUNTS
                       OF 5 DIFFERENT COLORS OF PAINT, 1 SMALL PAINT BRUSH,
                       1/4" PVC RING.


                       SUPPLIES:
                       SCISSORS, PENCIL, HOT GLUE GUN


INSTRUCTIONS:
  1. TRACE PALETTE PATTERN ON FUN FOAM AND CUT OUT.

  2. PLACE A DOLLOP OF EACH COLOR OF PAINT AROUND THE EDGE OF PALETTE

  3. SHORT PALNT BRUSH BY ABOUT 1 1/2". SAND HANDLE TO LOOK LIKE THE ORIGINAL AND
     PAINT TO MATCH.

  4. INSERT PAINT BRUSH THROUGH THUMB HOLE IN PALETTE AND GLUE IN PLACE.
  5. GLUE PVC RING TO THE BACK.




                              COMMUNICATOR
                                     COMPUTER CHIP TIE SLIDE

                MATERIALS:

                1 1/2" x 1 1/2" SQUARE OF WHITE FUN FOAM & LIGHT WEIGHT
                CARDBOARD, COLORED TELEPHONE WIRE, THIN FLORAL WIRE, SMALL
                COLORED BEADS WITH HOLE IN CENTER, 1/4" PVC RlNG.

                SUPPLIES:

                SCISSORS, TOOTHPICK, HOT GLUE GUN.

INSTRUCTIONS:
  1. CUT FLORAL WIRE INTO 1 1/2" PIECES. THREAD BEADS ONTO FLORAL WIRE LEAVING A
     LITTLE PIECE AT EACH END TO TURN DOWN AND POKE INTO THE FUN FOAM.

  2. TWIST TELEPHONE WIRE AROUND A TOOTHPICK TO FORM SMALL COILS

  3. INSERT COILS AND BEADED WIRE INTO THE FUN FOAM IN ANY ARRANGEMENT YOU
     WISH TO MAKE A COMPUTER CHIP

  4. AFTER FUN FOAM IS COVERED WITH BEADS AND COILS. HOT GLUE THE FUN FOAM ONTO
     THE CARDBOARD FOR ADDED SUPPORT.

  5. HOT GLUE PVC RING TO BACK OF CARDBOARD.



                                  READYMAN
                               FIRST AIDE TIE SLIDE

                                 MATERIALS:

                                 1 WHITE FILM CANISTER, 1 - 3 1/2" x 1 3/4" PIECE
                                 OF WHITE PAPER, 1 - 1/4" PVC RING, AND VARIOUS
                                 1st AIDE SUPPLlES.


                                 SUPPLIES:
                                 RED MARKER, SCISSORS AND HOT GLUE GUN


INSTRUCTIONS:
  1. TRACE RED CROSS PATTERN ONTO CENTER OF PAPER. AND COLOR IN WITH RED MARKER

  2. INSERT PAPER INTO FILM CANISTER SO CROSS SHOWS THROUGH.

  3. PLACE 1ST AIDE ITEMS IN CANISTER. (i.e. BANDAIDE, STERILE WIPE, NEEDLE, THREAD,
     BUTTON, SAFETY PIN, ASPIRIN, 35 CENTS FOR PHONE CALL, ETC)

  4. HOT GLUE PVC RING ON BACK OF CANISTER.

                                           SPORTSMAN
                                         WATER SKI TIE SLIDE

                  MATERIALS:

                  2 CRAFT STICKS, 1 MATCH STICK, 8" OF EMBROIDERY FLOSS, 1 - 1/4"
                  PVC RING


                  SUPPLIES:
       MARKERS, SANDPAPER, HOT GLUE GUN, SCISSORS, AND SOMETHING TO CUT
       CRAFT STICKS WITH.


INSTRUCTIONS:
   1. CUT CRAFT STICKS TO 3" LENGTH.

   2. COLOR CRAFTS STICKS WITH MARKERS IN YOUR OWN DESIGN.

   3. GLUE STICKS TOGETHER IN AN "X"

   4. SEPARATE EMBROIDERY FLOSS INTO TWO THREE STRAND PIECES.

   5. TIE ONE THREE STRAND PIECE INTO A BOW & GLUE ONTO CENTER OF SKIS.

   6. CUT MATCHSTICK INTO A 5/8" PIECE AND GLUE ACROSS THE TWO ENDS OF FLOSS TO
      FORM THE TOW LINE HANDLE.

   7. HOT GLUE PVC RING TO BACK OF SKIS.

Here are some neat slides from Phil Gandron of New York. He's had some fun crafting some
neat slides from ordinary branches, wooden nickels, and metal buttons.
                                                                     Phil created these
                                                                     slides by hollowing
                                                                     out birch branches.
                                                                     He's varnished
                                                                     them, then nailed
                                                                     Scout hiking staff
                                                                     medallions to a few.
                                                                     These could be used
                                                                     to commemorate a
                                                                     hike, campout, or
                                                                     special event. Cool
                                                                     Phil!

                                                                     More branch
                                                                     woggles from Phil's
                                                                     collection. Your
                                                                     Scouts can use
                                                                     different types of
                                                                     wood, with
                                                                     different bark, to
                                                                     remember
                                                                     different
                                                                     adventures.
                                                                         An assortment of
                                                                         Phil's woggles. He
                                                                         fashions loops from
                                                                         the removable
                                                                         plastic strip from
                                                                         those big old water
                                                                         cooler bottles. A
                                                                         staple to create the
                                                                         loop and a little hot
                                                                         glue to secure it to
                                                                         the back of the pin
                                                                         is all it takes to
                                                                         create a neat slide.




Below are even more creative woggles from Gerald Collogan of South Dakota. He'd just finished putting
together his collection for a Cub Scout Pow Wow and shot a roll of film just for us. Look for more of his
fun slides on our Carved Wood Woggle pages. Thanks again Gerald!
Keep it Simple...
Something as simple as a bread bag twist-tie will work in a pinch as a loop. Stay away from metal rings as
they can be pushed, intentionally or by accident, into the boy's neck and hurt. The twist tie alone will do
the job in a pinch, in fact -- a fellow den leader forgot his slide once at a pack meeting and nobody
noticed (not to suggest this is a good option when you have other options). For a nice permanent loop on a
wooden slide, I take a piece of 1x2 or 1x3 and drill holes with a 3/4" bore bit, then cut around the holes
with a jig saw to make nice wooden loops, flat on one side. The boys can sand and hot glue these to the
backs of whatever you have for the slide.
                  --------+-----------+--edge of 1x2---
                           |    _____   |
                           | /3/4" \ | ... repeat for length of wood
                           | | hole| |
                           \ \_____/ /
                             \_________/




Make It Your Own
Get the boys into the habit of making their own slides. Often cheaper and definitely more pride in these
than the stamped metal ones that their folks buy for them with their uniforms. Most of my Bears still
wear the thunderbirds we made last year as Wolves. I've also found that kitchen magnets are ideal fast
slides. They're certainly the right price and size. My local WalMart had a series of wooden decoy models
for $1.50 each which I bought up for my son & I -- pry off the magnet, grip the decoy in a vice and drill
a hole thru it, open at the back. Then an ice cream stick / tongue depressor (available by the ton at
craft stores) was cut to fit & form a backing & hot glued on. Plastic or cast magnets can use the wooden
loop I described above. I have pie plates with a juicy slice cut from the pie, a juke box, a hot dog with
trimmings, a loon, a wood duck, a gramaphone, a steam locomotive, a cast plaster cow skull (that was a
suprise) and even a bar-b-que grill (we have a pack picnic coming up ;-) all made from kitchen magnets.
Kids & adults both love 'em.



                                    Don't Loose That Slide!
                                    Another trick with slides is to make them loss-proof. Nothing's
                                    sadder than a youngster who's lost that slide they made all by
                                    themselves. I know -- at my cub leader basic training I lost a slide
                                    I'd made 30 years before.
                                    Notch that wooden loop in two places where it connects to the back
                                    of the slide.

Now make a loop from a 3.5 - 4 foot length of plastic lace (craft stores again this in spools, for
leathercraft and lanyard braiding projects). Feed the ends of the loop through the notches after the
back is glued onto the slide, leaving at least 18" above the slide loop. string one or more good sized beads
on the ends of the lace and knot them well under the beads. The loop is thus fixed to the slide (and in
fact the slide will now look a lot like a bolo tie).

                Slip the loop around the wearer's neck, feed the neckerchief through the slide and draw
                down the beads to tighten the loop. Now, if the slide comes off the neckerchief, the
                neck loop will keep it from dropping off the wearer. Leather lace works just as well but
                make sure your notches are big enough to handle it.

                After seeing this trick on a purchased slide given to me as a gift, I tried applying it to
                plaque slides my den was going to construct. After seeing how well that went, and now a
year later seeing how many of those boys still wear those slides, I've decided thatany slides I make
from now on with some special meaning to me will have this safety guard feature.
More Quick and Simple Ideas
                                                                    Wooden Cutouts
                                                                    This plaque slide was made from a
                                                                    precut wooden cutout,
                                                                    available at many handicraft stores.
                                                                          "Leather" Raven made from two
                                                                                                 pieces cut
                                                                     a piece of vinyl craft fabric. Slots in
                                                                                               the "wings"
                                                       accept long tabs from the "body" which are drawn
                                                                          back and stapled to form a loop.



A Collection of Slides
The following images depict slides either I, my brother Joel (a 1970's eagle) or my father Dusty have
created over the years or have purchased in our travels.
Note that many of the best slides are from the classic Boys Life column Slide of the Month, by Whitlin'
Jim. This column, a standard all during my years as a cub scout in the mid 1960's, has virtually died out.
It appears infrequently now as a "special feature" (my son's not allowed to see his new Boys Life issues
until I've checked them for Slide of the Month). As late as 1976, BSA sold a reprint on Slide of the
Month which had many of these columns collected into a booklet of about 30 pages, 2 to 3 slides per
page. This apparently stopped when National moved from New Brunswick, NJ to Irving, TX. While talking
to the publications office last fall on another issue, I asked if it was ever going to be done again (a
reprint). Apparently some worthy held on to some of the gallies and proofs, and I was sent a selection of
photocopied pages which were clearly intended to be used as another reprint, but never were. The pages
contained a combination of elements from the 1976 reprint I already had, plus others I had never seen.
Needless to say these will continue to provide ideas and techniques for years to come. Copyright
concerns prohibit me from including them here, but any slide which I actually make one of, I'll include
what details I can paraphrase from the articles.

Of course, any PRESSURE POSSIBLE on National to include that wonderful reprint and new articles like
that on their own web pages, or to release the authorization necessary for me to put them on mine,
would be welcomed. Further, any PRESSURE POSSIBLE on National and the editors of Boys Life to
return Slide of the Month to its former monthly glory would be welcomed even more!


                          Slides made by Joel and Dusty Wilkinson
                                               Nazrat Patrol Block of wood with fake fur
                                               tail, for TLD staff.
                                                                             Leather tubes,
                                                                           tooled or carved
                                                                                 then laced
     up the back, for TLD                                                            camps.
       Incised disk of wood cut from white birch branch, lettering incised into disk. Two holes drilled for
                                                                            plastic lacing to form loop, for
                                                                        Trexler Scout Reservation staff,
                                                                                                      1974.

                                                                       Cast plaster Boy Scout hand signs,
                                                                                      painted and lettered
                                                                          to commemorate various events.
                                                                         Plastic ring set in plaster before
                                                                                                    fully se
                                          to form loop, Pocono District camporees and Den Chief training.



TLD emblem, Wood slab painted
with leather loop, for Minsi Trails
                                                                                 Council TLD event.

                                                                                    Hairy Gnu, Wooden spool
                                                                                                   with white
                                                                                  fur glued on, buttons (sewn
                                                                                                to fur before
                                                                                    gluing) for eyes, for TLD
                                                                                                        staff.



Knot tied/woven from clothesline cord.

                                                     Evergreen Tree jigsawed wood evergreen tree and loop,
                                                                                    tole painted by Dusty.


                       Slides made by J.Lance Wilkinson from Boy's Life Whitlin' Jim (Slide of the
                       Month) articles or reprints.
                       Anvil and Hammer carved from wood, painted and glued, with leather loop.
                                                     Order of the Arrow, jigsawed wood, glued and painted.
                                                                                    4th of July! jigsawed and
  painted wood backing with dowel, sawed in half                                                     and then
  hand broken to leave jagged edges painted and                                      glued to backing to form
 firecracker. Singed cord glued in hole drilled on                                          one end for fuse.




                                                             Native American
                                                     Caricatures jigsawed and
                                                             relief carved and
   painted mousetrap                                            wood. Mahogany stain forAmerind skin tones.


Cow Skull Carved,                     burned and sealed
wood. Loop drilled                    through block before carving.

  Painted                                                                            Turtle Carved and painted
    wood.                                                                      Slot cut in turtle back for loop,
  covered                                                                      with carved and painted leather
  to form                                                                                          top of shell.


Chinese                  Figurine Carved from walnut, gloss finished, script painted on before final gloss coat.
This was a               rather early project that I remember seeming to take forever to carve. Carving
                                weapon of choice at that time was a dremel tool with a dental burr for
                                the bit. Even the loop is walnut.




                                Root Beer Keg Drilled first, then carved from pine, gloss finished, brass
bands formed                     and affixed with brads. Another early project which I'm still very fond
of. No safety                    guard so I always tie the frowned-upon knot under this slide.

    After 30                                                         years, the spout didn't survive my son's
   first time                                                                wearing this one, so the original
 hand carved                                                                  spout has been replaced with a
     new one                                                              formed from fine dowel fragments
                                                                                   carved and glued in place.


                                    Kitchen Magnets
                                    Your neighborhood WalMart, KMart or kitchen supply has a
                                    remarkable number of almost ready-made neckerchief slides.
                                    Removing the magnet is not always necessary. Sometimes some extra
                                    work needs to be done, but most of the time only gluing on the loop is
                                    needed.
I find 3/4" lengths of garden hose to be excellent loop material when hot glued to the back of the slide
artwork, provided the slide artwork itself is not particularly flexible. If the slide artwork is rather
flexible, however, that flexing will tend to break up the hot glue/hose loop combination and you're left
with a hose fragment and some nubbins of hot glue on your neckerchief, with the artwork nowhere to be
                                    found.



                                   Sitting Ducks
These decoys are real wood. I removed the magnets, clamped down the decoys in a vice, and used a 3/4"
drill to dig out a loop in the back of them. I then glued a sawed-off length of craft stick (think tongue
depressor or popcicle stick) across the back of the hole and used a dremel tool to sand off the rough
edges. This loon and wood duck are among my favorites.




                                    Wurlitzer Juke Box

                                    You can almost see the lights flashing on this miniature. Using my
                                    dremel tool and a small cutting wheel, I cut out the bottom and cut a
                                    hole in the top of the solid plastic body to form the loop. I didn't
                                    bother to remove the magnet. When I put on the slide, I tie a knot in
the neckerchief below the slide and then slip the big hole in the bottom over the knot. The knot catches
on the structural support cast inside the model, preventing loss of this beauty.




                     Picnic Fun

                   I did this one about a half hour before a Pack picnic.
                   After removing the magnet (I had to cut this one
                   off), I used hot glue to affix a 3/4" length of garden
hose to the back of the kitchen magnet.




The following section was written by my brother Paul. He is a Scouter in the Clinton Valley Council,
Pontiac, Michigan.)

We live in a fashion-crazed world. Fair or not, the image with which we present ourselves tells everyone
we meet a good deal about our personalities, sensibilities and values. It seems that we can, after all,
judge a book by its cover. It happens all the time.

How we as Scouts and Scouters present ourselves to the world outside of Scouting becomes an
advertisement for Scouting. People will think less of the entire Cub Scout program if the few Scouts
they know are sloppy or unruly. Conversely, if the Scouts they know wear their uniforms and are proud to
wear them, people will think well of entire program, not just a single Scout.

There is nothing that looks as sharp as a den of uniformed Cub Scouts venturing into the public eye. Part
of the reason is the uniformity of the Cub uniform. A group of well-dressed Scouts can appeal to other
boys and act as a recruitment tool. However, most boys of Scouting age like to establish their own sense
of style and that uniformity can, sometimes, be seen as a drawback. How can we, as Cub Scouters, help
these young men develop a sense of individuality while remaining true to the group?

Accessorize!
 And, in Cub Scouting, that means neckerchief slides. Slides, or woggles, come in all sorts of shapes, sizes
 and colors. Some are extremely elaborate while others are the epitome of simplicity. The one thing that
 all hand-made slides have in common? They’re fun to make and wear. A great slide can be made in less
 than an hour, making it the perfect craft for a den meeting. We all know how frequently Cub Scouts lose
 the official BSA-issued slides. How many of us have slipped a wedding ring on our sons’ neckerchiefs and
 hoped to goodness they wouldn’t disappear as well? Well, instead of risking your wedded bliss, teach your
 den how to make slides and they will never again be underdressed at that formal pack ceremony or Blue
 and Gold banquet


 The Slam Dunk
Are any of your Scouts sports enthusiasts? Here’s a good, easy-to-make slide for anybody who likes to dribble.
Materials list:
        1” x 2” luan
        1” x 2” paper (for pattern making)
        2 beverage bottle tamper rings
        1” x 3” citrus bag mesh (white or orange is best)
        coping saw (electric jig saw may be used by adults, only!)
        fine sandpaper
        pencil or fine-point marker
        hot glue gun
        tempra paint with brushes
Take a good, long look at a basketball backboard. Lightly draw the backboard onto the paper with the pencil. You may
want to fold the paper in two and only draw half the backboard. Pay attention to the height and width ratio to make
the “backboard” realistic. Once you’re satisfied with your pattern, cut it out and transfer it to the luan.

Cut the backboard out of the luan. If you have a hobby vise to hold the luan, use it. Using a coping saw is pretty safe
but, for younger Scouts you still may want an adult to do the cutting. Never let a Cub Scout use an electric saw.
Their fingers are too precious and Scouts tend to get too excited about using power tools. That’s a scary combination.

Once the backboard is cut, smooth the front edges with the sandpaper. Use a downward stroke to make sure you don’t
pull the layers of the luan apart. Flip it over and smooth the back edges. Taking the time to smooth out the edges will
give the slide a more “professional” look and feel.

If the slide builder desires, now is the time to paint the backboard. Painting the front is all that is needed. Don’t
forget the black rectangle on the board! It’ll make shooting baskets all that much easier. Either paint one or use a
black marker to draw it on.

Take one of the tamper rings and stretch the mesh around it, hot gluing them together. It doesn’t take much glue to
securely fasten the mesh to the ring. Suddenly, you have a basketball rim and net. Hot glue the unit to the backboard
(wait for the paint to dry, first) just beneath the rectangle you painted or drew on. Align the “rim” so the seam of the
mesh is closest to the board. That will hide it, somewhat.

All that’s left to do is to hot glue a support on the back of the slide.

Optionally, you can find a small (1” diameter or so) toy basketball to glue onto the rim. An orange fuzzy pompom might
work, as well. But take care so the ball doesn’t put too much stress on the glue joint between the rim and board.

Do you prefer glass backboards? You can simulate one by substituting plexi-glass for the luan. However, plexi-glass is
expensive, hard to cut, difficult to paint and potentially sharp-edged. Only an adult should make a plexi-glass
backboard although a Cub Scout can decorate it. Never use real glass for this slide!




                       Hot-glue the mesh onto the tamper ring. Trim off the excess on top.




                       Hot-glue the basket to the backboard. Attach a slide support and start
                       dribbling!

				
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