WELD 122 G.M.A.W. WELDING by ipi11555

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									                          WELD 122: G.M.A.W. WELDING

                             INSTRUCTOR: KEVIN L. RAY
                    OFFICE: HARRY L. CRISP BUILDING/ROOM 103
                   2005 EAST McCORD, CENTRALIA, ILLINOIS 62801
                            WORK PHONE: (618)-545-3406
                             SCHOOL FAX: (618)-532-4983
                              OFF. HR: By Appointment Only
                         DIRECT E-MAIL TO: kray@kaskaskia.edu

Unexcused Absences, bad weather, or other needs:

If you have to miss class please call me that morning, or as early as possible to let me know so
other arrangements can be made to make up any missed quizzes, welding assignments, or
question hand-in assignments. For those of you that don‟t or won‟t call, you‟ll be given two (2)
and only two U.A.‟s (Unexcused Absences) per semester. On the third unexcused absence,
you will be dropped from the program. For those times when the weather will not permit those
students in the far north regions of the district to attend, and an assignment is due, please try to
fax the assignment to the Crisp Building or send it via email. Otherwise, assignments are due as
listed in this syllabus. There will be no use of cell phones during lab, period. No
exceptions.

Cheating Policy: as the semester progresses you may find that working in a study
group, working with a tutor, or utilizing office hours with the instructor will not be
viewed as cheating. Yes, those answers will be similar, but it is not viewed as
cheating. Use of a work-book from a previously graduated class, use of a previous
classes notes, or utilizing any electronic data, quizzes, tests, or notes not solely of
your own creation is cheating and will be dealt with by immediate removal from the
course, and depending upon the severity of the action, removal from the program is
an option too. You’ll be placed on immediate academic probation, not to end until
either you leave the program or graduate. Upon proof presented to the Dean of
Career and Technical Education, you’ll be asked to take a leave of absence from the
class. Should an individual or group be found guilty of the charge for cheating, then
you’ll be asked to leave the course, if not the welding program, immediately.

                                  GRADING BREAKDOWN

                     ATTENDANCE= 50 % OF GRADE
    IN-LAB ASSIGNMENTS, LAB MANUAL, TEXTBOOK FINAL = 50% OF GRADE

  THE DAY THAT A WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT IS LATE IS THE DAY IT WILL
                       NOT BE ACCEPTED




                                                 1
The WELD 122: MIG WELDING program at Kaskaskia College offers both in-district and out of
district students a basic background in gas metal arc welding. A combination of lecture and
extensive hands on laboratory work is provided to encourage students to learn the theory and
procedures for proper use of safety items and safety procedures in the use of MIG welding
operations. Theories and procedures in actual welding situations are also examined: welding on
carbon plate in the flat, horizontal, vertical, and over head positions as examples. This will be done
using a four plate fit up (square groove, butt fit, open root; lap joint; tee plate fit up), a standard tee
plate fit up, and the use of a single-vee joint as well. Emphasis is also placed in the areas of
electrode (spooled wire) identification, selection, machine capabilities, and basic joint set up and
weld out.


                                         Specific Objectives:

1.) Introduce the students to the principles and the theory of welding machinery components and
functions, electrode identification (spooled wire) selection and function.

2.) Stress the required safety and the proper operation/application and procedures with tools,
equipment, and various materials and supplies used in MIG welding operations.

3.) The course will try to familiarize students in how to control the weld pool and the arc during
MIG welding operations.

4.) Provide students with a basic working knowledge of an all position weld using a solid core wire
(i.e. ER-70S-3, or -6) that is .035 in diameter.

5.) Provide enough practical laboratory experience for the student to apply this training in various
gas metal arc-welding situations. This will also include the F.C.A.W. process too.

                             Students must have the following items

Miller Jobsite Tool Bag
Krazy Kap/Welders Cap-with elastic
Jackson Welding Helmet: HSL 100
Tillman Green Cotton Welding Jacket (XL)
Leather sleeved ½ -cape (XL)
14-inch leather bib
Leather chaps 40
Leather welding glove/brown
All leather utility work glove brown/2cuff
Chipping hammer cx-handle
Wire scratch brush w/shoe handle
32-oz. ball peen hammer hvb3214
Center punch 3/16 x 5
Retractable tape 1 x 25 w/blk rub boot
Round soapstone holder
Flat soapstone holder
Hex key set/fold-up: 5/64 - ¼
Hex key set/fold-up: 2mm – 8mm
Mini steel framing square: 8” x 12”


                                                     2
Mig pliers: Welpers
Cold chisel ¼ x 5
Cold chisel ½ x 6
9-1/2” pliers tongue/groove Channellock
14” file: round Bastard
14” file: half-round Bastard-Simonds
Screwdriver slotted: ¼ x 4
Screwdriver Phillips #2 x 7
12” adjustable wrench chrome
Lapco flame retardant work shirt
Carhart cotton brown duck (twill) work pants
All leather work boot




                           OUTLINE FOR WELD 122: MIG WELDING

This outline is to be followed in the order that it is written. Reading assignments, labs, homework,
and quizzes may be added to or excluded from this outline at any time at the instructor‟s
discretion.

                 For the spring of 2010 you‟ll need to purchase the following books:

                             1.) Title: Welding-Principles and Applications
                                          Author: Larry Jeffus
                                              Edition: Sixth
                                 Publishing Company: Thomson/Delmar

            2.) Title: Welding-Principles and Applications, Study Guide and Lab Manual
                    Authors: Larry Jeffus, William Thompson, and Dewayne Roy
                                            Edition: Sixth
                               Publishing Company: Thomson/Delmar


1.)     Read the Jeffus textbook: Chapter 10, pp. 222-246, by Friday, January 15th, 2010.
        Answer the questions in the Jeffus lab manual for Chapter 10. The lab manual pages
        are pp. 167-170; this assignment is due on Friday, March 5 th , 2010.

2.)     Lecture/lab: set up of the GMAW equipment. Read the Jeffus textbook, Chapter 11,
        pages 249-251, by Saturday, January 23rd, 2010, stop reading at practice section 11-2.

3.)     Lecture/lab: set up and threading of the GMAW wire into the equipment. Read the
        Jeffus textbook, Chapter 11, pages 251-254. Stop reading at the yellow/black caution
        flag in the text, lower left hand side of page 254. This should also be read by Saturday,
        January 23rd, 2010.

4.)     Lecture/lab: learning the gas density and flow rates along with the current setting (arc-
        voltage and amperage characteristics) on the GMAW equipment through textbook reading


                                                   3
          and hands-on-experience in the lab. Read the Jeffus textbook, pages 254-257:
          “Experiment 11-1: Setting gas flow rate and Experiment11-2: Setting the Current”. This
          should be read by Saturday, February 6th, 2010.

 5.)      Lecture/lab: electrode extension. Read the Jeffus textbook, pages 257-258. This
          includes Experiment 11-3: “Electrode extension” on page 258. This too should be read
          by Saturday, February 6th, 2010.

 6.)       Finish reading the Jeffus textbook, Chapter 11, pages 258-279. This should be done by
        Saturday, February 13th, 2010. Read from the Jeffus lab manual pages 173-177 before going
        on to answer the Chapter 11 lab manual questions. All questions in the Jeffus lab manual,
        pp. 227-230, are to be answered. This assignment will be due Friday, March 5 th, 2010.

 7.) Read the Jeffus textbook: Chapter 12, pp. 281-301, by Saturday, February 13th, 2010.
     Answer the questions in the Jeffus lab manual for Chapter 12. The lab manual pages are
     pp. 231-236; this assignment is due on Friday, March 5 th, 2010.

 8.) Read the Jeffus textbook: Chapter 13, pp. 302-342, by Saturday, February 20th, 2010.
     Make sure and read and understand the following pages out of the Jeffus lab manual for
     flux-cored arc welding parameters on pages 237-240. Answer the questions in the Jeffus
     lab manual for Chapter 13. The lab manual pages are pp. 308-309; this assignment is due
     on Friday, March 5 th, 2010.


9.)       Answer the Chapter 10 questions-Jeffus textbook, page 247, questions 1-29. This
          assignment will be due on Friday, March 5 th, 2010.
10.)      Question number 6 you must use table 10-3 to answer properly; question number
          15 you must use figure 10-11 to answer properly. Please make sure to single space
          between all sentences and to double space between your answers so that I can have
          room to write a correction. All answers for the textbook questions must be typed. They
          should be submitted on a thumb-drive (also known as a “smart-stick”), written in
          Microsoft Word and done in Times New Roman font. No handwritten papers will be
          accepted. NO EXCEPTIONS!

       11.) Answer the Chapter 11 questions-Jeffus textbook, page 280, questions 1-26. This
           assignment will also be due on Friday, March 5 th, 2010. Please make sure to single
           space between all sentences and to double space in order to separate between your
           answers so that I can have room to write a correction. All answers for the textbook
           questions must be typed. They should be submitted on a thumb-drive (also known as a
           “smart-stick”), written in Microsoft Word and done in Times New Roman font. No
           handwritten papers will be accepted. NO EXCEPTIONS!

12.)     Answer the Chapter 12 questions-Jeffus textbook, page 301, questions 1-34. This
assignment will also be due on Friday, March 5 th, 2010. Please make sure to single space
between all sentences and to double space in order to separate between your answers so
that I can have room to write a correction. All answers for the textbook questions must be typed.


                                                 4
They should be submitted on a thumb-drive (also known as a “smart-stick”), written in Microsoft
Word and done in Times New Roman font. No handwritten papers will be accepted. NO
EXCEPTIONS!

13.)     Answer the Chapter 13 questions-Jeffus textbook, page 342, questions 1-27. This
assignment will also be due on Friday, March 5 th, 2010. Please make sure to single space
between all sentences and to double space in order to separate between your answers so
that I can have room to write a correction. All answers for the textbook questions must be typed.
They should be submitted on a thumb-drive (also known as a “smart-stick”), written in Microsoft
Word and done in Times New Roman font. No handwritten papers will be accepted. NO
EXCEPTIONS!

These last assignments are your textbook final. This final must have a cover sheet that has
your class listing (e.g. WELD 122: MIG WELDING), your full name, correct home mailing
address, and your home phone number written on this cover page. This is so that the diskette or
the CD-RW can be mailed back to you. Please make sure that you single space between
sentences and that you double space between an answer and the next question so that I
can have room to write a correction if it has to be made. During the semester you will have
questions about how to answer some of the questions in the lab manual. Utilize all the office hour
time you need (please remember to set an appointment first) to ask me for help in locating some
of the answers in the textbook reading; especially during the semester when you are working on
the lab manual questions. You will need it. Work on finding the answer yourself, and then ask a
fellow classmate if they want to work with you in a study group; then if all else fail, ask the
instructor. This will be the same advice for you on the final as well.

        All of the above reading assignments should be completed in compliance with the
written questions and their due dates as listed.

All welding assignments will need to pass the visual criteria set up by the American Welding
Society‟s (A.W.S.) visual inspection program. This means that all welds must have a
minimum of the following:
                                             (No) under fill.
                                             (No) undercut.
                                              (No) porosity.
                                         (No) excessive lapping.
                                          (No) excessive piling.
All tie-ins on the edges of a lap joint, or a tee-plate, must be complete. This includes the edges of
             welds to another weld when making a pad of beads, regardless of position.

There are approximately 80 days that can be used for this open entry/open exit course. There
will only be 32 days for those of you attending in the evenings and a perfect attendance is
the only way to finish all in-lab assignments if you are an evening student. If the welding
instructor is granted his overload, then those students planning on attending in the evenings will
have three hours per visit. You‟ll need every one of those hours. I strongly recommend that
you plan on attending at least 36 to 54 days, at a minimum of three hours per visit if you are a
daytime student. The main reason behind this is that there are approximately 49 in-lab
assignments that are due in this course for the semester. It will take time to learn how to do


                                                  5
them, and to do them correctly. The more errors a student has in his/her finished welding
assignment the lower the letter grade. No grade below a “C” will be accepted for a completed
welding assignment. One to two errors will keep the assignment at an “A”. Two to four errors
will keep the assignment at a “B” level. Four to five errors (depending on the severity of the
mistake) usually will keep a grade of “C”. Severity of a given error could keep a welded
assignment from even getting an “A” grade, even when it may be the only single error on the
welded piece. An explanation of any given assignment usually happens right when it is handed in
for grading. The instructor does his best to grade all in lab assignments after completion. This
keeps the student from guessing, and the instructor from losing track of whom did what, and
when.


           The lab hours for the spring semester are as follows (unless overload is granted):

                        Mondays and Wednesdays: 1000-1500 hours.
                   Tuesdays and Thursdays (mornings): 1000-1200 hours.
 Lab will be open with instructor Mr. Chris Austin from 1600 hours to 1900 hours on Tuesday
                          and Thursday afternoons and early evenings.

                          Fridays: 0800-1530 hours. (If overload is granted!)

                 Days that the lab will be closed during the spring semester of 2010:

                         Monday, January 18th, 2010: M.L. King Day.
                        Monday, February 15th, 2010: President‟s Day.
                 Tuesday, February 16th, 2010: Faculty/Staff Workshop Day.
            Monday through Saturday, March 8th-13th, 2010: Spring Break.
                    Thursday, April 1st, 2010: Faculty/Staff Workshop Day.
  Friday, April 2nd and Saturday, April 3rd, 2010: Spring Holiday (Good Friday) and Campus
                                          wide closing.


11.)       How-to properly create a pad of beads in the flat position. This is a lab assignment.
           Please use either 1/8th or 3/32” thick material for this assignment. Proper current
           selection, setting the amperage (through the wire feed unit), electrode extension, welding
           gun angle, and the use of either a „drag‟ or „push‟ technique will be expected of the
           student after in lab discussion and demonstration.


       12.) Square groove, open root, butt-fit in the flat position. This weld-joint design is used in
           order to familiarize the welding student with the parameters of voltage, wire feed rate,
           electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel in one order of operation. The welding
           student will weld this open root design with a minimum of flush or maximum of 1/8” drop
           through on the backside of this open root plate. There can be no discontinuities or flaws




                                                    6
    on either side of the plate that can be interpreted as defects according to the guidelines of
    the American Welding Societies visual inspection criteria.

13.) The next order of welding operations that the student will learn is the lap joint in the fillit
    position. This particular joint design will have at a maximum only ¼” of overlap for the
    top plate over the bottom plate. Once again, the parameters of voltage, wire feed rate,
    and the rate of travel will have to be modified, along with electrode extension, and gun
    angle in order to properly weld this joint. Along the joint to be welded there can be no
    dross from plasma cutting, no residual burr from any grinding needed to square up the
    edge to be welded, or paint, grease, oil, dirt, grit, or grime can be along this edge prior to
    welding operations occurring.

14.) The next joint design to be welded in the fillit position is that of the Tee-plate design. This
    plate fit up will require that one plate act as a spine as it sits directly down the middle of
    another plate acting as the base plate for the two. Again, the welding voltage, wire feed
    rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will determine the success of the
    student when welding up this particular joint design. The student will then be asked to
    place the same Tee-plate design at a 45-degree angle in order to weld the spine and base
    plate in the flat position. Once again the parameters of welding voltage, wire feed rate,
    electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will have to change in order for this
    design to be welded correctly.

15.) 4-plate weld test: fit up. The square groove, open root, butt fit, lap joint, and a tee plate
    fit up make up the three welded joints in this design. Understand that it will take four
    plates though to make up the three welds required. Once the open root, lap joint, and tee
    plate fit up have been welded they must then pass the visual inspection of the instructor,
    while in the fillet and flat positions. All three joint designs are graded, and the average of
    the three is what the student will then receive as his/her grade for this small welding test.
    Then the student can move on to the next set of operations. Each student will be required
    to practice running an open root first, master it; then run a lap joint to visual criteria, and
    then practice the tee-plate to acceptable visual criteria before the 4 plate fit up is
    attempted for grade. Once the student starts the four-plate test there is no do-over. It is
    either correct of it is in the dumpster with no grade!

16.) How to create a horizontal pad of beads . Material thickness will again be either 1/8”
    or 3/32” thick material. Proper current selection, setting the amperage (through the wire
    feed unit), electrode extension, welding gun angle, and the use of „push‟ technique will be
    expected of the student after in lab discussion and demonstration.
    This will be a necessary part of the programs welding in order to give the student a
    working idea of what the welding process can do in out of position welding.

17.) Square groove, open root, butt-fit in the horizontal position. This weld-joint design is used
    in order to familiarize the welding student with another change to the parameters of
    voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel in one order of
    operation. The welding student will weld this open root design with a minimum of flush or
    maximum of 1/8” drop through on the backside of this open root plate. There can be no




                                                7
    discontinuities or flaws on either side of the plate that can be interpreted as defects
    according to the guidelines of the American Welding Societies visual inspection criteria.

18.) The next order of welding operations that the student will learn is the lap joint in the
    horizontal position. This particular joint design will have at a maximum only ¼” of overlap
    for the top plate over the bottom plate as they sit in the horizontal position. Once again,
    the parameters of voltage, wire feed rate, and the rate of travel will have to be modified,
    along with electrode extension, and gun angle in order to properly weld this joint. Along
    the joint to be welded there can be no dross from plasma cutting, no residual burr from
    any grinding needed to square up the edge to be welded, or paint, grease, oil, dirt, grit, or
    grime can be along this edge prior to welding operations occurring.

19.) The next joint design to be welded in the horizontal position is that of the Tee-plate
    design. This plate fit up will require that one plate act as a spine as it sits directly down
    the middle of another plate acting as the base plate for the two. Again, the welding
    voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will determine
    the success of the student when welding up this particular joint design. The student will
    then be asked to place the same Tee-plate design at a 45-degree angle in order to weld
    into the “sparrow‟s mouth”. The spine is tacked off to a wrist that will be on a swing
    arm that is connected to a vertical upright post that is connected to the welding table in the
    lab booth. Understand that the base plate can also be tacked off to the wrist in order to
    produce the required “birds mouth” needed to weld the Tee-plate in the horizontal
    position. Once again the parameters of welding voltage, wire feed rate, electrode
    extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will have to change in order for this design to be
    welded correctly.

20.) 4-plate fit up: square groove, open root, butt fit; lap joint fit up, and a tee plate fit up.
    Once the open root, lap joint, and tee plate fit up can pass the visual inspection of the
    instructor, while in the horizontal position, then the student can move on to the next set of
    operations. As stated in the fillet and flat description, an open root, a lap joint, and then a
    tee-plate, ran on scrap practice material, is recommended first before doing the graded
    work required for grade and according to the A.W.S. visual code. This weld test must be
    accomplished first, in the horizontal position, before moving on to the next welding
    assignment. Understand that this test is a one-time event. No do-over! You get what
    you earn.

21.) How to create a vertical down /vertical up pad of beads . Material thickness will
    again be 1/8” to 3/32” thick. Again, these positions of welding are to help the student
    develop the needed eye to hand coordination to involve the five basics of welding with the
    G.M.A.W. process: know your electrode selection, know your heat input (your voltage to
    wire feed settings), your electrode extension (how far away is the wire from the nozzle
    during welding operations), gun angle during welding, and last but not least-your rate of
    travel. How fast does one go during welding either from the left to the right, or from the
    bottom to the top while welding? That‟s what the pad of beads is all about. Figuring out
    parameters prior to welding up the given joint designs for grade.




                                               8
22.) Square groove, open root, butt-fit in the vertical down position. This weld-joint design is
    used in order to familiarize the welding student with another change to the parameters of
    voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel in one order of
    operation. The welding student will weld this open root design with a minimum of flush or
    maximum of 1/8” drop through on the backside of this open root plate. There can be no
    discontinuities or flaws on either side of the plate that can be interpreted as defects
    according to the guidelines of the American Welding Societies visual inspection criteria.

23.) The next order of welding operations that the student will learn is the lap joint in the
    vertical down position. This particular joint design will have at a maximum only ¼” of
    overlap for the top plate over the bottom plate. Understand that the joint design will be in
    the vertical position. Once again, the parameters of voltage, wire feed rate, and the rate
    of travel will have to be modified, along with electrode extension, and gun angle in order to
    properly weld this joint. Along the joint to be welded there can be no dross from plasma
    cutting, no residual burr from any grinding needed to square up the edge to be welded, or
    paint, grease, oil, dirt, grit, or grime can be along this edge prior to welding operations
    occurring.

24.) The next joint design to be welded in the vertical down position is that of the Tee-plate
    design. This plate fit up will require that one plate act as a spine as it sits directly down
    the middle of another plate acting as the base plate for the two. Again, the welding
    voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will determine
    the success of the student when welding up this particular joint design. The student will
    then be asked to place the same Tee-plate design at a 45-degree angle in order to weld
    into the “sparrow‟s mouth”. The spine is tacked off to a wrist that will be on a swing
    arm that is connected to a vertical upright post that is connected to the welding table in the
    lab booth. Understand that the base plate can also be tacked off to the wrist in order to
    produce the required “birds mouth” needed to weld the Tee-plate in the vertical down
    position. Once again the parameters of welding voltage, wire feed rate, electrode
    extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will have to change in order for this design to be
    welded correctly.

25.) 4-plate fit up: square groove, open root, butt fit, lap joint fit up, and a tee plate fit up.
    Once the open root, lap joint, and tee plate fit up can pass the visual inspection of the
    instructor, while in the vertical down positions, then the student can move on to the next
    set of operations. As previously stated with the other four plate fit ups, the student had
    better practice on some scrap before trying the actual test. All three joint designs are
    graded, and the average of the three is what the student will then receive as his/her grade
    for this small welding test.

26.) Square groove, open root, butt-fit in the vertical up position. This weld-joint design is
    used in order to familiarize the welding student with another change to the parameters of
    voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel in one order of
    operation. The welding student will weld this open root design with a minimum of flush or
    maximum of 1/8” drop through on the backside of this open root plate. There can be no
    discontinuities or flaws on either side of the plate that can be interpreted as defects
    according to the guidelines of the American Welding Societies visual inspection criteria.



                                              9
27.) The next order of welding operations that the student will learn is the lap joint in the
    vertical up position. This particular joint design will have at a maximum only ¼” of
    overlap for the top plate over the bottom plate. Understand that the joint design will be in
    the vertical position. Once again, the parameters of voltage, wire feed rate, and the rate
    of travel will have to be modified, along with electrode extension, and gun angle in order to
    properly weld this joint. Along the joint to be welded there can be no dross from plasma
    cutting, no residual burr from any grinding needed to square up the edge to be welded, or
    paint, grease, oil, dirt, grit, or grime can be along this edge prior to welding operations
    occurring.

28.) The next joint design to be welded in the vertical up position is that of the Tee-plate
    design. This plate fit up will require that one plate act as a spine as it sits directly down
    the middle of another plate acting as the base plate for the two. Again, the welding
    voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will determine
    the success of the student when welding up this particular joint design. The student will
    then be asked to place the same Tee-plate design at a 45-degree angle in order to weld
    into the “sparrow‟s mouth”. The spine is tacked off to a wrist that will be on a swing
    arm that is connected to a vertical upright post that is connected to the welding table in the
    lab booth. Understand that the base plate can also be tacked off to the wrist in order to
    produce the required “birds mouth” needed to weld the Tee-plate in the vertical up
    position. Once again the parameters of welding voltage, wire feed rate, electrode
    extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will have to change in order for this design to be
    welded correctly.

29.) 4-plate fit up: square groove, open root, butt fit, lap joint fit up, and a tee plate fit up.
    Once the open root, lap joint, and tee plate fit up can pass the visual inspection of the
    instructor, while in the vertical up positions, then the student can move on to the next set
    of operations. As previously stated with the other four plate fit ups, the student had better
    practice on some scrap before trying the actual test. All three joint designs are graded,
    and the average of the three is what the student will then receive as his/her grade for this
    small welding test.

30.) Over head run, pad of beads. Material thickness will once again be 1/8” to 3/32” thick.
    Again, this welding position is used in order to allow the student the needed practice to
    discover how to adjust the voltage to wire feed ratio in order to operate the short arc
    transfer of the G.M.A.W. welding process. If the student can also understand how the
    electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel also plays a part in the overhead position
    he/she will have a much easier time when moving onto the plate operations.

31.) Square groove, open root, butt-fit in the overhead position. This weld-joint design is used
    in order to familiarize the welding student with another change to the parameters of
    voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel in one order of
    operation. The welding student will weld this open root design with a minimum of flush or
    maximum of 1/8” push-through on the backside of this open root plate. There can be no
    discontinuities or flaws on either side of the plate that can be interpreted as defects
    according to the guidelines of the American Welding Societies visual inspection criteria.




                                              10
       32.) The next order of welding operations that the student will learn is the lap joint in the
           overhead position. This particular joint design will have at a maximum only ¼” of overlap
           for the top plate over the bottom plate. Understand that the joint design will be in the
           overhead position. Once again, the parameters of voltage, wire feed rate, and the rate of
           travel will have to be modified, along with electrode extension, and gun angle in order to
           properly weld this joint. Along the joint to be welded there can be no dross from plasma
           cutting, no residual burr from any grinding needed to square up the edge to be welded, or
           paint, grease, oil, dirt, grit, or grime can be along this edge prior to welding operations
           occurring.

       33.) The next joint design to be welded in the overhead position is that of the Tee-plate design.
           This plate fit up will require that one plate act as a spine as it sits directly down the middle
           of another plate acting as the base plate for the two. Again, the welding voltage, wire
           feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle, and rate of travel will determine the success of
           the student when welding up this particular joint design. The student will then be asked to
           place the same Tee-plate design at a 45-degree angle in order to weld up and into the
           “sparrow‟s mouth”. The spine is tacked off to a wrist that will be on a swing arm that is
           connected to a vertical upright post that is connected to the welding table in the lab booth.
           Understand that the base plate can also be tacked off to the wrist in order to produce the
           required “birds mouth” needed to weld the Tee-plate in the overhead position. Once
           again the parameters of welding voltage, wire feed rate, electrode extension, gun angle,
           and rate of travel will have to change in order for this design to be welded correctly.

       34.) 4-plate fit up: square groove, open root, butt fit, lap joint fit up, and a tee plate fit up.
           Once the open root, lap joint, and tee plate fit up can pass the visual inspection of the
           instructor, while in the overhead positions, then the student can move on to the next set of
           operations. As previously stated with the other four plate fit ups, the student had better
           practice on some scrap before trying the actual test. All three joint designs are graded,
           and the average of the three is what the student will then receive as his/her grade for this
           small welding test.

                                    Material thickness must be 1/4"

35.)       T-plate, 10 count-multiple beads, fillit position.
36.)       T-plate, 10 count-multiple beads, flat position.
37.)       T-plate, 10 count-multiple beads, true horizontal (positioned with the „vee‟ or the
           „sparrow‟s mouth‟ at eye level) position.
38.)       T-plate, 10 count-multiple beads, vertical up position.
39.)       T-plate, 10 count-multiple beads, overhead position.


                                    Material thickness must be 3/8"

40.)       Single vee, open root, butt fit w/land, flat position and butterflied, guided bend test plate.
41.)       Single vee, open root, butt fit w/land, horizontal position and butterflied, guided bend test
           plate.




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42.)    Sing vee, open root, butt fit w/land, vertical up position and butterflied, guided bend test
        plate.
43.)    Single vee, open root, butt fit w/land, over head position and butterflied, guided bend test
        plate.


Even though this outline does not list all 135 lab assignments, rest assured that you will have that
many for your final lab total. Students that are exceptional, and have time at the end of the
semester to do more, will be given the opportunity to learn how to weld with the Millermatic 30A
for aluminum Mig welding. Those that do not want to learn this will be given the chance to learn
how to run flux-cored wire to A.W.S. code. This will give the more motivated students the
opportunity to earn a welding qualification certification. This test will be a proctored exam, and it
is a welding test (physical) that will have a certified welding inspector making all the calls during
the exam. Students will learn how to set up a proper welding test plate according to code
guidelines, how to weld it, carbon air arc it, properly clean the C.A.C. gouge, then layout the plate
for the proper coupons to be stripped out from the test plate after welding. A destructively guided
bend test will then be done to the coupons and the C.W.I. will interpret the results for either a
“pass” or “fail” result. This flux-cored (F.C.A.W. /G.M.A.W.) test will be run sometime during
“finals week” in May. This should be May 12th, 2010.




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