Implementing Your SRA Program Logic Document The Why and by elizabethberkley

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									Rural Health Leaders Development Conference
Southern Rural Access Autumn Meeting
Charleston, South Carolina
November 1, 2000




   Implementing Your SRA
  Program Logic Document:
    The Why and How of Constructing a
             Program Logic


                           Amy Brock
                          Don Pathman
         Introduction
   Who we are
   Purpose of this session
        Describe program logic grids and their role in SRA
        Review how to construct them
        Advice from South Carolina
        Group brain-storming and Q and A
    Who are you?
        Program Logic Models Grid

   Text that spells out the thinking or logic behind
    a program.
   Its key elements are:
       It explicitly lays out selected aspects of the program
       It presents information on the underlying rationale for the
        program, ie, what is to be done to achieve what ends
       It is used for planning, management, and/or evaluation
       Its contents and format are chosen to fit the program and its
        intended uses and users
Program Logic Grid for SRA
  Program Logic Grid for SRA

Example:

Alabama’s Healthy Communities
Capacity Building Technical
Assistance Team (TAT)


           (See handout)
        Hints in Preparing SRA
        Program Logics

   Component Description
       Describe the key activities, staff/players, and
        participants (what/where/how/who)
       Shouldn’t be long or detailed, but detailed enough for
        the uninformed reader to understand the activity
   Measurable Process Objectives
       List few key tasks, steps or milestones in the planning
        and execution of the program
       Give explicit target dates for task completion
       Keep it simple and easily measurable
          Hints Continued . . .

   Measurable Outcome Objectives
       List a few measurable outcomes, specifically things
        that can be documented by physical products, counts,
        reportable achievements, and demonstrations of
        participants’ new skills, attitudes and behaviors
       Don’t shy away from targets. State what you want to
        accomplish and the evidence you will gather to show
        you’ve done it
       Give explicit target dates
        Hints Continued . . .

   Programmatic Goals
       One or two sentences stating health or
        health care service availability goals of the
        component. It can include a brief
        restatement of the program’s activities
         Program Logic Grids for
         Planning and Evaluation
   Addresses 6 of the 12 Golden Rules of Project
    Management
       Thou Shalt Gain Consensus on Project Outcomes
       Thou Shalt Develop a Comprehensive, Viable Plan and
        Keep It Up-to-Date
       Thou Shalt Have a Realistic Schedule
       Thou Shalt Not Try to Do More Than Can Be Done
       Thou Shalt Gain the Formal and Ongoing Support of
        Management and Stakeholders
       Thou Must Keep People Informed of What You’re Up To
       Use of Program Logic
       Grids in SRA

   States asked for a way to report their unique
    accomplishments to the SRA evaluation team.
   Makes SRA effort and goals explicit for lead
    agencies, sub-contracting agencies, the NPO,
    and the evaluators. Assists communication
    and setting shared expectations.
   Incorporated into quarterly reports to be used
    by both the NPO and evaluation team.
The South Carolina Experience

   Orienting Framework
   Overview of the Process
   Lessons Learned
   From Table to Progress Report
You never have to recover
from a good start.



        Anonymous
    Orienting Framework

   Empowerment Evaluation
       Those implementing the project must have
        ownership of the evaluation process
       Every participant must be an equal partner in
        the evaluation process
       Evaluation must begin on the “frontline” with
        buy-in from all participants
When you’re through changing,
you’re through changing.



         Bruce Barton
     Negotiation Process
   Lead Agency to Contractors
       accountability
                                                    SCSORH
       contract negotiation
       expectation clarification

   Lead Agency to Sheps Center
       suggestions for revision
       clarification of programmatic
        activities
       mapping & monitoring assistance   Sheps Center     Contractors
   Lead Agency to NPO
       benchmark approval
                                                         NPO
   NPO to Sheps Center
       additional consultation
You must have long-range goals
to keep you from being
frustrated by short-range
failures.

        Charles C. Noble
     Lessons Learned
   Writing objectives…there is an art AND a
    science.
   Clarifying definitions…what’s “process” to you
    may be an “outcome” to them.
   Establishing benchmarks…don’t bite off more
    than you can chew AND, keep your goals in
    sight.
   Making time…no matter how long you think it
    will take, it will take longer!
Most of us must learn a great
deal every day in order to keep
ahead of what we forgot.


         Frank A. Clark
    From Table to Progress Report

   Report Card vs. Fluid Document
       using the Program Logic to “keep score” of progress
       structuring the Program Logic so that it is amenable
        to change and is meaningful to the programs
   Anectdotal vs. Concrete Evidence
       capturing and reporting evidence that directly
        supports the progress of the projects
       using the anecdotal information to support
        development of program models and frameworks
It’s lonely at the top…so you’d
better know why you’re there.


          John Maxwell
    Uniform Outcome Objectives

   Revolving loans:
       # of loans; $ value of loans

   R and R initiatives:
       Provider counts (6 states)

   Practice management technical assistance
    given in one-on-one format
       # of practices/providers given technical assistance
       assessments of its usefulness by recipients
    Uniform Outcome Objectives
    Continued…
   Network activities
       Evidence of commitment of network partners,
        e.g., financial commitments
       Evidence of permanence and expansion of
        networks
   Rural health leader training
       # of participants
       Participants’ rating of the programs and their
        leadership skill acquisition
Loose Ends


Now how can we help?

What did we overlook?

What can we clarify?

								
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