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					                                       11th Grade: US History & Geography
                                                    Ms. Gregory, Rm 143
                                                         513-2913
                                           http://roadrunner-ush.wikispaces.com/

Course Description:
    Students in grade eleven study the major turning points in American history in the twentieth century. Following a
       review of the nation's beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals, students build upon
       the tenth grade study of global industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a
       corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects. They trace the change in the ethnic composition of
       American society; the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United
       States as a major world power. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal
       courts as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. Students consider the major social
       problems of our time and trace their causes in historical events. They learn that the United States has served as a
       model for other nations and that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are not accidents, but the results of a defined set of
       political principles that are not always basic to citizens of other countries. Students understand that our rights under
       the U.S. Constitution are a precious inheritance that depends on an educated citizenry for their preservation and
       protection.

Course Objectives:
    This course will closely follow the California Standards. Please refer to the California Standards as indicated in your
       textbook on pages xxxi – xxxvii.

Materials:
    The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century, McDougal Littell, California Edition, 2006
    Supplemental textbook materials provided by the social studies department
    Various other handouts and readings provided by Ms. Gregory

Class Policies:
     All homework is due at the start of class. Late work = half of earned credit.
     If you are absent, it is your responsibility to find out what you missed. You have as many days as you were absent to
        make up the work. This only applies to excused absences.
     If there is a quiz given on the day that you miss, you must make it up. Those points can make a difference.
     Make up times for tests and quizzes are Tuesdays before school or at lunch.
     It is strongly suggested that you obtain phone numbers from a number of your classmates. This can help student
        success in a number of ways.
     After being absent, it is your responsibility to bring any due homework up to me! It is not my responsibility to ask you
        for it. It is due at the very start of class.
     Any homework that is not passed in on time due to an unexcused absence or tardy will receive a 0.
     You will be responsible for keeping a notebook for each grading period. It will have all your work for the grading
        period as well as the semester-long assignment of the class glossary.

Grading:
    Here is the grading scale: 90-100= A; 80-89=B; 70-79=C; 55-69=D; 0-54=F.
    Here are the requirements and their weights:
                      30% = Tests                40% = Classwork/Homework/Writing Assignments
                      10% = Quizzes              20% = Notebooks

Behavioral Expectations – The Three R’s: RESPECT / RESPONSIBILITY / REALIZATION

How long have you been in school now? Please don’t tell me that you don’t know how to properly behave in a classroom! Do
you really need another list of classroom rules? I myself have been in school a mere 45 years and have long known that there is
only one rule necessary to a well-run classroom: Understand and practice RESPECT.


RESPECT: ___________________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSIBILITY: ___________________________________________________________________________________

REALIZATION: ______________________________________________________________________________________
                                                                                                                                  1
Topics and Corresponding California Standards:
1) Exploration and the Colonial Era (11.1; 11.3.1; 11.3.2)

2) Revolution and the Early Republic (11.1.1; 11.1.2; 11.8.4; 11.1.2; 11.5.4; 11.10.7; 11.11.3; 11.3.5; 11.1.3; 11.2.2)

3) The Growth of a Young Nation (11.2.3; 11.1.2; 11.2.1; 11.10.2; 11.3.3; 11.2.2; 11.2.6; 11.5.6; 11.8.7; 11.3.2; 11.10.7)

4) The Union in Peril (11.1.4; 11.10.2; 11.1.4; 11.2.2; 11.5.2)

5) Changes on the Western Frontier (11.1.4; 11.2.6; 11.1.4; 11.2.2; 11.5.2)

6) A New Industrial Age (11.1.4; 11.2.1; 11.2.2; 11.2.6; 11.2.9; 11.5.7; 11.2.5; 11.2.27)

7) Immigrants and Urbanization (11.2.2; 11.2.3; 11.3.3; 11.11.7; 11.1.4; 11.2.7; 11.3.2; 11.2.4)

8) Life at the Turn of the 20th Century (11.2.2; 11.2.3; 11.3.3; 11.11.7; 11.1.4; 11.2.7; 11.3.2; 11.2.4)

9) The Progressive Era (11.2.4; 11.2.7; 11.2.9; 11.3.2; 11.5.3; 11.8.7; 11.2.1; 11.2.6; 11.5.2; 11.8.6; 11.10.7; 11.2.9; 11.4.4;
        11.11.5; 11.1.4; 11.2.5; 11.5.4; 11.6.5)

10) America Claims and Empire (11.4.2; 11.4.1; 11.2.9; 11.4.3)

11) The First World War (11.2.6; 11.4.5; 11.7.6; 11.10.5; 11.10.7; 11.4.4; 11.5.6; 11.9.3)

12) Politics of the Roaming Twenties (11.5.1; 11.5.2; 11.6.5; 11.8.2; 11.5.4; 11.5.7; 11.6.1; 11.6.2; 11.8.7)

13) The Roaring Life of the 1920s (11.2.2; 11.2.7; 11.3.2; 11.5.3; 11.5.4; 11.5.5; 11.5.6; 11.5.7; 11.5.2)

14) The Great Depression Begins (11.5.1; 11.6.1; 11.6.2; 11.6.3)

15) The New Deal (11.6.2; 11.6.4; 11.6.3; 11.6.5; 11.5.4; 11.10.5; 11.5.5; 11.5.6; 11.8.6; 11.7.6)

16) World War Looms (11.7.1; 11.7.5; 11.7.4; 11.7.6)

17) The United States in World War II (11.5.6; 11.7.3; 11.7.5; 11.11.3; 11.7.2; 11.10.1; 11.7.6; 11.7.7; 11.8.7; 11.10.4;
        11.10.5)

18) Cold War Conflicts (11.4.6; 11.7.8; 11.8.5; 11.9.1; 11.9.2; 11.9.3; 11.8.7; 11.11.14; 11.9.6)

19) The Postwar Boom (11.7.8; 11.8.1; 11.8.3; 11.8.4; 11.10.1; 11.11.2; 11.8.7; 11.10.7; 11.11.7; 11.2.2; 11.5.6; 11.8.; 11.8.2;
        11.116)

20) The New Frontier and the Great Society (11.3.3; 11.8.5; 11.9.3; 11.10.4; 11.8.2; 11.8.4; 11.9.7; 11.11.1; 11.11.12; 11.11.6;
        11.8.4; 11.10.6)

21) Civil Rights (11.3.1; 11.10.1; 11.10.2; 11.10.4; 11.10.5; 11.10.6; 11.1.2; 11.3.1; 11.10.3; 11.10.3; 11.10.4; 11.10.5)

22) The Vietnam War Years (11.9.3; 11.9.4; 11.8.8)

23) An Era of Social Change (11.6.5; 11.8.2; 11.10.5; 11.11.1; 11.10.7; 11.11.3; 11.5.6; 11.8.8)

24) An Age of Limits (11.9.3; 11.10.2; 11.11.2; 11.8.7; 11.8.8; 11.11.4; 11.4.3; 11.9.6; 11.10.3; 11.5.6; 11.8.6; 11.11.5)

25) The Conservative Tide (11.3.1; 11.3.2; 11.9.5; 11.8.4; 11.8.6; 11.11.2; 11.8.2; 11.10.5; 11.10.6; 11.11.3; 11.11.6; 11.9.3;
        11.9.6)

26) The United States in Today’s World (11.8.4; 11.9.1; 11.9.6; 11.9.7; 11.11.6; 11.8.7; 11.9.1; 11.9.7; 11.11.6; 11.8.7; 11.9.1;
        11.9.7; 11.11.3; 11.11.2; 11.8.6; 11.8.7)



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