The IEP Progress Monitoring Process - PowerPoint by bib17384

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									               The IEP:
          Progress Monitoring
                Process
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               Southwest Ohio Special Education
                   Regional Resource Center
                 By: Liz Neal, Clermont County
                  Educational Service Center
      Session Objectives
• To provide an overview of the steps of
  progress monitoring.
• To provide resources and tools for
  gathering and compiling data.
• To provide time for practical
  application and feedback.
                Session Agenda
•    Definition
•    Rationale
•    Prerequisites
•    The Steps of Progress Monitoring
    1.   Data Collection
         –   Unpack Existing IEP
         –   Fill in the Missing Pieces
         –   Determine Measurement Types and Tools
         –   Data Collection Schedule
    2.   Data Compilation
         –   Data Compilation Tools
         –   Data Compilation Schedule
    3.   Data Reporting
         –   Data Reporting Schedule
         –   Data Presentation… To Graph or Not to Graph
    4.   Using Data to Make Instructional and Service Decisions
                  Session Format
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     • These slides indicate time
       for questions, group




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       discussion, review of the
       IEPs you brought, and
       application of monitoring
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       suggestions.


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What is Progress Monitoring?
• Progress monitoring is the
  ongoing process of collecting and
  analyzing data to determine
  student progress.
• Progress monitoring should be
  used to make instructional and
  service decisions based on
  student performance.
                             Rationale
 • Individuals With Disabilities
   Education Improvement Act (IDEIA)
   2004
     – Requires a student’s individualized
       education plan (IEP) to include:
          • A statement of present levels of academic and
            functional performance;
          • A statement of measurable annual goals;
          • A statement of special education, related and
            supplemental services;

Etscheidt, Susan K. (2006)
                             Rationale
          • An explanation of the extent, if any, of non-
            participation in the regular classroom;
          • A statement of any appropriate and necessary
            accommodations on state and district-wide
            assessments;
          • A statement of dates and duration of services;
          • Appropriate, measurable post-secondary
            goals and transition services; and
          • A statement of how the child’s progress
            toward the annual goals will be
            measured.
Etscheidt, Susan K. (2006)
                             Rationale
 • Legal Decisions
     – The absence of adequate progress
       monitoring has been the focus of several
       administrative and judicial decisions.
     – Courts are unwilling to accept the claims
       of school districts regarding the
       appropriateness of a student’s program
       without proof in the form of data.

Etscheidt, Susan K. (2006)
                             Rationale
 • Legal Decisions
     – Recent decisions concerning
       progress monitoring have revealed
       five primary areas of concern:
          1. The IEP team fails to develop or
             implement progress monitoring plans;
          2. Responsibilities for progress
             monitoring are improperly delegated;

Etscheidt, Susan K. (2006)
                             Rationale
          3. The IEP team does not plan or
             implement progress monitoring for
             behavior intervention plans (BIPs);
          4. The team uses inappropriate
             measures to determine student
             progress toward graduation;
          5. Progress monitoring is not frequent
             enough to meet the requirements of
             IDEIA or to provide meaningful data
             to IEP teams.
Etscheidt, Susan K. (2006)
           Prerequisites
• A statement of measurable annual
  goals, including benchmarks or short-
  term objectives related to meeting the
  child’s needs that result from the
  child’s disability to enable the child to
  be involved in and progress in the
  general curriculum and to meet the
  child’s other educational needs that
  result from the child’s disability. (OS
  page 66)
             Prerequisites
• In order to collect data that provides evidence
  of student progress, the IEP must include
  measurable annual goals and benchmarks or
  short-term objectives.
• Annual goals and benchmarks or short-term
  objectives must include:
  – clearly defined, observable behaviors/actions;
  – the condition under which the behavior is
    performed;
  – the performance criterion.

            Who… will do… what…
       how well… under what conditions?
          Prerequisites
• A statement of how the child’s progress
  towards the annual goals will be
  measured and how the child’s parents
  will be regularly informed (through
  such means as periodic report cards),
  at least as often as parents are
  informed of their non-disabled
  children’s progress… (OS page 66)
           Prerequisites
• …in regard to
  – Their child’s progress towards the
    annual goals, and
  – The extent to which that progress is
    sufficient to enable the child to
    achieve the goals by the end of the
    year.
    (OS page 66-67)
            Prerequisites
• In order to collect data that provides
  evidence of student progress, the IEP
  must also include a specific statement
  of how and when progress will be
  measured and reported.
  – What data will be collected?
  – Where will the data be collected?
  – Who will collect and compile data; who will
    report progress?
         Step 1: Data Collection
         Unpack the Existing IEP
                       Existing IEP contains
                         measurable goals
   YES                                                         NO
                      and short-term objectives
                         as well as a clear
                       and specific statement
                        of student progress.



  Measure the behaviors under the               Determine and define
    conditions using the criteria             missing pieces of the goal,
       set forth in the goal,                 benchmark, or objective.
 benchmark, or short-term objective
         defined in the IEP.                      Determine and define
                                                  missing pieces in the
   Follow data type, schedule, and                    statement of
person responsible defined in the IEP.             student progress.
      Step 1: Data Collection
     Fill in the Missing Pieces
• Make the existing IEP’s goals,
  benchmarks, and/or short-term
  objectives measurable.
  – Determine purpose and outcome of goal.
    (What do we need to observe of this
    student?)
  – Fill in the blanks. (Conditions? Criteria?)
  – Check with the team. (What are parent
    and other team member perceptions of
    purpose and outcome?)
      Step 1: Data Collection
     Fill in the Missing Pieces
• Make the existing IEP’s statement of
  student progress specific.
  – Determine the best way to provide evidence of
    student progress. (What type of data will be
    collected?)
  – Determine who will collect, compile and report
    data and progress.
  – Determine where evidence will be collected.
    (Where will the data be easily collected as well as
    provide documentation of skill?)
      Step 1: Data Collection
     Fill in the Missing Pieces
• Make the existing IEP’s statement of student
  progress specific. (continued)
  – Determine how often evidence will be collected.
    (How often is enough to truly show progress, or
    lack of?)
  – Check with the team. (What are parent and other
    team member perceptions about data collection
    and reporting?)

      Any written changes on an IEP must be
     approved by the IEP team (parents, service
           providers, district personnel).
             Step 1: Data Collection
                    in the Missing Pieces
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   • Questions and Suggestions.
   • Review the IEP at your table and


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     work through the flow chart
     for unpacking the existing IEP.




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      –   Changes?
      –   Questions?
      –   Feedback?
      –   Roadblocks?
      Step 1: Data Collection
Determine Measurement Types and Tools

• The tools used to collect data and
  ultimately measure progress provide
  evidence of student performance
  specific to IEP goals, objectives,
  and/or short-term benchmarks.
• Data collection tools should represent
  different types of measurement in
  order to provide a clear picture of
  student progress.
       Step 1: Data Collection
 Determine Measurement Types and Tools
• DIRECT MEASUREMENT provides valid
  and reliable indications of student progress.
  – Behavior Observation can be documented in
    many different ways; behavior observation
    provides first hand evidence of student
    performance as it occurs.
     • Observation Narratives
     • Data Charts
        –   Frequency Recording
        –   Duration Recording
        –   Interval Recording
        –   Time Sampling
        –   More…
      Step 1: Data Collection
 Determine Measurement Types and Tools
• DIRECT MEASUREMENT                 (continued)
  – Curriculum Based Assessment (CBA) is the
    direct observation and recording of student’s
    performance in the school curriculum.
        – Criterion Referenced Test (CRT)
           » Teacher constructed
           » Focuses on hierarchies of skills in the general
              education curriculum
        – Curriculum Based Measure (CBM)
           » Brief, standardized samples
           » Fluency based (accuracy and time)
              Step 1: Data Collection
       Determine Measurement Types and Tools
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     • DIRECT MEASUREMENT
         – Questions and Suggestions.
         – Review the data collection tools for


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           direct measurement.
             • Which of these tools could be used to




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               monitor the IEP you just unpacked?
             • Questions?
             • Feedback?
             • Roadblocks?
      Step 1: Data Collection
 Determine Measurement Types and Tools

• INDIRECT MEASUREMENT can
  supplement direct measures.
  – Rubrics
    • Describes performance on a scale from
      desired performance to undesired
      performance using both qualitative and
      quantitative descriptions.
  – Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS)
    • Rates student performance changes on a five-
      point scale of from least to most favorable.
       Step 1: Data Collection
 Determine Measurement Types and Tools
• INDIRECT MEASUREMENT                 (continued)
  – Interviews
     • Provides a summary of student performance on a given
       behavior in a structured format; regular education
       teachers or other school personnel can informally
       conference with the teacher in charge of data
       collection; conferences are then summarized and
       added to the progress monitoring file.
  – Student Self-Monitoring
     • Documents student behaviors and performance
       through self recording given specific cues.
              Step 1: Data Collection
       Determine Measurement Types and Tools
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     • INDIRECT MEASUREMENT
         – Questions and Suggestions.
         – Review the data collection tools for


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           direct measurement.
             • Which of these tools could be used to




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               monitor the IEP you just unpacked?
             • Questions?
             • Feedback?
             • Roadblocks?
       Step 1: Data Collection
 Determine Measurement Types and Tools
• AUTHENTIC MEASUREMENT provides
  evidence of student performance through
  genuine student input.
  – Work Samples
     • Provides evidence of student performance through
       “hard copies” of actual student work.
        –   Writing
        –   Math
        –   Projects (cutting, drawing)
        –   Pictures of student work
        –   Audio recordings of student performance (reading,
            responding to questions)
  – Portfolios
     • Documents student performance through a collection
       of work samples demonstrating specific outcomes.
    Step 1: Data Collection
Determine Measurement Types and Tools

• AUTHENTIC MEASUREMENT           (continued)

  – Student Interviews
   • Assesses student performance through
     informal conferences between the teacher
     and student; conversations are then
     summarized and included in the progress
     monitoring file.
              Step 1: Data Collection
       Determine Measurement Types and Tools
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     • AUTHENTIC MEASUREMENT
         – Questions and Suggestions.
         – Review the data collection tools for


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           direct measurement.
             • Which of these tools could be used to




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               monitor the IEP you just unpacked?
             • Questions?
             • Feedback?
             • Roadblocks?
    Step 1: Data Collection
           Schedule
• The data collection schedule depends
  on how service is delivered.
  – Direct Instruction
    • Times for data collection should be worked
      into daily and weekly plans for instruction.
    • Data collection does not necessarily have to
      be separate from this instructional time; this
      situation can provide a real picture of student
      performance during a typical day.
  Step 1: Data Collection
         Schedule
– Indirect Instruction or Support
   • Times for data collection should be worked into the
     time when service is being delivered, if possible.
   • Data can also be collected remotely by regular
     education teachers or other service providers.
– Consultation
   • Regular education teachers and other service providers
     play a key role in data collection and input.
   • Times for data collection should also be scheduled
     when concerns have been brought up; this is a perfect
     opportunity for using direct measures (observations,
     data charts, etc.)
               Step 1: Data Collection
                      Schedule
 • The effectiveness of services and instructional
   method is determined most efficiently when
   progress is measured frequently.

If progress is monitored                       Then effectiveness may
Daily, as part of instruction                  Be determined within 2 weeks
Twice a week                                   Be determined within a month
Weekly                                         Be determined within a quarter
Quarterly                                      NOT be determined, even after a
                                               year

An Administrator’s Guide to Measuring Achievement for Students with IEPs.
http://www.awa11.k12.ia.us/iep/iepresults/AdministratorsGuide.htm
           Step 1: Data Collection
                           Schedule
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   • Questions and Suggestions
   • Develop a data collection schedule for two or
     three of the tools you chose.


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      – Use your daily routine.
      – Consider how services are delivered.
      – Consider measurement type and




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        frequency.
         • Questions?
         • Feedback?
         • Roadblocks?
     Step 2: Data Compilation

• Compiling data is a critical component in
  progress monitoring.
  – Summarizes data collected periodically during
    the duration of an IEP.
     • Ultimately saves time; attempting to compile all data
       collected during the duration of a year long IEP would
       be an overwhelming task.
  – Provides the team with useful reference points in
    time.
  – Saves time and confusion during meetings.
    Step 2: Data Compilation
             Tools
• The tools used to compile data should
  include:
  – Student name;
  – IEP effective dates;
  – The goal, benchmark, or short-term
    objective directly from the IEP;
  – A restatement of the criteria in the goal,
    benchmark, or short-term objective;
  – An organized format that makes clear the
    data compilation schedule.
        Step 2: Data Compilation
                Schedule
• The data compilation schedule depends upon the
  data collection frequency.
• Suggested compilation schedules:

If data is collected          Then data should be compiled
Daily                         Weekly
Two or three times per week   Bi-weekly or monthly
Once a week                   Monthly
           Step 2: Data Compilation
                 Tools and Schedule
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   • Questions and Suggestions?
   • Discuss data compilation:


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     – If you already practice compiling
       data, how do you make it work
       along with all other




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       responsibilities?
     – If you don’t usually compile data,
       how might it be worked in with
       everything else you do during
       school?
     Step 3: Data Reporting
            Schedule
• Progress on IEP goals, benchmarks, and
  short-term objectives is reported to parents
  as often as non-disabled student receive
  academic progress reports.
  – Timeline
     • Mid-Quarter (Interim Reports)
     • Quarterly
  – Format
     • Compilation Forms
     • Graphs
     • Narratives
        – Accompanies hard data
        – Explains any instructional changes or specific
          circumstances
           Step 3: Data Reporting
     Data Presentation… To Graph or Not To Graph
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     • Review the two sets of collected data
       provided at your table.
     • Review the graphs used to compile the


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       data collected.
         – Discuss the impact of the graphs.




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         – How might the IEP meetings for these
           students gone had only the collected data
           (not compiled) been shared.
         – Questions?
Using Data to Make Instructional
     and Service Decisions
•   Student progress is considered in
    relationship to each goal,
    benchmark, or short-term objective.
•   Four aspects should be considered:
    1. Progress
       – Did the student make the progress
         expected by the IEP team? (criteria)
Using Data to Make Instructional
     and Service Decisions
 2. Comparison to Peers or Standards
   – How does the student’s performance
     compare with the performance of general
     education students?
 3. Independence
   – Is the student more independent in the goal
     area?
 4. Goal Status
   – Will work in the goal be continued?
   – Will student be dismissed from this goal
     area?
       Using Data to Make Instructional
            and Service Decisions
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     • Questions and Suggestions
     • Using the graphs of compiled data,
       consider instruction or service options.


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        – Consider progress, comparison to
          peers or standards, independence,
          and goal status (with the limited




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          information you have).
                     Final Thoughts
 • Progress monitoring remains a
   required part of the IEP with IDEIA
   2004.
 • Other provisions in IDEIA 2004
   mandate greater accountability for
   student progress.
     – Results-oriented shift
     – Outcomes
Etscheidt, Susan K. (2006)
         Final Thoughts
• Progress monitoring processes that
  are focused, clearly defined, and
  completed will ensure meaningful
  educational programs for students
  with disabilities.
        Works Cited/Consulted
1.   Alexandrin, J. R. (2003). Using continuous, constructive classroom
     evaluations. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 52-57.
2.   An Administrator’s Guide to Measuring Achievement for Students with IEPs.
     http://www.awa11.k12.ia.us/iep/iepresults/AdministratorsGuide.htm
3.   Etscheidt, Susan K. (2006). Progress monitoring: Legal issues and
     recommendations for IEP teams. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 56-60.
4.   Jones, C. J. (2004). Teacher-friendly curriculum-based assessment in
     spelling. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 32-38.
5.   Operating Standards for Ohio’s Schools Serving Students with Disabilities
     (OS), 61-74.
     http://www.ode.state.oh.us/exceptional_children/children_with_disabiliti
     es/Operating_Standards/default.asp
6.   Show Me the DATA! University of Washington, Experimental Educational
     Unit. 2004.
7.   Pemberton, J. B. (2003). Communicating academic progress as an
     integral part of assessment. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 16-20.
                      Information
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     • Contact Information
         Elisabeth Neal
         Clermont County Educational Service Center
         735-8332 (office)
         neal_l@ccesc.org                   1
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     • The IEP: Progress Monitoring Systems
         September 12, 2006
         4:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

								
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