Community Health Administration (CHA)

Document Sample
Community Health Administration (CHA) Powered By Docstoc
					                                   Community Health Administration (CHA)


Q3:   Please complete the attached Program and Activity Detail Worksheet for each activity within CHA.

      Response: Please See Attachments
Program Title and Org. Code           Bureau on Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code           Asthma Program
Responsible Individual Name            Edwina Davis-Robinson
Responsible Individual Title           Asthma Program Coordinator
Number of FTEs (NTE)                   2
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   The DC Control Asthma Now (DC CAN) program supports the goals and
                                      objectives of Healthy People 2010 for asthma: to reduce the number of
                                      deaths, hospitalizations, emergency department visits, school or work days
                                      missed, and limitations on activity due to asthma.

                                      The Asthma Program has three major responsibilities to achieve the overall
                                      goal:

                                            1.   Implementation of strategies outlined in the Asthma Strategic Plan
                                            2.   Developing, and maintaining an asthma surveillance system and
                                                 generate asthma epidemiological reports to the public.
                                            3.   To work collaboratively with community partners to achieve over
                                                 all goal

Services within the Activity                    Assure high quality asthma care for children with asthma in DC.
                                                Assure high quality asthma care for seniors (55 years of age and
                                                 older).
FY09 Performance Measures                       Reduced rate of Asthma related Emergency Department utilization
                                                 for children 1-17 years of age (Visits per 10,000)
                                                Number of medication givers trained and certified in emergency
                                                 medication administration
                                                Number of Standard Medical Record Forms entered into the Health
                                                 Check (electronic registry) Data base
                                                Reduced Hospitalization rate for the target population (55 years of
                                                 age and older)
FY09 Performance Outcomes                       2007 emergency department (ER) utilization for children 0-17 year
                                                 of age (visits per 10,000) in 2007 was 344 per 10,000 (376 per
                                                 10,000 is the 2006 baseline)_
                                                There are 220 trained lay medication givers. The school nurse
                                                 program is exploring a process to develop a certificate program
                                                 through the Board of Nurses; the certification training will include
                                                 emergency procedures and protocols.
                                                According to the latest hospitalization data (baseline 2006), the
                                                 hospitalization rate for target population (>55 year of age and due to
                                                 asthma) was 34 per 10,000

FY 10 Performance Measures
                                                Reduction in ER visits for pediatric patients (0-17)

                                                Reduction in asthma related hospitalizations for older adults

                                                Number of clinics engaged in the clinical asthma collaborative to
                                                 improve asthma outpatient care

FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to
date)                                           Performance data is not yet available




                                                         1
Cancer and Chronic Disease Bureau (8502)


       Program Title and Org. Code           Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
       Activity Title and Org. Code          Cardiovascular Health Program
       Responsible Individual Name           Vance Farrow
       Responsible Individual Title          Supervisory Public Health Advisor
       Number of FTEs                        3.33
       Activity Functions/Responsibilities   The mission of the Cardiovascular Health Program (CHP) is to prevent,
                                             control and limit the morbidity and mortality associated with
                                             cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the District of Columbia.
       Services within the Activity          The Cardiovascular Health Program was developed to address the burden
                                             of CVD in the District of Columbia through data collection and reporting,
                                             health promotion and disease prevention. The CHP is in a capacity
                                             building phase of funding, and as a result is not a clinical direct services
                                             program. Strategies of the program thus include collaborating with
                                             stakeholders to raise awareness of CVD, increasing community services
                                             through effective partnerships, and creating and/or amending policies
                                             supportive of optimum cardiovascular health as they pertain to
                                             government, communities, private sector businesses and the healthcare
                                             delivery system.
       FY09 Performance Measures                 1. Number of residents receiving educational information with regard
                                                     to CVD risk factors and the signs and symptoms of heart attacks
                                                     and strokes.
                                                 Target: 5,000

                                                 2. Number of District faith-based organizations participating in
                                                    CHP/AHA Power to End Stroke Campaigns.
                                                 Target: 75

                                                 3. Number of residents screened for chronic kidney disease, high
                                                    blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol by DOH/CHA funded
                                                    organizations.
                                                 Target: 3,500

                                                 4. Percentage of residents who have been diagnosed with high blood
                                                     pressure who self-report it under control (measure: BRFSS odd
                                                     years ONLY).
                                                 Target: 33% Baseline = 27.8%

                                                 5. Percentage of residents who have been diagnosed with high blood
                                                    cholesterol who self-report it under control (measure: BRFSS)
                                                 Target: 40% Baseline = 34.1%

       FY09 Performance Outcomes                 1. 6,393 residents received educational information on
                                                    cardiovascular disease and the associated risk factors.
                                                    Additionally, through our media campaign, there were an
                                                    estimated 1,362,211 impressions made upon foot traffic utilizing
                                                    the Metro system.
                            2. 79 District faith-based organizations participated in the
                               Cardiovascular Health Program/American Heart Association
                               Power to End Stroke Campaign. Each organization provided their
                               congregation with hypertension awareness information and
                               stressed the importance of calling 9-1-1 at the onset of symptoms.

                            3. 4,258 residents were screened for chronic kidney disease, high
                               blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol levels by DOH funded
                               programs. The majority of residents were screened in Wards 5, 6,
                               7, & 8.

                            4. 2009 BRFSS data collection concluded December 31, 2009 and
                               will be made available in April of 2010.

                            5. 2009 BRFSS data collection concluded December 31, 2009 and
                               will be made available in April of 2010.

FY10 Performance Measures   1. Number of District hospitals participating in the D.C. Stroke
                               Collaborative and sharing data with the Department of Health on
                               clinical improvement measures.
                            Target: 7

                            2. Number of residents receiving educational information with regard
                               to CVD risk factors and the signs and symptoms of heart attacks
                               and strokes.
                            Target: 4,000

                            3. Number of District faith-based organizations participating in
                               CHP/AHA Power to End Stroke Campaigns.
                            Target: 100

                            4. Number of residents screened for chronic kidney disease, high
                               blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol by DOH/CHA funded
                               organizations.
                            Target: 3,750

                            5. Percentage of residents who have been diagnosed with high blood
                               pressure who self-report it under control (measure: BRFSS odd
                               years ONLY).
                            Target: 33% Baseline = 27.8%

                            6. Percentage of residents who have been diagnosed with high blood
                               cholesterol who self-report it under control (measure: BRFSS).
                            Target 40% Baseline = 34.1%

FY10 Performance Outcomes   1. 7 District hospitals are currently involved in the DC Stroke
                               Collaborative. The AHA and Delmarva are currently establishing
                               HIT/HIE infrastructure for future data sharing agreements.

                            2. 694 residents received educational information on cardiovascular
    disease and the associated risk factors. Our media campaign will
    begin in February and will continue throughout 2010.

3. To increase the number of District faith-based organizations
   participating in the Cardiovascular Health Program/American
   Heart Association Power to End Stroke Campaign from 79 to 100.
   Each organization will provide their congregation with
   hypertension awareness information and stressed the importance
   of calling 9-1-1 at the onset of symptoms.

4. To date, 245 residents have been screened for chronic kidney
   disease, high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol levels by
   DOH funded programs. The majority of residents were screened
   in Wards 5, 6, 7, & 8.

5. In 2007, 27.8% of residents surveyed with diagnosed high blood
   pressure self-reported it as under control. BRFSS 2009 survey is
   currently collecting this data, which is only received in odd years
   of the survey. Our goal is to increase that percentage to 33%.

6. 2009 BRFSS data collection concluded December 31, 2009 and
   will be made available in April of 2010 and will serve as our
   baseline.
Program Title and Org. Code    Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code   Diabetes Prevention and Control Program

Responsible Individual Name     James Copeland MHS
Responsible Individual Title    Supervisory Public Health Analyst
Number of FTEs                  2.33
Activity                       Influence health systems, businesses, communities and government
Functions/Responsibilities     agencies to adopt strategies which will prevent and control diabetes in the
                               District of Columbia.
Services within the Activity   The Diabetes Program conducts epidemiologic surveillance to understand
                               the impact of diabetes on District residents. The program uses the
                               surveillance data to develop and recommend policies that improve the
                               prevention and control of diabetes in the health care delivery system and
                               where residents live, work and play. The Diabetes Program also develops,
                               implements and evaluates interventions aimed at reducing health disparities
                               among the city’s most vulnerable populations.
FY 09 Performance Measures
                               1) Number of DOH funded diabetes projects using quality improvement
                               methodology as part of their care delivery operations. Target: 1 Project

                               2) Number of residents with diabetes affected by a DOH/CHA/Diabetes
                               funded program. Target: 500

                               3) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities that have an A1c
                               values below 7. Target: 43%

                               4) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities have blood pressure
                               levels < 130/80 or lower. Target: 70%

                               5) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities that have total LDL
                               levels that are <100mg/dl. Target:10% improvement

                               6) Percentage of residents screened for chronic kidney disease by
                               DOH/CHA funded programs. Target:61%

FY 09 Performance Outcomes
                               1) 1 out of 3 DOH funded diabetes projects met the basic criteria for using
                               quality improvement methodology*.

                               2) More than 800 residents with diabetes were affected by a
                               DOH/CHA/Diabetes funded program. 600 out of the 800 were affected by
                               an evidence-based program.

                               3) 39% of residents enrolled in evidence-based programs (n=600) had
                               A1c’s equal to or below 7.

                               4) 67% of residents enrolled in evidence-based programs (n=600) achieved
                               a blood pressure of <130/80 or lower.

                               a. 50% of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                                  diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities achieved total
                                  LDL levels that are <100mg/dl.

                               b. 66% of residents were screened for chronic kidney disease by
                                  DOH/CHA funded programs.


FY 2010 Performance Measures   1) Number of DOH funded diabetes projects using quality improvement
                               methodology and evidence-based programs as their care delivery. Target: 5
                               Projects

                               2) Number of residents with diabetes affected by a DOH/CHA/Diabetes
                               funded program. Target is 3,000.

                               3) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities that have an A1c
                               values below 7. Target is 40%.

                               4) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities have blood pressure
                               levels < 130/80 or lower. Target is 67%

                               5) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities that have an A1c
                               values below 7, and have total LDL levels that are <100mg/dl. Target is
                               56%.

                               6) Percentage of at-risk residents screened for chronic kidney disease by
                               DOH funded programs. Target is 66%.

FY 2010 Performance Outcomes   1) Seven projects funded by the DOH/CHA meet the basic definition for
(to date)                      having a program plan based upon continuous quality improvement
                               principals. This represents an increase of six programs from the previous
                               year.

                               2) Most projects are in start-up phase but when fully operational should
                               affect an estimated 3,000 residents.

                               3) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities that have an A1c
                               values below 7. Data not yet available.

                               4) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities have blood pressure
                               levels < 130/80 or lower. Data not yet available.

                               5) Percentage of residents <80 years of age with diabetes affected by DOH
                               diabetes projects with IT clinical tracking capabilities that have an A1c
                                     values below 7, and have total LDL levels that are <100mg/dl. Data not yet
                                     available.

                                     6) Percentage of at-risk residents screened for chronic kidney disease by
                                     DOH funded programs. Data not yet available.

Other comments:

The goal for 2010 is to scale-up evidence-based programs to a broader portion of the population. We plan
to increase the number of funded projects, which will require a period of capacity building. As
programmatic capacity increases baseline data will be available for reporting purposes and will be
included in quarterly KPI reports. However, as programs scale-up we anticipate that clinical metrics may
actually decrease in the short term as patients with poor disease management enter into the system and
bring down the population’s clinical outcome averages. However, we should see an increase in clinical
metric outcomes as patients are better managed over time. Our outcome targets for clinical metrics have
been set by using outcomes from our best performing program, the Howard University Diabetes
Treatment Center. All new programs will be measured against its performance.

Interventions funded by the diabetes program have demonstrated that good disease management is
possible in a variety of populations and geographic locations. However, we have found that good disease
management requires a high intensity, multifaceted programmatic approach. Thus, primary prevention of
these conditions should become a major public health focus in future years.


* Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) – A general term to indicate a method of deliberate
improvement that uses repeated rapid cycles of testing changes and learning from the results in order to
pursue specific aims. The method requires a concerned team with responsibility and authority to make
changes, one or more aims, one or more measures to monitor progress toward the aim(s), and testing
changes with monitoring. The team serves as the primary “learning organization” which guides the
process, using data along the way. Ordinarily, CQI measurement relies heavily on annotated time series to
monitor changes, rather than statistical tests of differences between populations.
Program Title and Org. Code    Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code   Tobacco Control Program
Responsible Individual Name    Ashley Ross
Responsible Individual Title   Program Manager
Number of FTEs                 4.33
Activity                       The Tobacco Control Program strives to achieve tobacco prevention and
Functions/Responsibilities     control policy and systems change to eliminate the effects of tobacco and
                               tobacco-related products. TCP collaborates with community in providing
                               cessation, prevention, and education services that empower residents and
                               visitors to the District of Columbia to address tobacco in the District.

Services within the Activity   The Tobacco Control Program provides services to prevent initiation of
                               smoking among youth; promote cessation among youth and adults;
                               eliminate second-hand smoke, and, identify and eliminate tobacco related
                               disparities in specific populations. Specifically, this is achieved through
                               educating the public on disease processes, prevention, and cessation
                               strategies; mobilizing partnerships with various groups; linking residents to
                               high-quality, unbiased, culturally-competent care and/or resources; and
                               researching data to assist in defining policy and program direction.


FY 09 Performance Measures        Number of Quitline callers
                                         o Target: 4,200
                                  Number of nicotine replacement products distributed to qualified DC
                                    residents calling Quitline
                                         o Target: Not set
                                  Percentage adults who reported quit attempts within the past 30 days
                                         o Target: Not set
                                  Percent of DCPS with implemented and enforced smoke-free policies
                                         o Target: 100%
                                  Number of hospitals with smoke-free campuses.
                                         o Target: 5

FY 09 Performance Outcomes        2,836 callers to the DC Quitline 1 800 QUIT NOW
                                  2,500 nicotine replacement products distributed to qualified DC
                                    residents calling Quit line
                                  58.4 % of adult smokers reported quit attempts within the past 30 days
                                    (BRFSS 2007)
                                  100% of DCPS with implemented and enforced smoke-free policies
                                  Eight (8) hospitals with smoke-free campuses

FY 10 Performance Measures        Number of Quitline callers
                                        o Target: 1800
                                  Percent of Quitline callers from priority populations defined as targeted
                                    Wards 5-8, Medicaid/Alliance, Uninsured, African American
                                             o Target: 70%
                                  Number of nicotine replacement products distributed to qualified DC
                                   residents calling Quitline
                                        o Target: 1000
                                             Percentage of tobacco using adults reporting quit attempts
                                                   o Target: 50%
                                             Presence of enhanced tobacco-free school policy for DCPS/OSSE
                                               schools
                                                   o Target: Revised policy
                                             Enhanced tobacco prevention and control data and evaluation capacity
                                               (including collection and use, and staff/community skill) for the District
                                                   o Target: Tangible changes for example new BRFSS
                                                            questions/analyses, tobacco presence in YRBSS, etc.
                                             Presence of revised and community vetted Tobacco Prevention and
                                               Control Strategic Plan
                                                   o Target: Plan complete

FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to               340 callers to Quitline (as compared to 438 during this Q1 of FY 09)
date)                                        Quitline callers from priority populations: including targeted Wards 5-8
                                               is (206 or 60.6%), Medicaid/Alliance (274 or 80.6%), Uninsured (33 or
                                               9.7%) and African Americans (272 or 80%)
                                             631 nicotine replacement products distributed to qualified DC residents
                                               calling Quitline
                                             58.4 % of tobacco using adults reporting quit attempts within the past 30
                                               days (BRFSS 2007) 1
                                             Enhanced tobacco-free policy being routed through OSSE for
                                               incorporation into existing Wellness Policy, with potential opportunity
                                               for inclusion of tobacco in emerging Healthy Schools Act
                                             Addition of 6 tobacco-related questions to the BRFSS, including
                                               questions regarding use of menthol and little cigars as well as impact of
                                               tobacco industry marketing; preliminary collaboration with OSSE on
                                               inclusion of tobacco questions on and use of data from YRBSS
                                             Progress towards updated Tobacco Prevention and Control Strategic
                                               Plan in collaboration with DC Tobacco Free Coalition


   Other Comments – Special funding from the tobacco settlement funds were expended as of the end of the
   2009 fiscal year. Funds to sustain Quitline volume at a reasonable level now come from DC Cancer
   Consortium funds, supplemented by Tobacco Control Program funds. Funds for public information,
   campaigns to reduce uptake of tobacco, and coordinating policy and environmental change are greatly
   reduced. DC DOH has applied for funding under the Communities Putting Prevention to Work grant
   opportunity in the federal stimulus funding, which might help sustain the work. The broad community-
   based Coalition is reorganized and re-energized to continue the work.




   1
       More updated data are not yet available.
Program Title and Org. Code    Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code   National Program of Cancer Registries
Responsible Individual Name    Kathleen Rogers, CTR
Responsible Individual Title   Program Manager
Number of FTEs                 5.25 FTE
Activity                            Catalog onset, type, stage, demographics and initial treatment for all
functions/Responsibilities            cancers (and certain non-cancer tumors) occurring in Washington,
                                      DC, or among Washington, DC, residents
                                    Develop insights as to the rates, trends, correlations, and
                                      effectiveness of control measures concerning cancer
                                    Report rates locally and nationally
                                    Support research and policy development
Services Within the Activity        Train registrars and others to report data correctly
                                    Provide data (with appropriate safeguards for confidentiality) for
                                      research, policy, and epidemiologic purposes
                                    Match with other databases to assure completeness and gain insight
                                    Support research and policy generation
FY 09 Performance Measures          Enhanced data reporting completeness (Target 95% on time)
                                    Presence of monthly case ascertainment monitoring of to ensure
                                      hospitals are meeting requirements
                                    Death Certificate Only (DCO) rate (Target: Maintain at or below
                                      3%)
                                    Monitored and enforced mandatory reporting requirements (Target:
                                      All facilities monitored to ensure compliance with every monthly
                                      reporting requirement.)
                                    Community trainings provided to Registrars (Target: At minimum,
                                      biannual trainings)
                                    Advisory Committee and Subcommittee meetings held (Target: A
                                      minimum of quarterly meetings)
                                    Accuracy of cancer registry (Target: All data passes defined
                                      NAACCR/NPCR/DCCR edit sets.)
FY 09 Performance Outcomes          Timeliness report reflected 83% cases are received within 24 months
                                      of diagnosis
                                    All hospitals with the exception of one maintained their expected
                                      level of case reporting.
                                    DCO rate was 1.7%
                                    Seven of the eight DC hospitals compliant with the reporting
                                      requirement.
                                    Provided one training to community Registrars
                                    Advisory Committee convened every other month.
                                    All cases are run through defined edit sets at time of initial
                                      processing. Those submissions in which 40% or more do not pass
                                      edits are returned to the facility for correction. In FY 2009 no data
                                      submissions were returned to any facility.
FY 10 Performance Measures          Number of reporting hospitals maintaining the Completeness of
                                      Data Reporting
                                    Number of reporting hospitals meeting the Timeliness of data
                                 reporting requirement (Target 95% on time).
                                Percentage of high level of quality control of the cancer registry
                                 database (Target: 75% incoming data submissions will pass defined
                                 NAACCR/NPCR/DCCR edit sets.)
                                Number of basic and advanced trainings designed and provided to
                                 Community Registrars (Target: At minimum, biannual trainings)
                                 and DCCR staff (Target: At minimum quarterly).
                                Number of cases meeting the mandatory reporting requirements
                                 (Target: All facilities are required to submit data every other month
                                 to DCCR.)
                                Percentage of Death Certificate Only (DCO) cases (Target: Maintain
                                 at or below 3%)
                                Number of Advisory Committee and Subcommittee meetings held
                                 (Target: A minimum of quarterly meetings)
                                Produce a substantial summary of cancer epidemiology in DC
                                 through 2007 data.
FY 10 Performance Outcomes      Currently 7 of the 8 reporting hospitals are maintaining their number
(to date)                        and percent of cases reported per month by facility, compared to
                                 their expected number of cases.
                                Timeliness Report reflects 100% cases are received from all 8
                                 reporting facilities within 24 months of diagnosis.
                                80% of incoming abstracts run through defined
                                 NAACCR/NPCR/DCCR edit sets at time of initial processing are
                                 passing edits. Those submissions in which 40% or more of the cases
                                 do not pass edits are returned to the facility for correction and
                                 resubmission.
                                During FY 2010 we have provided training to community Registrars
                                 at one training session, and DCCR staff twice.
                                7 of the 8 reporting hospitals are complying with the reporting
                                 requirement.
                                Our current DCO rate is 1.7%
                                Advisory Committee is currently meeting every other month.
                                Currently, we are in the process of recruiting an Epidemiologist –
                                 Outcome will be 2007 Annual Cancer Registry Report identifying
                                 Incidence Summary, Mortality Summary, Age Adjusted Rates
                                 Incidence 2007 and trend, Age Adjusted Mortality 2007 and trend,
                                 Stage Distribution, Trend of Wards, Site Specific studies; Lung,
                                 Colorectal, Breast, Prostate, and HIV associated Cancers.
Program Title and Org. Code     Cancer & Chronic Disease Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code    Comprehensive Cancer Control Program
Responsible Individual Name      Amari Pearson-Fields
Responsible Individual Title    Program Manager.
Number of FTEs                  2
                               The mission of the Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (CCCP) is to
Activity                       reduce the District’s cancer burden by using a collaborative process that
Functions/Responsibilities     brings together the expertise and resources necessary to:

                                      Prevent cancer risk factors.
                                      Research effective cancer interventions that address cultural
                                       differences.
                                      Educate citizens about the importance of early detection and
                                       screening.
                                      View cancer as survivable a disease.
                                      Expand collection and dissemination of cancer related data to
                                       community stakeholders
                                      Navigate patients effectively through the cancer screening and
                                       treatment journey.
                                      Treat cancers early with high quality care.

Services within the Activity   The Comprehensive Cancer Program (CCP) supports the goals and
                               objectives of the DC Cancer Plan. CCP activities are aimed at reducing
                               cancer disparities through improving access to community education to
                               reduce cancer risk factors; improving access to timely cancer screening that
                               improves early detection; improving access to quality cancer treatment;
                               expanding accessing to both adult and pediatric palliative care and patient
                               navigation. Program strategies include maintaining effective collaborative
                               partnerships with the DC Cancer Consortium and other community partners
                               seeking to implement the goals and objectives of the DC Cancer Plan.

FY09 Performance Measures             Participation in DCCC general and committee meetings by DOH
                                       staff, leadership, and grantees
                                      Number of referrals sent to DCCC from institutional and
                                       community based partners who join DCCC
                                      Number of residents receiving colorectal cancer, prostate, and oral
                                       cancer education, screening, and referrals to medical homes.
                                      Number of sustained collaborative partnerships
                                      Number of stakeholder and residents requesting copies of cancer
                                       resource directors, the Cancer Plan, and the DCCC web site.
FY09 Performance Outcomes             CCCP staff attended all monthly DCCC general meetings; PD
                                       attended all invitational executive board meetings; the PD worked
                                       on the DCCC contributed to the Early Detection Committee and
                                       the CRC and Breast and Cervical sub-committee, and held
                                       teleconferences weekly with the PD for DCCC; the PSS worked
                                       with the Access to Care and Early Detection Committee, as well as
                                       the CRC, prostate cancer and Survivorship subcommittee, and the
                                       Survivors symposium.
                                      All 3 cancer BSA grantees United Medical Ctr. Fdn.,
                                  SmilePerfection., and GW Cancer Institute (staff supported by
                                  grant) joined the DCCC (totaling 5 new); referred 2 new members
                                  from HUH Radiation Dept.; and, were able to get 2 in-active
                                  members to return.
                                 CRC- 3,055 were educated, 552 were screened, 5 had abnormal
                                  screenings, and 1 had cancer.
                                 Prostate Cancer- 720 educated, 310 screened, 4 abnormal
                                  screening, and none diagnosed with cancer.
                                 Oral Cancer- 320 were educated, 274 were screened, 6 had
                                  abnormal screenings, and two were diagnosed with cancer.
                                 All grantee partnerships (6) are still in effect.
                                 Approximately 1,600 cancer related educational booklets,
                                  pamphlets, etc. have been disseminated.
FY 10 Performance Measures       Attendance at DCCC general and committee meetings by DOH
                                  staff , leadership, and DOH grantees.
                                 Number of referrals sent to DCCC from institutional and
                                  community based partners who join DCCC
                                 Number of sustained collaborative partnerships
                                 Number of stakeholder and residents requesting copies of cancer
                                  resource directors, the Cancer Plan, and the DCCC web site.
                                 Support and enhancement of the implementation plans of the
                                  DCCC.
                                 Support for development of cancer education for culturally diverse
                                  communities (Vietnamese, Ethiopian and Gay and lesbian).
                                 Dissemination of DC cancer data in collaboration with DC Cancer
                                  Registry.
                                 Internal collaborative activities with DOH cancer programs (DC
                                  Cancer Registry, DC Project Wish).
                                 Development and distribution of cancer education materials for
                                  immigrant and refugee community in partnership with the Office
                                  of Refugee Health.
FY 10 Performance Outcomes      CCCP staff has attended all DCCC general meetings and Breast &
                                 cervical and survivorship meetings.
                                Final drafts of the culturally based ethnic cancer curriculum for
                                 Vietnamese, Ethiopian, and Gay & lesbian are completed and being
                                 reviewed by CCCP.
                                Number of DC Cancer Bulletins and/or DC Cancer Report
                                 distributed.
                                Collaborative development of in-service training program for
                                 Project Wish partners.
Program Title and Org. Code    Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code   District of Columbia Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Screening
                               Program (Project WISH)

Responsible Individual Name    Felicia Buadoo-Adade
Responsible Individual Title   Program Manager
Number of FTEs                 4.5
Activity                       The District of Columbia (DC) Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection
Functions/Responsibilities     Program (DC BCCEDP) also known as Project WISH (Women Into Staying
                               Healthy) offers a breast and cervical cancer early detection screening program
                               to eligible women. The Project WISH aims to decrease mortality and
                               morbidity from breast and cervical cancer through early detection. Project
                               WISH works to accomplish the following: a) eliminate breast and cervical
                               cancer disparities in the District due to income, insurance status, ethnicity, and
                               geographic location; b) increase access to quality early detection and treatment
                               services; and c) expand the number of eligible women who receive free
                               screening for breast and cervical cancer.

                               Project WISH supports systems to assure breast and cervical cancer screening,
                               follow-up and support services for low-income, with special emphasis on
                               reaching identified population defined as: uninsured and underinsured women,
                               with family income between 200% (upper limit for Alliance coverage) and
                               250% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines 2 , who are in the age group 40-64
                               years.

Services within the Activity
                               Project WISH provides the following for Breast and Cervical Cancer:
                                    Screening, Re-screening and Tracking
                                    Outreach, Recruitment and Enrollment
                                    Case management and Follow-up
                                    Public Education
                                    Coalition and Partnership
                                    Professional Education
                                    Data Management
FY09 Performance Measures       Number of program participants.
                                Number of women screened for breast cancer.
                                Number of women screened for cervical cancer.
                                Number of vendors providing screening services.
                                Number of women receiving educational information with focus on breast,
                                   cervical and ovarian cancer.
FY09 Performance Outcomes       815 women received screening for breast and cervical cancer during FY09
                                   as compared to 571 last year. This shows an increase of 244 in screening.
                                581 women were screened for breast cancer during FY09 compared to 379
                                   for FY08.
                                234 women received cervical cancer during FY09.This is higher than
                                   FY08, when WISH screened 192.
                                Project WISH entered into contractual agreements with
                                    4 new vendors to provide screening and
                                    5 vendors to conduct outreach and recruitment.
                                 Project WISH distributed over 20,000 educational information on breast,
                                 cervical and ovarian cancer in FY09 for public education. Additionally,
                                 through partnership with community organizations, approximately 6,000
                                 women received face-to-face outreach and education.
                               15 District faith-based organizations partnered with Project WISH to
                                 conduct and promote breast, cervical and ovarian cancer awareness.
                              In partnership with our immigrant partners, WISH successfully reached 6
                                African Embassies to educate and disseminate breast, cervical and ovarian
                                cancer literature to African immigrants in DC. Through this effort, we
                                have increased awareness to approximately 8,000 immigrants.
FY 10 Performance Measures    Number of women screened for breast cancer. (Target 800)
                              Number of women screened for cervical cancer. (Target 200)
                              Number of vendors providing screening services and outreach. (Target to
                                maintain at 16 vendors)
                              Number of women receiving educational information with focus on breast,
                                cervical and ovarian cancer. (Target 5000 women)
FY10 Performance Outcomes     420 women screened for breast cancer
                              230 women screened for cervical cancer
                              16 vendors providing screening services and outreach
                              ~3000 women received educational information with focus on breast,
                                cervical and ovarian cancer
Program Title and Org. Code    Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code   Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant
Responsible Individual Name    Sherry Billings
Responsible Individual Title   Supervisory Public Health Advisor
Number of FTEs                 2.50
Activity                       The goal of the Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant is to
Functions/Responsibilities     provide funding to the District that allows for more flexibility and local control
                               to address the city’s priority health needs through the Public Law 102-531,
                               Public Health Service Act, and Healthy People 2010. For each health priority
                               area being funded, the PHHSBG Annual Plan is required to specify the
                               National 2010 Objective with one or more state level 2010 objectives, to
                               delineate the related health problem, to identify the disparity population being
                               served, to identify essential services that need to be addressed and to state the
                               impact and activities in SMART format.

Services within the Activity   PHHSBG funding was awarded to the National Capitol Poison Center in FY
                               2009
                                (1) to provide expert medical guidance to more than 60,000 callers, including
                               emergency calls for children, teens, adults, and seniors who have used the
                               wrong product or substance, in the wrong amount, or in the wrong way.
                               (2) The Poison Center also provides free poison prevention materials such as
                               stickers, magnets, English and Spanish brochures, videotapes, newsletters, etc.
                               (3) The Poison Center attends health fairs, distributes poison prevention
                               materials to health professional offices, conducts community-wide prevention
                               presentation, and teaches clinicians.

                               Funding to the United Planning Organization – to provide Asthma Education
                               Training to empower and engage childcare development staff and family
                               daycare providers to effectively manage asthma in a daycare environment.

                               Collaboration with Edgewood/Brookland Family Collaborative and DOH Title
                               V (funding 50/50), the PHHSBG is working to address the complicated issues
                               that promote and facilitate violence among young people in the city with a
                               specific focus on Cluster 21 within PSA 501, prevent youth violence.
                               Targeted neighborhoods Edgewood, Eckington, Truton Circle and
                               Bloomingdale which all present community risk factors: diminished economic
                               opportunites, high concentrations of poor residents, high level disruption, and
                               low level of community participation.

FY09 Performance Measures      National Capitol Poison Center:
                                   1. Center will maintain patient outcomes that are moderate, major, life-
                                      threatening or fatal below 11 percent (Baseline FY06 – 10.71)
                                   2. Distribute a minimum of 100,000 poison prevention materials to 100%
                                      of the daycare centers in the District of Columbia.
                                   3. Manage at least 60% of reported poisonings at home without other
                                      healthcare intervention (Baseline FY06 – 60%)
                                   4. Handle a minimum of 7,100 poison related calls annually. (Baseline
                                      FY06 – 7049).
                               United Planning Organization:
                                   5. Increase the proportion of Daycare providers trained in providing care
                                      to children 0-4 years of age with asthma and/or asthma related
                                    symptoms.
                                6. Increase the proportion of parents trained in providing care for their
                                    children 0-4 years of age with asthma and/or asthma related
                                    symptoms.
                            Edgewood/Brookland Family Support Collaborative
                                7. Recruit 150 youth (ages 14-24) for the program
                                8. 95 youth will receive basic services and referrals to services
                                9. 55 youth will receive intensive case management services
                                10. Prevent and reduce youth violence, crime, and negative gang/crew
                                    activity.
                                11. Improve and expand access to services critical to family strengthening
                                    and youth development programs and resources.
                                12. Build the capacity of youth, residents and CBOs to engage in youth
                                    violence and crime prevention strategies for effective community
                                    change.
FY09 Performance Outcomes   National Capitol Poison Center
                                1. Of 5,259 (closed) human poison exposures 512 had moderate
                                    outcome, 84 had a major effect, and 12 deaths were reported. Thus,
                                    11.6% of poisoned patients had, moderate, major or fatal outcomes
                                    exceeding the target of less than 11.0%). (target not met)
                                2. Distributed 1,844, 276 poison prevention items to the public through
                                    health fairs, health professional offices, child care centers, and
                                    community organizations. Center distributed 61,301 prevention
                                    materials to 301 child care centers and preschools for distribution to
                                    20,223 children. Another 2,189 prevention pieces were sent to each of
                                    the 199 licensed DC child care homes. (Target met)
                                3. 58.8% of reported poisonings in patients of all ages in DC were
                                    managed at home without other healthcare intervention, 81.0% of
                                    reported poisonings in children younger than 6 years in DC were
                                    managed at home, without other health care intervention. (Target not
                                    met)
                                4. DC had a total of 8,766 toll-free confidential telephone consultation
                                    for poison emergencies and poison-related questions (Target met)
                            United Planning Organization
                                5. 42 daycare providers have received training in providing care to
                                    children 0-4 years of age with asthma and/or asthma related
                                    symptoms. Targeted population to be trained is 600 to date only 42
                                    have been trained. Note: Official training materials are in production
                                    stage. Vendor is confident that they will meet their goal to train 600
                                    daycare providers. The agreement has a second year option.
                            Edgewood/Brookland Family Support Collaborative
                            First quarter reporting - 1) 22 (15%) total youth recruited and enrolled for
                            services; 2) 8 youth recruited through partner agency for services; 3) 14 youth
                            were recruited through street outreach in Edgewood and Eckington; 4) 16
                            youth were assessed for case management services; 5) 15 youth are currently
                            receiving case management services, and 1 youth was not eligible for case
                            management, but was referred to a community partner for services.
FY10 Performance Measures   National Capitol Poison Center
                                1. Center will maintain patient outcomes that are moderate, major, life-
                                    threatening or fatal below 15 percent (FY 09 baseline was 11.5%)
                                2. Distribute a minimum of 100,000 poison prevention materials in the
                                    District of Columbia.
                                      3. Distribute poison prevention materials to all children enrolled in
                                         daycare centers or licensed family child care homes in the District of
                                         Columbia.
                                      4. Manage at least 70% of reported poisonings at home without other
                                         healthcare intervention (FY 09 60%)
                                      5. Handle a minimum of 7,100 poison related calls from DC residents
                                         annually. (FY 09 8,766).

FY10 Performance Outcomes         During Q1, PHHSBG released the latest round of RFA (2/12/10) with awards
                                  pending.

Other Comments: Having a highly reliable regional poison control center is an essential service for the
public’s health, as well as a prudent investment. Virtually all of the calls handled would have otherwise
used emergency rooms, and many persons would have been much more seriously ill or died without the
prompt intervention.
Program Title and Org. Code    Cancer and Chronic Disease Prevention Bureau (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code   Traumatic Brain Injury Implementation Program
Responsible Individual Name    Sherry Billings
Responsible Individual Title   Supervisory Public Health Advisor
Number of FTEs                 .45
Activity                       The purpose of the Traumatic Brain Injury Implementation Study is to address
Functions/Responsibilities     the needs and resources available to the homeless in the District of Columbia
                               for the homeless population, specifically those homeless individuals living
                               with a traumatic brain injury. Funding runs from 4/01/2008 through
                               3/31/2011.
Services within the Activity   In order to accomplish our goals and objectives for this three (3) year award
                               the following activities must happen: establishment the State TBI Advisory
                               Committee to identify services and accessibility to support systems for persons
                               with TBI and their families; 2) update and publish the DC and metropolitan
                               area TBI resources; 3) educate DC health clinics, homeless shelters, DC
                               agencies’ case managers; 5) establish a registry/tracking system on TBI; and 6)
                               develop an action plan for the integration of informal and formal systems of
                               support and care.

FY09 Performance Measures      1. Implementation of the TBI Advisory Committee
                               2. Development and implementation of the Internal Review Board
                                  Application
                               3. Development and implementation of the TBI Needs and Resources
                                  Assessment Survey Tool-300 interviews to be completed utilizing the
                                  population in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, missions, etc.
                               4. Implementation of Pilot Study and analysis
                               5. Implementation of TBI Needs and Resources Assessment Tool Survey -
                                  actual study
FY09 Performance Outcomes      1. Advisory Committee active with 25% membership consisting of persons
                                  with a TBI and/or family members
                               2. Received IRB approval to implement pilot study and needs and resource
                                  assessment tool survey
                               3. 35 interviews were completed in pilot study (March 2009) and analysis
                                  completed. Tool was updated and actual study began June 2009.
                               4. 150 surveys completed as of December 15, 2009
FY10 Performance Measures      1. Completion of 150+ interviews utilizing shelters, soup kitchens, day
                                  programs for the homeless, transition housing, etc.
                               2. Perform analysis and develop report for Mayor and City Council
                               3. Draft State Action Plan for DC Persons with TBI and their Families

FY10 Performance Outcomes      1. Completed 150 interviews in shelters, soup kitchens, day programs for the
                                  homeless, transition housing, etc.
                               2. Continued to engage robust advisory committee in the ongoing assessment
                                  of needs for this population.
Program Title and Org. Code    Bureau on Cancer and Chronic Disease (8502)
Activity Title and Org. Code   Asthma Program
Responsible Individual Name    Edwina Davis-Robinson
Responsible Individual Title   Asthma Program Coordinator
Number of FTEs (NTE)           2
Activity
Functions/Responsibilities
                               The DC Control Asthma Now (DC CAN) program supports the goals and
                               objectives of Healthy People 2010 for asthma: to reduce the number of
                               deaths, hospitalizations, emergency department visits, school or work days
                               missed, and limitations on activity due to asthma.

                               The Asthma Program has three major responsibilities to achieve the overall
                               program goals:

                                   1. To implement strategies outlined in the Asthma Strategic Plan
                                   2. To develop and maintain an asthma surveillance system and
                                      generate asthma epidemiological reports for the public.
                                   3. To collaborate with community partners to achieve overall program
                                      goals

Services within the Activity      Promote high quality asthma care for children with asthma in DC.
                                  Promote high quality asthma care for seniors (55 years of age and
                                   older).

FY09 Performance Measures         Decrease by 2% the rate of asthma-related emergency department (ED)
                                   utilization for children 0-17 years of age.
                                   (2005 baseline: 403 per 10,000)
                                   (Target: 395 per 10,000)
                                  Increase by 10% the number of Administration of Medication givers
                                   (AOM) in District of Columbia Public Schools (DC PS) trained in
                                   emergency medication administration by collaborating with the DOH,
                                   Child, Adolescent and School Health (CASH) Bureau and DCPS.
                                   (2008 baseline: 260 trained AOMs)
                                   (Target: 286 trained AOMs)
                                  Establish a baseline for the number of Standard Asthma Action Plans
                                   (AAP)) entered into the Health Office (school health electronic data
                                   management system).
                                   (2008 baseline: 0 AAPs entered into Health Office)
                                   (Target: 25% of available AAPs; exact number to be determined)
                                  Decrease by 2% the asthma-related hospitalization rate for adults 55
                                   years of age and older.
                                   (2005 baseline: 31 per 10,000)
                                   (Target: 30 per 10,000)
FY09 Performance Outcomes         The District experienced a 16% decline in the rate of asthma-related ED
                                   utilization for children 0-17 years for the period between 2005 and
                                   2007.
                                   (Outcome: 2006 - 368 per 10,000; 2007- 338 per 10,000)
                                  Fifteen percent (15%) fewer AOMs were trained to serve at DCOS sites
                                   by the end of FY 2009.
                                 (Outcome: 2009 - 220 trained AOMs)
                                Ultimately, the Health Office system was not designed to collect
                                 information on AAPs. In addition, there is currently insufficient staff to
                                 enter AAP data into Health Office. Currently, the DCCAN does not
                                 have a mechanism to capture the number of AAPs on file with DCPS.
                                 (Outcome: 0 AAPs entered into Health Office)
                                The asthma hospitalization rate for adults >55 year of age increased by
                                 almost 10% over the 2005 baseline.
                                 (Outcome: 2006 - 34 per 10,000)
FY 10 Performance Measures      Decrease by 3% the rate of asthma-related ED utilization for children 0-
                                 17 years of age.
                                 (2007 baseline: 338 per 10,000)
                                 (Target: 328 per 10,000)
                                Decrease by 2% the asthma-related hospitalization rate for adults 55
                                 years of age and older.
                                 (2006 baseline: 34 per 10,000)
                                 (Target: 33 per 10,000)
                                Increase to fifteen (15) the number of clinics engaged in the clinical
                                 asthma collaborative to improve asthma outpatient care (Quality
                                 Improvement Project).
                                 (2009 baseline: eight clinics)
                                 (Target: 15 clinics)
FY 10 Performance Outcomes      ED data for 2008 was collected in the first quarter of FY 2010 and will
                                 undergo analysis in the second quarter. Preliminary analysis indicates
                                 that ED asthma visit rate continues to decline.
                                The most recent hospitalization data will be analyzed by the third
                                 quarter of FY 2010.
                                Currently, eight (8) Children’s National Medical Center sites are
                                 participating in the Quality Improvement Project to improve quality of
                                 the asthma visits by implementing the NIH guidelines and utilizing an
                                 electronic medical record system.
Activity Title and Org. Code   Chronic Care Initiative
Responsible Individual Name    Joanne Lynn, MD, MA, MS
Responsible Individual Title   Bureau Chief, Cancer and Chronic Disease
Number of FTEs (NTE)           0
Activity
Functions/Responsibilities     The Chronic Care Initiative aims to
                                   Improve the experience of care for persons living with any of six
                                      major causes of death in DC (chronic lung disease, chronic heart
                                      disease, stroke, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes)
                                   Reduce the burden of these diseases for the population living in DC
                                   Increase the efficiency of care, reducing costs

                               The Initiative is developing the capacity of the community partners to test
                               potential strategies and use evidence to guide system and process
                               improvements. One grantee is specifically charged with supporting training
                               and coaching in the methods of quality improvement. The CCI is
                               encouraging collaborations among service providers and interchanging
                               patient records. The CCI is engendering a set of measures to guide city-
                               wide improvement work.

Services within the Activity   Each grantee provides improved services, and the Initiative overall provides
                               services to community partners in enabling successful quality improvement
                               and sustainable process changes.

FY09 Performance Measures
                                  Initiate the CCI
                                  Establish first set of improvement activities by summer 2009
FY09 Performance Outcomes         First CCI RFA was issued, receiving over 44 applicants and awarding a
                                   total of 12 grants in effect by June.
                                  Learning Sessions and Chronic Care Coalition occurred as scheduled
                                  The Chronic Care Coalition has 120 active members
                                  3 learning sessions were held with 50-60 attendees on average.

FY 10 Performance Measures        Establishment of city-wide measures to gauge increases in quality
                                   improvement for health care facilities and systems
                                  Establishment of 75% of projects showing substantial and measurable
                                   gains, for example an increase in transfer of information between
                                   hospital discharge and medical home, or increased availability of self
                                   care education to vulnerable populations
                                  All grantees and additional broad array of stakeholders (including
                                   consumer groups, neighborhood reps, clinical providers and disease
                                   based organizations) involved in a city-wide coalition to use data, set
                                   priorities and ensure spread.
FY 10 Performance Outcomes        CCI has an established coalition with grantees and partners testing
                                   systems change such as hospital transfer and self care education. CCI is
                                   seeing an increase in transfer of information between hospital
                                   discharge and medical home, and increased availability of self care
                                   education to vulnerable populations
                                  A second CCI RFA was issued; results of objective review and awards
                                   are pending.
   The next CCI Learning Session is scheduled for Monday, January 25th.
   Consultant has been hired to assist in establishing measures and
    measurement tools.
   Working with HIT partners to improve patient outcomes by establishing
    link between hospital discharge and medical home.
                   Pharmaceutical Procurement and Distribution Bureau (8503)



Program Title and Org. Code      Pharmacy Procurement and Distribution Bureau (8503)
Activity Title and Org. Code     Pharmaceutical Procurement and Distribution Bureau


Responsible Individual Name      Carolyn Rachel-Price R. Ph.

Responsible Individual Title     Bureau Chief

Number of FTEs                    7

                                 The DOH Warehouse is a licensed drug distribution center that
Activity                         administers the drug component of the Department of Health and the
Functions/Responsibilities:      Department of Health Care Finance programs that require prescription
                                 medications as part of their protocol. The Warehouse purchases,
                                 receives, stores and distributes drugs, vaccines for immunization and
                                 addiction and recovery medications. We also procure for emergency
                                 response services and facilitate SNS medications as required. Because
                                 the DOH Warehouse purchases medications at DOD pricing, the
                                 significant discount provides substantial savings on drug costs for the
                                 District.
                                 The DOH Warehouse currently services nine programs with a
                                 purchasing budget of $ 29,949,658




Services within the Activity     Services of the DOH Warehouse:

                                         a. Purchase pharmaceuticals at DOD prices
                                         b. Provide drugs at the most cost efficient prices through
                                              constant review of supplier database and drug price updates.
                                         c. Maintain drug formularies for all programs
                                         d. Maintain quality assurance measures of the programs
                                         e. Provide cost analysis and drug utilization information for
                                              programs local government and CMS reporting
                                         f.   Maintain budget requirements of each program
                                         g. Maintain P&T and other clinical component for programs as
                                              required
                                         h. Maintain regulatory and licensing compliance with HRLA

                                  Percent of all pharmaceutical requests will be processed within 72 hours
FY09 Performance Measures        (Goal: 98%)
                                Percent of all pharmaceutical requests were processed within 72 hours:
FY09 Performance Outcomes       99%

                                 Percent of all pharmaceutical requests will be processed within 72 hours
FY10 Performance Measures       (Goal: 98%)

                                Percent of all pharmaceutical requests were processed within 72 hours:
FY10 Performance Outcomes (to   99%
date)




Other Comments:
Program Title and Org. Code           Primary Care (8504)
Activity Title and Org. Code          Health Center and Hospital Capital Expansion
Responsible Individual Name           Lauren Ratner
Responsible Individual Title          Primary Care Bureau Chief
Number of FTEs                        .2
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   Provide funding and oversight for capital expansion projects aimed
                                      at building new and improving existing health center facilities.




Services within the Activity                 Track progress of ongoing capital projects and ensure funds
                                              are spent appropriately
                                             Track impact of completed projects on access to care
                                             Participate in RFA development and review of submissions
                                              for capitol health program capital funds



FY09 Performance Measures                    Compete 2 rounds of funding for capital expansion
                                             Fund 100% of projects recommended for funding


FY09 Performance Outcomes                    2 rounds of funding competed In FY09
                                             100% of projects recommended for funding in FY2009 were
                                              issued notice of intent to award in FY09. Grant agreements
                                              were finalized in FY10 have or are in the process of being
                                              funded. Three grant agreements totaling a commitment of:
                                              $50,755,000 was enacted in FY09 (Washington Hospital
                                              Center, United Medical Center, and DCPCA) in support of 6
                                              capital projects.


FY 10 Performance Measures                   Total number of projects funded by DOH with Tobacco
                                              Settlement Funds will increase from 6 to 9
                                             100% of projects recommended for funding will be funded


FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to               One new project has been funded and two are in the
date)                                         process of being funded (i.e. grant agreements being
                                              finalized)
                                             60% of recommended projects have been/are in the process
                                              of being funded. A total of 5 projects were recommended for
                                              funding; one award was denied by the grantee based on the
                                              funding level recommended, and one award is contingent on
                                              DMPED’s allowance of building use by the grantee
                                              (pending).


     Other Comments:




                                                     2
Program Title and Org. Code           Primary Care Bureau (8504)
Activity Title and Org. Code          Refugee Health Program
Responsible Individual Name           Kaleb Johnson
Responsible Individual Title          Refugee Health Coordinator
Number of FTEs                        1 (100% federal share, Office of Refugee Settlement)
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   The Refugee Health Program registers all eligible refugees
                                      (refugees, asylees, Survivors of Torture, Cuban/Haitian Entrants,
                                      Afghani/Iraqi Entrants, Victims of Human Trafficking,
                                      Unaccompanied Alien Children, Amerasians, and other entrants as
                                      dictated by the State) for a health assessment at a community clinic
                                      within the first 90 days of arrival and ensures each refugee receives
                                      health insurance and care for the first 8 months of resettlement.
                                      Additionally, the Program provides refugees with information on all
                                      DOH programs and communicates other health-related programs in
                                      the community.
Services within the Activity          The Program provides health insurance case management to
                                      refugee clients and acts as the link between patient and provider.
                                      Clients receive assistance sufficient to apply for public health
                                      insurance and other benefits, chose and enroll in a health plan, and
                                      chose and schedule an appointment with a primary care provider.

FY09 Performance Measures             Number of refugees receiving a health screening; Days from Date of
                                      Arrival/Asylum Approval to screening; Health statistics based on the
                                      screening

FY09 Performance Outcomes             Close to 400 refugees were registered for the Program and all but a
                                      few (less than 20) received health screenings. All health screening
                                      results and instance reports are on file.


FY 10 Performance Measures            Number of refugees receiving a health screening; Days from Date of
                                      Arrival/Asylum Approval to screening; Health statistics based on the
                                      screening

FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to        About 50 refugees have been registered in the Program and have
date)                                 received a health screening to date.




                                                     1
Primary Care Bureau (8504)

  Program Title and Org. Code           Primary Care Bureau (8504)
  Activity Title and Org. Code          Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO)
  Responsible Individual Name           Lauren Ratner
  Responsible Individual Title          Primary Care Bureau Chief
  Number of FTEs                        .2
  Activity Functions/Responsibilities   Support the development of a health information exchange network
                                        among providers of care in the District




  Services within the Activity             Provide budget and programmatic oversight for the RHIO project
                                           Represent RHIO project at internal and cross-agency HIE
                                            planning meetings
                                           Otherwise promote coordination of District HIE activities with the
                                            RHIO




  FY09 Performance Measures                Number of CHCs participating in the RHIO - 6
                                           Number of hospitals participating in the RHIO - 2
                                           Number of residents impacted by the RHIO implementation –
                                            90,000

  FY09 Performance Outcomes                6 health centers
                                           2 hospitals participating in the RHIO
                                           93,086 patients represented in the RHIO (40,891 patients at six
                                            community health centers and 52,195 patients from two
                                            hospitals). However, as RHIO has not gone live yet, the impact
                                            on these residents has not yet been realized.

  FY 10 Performance Measures               Live data exchange
                                           Increase the number of health centers participating in the RHIO
                                            from 6 to 8 (representing the addition of data from 30 additional
                                            sites)
                                           Increase from 2 to 5 the number of hospitals participating in the
                                            RHIO
                                           Establish connectivity with the Medicaid Patient Data Hub (PDH)
                                           Establish governance structure for RHIO


  FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to           RHIO is expected to “go live” on March 1, 2010
  date)                                    Two additional health centers have been identified
                                           3 additional hospitals have been identified
                                           Discussions regarding the interface between the RHIO and the
                                            PDH between DCPCA, DHCF and DOH are ongoing
                                           DOH is working with DCPCA to ensure DCPCA develops and
                                            implements a plan for the RHIO governance structure
Other Comments:



                                                       1
Program Title and Org. Code           Primary Care (8504)
Activity Title and Org. Code          Operation of Ambulatory Care Center (ACC) and former Public
                                      Benefit Corporation Clinics (PBCs)
Responsible Individual Name           Lauren Ratner
Responsible Individual Title          Primary Care Bureau Chief
Number of FTEs                        .2
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   Provide funding and oversight for a grant to ensure the provision of
                                      primary and specialty care services at 6 sites formerly associated
                                      with DC General Hospital.




Services within the Activity                 Work with grantee to establish service portfolios at each of
                                              the sights and track utilization
                                             Identify quality of care issues and work with grantee (Unity)
                                              to implement responsive solutions
                                             Negotiate facility issues at DC-owned or licensed properties




FY09 Performance Measures                    Unity Health Care, Inc. will provide services to patients
                                              through 95,000 visits at the former PBC sites
                                             Capitol Health Management Services (CHMS) will provide
                                              services to patients through 29,000 visits at the ACC


FY09 Performance Outcomes                    There were a total of 97,948 visits at the former PBC sites in
                                              FY09
                                             There were a total of 29,337 visits at the ACC in FY09


FY 10 Performance Measures                   Unity will provide 120,000 unduplicated patient visits
                                             100% of all patient complaints regarding services provided
                                              under the Unity grant will be documented and investigated
                                              by the DOH

FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to               In the first quarter of FY2010, Unity provided services during
date)                                         22,374 visits.
                                             The Project Officer has received, documented and
                                              investigated 3 patient complaints


     Other Comments:




                                                     2
Program Title and Org. Code            Primary Care Bureau (8504)
Activity Title and Org. Code           Workforce Recruitment & Retention
Responsible Individual Name            Lauren Ratner
Responsible Individual Title           Primary Care Bureau Chief
Number of FTEs                         1.5 (1 FTE position vacant since October 2009)
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   The Primary Care Bureau’s workforce recruitment and retention
                                      activities support access to high quality primary healthcare services
                                      within a comprehensive and integrated healthcare delivery system
                                      through incentive programs that recruit primary care providers to
                                      practice in the District, training programs for allied and community
                                      health workers, and assessments of provider shortages and the
                                      need for new and updated Health Professional Shortage Areas
                                      (HPSA) designations and Medically Underserved Areas (MUAs).




Services within the Activity             Assists in the development of placement sites and placement
                                          recommendations for National Health Service Corps. Provider
                                          placement throughout the District of Columbia
                                         Administers the J-1 Visa waiver program that secures committed
                                          (foreign) primary care and selected specialty physicians to serve
                                          for 3-year periods in underserved communities
                                         Operates the DC Health Professional Loan Repayment Program
                                          (HPLRP), providing loan repayment for providers committed
                                          primary care, psychiatric and dental providers in underserved
                                          communities
                                         Inventories the supply of providers in the District and otherwise
                                          assesses the need for new and updated Health Professional
                                          Shortage Areas, Medically Underserved Populations (MUP) and
                                          Medically Underserved Areas (MUA).
                                         Provides grant funding to promote expansion of training for
                                          under- and un- employed District residents in allied health and
                                          community health

FY09 Performance Measures                Increase access to care by increasing the number of providers
                                          placed in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) and
                                          Medically Underserved Areas (MUA) or populations that are
                                          underserved from 26 to 36. Providers will be placed through the
                                          DC Health Professional Loan Repayment Program, National
                                          Health Service Corps and the J-1 Visa Waiver Program.

                                         Increase access to care by increasing the number of Health
                                          Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) Facility Designations from
                                          2 to 5.

                                         Increase access to care for vulnerable populations in
                                          underserved areas by increasing the number of primary care
                                          treatment sites from 50 to 60.

                                         Retain 40 percent of DC Health Professional Loan Repayment
                                          Program, National Health Service Corps and J-1 Visa Program
                                          providers in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) and
                                          Medically Underserved Areas (MUA) after their commitment
                                          period.
                                                     3
  FY09 Performance Outcomes           There were 123 providers practicing in HPSAs and/or MUAs in
                                       the District in FY2009 including: 12 J-1participants (4 approved
                                       in FY2009), 33 providers (24 approved in FY2009) in the Health
                                       Professional Loan Repayment Program, and 78 providers (27
                                       approved in FY2009) in the National Health Service Corps
                                       placed in HPSAs and MUAs.
                                      10 facilities had current HPSA designations in FY2009; these
                                       included: 7 dental, 7 mental health, and 8 primary care HPSAs
                                       for facilities in HPSAs and MUAs.
                                      Number of access points for primary care: assessment in
                                       progress
                                      In FY09, the retention rate for the J-1 program completers was
                                       100% (N=3) and for the HPLRP was 100% (N=3).

  FY 10 Performance Measures          DOH will increase the number of J-1 Visa waiver
                                       recommendations for FY10 from 3 to 5.
                                      100% of HPSAs up for renewal that still qualify for designation
                                       will be renewed
                                      80% of new HPLRP contracts will be for providers serving in
                                       HPSAs that are appropriate for their disciplines
                                      Approve 100% of eligible NHSC site applications submitted
                                      Increase from 0 to 1 the number of recruitment materials
                                       available for DC’s primary care workforce programs

  FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to      1 recommendation for J-1 Visa waivers
  date)                               HPSA renewals in progress
                                      Due to funding limitations, 1 new HPLRP contract has been
                                       signed since the start of the fiscal year; the contract was for a
                                       mental health provider to practice in a mental health HPSA.
                                      1 NHSC site application submitted and approved
                                      Development of recruitment materials in progress


Other Comments:




                                                   3
    Office of the Senior Deputy Director (8510)

Program Title and Org. Code           Office of the Senior Deputy Director (8510)
Activity Title and Org. Code          Office of the Senior Deputy Director
Responsible Individual Name           Sandra Robinson
Responsible Individual Title          Interim Senior Deputy Director
Number of FTEs                         32
Activity Functions/Responsibilities
                                          The CHA Office of the Senior Deputy Director houses the
                                          Deputy Director for Operations, the Deputy Director for Policy
                                          and Programs, Office of Support Services, and the Office of
                                          Grants Monitoring and Program Evaluation. These divisions
                                          coordinate and help develop an integrated community-based
                                          health care delivery system, ensure access to preventative and
                                          primary health care, and foster citizen and community
                                          participation towards improving the health outcomes of women,
                                          infants, children, ( including children with special needs), and
                                          other family members in the District of Columbia. The Office of
                                          the Senior Deputy Director also houses the fiscal, procurement,
                                          administrative services, grants monitoring and evaluation and
                                          human resources personnel.

Services within the Activity                 Grant, sub-grant and contract management and evaluation.

                                             Staff supervision, training and career development.

                                             Fiscal and human resources management.

                                             Administrative services management.

                                             Data and performance measures evaluation and analyses.

                                             Program evaluation.

                                             Procurement of goods and services.

FY09 Performance Measures                % procurement actions processed with 3days of receipt
                                         % of personnel actions processed within 3 days of receipt
                                         Submit to Management 80% of all final grant budgets or financial
                                          reports 7 days before due date
                                         Expend at least 95% of approved grant budget excluding
                                          carryover funds during fiscal year
FY09 Performance Outcomes                90% of procurement actions processed with 3 days of receipt
                                         92% of personnel actions processed within 3 days of receipt
                                         50% of all final grant budgets or financial reports were submitted
                                          to management 7 days before due date
                                         Expended 96% of approved grant budget excluding carryover
                                          funds during fiscal year
FY 10 Performance Measures               % procurement actions processed with 3days of receipt
                                         % of personnel actions processed within 3 days of receipt
                                         Submit to Management 80% of all final grant budgets or financial
                                          reports 7 days before due date
                                         Expend at least 95% of approved grant budget excluding
                                          carryover funds during fiscal year
FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to
date)                            No performance data is available at this time
Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau (8511)


   Program Title and Org. Code      Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau - (8511)
   Activity Title and Org. Code     Eliminating Disparities In Perinatal Health Wards 5,6,7, & 8 - DC
                                    Healthy Start I and II
   Responsible Individual Name      Karen P. Watts, RNC, FACHE, FAHM, PMP
   Responsible Individual Title      Chief, Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau
   Number of FTEs                    48
   Activity                         Healthy Start is designed to reduce perinatal health disparities and
   Functions/Responsibilities       promote healthy lifestyles among pregnant and parenting women
                                    residing in Wards 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the District of Columbia. The
                                    project uses a blended model of Nurse Case Managers (NCM), and
                                    Family Support Workers (FSWs) to provide home visitation;
                                    physical and risk assessment; screening, referral; health education;
                                    and medical care coordination. For clients in the prenatal phase, the
                                    NCM provides physical assessment that includes monitoring vital
                                    signs, i.e., blood pressure; weight, and uterine fundal height. In
                                    addition, nurses monitor fetal heart tones and movement. The Project
                                    is comprised of the following components: Nurse Case Management;
                                    Outreach and Recruitment; Health Education; and Consortium.
                                    Healthy Start services are augmented through a grant award from
                                    CareFirst Blue Cross/Blue Shield. In addition DCHS operates the
                                    Maternal Outreach Mobile (MOM) Unit that provides services
                                    throughout the city. These services include: health education,
                                    screening and referral, lab test collection, and initial prenatal
                                    examinations by the Nurse Practitioner on high risk pregnant
                                    women. All women seen on the MOM Unit are assisted with
                                    identifying a medical home for continued prenatal care.

   Services within the Activity     Nurse Case Management - Patient assessment, screening i.e.,
                                    domestic violence, depression, HIV, etc.; referral; and medical care
                                    coordination Health educations
                                    Outreach and Recruitment - canvassing ; health education, health
                                    fairs/community events
                                    Health Education - focus groups; training sessions; In-service
                                    training.
   FY09 Performance Measures        Number of women in case management. (Target 500)

                                    Number of prenatal visits per program enrollee. (Target 2 per month)

                                    Number of postpartum visits per program enrollee. (Target 1 per
                                    month)
   FY09 Performance Outcomes        620 Number of women in case management.

                                    1.5 Number of prenatal visits per program enrollee.

                                    1.1 Number of postpartum visits per program enrollee.
FY 10 Performance Measures       Number of women in case management. (Target 500)

                                 Number of prenatal visits per program enrollee. (Target 2 per month)

                                 Number of postpartum visits per program enrollee. (Target 1 per
                                 month)
FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to   344 Number of women in case management.
date)
                                 1.3 Number of prenatal visits per program enrollee.

                                 0.98 Number of postpartum visits per program enrollee.
Program Title and Org. Code     Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau - (8511)
Activity Title and Org. Code     Safe Crib Program
Responsible Individual Name      Sharon Brandon
Responsible Individual Title     Program Coordinator
Number of FTEs                   1
Activity                        The goal of the Safe Crib program is to reduce the infant mortality
Functions/Responsibilities      rate and likelihood of Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID),
                                suffocation, and roll over caused by bed sharing. The program
                                promotes and educates parents and caregivers on providing a healthy
                                sleeping environment for infants. Once educated, the mother or
                                caregiver is provided with a crib and mattress to insure a safe
                                sleeping environment for their infant.




Services within the Activity    Enrollment; education and training; information dissemination;
                                referral; advocacy.




FY09 Performance Measures       Number of cribs distributed. (Target 500)




FY09 Performance Outcomes       537 Number of cribs distributed.




FY10 Performance Measures       Number of cribs distributed. (Target 500)

                                Number of Pack-n-Plays distributed. (Target 400)
FY10 Performance Outcomes (to   125 Number of cribs distributed.
date)
                                15 Number of Pack-n-Plays distributed.
Program Title and Org. Code           Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau (8500)
Activity Title and Org. Code          DC Linkage and Tracking System /50300
Responsible Individual Name
                                      Karen P. Watts, RNC, FACHE, FAHM, PMP
Responsible Individual Title           Program Manager
Number of FTEs                         2
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   Designed to identify, refer, and facilitates the linkage of children
                                      into comprehensive services, who are at-risk for developmental
                                      delays and disabilities. Registered nurses conduct home visits to
                                      assess the developmental and neurological status of children and
                                      provide referral and/or education to parents and family members
                                      about child growth and developmental milestones.




Services within the Activity          Assessment, referral; information dissemination; patient education.



FY09 Performance Measures             These activities were put on hold do to an unsigned MOU and a
                                      lack of funding from Department of Health Care Financing.




FY09 Performance Outcomes




FY10 Performance Measures


FY10 Performance Outcomes (to
date)
   Program Title and Org. Code        Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau (8511)
   Activity Title and Org. Code       Newborn Metabolic Screening Program
   Responsible Individual Name        Yvockeea Monterio
   Responsible Individual Title       Program Specialist
   Number of FTEs                     1.5
   Activity                           The Genetics and Metabolic Screening Program provides newborn
   Functions/Responsibilities         screening services for metabolic and genetic disorders to children
                                      born in the District of Columbia. Genetic counseling and education;
                                      clinical evaluation and management; diagnostic procedures
                                      (including laboratory testing), referrals; and follow-up services
                                      including pediatric genetic is offered to clients with metabolic
                                      disorders.


   Services within the Activity       Patient follow-up and parent education




   FY09 Performance Measures          % of positive screened newborns who received timely follow-up to
                                      definitive diagnosis and clinical management.

                                      Decrease the number of newborns lost to follow-up.



   FY09 Performance Outcomes          15,488 Newborns screened
                                      1,379 Newborns requiring follow-up
                                      NA      Lost to follow-up due to inaccurate contact information. (Not
                                      captured in FY09)


   FY 10 Performance Measures         % of positive screened newborns who received timely follow-up to
                                      definitive diagnosis and clinical management. (Base lining in FY10)

                                      Decrease the number of newborns lost to follow-up. (Base lining in
                                      FY10)


   FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to     3,507 Newborns screened – FY 10 to date
   date)                              265 Newborns requiring follow-up
                                      10% Lost to follow-up due to inaccurate contact information

Other Comments:
Program was realigned with the Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau effective 10/01/08
  Program Title and Org. Code      Child, Adolescent, and School Health Bureau (8511)
  Activity Title and Org. Code     Sickle Cell Disease Program
  Responsible Individual Name      Brenda Anderson
  Responsible Individual Title     Program Analyst
  Number of FTEs                   0
  Activity                         Ensures that infants identified with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a
  Functions/Responsibilities       medical home to ensure access to ongoing comprehensive family-
                                   centered and community-based health care. The program links
                                   patients to comprehensive sickle cell sites and community resources
                                   and promotes the principles of family-centered care. Education and
                                   counseling is provided for families with hemoglobinopathy related
                                   outcomes, as well as education regarding SCD, trait, and the benefits
                                   of screening and comprehensive follow-up to the general public.




  Services within the Activity     Case management/care coordination; education and information
                                   dissemination; counseling and follow-up services.



  FY09 Performance Measures        # infants screening positive for sickle cell disease

                                   # infants screening positive for sickle cell trait

                                   # infants referred to DC GAPS

  FY09 Performance Outcomes        32 infants screening positive for sickle cell disease

                                   644 infants screening positive for sickle cell trait

                                   32 infants referred to DC GAPS

  FY 10 Performance Measures       # infants screening positive for sickle cell disease

                                   # infants screening positive for sickle cell trait

                                   # infants referred to DC GAPS (Target 100%)

  FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to   7 infants screening positive for sickle cell disease
  date)
                                   180 infants screening positive for sickle cell trait

                                   7 infants referred to DC GAPS



Other Comments:
   Program Title and Org. Code         Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau- (8511)
   Activity Title and Org. Code        Universal Newborn Hearing Screening
   Responsible Individual Name         Caroline Sunshine
   Responsible Individual Title        Program Manager
   Number of FTEs                      1.5
   Activity                           The Newborn Hearing Screening Program (DC Hears) ensures that
   Functions/Responsibilities         infants with hearing loss have access services for optimal
                                      communication skill development.


   Services within the Activity       Patient identification and enrollment; patient referral; diagnostic
                                      assessment; follow-up; hearing amplification; education patient
                                      monitoring and information dissemination.



   FY09 Performance Measures          Number of newborns screened for hearing prior to hospital
                                      discharge.

                                      % of newborns screened for hearing prior to hospital discharge
                                      (Target – 100%).

   FY09 Performance Outcomes          15,964 Number of newborns screened for hearing prior to hospital
                                      discharge.

                                      100 % newborns screened for hearing loss before hospital discharge.

   FY 10 Performance Measures         Number of newborns screened for hearing prior to hospital discharge

                                      % of newborns screened for hearing prior to hospital discharge
                                      (Target – 100%).

   FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to     1,313 Number of newborns screened for hearing prior to hospital
   date)                              discharge

                                      42 % newborns screened for hearing loss before hospital discharge.

Other Comments: Program was realigned with the Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau effective 10/01/08
   Program Title and Org. Code        Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau (8511)
   Activity Title and Org. Code       Vision Screening Program
   Responsible Individual Name        Vacant
   Responsible Individual Title       Program Specialist
   Number of FTEs                    .5
   Activity
   Functions/Responsibilities        Provides vision screenings and glasses to uninsured or under insured
                                     children in Head Start, elementary, junior high school




   Services within the Activity      Identification; referral diagnostic evaluation; patient education
                                     tracking and follow-up services.




   FY09 Performance Measures         Due to the realignment of the Community Health Administration
                                     these services were discontinued as of October 1, 2008.



   FY09 Performance Outcomes




   FY 10 Performance Measures


   FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to
   date)

Other Comments: This Program has been relocated to the Child, Adolescent & School Health Bureau
  Program Title and Org. Code      Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau (8511)
  Activity Title and Org. Code     Care Coordination Program
  Responsible Individual Name      Pending
  Responsible Individual Title     Program Specialist
  Number of FTEs                   .50
  Activity                         Ensures that children with special health care needs have access to
  Functions/Responsibilities       appropriate comprehensive, community-based services to maximize
                                   optimal care and development, through a coordinated system of
                                   resources and referrals.




  Services within the Activity     Patient referral; therapeutic services; patient education, counseling
                                   and information dissemination.




  FY09 Performance Measures        Due to the realignment of the Community Health Administration
                                   these services were discontinued as of October 1, 2008.



  FY09 Performance Outcomes




  FY 10 Performance Measures



  FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to
  date)



Other Comments:
   Program Title and Org. Code        Perinatal and Infant Health Bureau (8511)
   Activity Title and Org. Code       Epilepsy Program
   Responsible Individual Name        Vacant
   Responsible Individual Title       Program Specialist
   Number of FTEs                     1
   Activity                          Provides services to children and youth with epilepsy residing in
   Functions/Responsibilities        medically underserved areas. The project seeks to engage in a
                                     coordinated and collaborative framework embraced by key partners
                                     utilizing a Family Advocate Model and Learning Collaborative to
                                     enhance a medical home approach.




   Services within the Activity      Care coordination; advocacy; training; technical assistance
                                     education and information dissemination.




   FY09 Performance Measures         Due to the realignment of the Community Health Administration
                                     these services were transferred to the CASH Bureau (8514) as of
                                     October 1, 2008.


   FY09 Performance Outcomes




   FY 10 Performance Measures


   FY 10 Performance outcomes (to
   date)


Other Comments: This Program has been relocated to the Child, Adolescent & School Health Bureau
Nutrition & Physical Fitness Bureau (8513)
    Program Title and Org. Code       Nutrition and Physical Fitness Bureau (8513)
    Activity Title and Org. Code      Commodity Supplemental Food Program/Supplemental Nutrition
                                      Program for Women Infants and Children, Special Nutrition
                                      Assistance Program Education, WIC and Senior Farmers’ Market
                                      Nutrition Programs
    Responsible Individual Name       Michele A. Tingling-Clemmons
    Responsible Individual Title      Bureau Chief
    Number of FTEs                    26
    Activity
    Functions/Responsibilities         The Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) provides
                                      supplemental USDA-funded commodity foods to eligible pregnant
                                      and postpartum women, children, and seniors 60 years and older
                                      residing in the District of Columbia. CSFP serves participants
                                      monthly through local public and private agencies. Eligible clients
                                      are provided a monthly food package, which supplies the nutrients
                                      needed for growth and maintenance of good health. To be eligible
                                      for CSFP an applicant must be a District resident, categorically
                                      eligible, and have low income (less than 185% of the poverty level
                                      for women, infants and children, and less than 130% for seniors).
                                      The CSFP also provides nutrition information and referrals to other
                                      health and social services.

                                       The Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and
                                      Children serves low-income pregnant and postpartum women,
                                      infants and children (185% of poverty or below and DC residents) by
                                      providing nutrition education and a monthly nutrition
                                      prescription/food package, as well as breastfeeding promotion and
                                      support.

                                       The mission of the Washington, D.C. EAT SMART MOVE
                                      MORE – Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education
                                      (SNAP-ED) is to develop and implement community-based nutrition
                                      education programs for families with young children, youth, the
                                      elderly, and individuals who receive or are eligible to receive Food
                                      Stamps. The goal of nutrition education in the SNAP-ED is to
                                      provide educational programs that increase, within a limited budget,
                                      the likelihood of all Food Stamp recipients making healthy food
                                      choices consistent with the most recent dietary advice as reflected in
                                      the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and My Pyramid plan.

                                       The WIC and Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Programs
                                      provide high-quality, low-cost fresh fruits and vegetables to eligible
                                      clients. Nutrition information is provided to increase participants’
                                      knowledge of the importance of consuming fruits and vegetables and
                                      to facilitate changes in dietary behavior leading to increased
                                      consumption of fruits and vegetables among WIC and CSFP Senior
                                      participants and the community at large. WIC and Senior customers
                                      receive 30 dollars of market checks enabling an average of 9,000
                                      high-risk pregnant women and children 2-5 years old enrolled in
                                      WIC and an average of 6500 seniors 60 and older enrolled in CSFP
                                      to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables from certified local Farmers’
                                      Markets in 2009.
Services within the Activity          Provides monthly food package – CSFP
                                      Provides supplemental food prescriptions – WIC
                                      Conducts Nutrition education – WIC, CSFP, SNAP-ED,
                                       FMNP & SFMNP
                                      Performs Food demonstrations
                                      Provides breastfeeding promotion and support – WIC
                                      Provides Farmers’ Market produce – FMNP & SFMNP

FY09 Performance Measures      Increase the average monthly CSFP enrollment of eligible women,
                               infants, children and seniors to improve the health and nutrition
                               status of participants above the USDA assigned caseload (6,647 for
                               2009) by 2%

                               Ensure that 75% of participants receive at least 1 nutrition education
                               contact within a 6 month certification period to improve participants’
                               health status.

                               Increase number of WIC postpartum women who initiate
                               breastfeeding from 48% to 50% to improve maternal and infant
                               health.

                               Ensure that 95% of WIC participants receive a nutrition education
                               contact during a 6-month certification period.

                               Increase enrollment among pregnant postpartum and breastfeeding
                               women, children and infants by 2% to make WIC benefits available
                               to more eligible residents. (FY 2008:18,502) (FY 2009:19,596)

                               An average of 90% of potentially eligible SNAP residents provided
                               SNAP-ED nutrition education will receive information that will
                               enable them to make healthy food choices and engage in daily
                               physical activity

                               Increase total number of potentially eligible SNAP residents
                               provided SNAP-ED nutrition education by 5% to promote healthy
                               food choices and physically active lifestyles.
                               (2008 Baseline, 11,915; 2009 Actual, 15,279 nutrition education
                               contacts

                               Increase farmers’ market voucher redemption rate among WIC
                               (FMNP) and CSFP (SFMNP) Senior participants by 2% to promote
                               increased fruit and vegetable consumption as a part of a healthy diet.
                               (FY 2008: 71%-FMNP, 87%-SFMNP; FY 2009: NA*)
                               * There is a problem with the data in the system. We are working on
                               resolving the issue.
FY09 Performance Outcomes      Increase of 8% average enrollment of eligible women, infants,
                               children and seniors to improve the health and nutrition status of
                               participants above USDA assigned CSFP caseload. (FY09 caseload,
                               6,647; average monthly enrollment, 7,172. FY08 caseload, 6,880;
                               average monthly enrollment, 7,763.)

                               An average of 90% of CSFP participants received at least 1 nutrition
                               education contact within each 6 month certification period to
                               improve participants’ health status.
                            FY 08 the average monthly participation 6,635. # of participants
                            receiving nutrition education within a 6 month
                            certification period was 5,970 or 90%;
                            FY 09, the average monthly participation was 6,447. # of
                            participants receiving nutrition education within a 6 month
                            certification period was 5,500 or 85%.

                            An average 3% increase of WIC postpartum women – from 48% to
                            50% - initiated breastfeeding to improve maternal and infant health.
                            (FY 2008:1,552/3,221=48% and
                            FY 2009:1641/3234=51%)

                            Ninety-six percent of WIC participants received a nutrition
                            education contact during a 6-month certification period. (FY
                            2008:3,328/3,469=96% and FY 2009:3464/3616=96%)

                            Enrollment of pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women,
                            children and infants increased by 6%, making WIC benefits
                            available to more eligible residents.
                            (FY 2008:18,502) (FY 2009:19,596)

                            The total number of potentially eligible SNAP residents provided
                            SNAP-ED nutrition education information.
                            FY 08 11,915 Baseline FY09 15,279 (28% increase)


                            An average of 100% of potentially eligible SNAP residents was
                            provided nutrition education information to enable them to make
                            healthy food choices and engage in daily physical activity.
                            FY09 15,279 nutrition education contacts
                                   15,279 residents provided nutrition education information
                            (100%)

                            Increased WIC FMNP Check redemption rate in
                             FY08 72% FY07 61%

                            Increased CSFP Senior FMNP check redemption rate in
                             FY08 87% FY 07 82%.

FY10 Performance Measures   Ensure that 95% of WIC participants receive a nutrition education
                            contact during a 6-month certification period.

                            Increase average monthly CSFP enrollment by 2%.

                            * Increase the total number of potentially eligible SNAP residents
                            provided SNAP-ED nutrition education by 3% to promote healthy
                            food choices and physically active lifestyles.

                            **Increase WIC FMNP check redemption rate by 2%.

                            **Increase CSFP Senior FMNP check redemption rate by 2%.
    FY10 Performance Outcomes           An average of 96% of WIC participants received at least 1 nutrition
    (to date)                           education contact within each 6 month certification period to
                                        improve participants’ health status. (October –
                                        January:3,481/3628=96%)

                                        CSFP enrollment for first quarter is 99% of USDA-assigned FY2010
                                        caseload 6,647. Oct- Dec. Avg monthly enrollment
                                        6,559

                                        Number of potentially eligible SNAP residents provided SNAP-ED
                                        nutrition education.

                                        FY10 Oct-Jan 2,639 nutrition education contacts
                                                     2,639 residents provided nutrition education
                                                          information


Other Comments:

*      CSFP performances in FY 2009 are impacted by budget cuts, departmental changes, bureau move and
changes in support services that directly affect our ability to deliver services.

**     We do no have final Farmers’ Market redemption figures from the data processing contractor for fiscal
year 2009 market season.
Program Title and Org. Code           Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)
Activity Title and Org. Code          State Implementation Grants for Integrated Community Systems for
                                      CSHCN
Responsible Individual Name           Twana Dinnall
Responsible Individual Title          Program Coordinator
Number of FTEs                        1
Activity Functions/Responsibilities     1. Develop private and public partnership to implement
                                            community-based service integration initiatives and coordinate
                                            community and state plans with partners around integrated
                                            early and continuous screening.
                                        2. Develop private and public partnership to address the
                                            disparities in access to health insurance and financing of
                                            services for CYSHCN
                                        3. Develop public and private partnerships to address transitional
                                            services for children and youth with special health care needs.
                                        4. Close gaps in the early screening, referral and follow-up
                                            systems to improve overall service delivery through organized
                                            and systematic collaborations and partnerships.
                                        5. Ensure that every child identified through early and continuous
                                            screening is linked to a medical home.


Services within the Activity            1. Provide a statewide forum to build partnerships, ensure family
                                           professional partnerships, and develop actions plans to
                                           address integrated services, health insurance and finance, and
                                           youth transition.
                                        2. Incorporate the action plans into the State Title V action plan.
                                        3. Develop and implement a systems process flow for early and
                                           continuous screening.
                                        4. Develop coordination strategies linking medical homes to early
                                           and continuous screening and other community based
                                           services/health related needs.
                                        5. Screen, monitor, track, and link children to medical homes,
                                           family to family support and intervention.
                                        6. Strengthen comprehensive systems of care to the transition
                                           from youth to adulthood.
                                        7. Create a Youth Advisory Committee to participate in all
                                           aspects of planning, implementation, and evaluation.
                                        8. Promote family/professional partnerships and community
                                           planning/governance and leadership in systems building.

FY09 Performance Measures               1. 2 family groups will be recruited for program and policy
                                           development.
                                        2. 300 children with special healthcare needs and their families
                                           will have access to a medical home.
                                        3. 10 youths will participate in developing a plan to transition to
                                           adulthood.
                                        4. 15 stakeholders will participate in developing a CYSHCN State
                                           Plan.
FY09 Performance Outcomes               1. Two family advocacy groups, DC family Voices and Advocates
                                           for Justice and Education participated in program and policy
                                           development
                                        2. Parent consultants had access to 350 families of children and
                                           youth with special health care needs to assist them with
                                           participating in the medical homes project.
                                        3. No youths participated in developing a plan to successfully
                                           transition adulthood (a sub-grant will be issued to a vendor in  1
                                           FY 10 to ensure that resources are available).
                                 4. 15 stakeholders participated in the process of developing a
                                    CYSHCN State Plan.

FY 10 Performance Measures       1. Include 150 families in program and policy development
                                 2. Number of families who participated in the CNMC Medical
                                    Home Initiative.
                                 3. Number of youths who participate in developing a plan to
                                    successfully transition to adulthood.
                                 4. Number of stakeholders who participate in the District-wide
                                    Symposium to help build partnerships, ensure family
                                    professional partnerships, and develop action plans to address
                                    integrated services, health insurance and finance, and youth
                                    transition.
                                 5. Number of stakeholders who participate in the development of
                                    the CYSHCN State Plan.


FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to   1. To date, the family advocacy groups, DC Family Voices and
date)                               Advocates for Justice and Education participated in program
                                    and policy development initiatives.
                                 2. No data is available to date on the number of children who
                                    participated in the CNMC Medical Homes Initiative.
                                 3. To date, 5 youths have participated in developing a transition
                                    plan to adulthood.
                                 4. To date, the symposium has not been held. However, a save-
                                    to-date flyer has been distributed to the public, and
                                    approximately 100 individuals are expected to attend the
                                    event.
                                 5. To date, 10 stakeholders have participated in the development
                                    of the CYSHCN State Plan.




                                                                                                     2
Program Title and Org. Code           Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)

Activity Title and Org. Code          Oral Health Program
Responsible Individual Name           Emanuel Finn, DDS,MS
Responsible Individual Title          Chief, Oral Health Program
Funding Source                        DC Local Funds, Title V Block Grant
Number of FTEs                        2.0
Activity Functions/Responsibilities    The School Based Oral Health Program provides preventive
                                      oral health services to DC Head Start centers and DC Public
                                      Schools (DCPS) elementary school students of all grades who
                                      presented their signed parental consent forms were provided
                                      with preventive oral health services. Schools with at least 50%
                                      of its student population enrolled in the National Free or
                                      Reduced Lunch Program are targeted by the Program. Dental
                                      services are provided in two schools simultaneously. This
                                      Program allows students enrolled in schools that meet this
                                      criteria with necessary dental services that they would have
                                      otherwise have had no access to The School Based Oral Health
                                      Program provides the following services:
                                        Sealant Application - Sealants are thin plastic materials
                                             that are applied to the chewing surfaces of permanent
                                             molars; they are most effective in reducing cavities in
                                             children with newly formed permanent teeth as usually
                                             found in 2nd and 3rd graders (6 - 8 years)
                                        Fluoride Treatment - Fluoride treatment is used as a
                                             preventive measure because it is absorbed into the
                                             enamel of the teeth making them more resistant to acid
                                             producing bacteria
                                        Dental Screenings - Helps to build a positive attitude in
                                             the student towards dental health, encourage parents to
                                             schedule dental examinations for their child, and be used
                                             to enhance the health education program
                                        Oral Health Education & Promotion - Inform students,
                                             parents and teachers of the importance of good oral
                                             health and advice them on techniques to prevent oral
                                             diseases
                                        Data Collection - The Project serves as a valuable source
                                             of original oral health data as the Division, in conjunction
                                             with the DC DOH and the District at large, continues to
                                             build its oral health data.

                                      The Project also serves as an invaluable source of primary oral
                                      health data. Data collected includes:
                                        •     Decayed, Missing and Filled Surfaces of both primary
                                        and permanent dentitions
                                        •     Percent participation in free/reduced lunch program
                                        •     Ward (school location)
                                        •     Percentage of parental consent returned
                                                    7
                                        •     Number of children referred for urgent/routine care &
                                cost per child/tooth treated
                                •     Gender & race/ethnicity
                                •     Sealants (previously and currently placed)




Services within the Activity   The Oral Health Division was able to successfully expand the
                               School Based Dental Program by hiring an additional dentist
                               and a community oral health educator (who also provides
                               dental assistance to the additional dentist).

                               An age-appropriate, oral health curriculum was implemented
                               using best practices found throughout the nation including the
                               American Dental Association and the Missouri Department of
                               Health and Senior Services, Division of Community and Public
                               Health, Oral Health Program.

                               Pre and post evaluation tests are conducted during the oral
                               health education seminars to determine the students’ level of
                               oral and general health literacy. This information is helpful as
                               it provides the program with information as the amount of
                               time, resources and levels of intervention that the program
                               needs to expend in the school and/or Head Start Center.

                               In addition, the Oral Health Program Manager provides oral
                               health services one and a half days per week at a qualified
                               DCPS Elementary school and at Woodson High School
                               Wellness center.

FY09 Performance Measures      Percent of 2nd and 3rd grade children in DC public and
                               charter schools who have protective sealants on at least one of
                               their permanent molar teeth

FY09 Performance Outcomes      71.0 % of 2nd and 3rd grade children in DC public schools and
                               DC Public Charter schools served by the oral health program
                               had a protective sealant on at least one of their permanent
                               molar teeth.




                                             7
FY 10 Performance Measures



FY 2010 Performance Outcomes
(to date)




                               7
Program Title and Org. Code           Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)
Activity Title and Org. Code          State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Program
Responsible Individual Name           Twana Dinnall
Responsible Individual Title          Program Coordinator
Number of FTEs                        1
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   The ECCS program has two basic goals: (1) to develop within the
                                      District cross service systems integration partnerships to enhance
                                      children’s ability to enter school healthy and ready to learn; and (2)
                                      to begin building an early childhood service system in the District
                                      that addresses the following priority areas: access to health and
                                      medical homes; mental health and social-emotional development;
                                      early care and education/child care; parent education; and family
                                      support.

                                      It has these major objectives:
                                         1. The District will substantially strengthen partnerships among
                                             all major stakeholders.
                                         2. The District will complete an environmental scan.
                                         3. The District will develop concrete methods to align funding
                                             streams, program resources, and policies.
                                         4. The District will identify and disseminate current best practices
                                             in early childhood systems building, service and program
                                             coordination, and integration.
                                         5. The District will develop a core set of indicators for early
                                             childhood health.
                                         6. The District will develop a broad DC-wide public/private multi-
                                             agency plan for early childhood.


Services within the Activity            1. Develop a cross trained and integrated work force (Child Care
                                            Health Consultants) in order to provide quality services and
                                            supports that will have the best outcomes for children and
                                            families.
                                        2. Enhance efficiency and effectiveness of collaborative efforts in
                                            the District.
                                        3. Support conferences to educate, train, and provide resource
                                            support to teachers, parents, health professionals, child care
                                            providers, and others who work with or have an impact on
                                            children’s readiness to learn and succeed upon entering
                                            school.
                                        4. Improve early identification of children with developmental
                                            needs to minimize the likelihood of placement in special
                                            education programs and increase the likelihood of receiving
                                            appropriate services.
FY09 Performance Measures                 1. Train 10 consultants on concepts related to oral health,
                                              universal precautions, and mental health.
                                          2. Develop 5 health related sessions for the Universal
                                              Readiness School (USR) Conference.
                                          3. Hold 12 meetings to enhance efficiency and effectiveness of
                                             collaborative efforts in the District.
FY09 Performance Outcomes                 1. 28 members of DOH Licensure Unit, Head Start Centers and
                                             Pre-K Incentive program provided a 1-day) training related to
                                             Universal Precautions
                                          2. 6 health related sessions developed for the Annual USR
                                             Conference
                                                      4
                                 3. Over 20 meetings were held to strengthen partnerships
                                    among all major stakeholders and enhance efficiency and
                                    effectiveness of collaborative efforts in the District
FY 10 Performance Measures       1. Number of consultants trained on concepts related to oral
                                    health, universal precautions, and mental health;
                                 2. Number of MOUs developed amongst core participating
                                    partners related to child care consultation
                                 3. Number of Early Childhood Development Centers
                                    (CDC)identified to participate in Early Childhood Mental
                                    Health Consultation (ECMHC)
                                 4. Percentage of children who participate in the ECMHC
                                    Program who are identified early with developmental needs
                                 5. Number of meetings held to enhance efficiency and
                                    effectiveness of collaborative efforts in the District.


FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to   1. 25 licensed clinicians (including members of the Head Start
date)                               Team) provided 5-day ECMHC training.
                                 2. MOU established between DOH and DMH related to the
                                    provision of services related to ECMHC.
                                 3. 15 DC Early Child Care Educational Centers identified and
                                    interviewed to participate in the Healthy Futures (ECMHC)
                                    program
                                 4. 1,817 children enrolled in the CDC’s that will receive
                                    ECMHC.
                                 5. To date, ECMHC services have not started. However, it is
                                    expected that approximately 30% (545) of these children will
                                    receive Incredible Years.
                                 6. To date, staff has participated in 10 collaborative meeting to
                                    enhance efficiency and effectiveness of collaborative efforts
                                    in the District, and has hosted 1 ECCS Steering Committee
                                    meeting.
                                 7. To date, individuals have not been recruited to participate in
                                    Strengthening Families programs.




                                            4
Program Title and Org. Code            Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)
Activity Title and Org. Code           Health Wellness and Sexuality Education
Responsible Individual Name            Margaret G. Copemann
Responsible Individual Title           Program Coordinator
Number of FTEs                         3 FTE
Activity Functions/Responsibilities       The Health Wellness and Sexuality Education program delivers age
                                             appropriate, culturally competent sexuality education to District of
                                             Columbia youth.
                                          Collaborates with community organizations and assists in the
                                             development of health-wellness and sex education curriculums.
                                          Conducts health and sexuality education workshops and trainings for
                                             community-based organizations and youth services organizations.
                                          Link with the school nurse to establish service needs
                                          Partner with the school nurses to facilitate educational sessions for
                                             student, parents, and the community of healthy sexual practices
                                          Collaborates with other youth services organizations to provide
                                             health and sexuality information and promote the use of condoms
                                             and other barrier methods to reduce the incidence of unplanned
                                             pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases including HIV among
                                             youth.
                                          Collaborates with schools, churches and other community
                                             organizations that promote teen pregnancy prevention.
                                          Conducts outreach activities to increase the number of youth and
                                             youth service organizations engaged in health wellness and
                                             prevention education.
                                          Promote safe sexual health behaviors through workshops and
                                             community meetings for youth, parents and community
                                             representatives
Services within the Activity          Promote healthy sexual behaviors among District youth by incorporating
                                      evidence based information into trainings and educational sessions to
                                      reduce incidences of risk behaviors among the target population.
                                            Reduce sexual activity that may lead to unintended pregnancy and
                                                sexually transmitted disease
                                           Provides accurate and culturally sensitive comprehensive health
                                               wellness and sexuality education
                                           Provides structure to classroom learning sessions on health
                                               wellness and sexuality education
                                           Partner with various District agencies to plan and develop
                                               educational sessions
                                           Partner with school nurses program to plan and develop
                                               educational sessions
                                           Provides support and contraceptive information for repeat
                                               pregnancies
                                           Provides male-only responsibility awareness initiative
                                           Provides parent education and training on adolescent development
                                           Development of a District-wide public health teen pregnancy
                                               prevention effort.
                                           Participates in school and community health fairs
                                           Provides health wellness and sexuality education sessions in
                                               English and Spanish
                                           Provides assistance to school nurses by providing training and
                                               classroom education sessions to District of Columbia youth
                                           Establish guidelines in partnership with OSSE for educational
                                               sessions for student attending Charter Schools
                                           Develop5 partnership with community based youth services
                                                         a
                                               organization to reach youth during out-of-school time
                                        Develop a frame work for DOH that targets preventing behaviors
                                         that contribute to unintentional injury and violence.
                                        Provide trainings and educational sessions in partnership with
                                         youth service and community based agency to reach population of
                                         out-of-school youth
                                        Conduct ongoing continuing education sessions to school nurses of
                                         instructions for the use of barrier methods
                                        Provides high school nurses with all barrier methods outlined in
                                         the Condom Availability Policy.


FY09 Performance Measures        The target goals for FY 2009;
                                       Provide 3,000 District of Columbia youth grades Pre-K - 12 with
                                          health wellness and sexuality education
                                       Conduct 200 education sessions
                                       Provide education sessions to 700 Latino youth
                                       Provide education sessions to 20 ( elementary, middle and senior)
                                          DC Public Schools
                                       Provide 15 Public Charter Schools (elementary, middle and
                                          senior) with education sessions.
                                 Provide 10 education sessions to 200 Summer Youth Employees at various
                                 work-sites
FY09 Performance Outcomes        Program outcomes for FY 2009;
                                       6,488 District of Columbia youth grades Pre-K - 12 participated
                                          in a health wellness and sexuality education session.
                                       230 education sessions were provided
                                       1,830 Latino youth participated in a health wellness and sexuality
                                          education session.
                                       25 DC Public Schools( elementary, middle and senior)
                                       27 Public Charter Schools (elementary, middle and senior)
                                          received health wellness and sexuality education sessions.
                                       25 education sessions were provided to 286 Summer Youth
                                          Employees at various work-sites.

FY 10 Performance Measures               Develop a Speakers Bureau to promote the program services
                                         Develop a training curriculum for the school nurses based school
                                          nurses standards and conduct 4 trainings
                                       Establish partnership with HASTA/OSSE/DCPS to develop
                                          standards for middle/high school students on sexually wellness
                                          education and prevention of
                                       Develop a contract, select a vendor to assist DOH in our efforts to
                                          evaluate existing teen pregnancy prevention programs to determine
                                          the scope and impact of existing services, and develop a District-
                                          wide public health initiative to prevent unintended pregnancy
                                          among teens
                                       Conduct three in-school training per month to reach 3,000 students
                                          attending DCPS/Charter Schools
                                       Conduct one training at a youth service agency per month 1,500
                                          out of school youth
FY 10 performance Outcomes (to   Performance Indicators were developed by the new Bureau Chief. Outcome
date)                            data will be made available at the end of the designated period.




                                                 5
Child, Adolescent & and School Health Bureau (8514)

  Program Title and Org. Code            Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)
  Activity Title and Org. Code           Immunization Program
  Responsible Individual Name            Rosemarie McLaren
  Responsible Individual Title           Program Manager
  Number of FTEs                        13 FTE’s
  Activity Functions/Responsibilities   The role of the Immunization Program is to reduce and eliminate
                                        disease, disability and death due to vaccine preventable diseases in
                                        the District of Columbia. The Program achieves its mission through
                                        education, immunization record assessments, direct service through
                                        vaccine administration, disease surveillance, outbreak control and a
                                        fully operational immunization registry.
  Services within the Activity
                                        The Immunization Program conducts a wide array of activities
                                        including but not limited to:

                                        Conducting annual assessments for immunization compliance in
                                        Head Start, Licensed Child Care facilities and schools – public,
                                        private, charter and parochial.

                                        Monitoring of hepatitis B infections in pregnant women and ensuring
                                        follow-up treatment for these women, infants, and contacts.

                                        Administration of immunizations to children and adults at one (1)
                                        express immunization clinic.

                                        Providing vaccines to medical practices and providers who serve
                                        high-risk adults.

                                        Distributing vaccines to healthcare providers enrolled in the Vaccine
                                        for Children Program (VFC) to ensure that children eligible for the
                                        VFC receive timely immunizations.        Members of the VFC staff
                                        program conduct monitoring visits in the offices of VFC providers to
                                        ensure accountability for vaccines distributed to their practices, this
                                        includes assessment of vaccine usage, storage and handling.

                                        Managing the District-wide immunization registry which warehouses
                                        all the immunization data for the District.

                                        Conducting immunization trainings for healthcare providers.

                                        Monitoring and tracking all vaccine-preventable diseases and
                                        outbreaks as well as adverse events in the District of Columbia.

                                        Supporting the efforts of the Immunization Coalition of Washington,
                                        D.C.

  FY09 Performance Measures             Percent of children with up-to-date immunizations in:
                                            Public Schools
                                            Charter Schools
                                            Licensed Child Development Centers
                                            Headstart Centers
                                            Private Schools
                                            Parochial schools
                                            Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for flu
                                            Percent of Institutionalized Residents immunized for flu
                                        Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for
                                         pneumococcus
                                     Number of practices reporting to the immunization registry
                                         on a regular basis
FY09 Performance Outcomes        Percent of children with up-to-date immunizations in:
                                     Public Schools – 98.21%
                                     Charter Schools – 95.55%
                                     Licensed Child Development Centers – 91.02%
                                     Headstart Centers – 91.75%
                                     Private Schools – 88.77%
                                     Parochial schools – 79.74%

                                       Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for flu -
                                        Flu Season 2008 – 61.3%; Flu Season 2009 – Unknown –
                                        Season in progress
                                       Percent of Institutionalized Residents immunized for flu -
                                        Unknown,
                                       Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for
                                        pneumococcus – Season 2008 – 55.1%; Season 2009 –
                                        Unknown – Season in progress
                                       Number of practices reporting to the immunization registry
                                        on a regular basis - 174

FY 10 Performance Measures       Percent of children with up-to-date immunizations in:
                                     Public Schools
                                     Charter Schools
                                     Licensed Child Development Centers
                                     Headstart Centers
                                     Private Schools
                                     Parochial schools
                                     Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for flu
                                     Percent of Institutionalized Residents immunized for flu
                                     Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for
                                         pneumococcus
                                     Number of practices reporting to the immunization registry
                                         on a regular basis

FY 10 Performance Outcomes (to   Percent of children with up-to-date immunizations in:
date)                                Public Schools – 86.89%
                                     Charter Schools – 71.46%
                                     Licensed Child Development Centers – 63.27%
                                     Headstart Centers – 86.74%
                                     Private Schools – 46.61%
                                     Parochial schools – 31.55%

                                       Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for flu -
                                        Unknown, Season in Progress
                                       Percent of Institutionalized Residents immunized for flu -
                                        Unknown, Season in progress -
                                       Percent of non-institutionalized residents immunized for
                                        pneumococcus - Unknown, Season in Progress
                                       Number of practices reporting to the immunization registry
                                        on a regular basis - Unknown, Season in progress
Program Title and Org. Code            Obesity Prevention and Reduction, 8514
Activity Title and Org. Code           Obesity Prevention and Reduction, 8514
Responsible Individual Name            Joni Eisenberg
Responsible Individual Title
                                        Policy Analyst, Obesity Prevention & Reduction
Number of FTEs                          1
Activity Functions/Responsibilities    Engage government, community, and other key stakeholders in citywide
                                       planning to prevent and reduce obesity among District children, families,
                                       and adults.

                                       Develop, implement, and monitor a coordinated Obesity State Plan with
                                       input from DC agencies, community-based organizations, and residents.

                                       Identify, implement, and monitor PANO (physical activity, nutrition and
                                       obesity) policies, regulations, and programs to combat obesity

                                       Improve obesity prevention efforts in the District by supporting community
                                       based organizations and government agencies that seek to improve nutrition
                                       and increase physical activity—healthy eating/active living--of District
                                       residents. Monitor and provide technical support and assistance for these
                                       efforts.

                                       Collaborate and coordinate with efforts within DOH, other DC government
                                       agencies and the private sector to prevent chronic illness and promote
                                       wellness, especially with regards to improved nutrition and increased
                                       physical activity.

                                       Provide technical assistance to organizations on obesity prevention and
                                       reduction, particularly via oversight of DOH-CHA obesity-related grants.
                                       Assist with special initiatives targeting increased physical activity and
                                       improved nutrition

                                       Identify and secure government, private sector, and community support for
                                       resources necessary to combat the obesity epidemic. Initiate and participate
                                       in public and private partnerships to combat obesity.

Services within the Activity: FY2009   During FY2009, the following six BSA PANO grants were monitored:

                                            1) DC Overweight/Obesity Action Plan:
                                       Grant to develop State Action Plan for the District of Columbia regarding
                                       the prevention and reduction of obesity across the lifespan and in various
                                       settings in collaboration with the DC Obesity Work Group.
                                       Recommendations and ideas from additional stakeholders (including
                                       community groups, professional organizations, government agencies and
                                       residents) also to be solicited in plan’s development via stakeholder
                                       sessions and community town hall meetings. Grantee: ABCD, Inc.,
                                       $100,000

                                           2) Child Care Training: I Am Moving/I Am Learning
                                       Grant to develop a model training program for the District’s child care
                                       development centers and child care homes, using the nationally tested I Am
                                       Moving/I Am Learning Head Start as a foundation. Grantee: SHIRE, Inc.
                                       (Summit Institute for Research & Education), $179,000.


                                           3) DC Healthy Corner Store Initiative
                                       Grant to promote and train 12 corner store owners in East of the River
                                       Ward 7 and Ward 8 neighborhoods to carry healthy foods. Grantee: D.C.
                                Hunger Solutions/FRAC (Food Research and Action Center), $121,000.

                                    4) Child Obesity Capacity Building Mini-Grants
                                Grant to provide mini-grants to help build the capacity of small community-
                                based organizations to address the obesity epidemic in their communities.
                                Grantee: United Way of National Capital Area. (Note: United Way
                                provided matching grant, doubling DOH funding).Amount: $100,000

                                    5) Fresh Food Produce Coop
                                Grant: a pilot project to create fresh produce coops in select Ward 7 and
                                Ward 8 locations. Grantee: DC Healthy Solutions, $50,000.

                                    6) We Can! Initiative
                                Grant to implement the nationally tested We Can! program at one
                                community clinic (Upper Cardozo) to educated parents and children
                                simultaneously on healthy eating/active living. Grantee: Unity Health
                                Systems, $50,000.

                                RWJ Partnership: In addition to the above-mentioned BSAs, TA was also
                                provided to other PANO special initiatives, including: The Robert Wood
                                Johnson (RWJ) Healthy Kids/Healthy Communities (HK-HC)
                                partnership. DC is one of the first initial nine jurisdictions to receive this
                                grant. Four-year grant mandates partnerships and a lead agency to identify
                                one physical activity policy and one nutrition policy to help reduce child
                                obesity. DC lead agency is SHIRE; DOH is a partner (no funding attached
                                to the partnership).

Services within the Activity:   In FY2010, the following grants will be monitored and TA provided:
FY2010
                                A. BSAs
                                1) A plan for a public information/social marketing campaign targeting
                                child obesity prevention, with linkages to chronic disease self-care, will be
                                developed. Grantee: SHIRE, $110,000

                                2) A Healthy Eating/Active Living Grant to provide support to Obesity
                                Work Group and establish a program for 75 community wellness
                                champions in Wards 5, 7, 8. Grantee: United Medical Center Foundation,
                                $175,000.

                                B. Preventive Health Block Grants (Federal PHBG)
                                1) Grant to develop training program to child care facilities on new healthy
                                eating/active living regulations ($125,000)
                                2) Grant to design/implement strategies to promote physical activity
                                (note: may not be under CASH Bureau) ($75,000)

                                Other PANO activities during FY2010:
                                1) Submit CDC ARRA proposals for potential funding of healthy
                                eating/active living activities’
                                2) Release Obesity State Plan and begin implementation
                                3) Continue RWJ HK/HC partnership
FY09 Performance Measures       1) DC State Action Plan on Obesity Prevention and Reduction
                                developed in collaboration with DC Obesity Work Group via
                                stakeholder meetings representing six settings: (schools and child care,
                                medical and health, food retail and food service, physical activity,
                                worksites, and faith-based institutions) and four community town hall
                                meetings. Draft due 9/30/09.

                                2) Child Care Training model developed on healthy eating/active living

                                                 2
                            for child care centers and homes in Wards 1, 5, 7, and 8 reaching children,
                            teachers, and community members/parents.

                            3) Promote and train 12 corner store owners in Wards 7 and 8 to carry
                            healthy foods, and increase availability of fresh produce, healthy
                            beverages, and healthy snacks.

                            4) Create child obesity mini-grant program to build the capacity of
                            small CBOs in targeted wards to respond to obesity epidemic.

                            5) Implement a pilot program to increase access to fresh fruits and
                            vegetables via a fresh produce coop to 100 youth and families in Wards
                            7and 8.

                            6) Implement nationally tested We Can! Program at one community
                            clinic to educate a targeted 225 overweight or obese participants (via 9
                            sessions of 25 participants each) in weekly cooking classes and physical
                            activity sessions; potential duplication at other clinics in the District.

                            RWJ Partnership: Assist RWJ-HK/HC partnership in identifying one
                            nutrition policy and one physical activity policy to increase healthy
                            eating/active living and reduce child obesity.

FY09 Performance Outcomes       1) Draft of DC State Action Plan to Reduce and Prevent Obesity
                                     completed via stakeholder meetings across six settings and four
                                     community town halls (one in Ward 8, Ward 5, and two youth-
                                     focused meetings) involving approximately 350 persons.
                                2) Provided training to approximately 100 child development center
                                     and 40 child care homes reaching 1,500 teachers, 2000 children,
                                     and 1,000 community members/parents primarily in Wards 1,5, 7
                                     and 8, creating a culturally appropriate children’s music CD, “My
                                     Little World” to help implement the training program.
                                3) Twelve corner stores in Wards 7 and 8 increased availability of
                                     fresh fruits and veggies, healthy beverages, and healthy snacks, via
                                     produce distribution pilots, promotion, and reduced prices.
                                4) Granted 16 mini-grants in Wards 5-8 to build the capacity of small
                                     CBOs to increase healthy eating/active living among children and
                                     families.
                                5) Over 291 Wards 7-8 community members purchased fresh
                                     produce via the coop; 37 community members joined the produce
                                     coop; four youth were trained in entrepreneurial skills and
                                     nutrition education. Over 220 community members surveyed on
                                     community needs for accessing fresh produce.
                                6) The We Can! Program at Upper Cardozo Clinic involved 331
                                     overweight or obese children/adults via 10 sessions (33
                                     participants/session) teaching classes on healthy eating and active
                                     living. Unity plans to expand program to an East of the River
                                     Clinic
                                RWJ Partnership: The Healthy Kids/Healthy Communities DC
                                Partnership identified two healthy eating and two active living policies
                                to focus on over the next three years. Partnership affiliation led us to
                                another RWJ national initiative—Leadership for Healthy
                                Communities—resulting in a commitment to train city officials (pro
                                bono) on child obesity.
FY10 Performance Measures   For two BSAs:

                            1)Develop a Plan for a child obesity prevention public awareness and social
                            marketing campaign to include: literature review of best practices;


                                             3
establishment of an Advisory Committee; identify potential community and
media partners; finalize core message strategies and core strategic design,
utilizing both traditional and “new media”.

2) Implement the Healthy Eating/Active Living grant to provide (a)
logistical support to DOH in convening four community meetings of the
Obesity Work Group—to include meeting to launch and/or discuss Obesity
Plan; one meeting on healthy eating strategies, another on active living
strategies; and an end of the year wrap up meeting. (b) Creation of
community wellness champion program in Wards 5, 7, and 8 to promote
healthy eating/active living via recruitment and training of 75 community
residents.

PHBG Grant will create training guide and plan to train DC child care
centers on new healthy eating/active living regs.

CDC ARRA grant will involve implementation of identified strategies and
policies to promote healthy eating and active living in the District.




                4
Program Title and Org. Code           Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)
Activity Title and Org. Code          Project LAUNCH (Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in
                                      Children's Health)
Responsible Individual Name           Twana Dinnall & Alvaro Simmons(Interim)
Responsible Individual Title          Program Coordinator – Bureau Chief
Number of FTEs                        1.5 – NOT FILLED
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   Though Project LAUNCH aims to create a system of connected
                                      programs that will increase and improve services to children ages 0-
                                      8 and their families in the city's poorest neighborhoods. The goal is
                                      to promote the wellness of young children in Wards 7 and 8 so they
                                      can thrive in safe, supportive environments and enter school ready
                                      to learn.

                                      The project will incorporate five basic services:
                                         o Developmental assessments in a range of child-serving
                                              settings
                                         o Integration of behavioral health programs and practices into
                                              primary care
                                         o Home visiting programs
                                         o Mental health consultations
                                         o Family strengthening and parent skills training

Services within the Activity              1. Establish the DC Council on Young Child Wellness
                                             (DCCYCW)
                                          2. Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation – and the
                                             provision of Incredible Years to children who require
                                             additional services
                                          3. Partnering with the DC DMH to enhance the Primary Project
                                             (children 5-8 years)
                                          4. Increasing the use of the Ages and Stages
                                             Questionnaire/ASQ:SE within a range of child-serving
                                             settings
                                          5. Incorporation of the Parents as Teachers: Born to Learn
                                             curriculum into the DC DOH Healthy Start Program
                                          6. Incorporating the Strengthening Families evidence based
                                             curriculum into family strengthening and parent skills training
                                             program(s)

FY09 Performance Measures             Grant award was received in September 2009




FY09 Performance Outcomes              Grant award was received in September 2009




FY10 Performance Measures                 1. recruit 13 members recruited to participate in the DCCYCW
                                          2. Identify 8 Early Childhood Development Centers
                                             (CDC)identified to participate in Early Childhood Mental
                                             Health Consultation (ECMHC)
                                          3. Identify 3 DCPS Elementary Schools identified to participate
                                             the Primary Project
                                          4. 25 consultants will be trained on concepts related to early
                                             childhood mental health
                                5. Develop 1 MOU related to core participating partners child
                                    care consultation
                                6. Enroll 902 of children in CDC’s that will receive ECMHC
                                7. Enroll 30% of children who participate in the ECMHC into
                                    Incredible years
                                8. Hold 12 meetings to enhance efficiency and effectiveness of
                                    collaborative efforts in the District.
                                9. Identify 13 stakeholders who participate in the
                                    environmental scan effort and the development of the Early
                                    Childhood Strategic Plan
                                10. Screen 240 children to participate in Primary Project
                                11. Enroll 40 children that were screened into Primary Project.
                                12. Train 10 staff for the Parent as Teachers Born to Learn
                                    curriculum.
                                13. Recruit 100 individuals to participate in Strengthening
                                    Families Program.

    FY10 Performance Outcomes   1. 18 individuals from various DC Agencies have been
    (to date)                       identified to participate in the DCCYCW
                                2. 6 DC CDC’s have been identified and interviewed to
                                    participate in the ECMCH program.
                                3. 3 DCPS Elementary Schools have been identified to
                                    participate in the Primary Project.
                                4. 25 licensed clinicians (including members of the Head Start
                                    Team) provided 5-day ECMHC training
                                5. MOU has established between DOH and DMH related to the
                                    provision of services related to Project Launch
                                6. 487 children are enrolled in the CDC’s that will receive
                                    ECMHC
                                7. To date, ECMCH services have not started. However,
                                    approximately 487 children are enrolled in the 6 CDC’s
                                    identified and it is expected that approximately 30% (146) of
                                    these children will receive Incredible Years
                                8. Staff has had several conference calls with the PAT Team
                                    (based in St. Louis, MO.) and developed a plan to
                                    incorporate the curriculum into the Healthy Start Program.
                                    Project Launch staff have also hosted 2 key DC stakeholder
                                    meetings.
                                9. To date, stakeholders have not participated in the
                                    environmental scan process. However, a statement of work
                                    has been developed to acquire a contractor to begin the
                                    process.
                                10. To date, 102 children have been screened for Primary
                                    Project. Screening letters were sent to families of the 288
                                    children eligible for the program at the 3 schools. It is
                                    expected that all eligible will be screened.
                                11. To date, no child has been enrolled into Primary Project.
                                    However, 28 children have been identified as being eligible.
                                    Once the remaining students have been screened, it is
                                    expected that additional students will be available. Consent
                                    forms will be sent to parents of all eligible children.
                                12. To date, no individuals have been trained. Plans are being
                                    made to establish a training date.
                                13. To date, individuals have not been recruited to participate in
                                    the Strengthening families program. Plans are being made
                                    to procure these services


Other Comments:
Program Title and Org. Code           Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)
Activity Title and Org. Code          Center for Disease Control funded: Rape Prevention Education
                                      Program
Responsible Individual Name           Tara Humphrey
Responsible Individual Title          Rape Prevention and Education Program Coordinator
Number of FTEs                        1
Activity Functions/Responsibilities   Educate students in District of Columbia public and public
                                      charter school to dispel myths about rape and foster attitudes
                                      and values that will reduce the incidence of rape.

                                      Provide structure classroom sessions sexual assault prevention
                                      targeting children ages 4 to 21 in Ward 7 and 8.
                                      .Conducts rape prevention outreach and educational services to
                                      District of Columbia school administrators in Wards 7 and 8.

                                      Collaborates with public and private agencies, healthcare
                                      professionals and service organizations, stakeholders,
                                      advocacy groups and community representatives to plan and
                                      implement strategies that provide services to identified priority
                                      populations.
Services within the Activity
                                      Rape Prevention Education sessions involves supplying
                                      information about awareness and different types of rape, signs
                                      of rape, how to appropriately handle rape once it has occurred,
                                      legal responsibilities of mandated reporting and relevant
                                      community resources with in the District of Columbia Wards 7
                                      and 8.


FY09 Performance Measures             The Rape Prevention and Education Program’s target goal for
                                      FY08 was education 500 students in District of Columbia.


FY09 Performance Outcomes             The Rape Prevention and Education Program outcome for
                                      FY09 to date are 1500 students in District of Columbia.
                                      Indicating that the outcome is 1000 students over its target
                                      goal.
FY10 Performance Measures             Provide sexual violence education to 700 students at
                                      elementary, middle and senior high schools in Wards 7 and 8
                                      by October 2010.

                                      Provide sexual violence education to 12 schools in Wards 7
                                      and 8 by October 2010.
FY 10 performance Outcomes (to
date)                                 The Rape Prevention Program outcome to date has served 604
                                      students in the District of Columbia.
                                                     2
                                      The Rape Prevention Program outcome to date has served 11
                                      schools in the District of Columbia.



Other Comments: The Rape Prevention Program is focusing its program educational services to priority
populations which include Wards 7 and 8. As of year 2010, the RPE Program services will concentrate on
priority populations.




                                                     2
Program Title and Org. Code           Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau (8514)
Activity Title and Org. Code           School Health Program
Responsible Individual Name            Alvaro Simmons
Responsible Individual Title          Child, Adolescent and School Health Bureau Chief
Number of FTEs                        The Division has 3 FTEs
                                           1. Public Health Advisor
                                           2. Public Health Analyst
                                           3. Quality Assessment Specialist
Activity Functions/Responsibilities         The Child Adolescent and School Health Bureau provides
                                              oversight and develops policies for the School Health
                                              Nursing Program which provides comprehensive school
                                              nursing services in the District of Columbia public and public
                                              charter schools.
Services within the Activity          The school nurse provides leadership in the schools for the provision
                                      and coordination of health services to students. They are responsible
                                      for promoting health and wellness and actively collaborating with
                                      students, family members, school personnel and community based
                                      organizations to ensure that the health needs of the students are
                                      met. In addition, school nurses are responsible for performing
                                      required screenings such as vision, hearing, scoliosis and BMI.
                                      Specific responsibilities include:
                                            Administration of medications, treatments and procedures
                                            Providing case management and referrals for identified
                                              students with special health care needs
                                            Promoting good health practices through health education
                                            Implementing the Adolescent Aids Prevention /Condom
                                              Availability Program including conducting educational
                                              sessions, providing individual counseling and distribution of
                                              various barrier methods.

FY09 Performance Measures             I. Measure FY09: Percent of school-aged children in grades 2,4 and
                                      6 with a body mass index

                                      II. Measure FY09: Percent of DCPS sites with full-time nursing
                                      coverage

                                      III. Measure FY09: Percent of school-aged children identified with
                                      chronic diseases and/or special health care needs who have
                                      Individualized Health Plans (IHPs) developed by school nurses

FY09 Performance Outcomes             I. Outcome FY09: 33% of the overall population in designated
                                      grades were screened for BMI 9,632/29,263

                                      II. Outcome FY09: 98.4% of DCPS with full-time coverage (121/123
                                      DCPS sites )

                                      III. Outcome FY09: In SY2008-2009, 76% of students with health
                                      care needs had IHPs developed by school nurses.

FY 10 Performance Measures            I. Measure FY10: Percent of school-age children in grades Pre-K, K,
                                      2,4,6,8 and 10 who receive vision, hearing and scoliosis screenings.

                                      II. Measure FY10: Percent of school-aged children in grades 2, 4
                                      and 6 with body mass index measurements.

                                                     4
III. Measure FY10: Percent of public schools with full implementation
of the data management system, Health Office.

IV. Measure FY10: Percent of DCPS with full-time nursing
coverage.

V. Measure FY10: The number of public charter schools with
nursing coverage

VI. Measure FY 10: Percent of identified school-aged children with
chronic diseases who have Individualized Health Plans (IHPs)
developed by school nurses

VII. Measure FY 10: Percent of identified pregnant students who
receive prenatal care and case management in the first trimester

VIII. Measure FY 10: The nurse will submit a schedule of health
education programs and activities to be conducted.

IX. Measure FY 10: Percent of immunization record reviews,
updates to the DC immunization program registry, and necessary
follow-up.

X. Measure FY 10: Percent of bi-annual health assessments
including measurements of height, weight, and blood pressure on
students in grades 2, 4, 6, and special education students in all
grades.

XI. Measure FY 10: Percent of nurses conducting survey on all
incoming students for their universal health certificate and oral health
assessment to identify gaps in services and notify parents and
guardians accordingly.

XII. Measure FY 10: Percentage of child health and oral health
certificate reviews conducted.

XIII. Measure FY 10: Number of authorized medications monitored
as required and as provided by the school nurse and school
personnel in accordance with established guidelines.

XIV. Measure FY 10: Percent of students utilizing the DOH AAPP/
Condom Availability Program.

XV. Measure FY 10: Percent of nurses utilizing the bio-surveillance
system.

XVI. Measure FY 10: Percent of suspected or disclosed incidents
of abuse or neglect reported to Child Protective Services,
documented in the student health record, on the Unusual Incident
Report Form and reported to the DOH designee before close of
business on the date on which the report is filed

XVII. Measure FY 10: Percent of student health records with current
family emergency contact information

XVIII. Measure FY 10: The number of students referred for case
management.


                4
                             XIX. Measure FY 10: The number of unusual incidents reported.

                             XX. Measure FY 10: The following programmatic statistical reports
                             will be submitted on the dates specified in the contract year to
                             include the following data collected by wards to categorized nursing
                             services rendered in District of Columbia Public and Charter
                             Schools:
                             a. Visits to Health Suite
                             b. Medication Administration
                             c. AAPP Report (monthly and running cumulative)
                             d. Performance Measures
                             e. Educational Sessions
                             f. Injury Report
                             g. Major Conditions
                             h. Prenatal/Maternity Profile Report
                             i. Children with Special Needs
                             j. Medically fragile student
                             k. Verification of Nursing Hours
                             l. Compliance Report
                             m. Referral Report
                             n. Schedule by Wards




FY 10 Performance Outcomes   I. Outcome FY10: Screenings for this academic year were
                             completed in December 2009. To date, screening results are
                             unavailable.

                             II. Outcome FY10: Screenings for this academic year were
                             completed in December 2009. To date, screening results are
                             unavailable.

                             III. Outcome FY10: To date, Health Office electronic system is
                             functional in 115 of 123 or 93% of the DCPS health suites.

                             IV. Outcome FY10: To date, 122/123 (99.2%) of DCPS have full-
                             time nursing coverage.

                             V. Outcome FY10: To date, forty-seven (47) public charter schools
                             receive DOH supported school nursing services.

                             VI. Outcome FY10: To date, information is unavailable

                             VII. Outcome FY10: To date, 44/158 (27.8%) received prenatal care
                             in the first trimester.

                             VIII – XIII. Outcomes FY10: To date, information is unavailable

                             XIV. Outcome FY 10: To date in FY10, 3248 students utilized the
                             AAPP/Condom Availability Program. This number is indicative of
                             approximately 16% of the student population enrolled in high
                             schools.

                             XV - XXI. Outcomes FY10: To date, information is unavailable




                                            4
Other Comments:




                  4
Program Title and Org. Code           Child, Adolescent and School health Bureau (8514)
Activity Title and Org. Code          Woodson School Base Wellness Center
Responsible Individual Name           Coleen DeFlorimonte Lucas
Responsible Individual Title          Supervisory Nurse Practitioner
Number of FTEs                        4 FTE’s
Activity Functions/Responsibilities




                                      The Woodson School Base Wellness Center is responsible for
                                      providing access to primary and preventative health services and
                                      related social services to a school-age population on a school
                                      campus.
Services within the Activity          The School Base Wellness Center provides a wide range of health
                                      care and social services to adolescents enrolled at H.D. Woodson
                                      Senior High school.

                                      Provides Physical exams.

                                      Provides attention to illness through Diagnosis and Treatment

                                      Provides gynecological exams including STI and HIV testing.

                                      Provides pregnancy testing and contraceptive management
                                      including abstinence plan and support.

                                      Administers immunizations to students.

                                      Provides mental health screening and referral.

                                      Provides social work services and referrals.

                                      Provides Level II Oral health screenings including Dental cleaning.

                                      Conducts Health Promotion Education sessions to individuals, and
                                      small & large groups of students.

                                      Refers students to other health care providers and community
                                      resources.

                                      Supports the efforts of the District of Columbia Public Schools by
                                      contributing to student academic success.

                                      Supports students by providing a safe place to talk about sensitive
                                      issues such as depression, family problems, relationships, and
                                      substance abuse.

                                      Supports the school environment by helping children stay in school
                                      and by identifying and addressing health problems that may interfere
                                      with the learning process.

                                      Supports families by allowing parents to stay at work while attending
                                                                                                              1
                            to their child’s routine health care needs.

                            Saves money by keeping children out of hospitals and emergency
                            rooms.




FY09 Performance Measures   To improve the health status of adolescents by providing medical
                            and behavioral health maintenance services, attention to illness, and
                            referrals as needed.

                                   Percent of students tested in the wellness center with
                                    positive STI’s who test positive again within the current
                                    school year.

                                   Percent of students having repeat pregnancy tests in the
                                    Center within a school year.

                                   Percent of Woodson’s students tested for HIV in the
                                    Wellness Center.

                                   To increase access to health care for Woodson Senior High
                                    School students at the Wellness Center.

                                   Percent of students registered in H.D. Woodson High School
                                    who voluntarily enrolled in the program.

                                   Customer satisfaction among students seeking services in
                                    the Wellness Center



FY09 Performance Outcomes   To improve the health status of adolescents by providing health
                            maintenance services, attention to illness, and referrals as needed.
                                 Percent of students tested in the wellness center with
                                   positive STI’s who test positive again within the current
                                   school year.
                                           Students tested positive for STI’s - 19
                                           Students tested positive again – 0 = 0%

                                   Percent of students having repeat pregnancy tests in the
                                    Center within a school year.
                                        Students having pregnancy tests – 93
                                        Students having repeat pregnancy tests -15 = 16%

                                   Percent of Woodson’s students tested for HIV in the
                                    Wellness Center.
                                         Students Having HIV test – 149 = 25%

                                   To increase access to health care for Woodson Senior High
                                    School students at the Wellness Center

                                   Percent of students registered in H.D. Woodson High School
                                    who voluntarily enroll in the program
                                        Students enrolled in the school – 604
                                                                                                    2
                                             Students enrolled in the program – 453 = 75%

                                  Customer satisfaction among students seeking services in
                                   the Wellness Center.
                                           Students surveyed in the Wellness Center – 85
                                           Students reporting dissatisfaction with services – 0
FY10 Performance Measures   To improve the health status of adolescents by providing health
                            maintenance services, attention to illness, and referrals as needed.
                                 Percent of students tested in the wellness Center with
                                   positive STI’s who test positive again within the current
                                   school year. (ongoing)

                                       Percent of students having repeat pregnancy tests in the
                                        Center within a school year.

                                       Percent of Woodson’s students tested for HIV in the
                                        Wellness Center.

                                       To increase access to health care for Woodson Senior High
                                        School students at the Wellness Center

                                       Percent of students registered in H.D. Woodson High School
                                        who voluntarily enroll in the program.

                                       Customer satisfaction among students seeking services in
                                        the Wellness Center

FY10 Performance Outcomes   To improve the health status of adolescents by providing health
(to date)                   maintenance services, attention to illness, and referrals as needed.

                                        Percent of students tested in the wellness Center with
                                         positive STI’s who test positive again within the current
                                         school year. (ongoing)

                                           Total # of students tested - 159
                                           Students tested positive – 12
                                           Students tested positive again – 0

                                       Percent of students having repeat pregnancy tests in the
                                        Center within a school year.
                                            Students having pregnancy tests – 31
                                            Students having repeat pregnancy tests – 4 = 13%

                                       Percent of Woodson’s students tested for HIV in the
                                        Wellness Center.
                                             Total # of students at HD Woodson - 591
                                             Students Having HIV test – 40 = 7%

                                       To increase access to health care for Woodson Senior High
                                        School students at the Wellness Center.
                                             Services are free, enrollment fee now waived.

                                       Percent of students registered in H.D. Woodson High School
                                        who voluntarily enroll in the program
                                            Students registered at H.D. Woodson - 591
                                            Students enrolled in the program - 314 = 53%

                                       Customer satisfaction among students seeking services in
                                        the Wellness Center.
                                                                                                     3
                           Students surveyed in the Wellness Center – C.S. surveys
                  not yet completed




Other Comments:




                                                                                     4