Vancouver Organizing Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Winter by tiffanitheisen

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									Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games

                                               Business Plan and Games Budget
                                                                     May 2007
Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.     INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................................7
   1.1    Message from the Chief Executive Officer ....................................................................7
   1.2    About VANOC ...............................................................................................................9
     1.2.1     VANOC Board of Directors....................................................................................9
     1.2.2     VANOC Executive Team .....................................................................................10
   1.3    Bid History ...................................................................................................................10
   1.4    Quick Facts about the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games ......11
   1.5    VANOC Business Plan and Budget – Executive Summary ........................................11
     1.5.1     Overview .............................................................................................................11
     1.5.2     Development of the Business Plan......................................................................13
     1.5.3     Vancouver 2010 Winter Games Operating Budget .............................................14
     1.5.4     Vancouver 2010 Winter Games Venue Development Budget ............................16
     1.5.5     Executive Summary Conclusion..........................................................................17
2.     BACKGROUND ..............................................................................................................18
   2.1    Building of the Business Plan......................................................................................18
     2.1.1     Setting the Strategic Direction .............................................................................19
     2.1.2     Determined Function Scope ................................................................................19
     2.1.3     Completed Research, Including Previous Games Experience............................19
     2.1.4     Writing and Updating Function Business Plans...................................................20
     2.1.5     Cross-Function Reviews and Validations ............................................................20
     2.1.6     Built Detailed Budgeting Models and Workforce Plan .........................................21
     2.1.7     Financial and Workforce Due Diligence Reviews Completed .............................21
     2.1.8     Executive Team Workshops – Balancing Resources and Budgets across the
               Functions and Setting the VANOC Business Plan Framework ...........................22
     2.1.9     Board of Directors and IOC Review Sessions Completed ..................................22
   2.2    Future Business Plans ................................................................................................22
   2.3    The VANOC Environment ...........................................................................................23
   2.4    Pre-existing Contracts and Commitments...................................................................23
     2.4.1     Multiparty Agreement (MPA) ...............................................................................24
     2.4.2     Host City Contract (HCC) ....................................................................................24
     2.4.3     Marketing Plan Agreement (MPA2).....................................................................24
     2.4.4     Joint Marketing Plan Agreement (JMPA) ............................................................24
     2.4.5     Venue Agreements..............................................................................................25
     2.4.6     Shared Legacy Agreement..................................................................................25
     2.4.7     Canadian Paralympic Committee (CPC) Joint Marketing Agreement .................25
   2.5    Other Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games............................................................25
   2.6    Core Assumptions .......................................................................................................26
     2.6.1     Inflation, Cost Escalation and As-Spent Dollars ..................................................26
     2.6.2     Foreign Currency.................................................................................................26
     2.6.3     Taxes...................................................................................................................26



Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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     2.6.4     Completeness .....................................................................................................27
     2.6.5     Value in Kind (VIK) ..............................................................................................28
3.     RISKS .............................................................................................................................28
4.     VANOC APPROACH ......................................................................................................30
   4.1    VANOC Vision.............................................................................................................30
   4.2    VANOC Mission ..........................................................................................................30
   4.3    Values and Guiding Principles ....................................................................................30
   4.4    VANOC Strategy .........................................................................................................32
   4.5    Project and Contingency Management .......................................................................33
   4.6    VANOC Organizational Structure................................................................................34
5.     LEGACIES OF THE 2010 WINTER GAMES ..................................................................34
   5.1    Venue Legacies...........................................................................................................35
   5.2    Sport Legacies ............................................................................................................35
   5.3    Community Legacies...................................................................................................36
   5.4    Economic Legacies .....................................................................................................36
6.     SCHEDULE.....................................................................................................................37
   6.1    Phases of the Games..................................................................................................37
   6.2    Master Schedule .........................................................................................................39
   6.3    Games Time Planning Roadmap ................................................................................39
   6.4    Key Dates of the Games in 2010 ................................................................................39
7.     VANOC BUDGET ...........................................................................................................40
   7.1    Revenue ......................................................................................................................40
   7.2    Expenses.....................................................................................................................43
   7.3    Revenue, Marketing and Communications .................................................................43
   7.4    Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue Management ...................................................47
   7.5    Service Operations and Ceremonies ..........................................................................51
   7.6    Technology and Systems ............................................................................................57
   7.7    Human Resources, Sustainability and International Client Services...........................60
   7.8    Finance, Legal and CEO’s Office ................................................................................63
   7.9    Project Contingency – Games Operations ..................................................................66
   7.10 Paralympic Games ......................................................................................................67
8.     VENUE DEVELOPMENT (CONSTRUCTION) BUDGET ...............................................68
9.     GAMES OPERATIONS CONTINGENCY MANAGEMENT ............................................71
   9.1    Cash flows...................................................................................................................71
10.    BUDGET SCHEDULES ..................................................................................................73
11.    VANOC ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE (CHART)....................................................89
12.    APPENDIX 1: MARKETING AND SPONSORSHIP PLAN .............................................93



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Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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13.        APPENDIX 2: PROJECT CONTROL AND DEFICIT AVOIDANCE PLAN....................101
14.        APPENDIX 3: RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN .................................................................111
15.        APPENDIX 4: PROCUREMENT PLAN ........................................................................115
16.        APPENDIX 5: HUMAN RESOURCES PLAN................................................................121
17.        APPENDIX 6: THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT..........................................................131
18.        APPENDIX 7: VENUE AGREEMENT PLAN ................................................................137
19.        APPENDIX 8: GAMES SECURITY – CONCEPT, PARTNERS AND INTEGRATION..139
20.        APPENDIX 9: CULTURAL PLAN..................................................................................143
21.        APPENDIX 10: HEALTH SERVICES PLAN .................................................................149
22.        APPENDIX 11: COMMUNICATIONS PLAN .................................................................157
23.        APPENDIX 12: VANOC SUSTAINABILITY POLICY ....................................................163
24.        APPENDIX 13: OFFICIAL LANGUAGES .....................................................................169
25.        APPENDIX 14: EVALUATION MECHANISMS .............................................................175
26.        APPENDIX 15: LEGACIES OF THE 2010 WINTER GAMES.......................................181
27.        APPENDIX 16: VANCOUVER 2010 BUSINESS PLAN – GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND
           ACRONYMS .................................................................................................................193




      In the event of any discrepancy between the English and French version of this document, the English version shall prevail.




Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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1.       INTRODUCTION

1.1 Message from the Chief Executive Officer

Organizing an event that will attract thousands of athletes from more than 80 nations, 10,000
media members and a worldwide television audience of some three billion is a monumental
task. For more than 10 years, the venue delivery and staging plans for the 2010 Olympic and
Paralympic Winter Games have been taking shape. In fact, the dreams of hosting the Games on
Canada’s West Coast were born back in the early 1960s. The vision of those early sport and
recreation pioneers led to the development of the Whistler ski area – now one of North
America’s top winter sport destinations. For decades, bringing the Winter Games to Canada’s
West Coast has been supported by all levels of government. As the Flame is lit on
February 12, 2010, it will represent the culmination of 50 years of dreaming and planning
inspired by Canada’s passion for sport, culture and sustainability.

Since the beginning, in 1996, of Vancouver and Whistler’s venture into the Canadian Olympic
Committee’s domestic competition to determine Canada’s applicant for the 2010 Winter Games,
one vision has been consistently clear: the Games must be about creating benefits and legacies
for sport, for our host communities, the host province, our country and the global Olympic and
Paralympic movements.

It was this clear vision combined with a thorough bid development process that resulted in
Vancouver being named Host City for the 2010 Winter Games on July 2, 2003. Our bid was a
detailed plan based on the best information available in 2002.

With any project that takes seven years to deliver, changes are inevitable. Each day, new
information becomes available. We continue to assess and analyze, find innovative ideas and
make informed decisions. Our entire team is focused on our mission to touch the soul of this
nation and inspire the world by staging outstanding Olympic and Paralympic Games with
sustainable legacies. And we keep a close eye on the bottom line – to ensure we are making
prudent decisions respecting the financial resources available to us. This applies to both the
construction of the 2010 Winter Games venues, funded equally by the Governments of Canada
and British Columbia, and to the cost of planning and staging the Games that will be delivered
from monies secured from the private sector.

The issue of contingency management is addressed in several parts of this plan. It is of crucial
importance to us and to our partners. Our goal is to first ensure that we can host an outstanding
Games within our approved budget and then to take whatever measures we can to maximize
the financial legacy arising from the Games. Simply put, we will not spend funds we do not
have. This budget will remain balanced.

VANOC benefits from a strong working relationship with the International Olympic Committee
which is in a unique position to provide counsel and oversight having supervised every Games
ever staged. The IOC has provided considerable assistance to VANOC through a formal



Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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transfer of knowledge program and through countless meetings with various members of our
team. The IOC formally monitors VANOC through its Coordination Commission to ensure
deadlines are met and the best possible planning is taking place en route to the Games. The
Commission is comprised of senior IOC Members and expert advisors who offer assistance and
guidance on all aspects of Games management. This strengthens our project and helps mitigate
risks typically associated with a project like ours.

This Business Plan is a living, pliable document. It contains our current assumptions and
estimates, based on our best assessment of Games requirements, risks and opportunities. Its
structure reflects the requirements of the Multiparty Agreement. It is robust and flexible. We
have combined the lessons from previous Games with the expertise from our partners, the
tireless efforts and contributions from Board members and committees of VANOC, and perhaps
our best resource – our dedicated workforce – to create what we believe is a solid, thoroughly
researched and validated program. This plan will guide our decisions as we approach the
staging of the 2010 Winter Games in a fiscally disciplined way leaving benefits and legacies that
will last long after the Flame is extinguished. With fewer than three years to go until the Games,
we are certain there will be changes and adjustments – likely many of them – all aimed at
producing the best experience for all Games participants.

The plan is at, least in part, designed to provide our government partners, stakeholders and the
Canadian public with a clear sense of the work that is well underway with a focus on the
disciplined financial framework we must work within and respect. While the document is of
considerable length, it does not, and cannot, possibly address all of the activity and planning
that is already completed or is still in front of us. The truth is VANOC’s planning will continue
with added layers of detail and refinement right down to Games time. There is an extensive
body of work behind this plan – detailed financial estimates, function plans and schedules.
These will continue to evolve as the project advances. The plan frames the road to 2010 for
VANOC and is a key tool for helping us get there.

At Vancouver 2010, we are one team with clear goals – to stage outstanding Games and to
leave lasting legacies. Games that will lift Canadians and inspire the world! By working together,
the dreams that have spanned nearly five decades will come alive in February 2010.

Respectfully,




John A. Furlong
Chief Executive Officer
Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games
May 8, 2007




Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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1.2 About VANOC

The Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games
(VANOC) was established on September 30, 2003 as a not-for-profit private company under the
Canada Corporations Act. The Committee’s mandate is to support and promote the
development of sport in Canada by planning, organizing, financing and staging the 2010
Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

The Vancouver 2010 mission is to touch the soul of the nation and inspire the world by creating
and delivering an extraordinary Olympic and Paralympic experience with lasting legacies. The
vision is to build a stronger Canada whose spirit is raised by its passion for sport, culture and
sustainability.

1.2.1    VANOC Board of Directors

VANOC is governed by a 20-member Board of Directors nominated by the Government of
Canada, the Province of British Columbia, the City of Vancouver, the Resort Municipality of
Whistler, the Canadian Olympic Committee, the Canadian Paralympic Committee and local First
Nations.

Member                                                    Nominated by
Peter Brown                                               Government of Canada
Michael Chambers                                          Canadian Olympic Committee
Charmaine Crooks                                          Canadian Olympic Committee
Ken Dobell                                                Province of British Columbia
Barrett Fisher                                            Resort Municipality of Whistler
Jacques Gauthier                                          Government of Canada
Jim Godfrey                                               Resort Municipality of Whistler
Rusty Goepel                                              Province of British Columbia
Gibby Jacob                                               Squamish and Lil’wat First Nations
Patrick Jarvis                                            Canadian Paralympic Committee
Jeff Mooney                                               City of Vancouver
Michael Phelps                                            Canadian Olympic Committee
Jack Poole, Chair                                         VANOC Board
Richard Pound                                             Canadian Olympic Committee
Judy Rogers                                               City of Vancouver
Chris Rudge                                               Canadian Olympic Committee
Becky Scott                                               Canadian Olympic Committee
Walter Sieber                                             Canadian Olympic Committee
Carol Stephenson                                          Government of Canada
Richard Turner                                            Province of British Columbia




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1.2.2    VANOC Executive Team

On May 18, 2006, VANOC announced a number of internal structural changes to create
enhanced efficiencies in decision making and add significant venue construction and project
management expertise. The changes, originally contemplated to occur following the Torino
2006 Winter Games, were made as part of the normal evolution of a Games Organizing
Committee from the planning to the operational phase. By combining departments with
operational synergies, including Sport with Technology and Legal with Finance/Administration,
the Organizing Committee now reflects a more operational Games-time structure. The seven
divisions of VANOC are responsible for 50 Organizing Committee functions. A current VANOC
organizational chart is on page 89.

         John Furlong, Chief Executive Officer

         Dave Cobb, Executive Vice President, Revenue, Marketing and Communications

         Dan Doyle, Executive Vice President, Construction

         David Guscott, Executive Vice President, Corporate Strategy and Government Relations

         Rex McLennan, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

         Cathy Priestner Allinger, Executive Vice President, Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue
         Management

         Donna Wilson, Executive Vice President, Human Resources, Sustainability and
         International Client Services

         Terry Wright, Executive Vice President, Service Operations and Ceremonies


1.3 Bid History

In 1998, the Canadian Olympic Committee selected Vancouver to present Canada’s Bid for the
2010 Winter Games. Over a five-year period, the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation developed a
Games delivery plan with a vision of creating sustainable legacies for athletes, sport
development, host communities and the Olympic and Paralympic movements.

The Vancouver 2010 Bid Book was delivered to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in
January 2003. In March 2003, the IOC Evaluation Commission for the 2010 Winter Games
visited Vancouver to review its bid plans. The extensive review included presentations on 18
themes including Games financing, marketing, sport venues, culture, transportation and
accommodation.




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On July 2, 2003, members of the IOC, at their 115th Session in Prague, selected Vancouver as
the Host City of the 2010 Winter Games from a field of three Candidate Cities that included
Salzburg, Austria and PyeongChang, South Korea.

The Bid Book, available online at vancouver2010.com, was the first Games delivery plan for the
2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. It formed the foundation for VANOC and its
efforts to stage outstanding Games in 2010.


1.4 Quick Facts about the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games

         5,500 Olympic Games athletes and team officials (projected)
         1,350 Paralympic Games athletes and team officials (projected)
         86 Olympic medal events
         58 Paralympic medal events
         80+ countries participating in the Olympic Winter Games
         40+countries participating in the Paralympic Winter Games
         10,000 media representatives
         3 billion worldwide television viewers
         70 million website viewers
         25,000 volunteers
         Olympic Winter Games – February 12-28, 2010
         Paralympic Winter Games – March 12-21, 2010


1.5 VANOC Business Plan and Budget – Executive Summary

1.5.1    Overview

The Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games
(VANOC) is responsible for two key areas relating to the 2010 Winter Games: the construction
of Games venues, and the delivery of successful Games on behalf of all Canadians.

Since VANOC’s inception on September 30, 2003, this Business Plan represents its second
plan that details the Games operating budget and venue development budget.

As required under the Multiparty Agreement (see section 2.4.1), VANOC’s first Business Plan
was to detail, to the best extent possible, the planning, organizing, financing and staging of the
Games. VANOC met this requirement with its first Business Plan, known as Version 1, being
approved by the VANOC Board of Directors in July 2005. That plan updated the Vancouver
2010 Bid Book assumptions and reflected the state of planning and expectations at that time.
The Version 1 Business Plan included a discussion of future business plans with an indication



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that Version 2 of the Business Plan would be developed in late 2006 when function managers
had been hired, function planning was sufficiently advanced and when the experience of the
Torino 2006 Winter Games could be properly incorporated. The first draft of this Version 2
Business Plan was delivered to the VANOC Board of Directors in November 2006.

The Games operating budget in the VANOC Version 2 Business Plan is the product of 50
individual function business plans that were developed through an extensive and thorough
exercise across the entire organization that took place in 2006.

VANOC will develop three versions of its Business Plan and budget over the course of its
lifespan. These plans will reflect the stage of organization of the Games and the need to
continuously update financial plans and revenue projections. The first Games revenue and
expense projections were prepared for Vancouver’s bid and were completed in late 2002. It was
a plan deemed very detailed for its time that was subjected to the careful scrutiny of British
Columbia’s Auditor General. As directed by the IOC, the plan was prepared in fixed 2002 dollars
and presented to the IOC in US Dollars. Version 3 of the VANOC Business Plan and Budget is
expected to be completed in fall 2008. It will be based on 18 months of further detailed
operational planning and early test event results. Completion of this budget at that time will
allow functions to properly react to changes in time for the staging of the Games. Version 3 will
essentially be an exercise in validating financial assumptions, ensuring that the Games
operating budget is realistic and achievable. By then, operating plans will be well advanced. It
will be completed approximately 16 months in advance of the Games and should reflect a high
degree of confidence about the costs and revenues associated with the Games.

The Multiparty Agreement requires the VANOC Business Plan to include the following elements:

         a values, vision, mission, goals and objectives statement
         a financial plan that includes all sources of funding, a complete set of financial
         projections and cash flow projections
         a plan for achieving sponsorship revenue and value-in-kind support targets
         an operating budget and capital budget for each of the Olympic Games and the
         Paralympic Games
         a deficit avoidance plan that will include the requirement for the OCOG to immediately
         implement remedial measures to eliminate a deficit and to establish acceptable levels of
         risk
         a risk management plan
         a plan for acquiring services required by the Games Organizing Committee (OCOG) for
         identifying how those services will be provided (for example, by the OCOG, third-party
         sponsorship, volunteer support, one of the Parties, or by other means)
         a human resources plan regarding paid staff and volunteers, including an employment
         equity plan; provision for an environmental scan that is to be regularly updated
         a plan for concluding development and use agreements with facility owners, as required,
         for the Games



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         a marketing plan
         a security plan to be developed in consultation with the Government Parties
         a cultural plan
         a health plan to be developed in consultation with the Government Parties
         a communications plan
         an evaluation mechanism for ongoing assessment of the OCOG’s progress in planning,
         organizing, financing and staging of the Games
         an Official Languages plan that will facilitate OCOG’s delivery of bilingual Games

The VANOC Business Plan includes all of the above noted elements within the plan and its
appendices.


1.5.2    Development of the Business Plan

In order to develop the VANOC Business Plan and Budget, each Games department, also
known as a Games function, produced a business plan. This work was carried out in spring and
summer 2006 and was validated by the VANOC Executive Team and reviewed by the Board of
Directors in fall 2006. Each function business plan includes the following:

         Mission and performance outcomes
         Roles and responsibilities
         Contractual obligations
         Customers (internal and external)
         Receipt from and delivery of services to other VANOC functions
         Issues
         Key planning assumptions
         Key delivery strategies
         Key deliverables and schedules
         A workforce plan

The most recent update of the function business plans was completed in November 2006. This
information was used to develop the overall Games operating budget and the specific
deliverables to be provided by each VANOC function in order to properly stage the Games.




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1.5.3    Vancouver 2010 Winter Games Operating Budget

The Games Operating Budget is financed by revenue sources from the private sector. These
sources include a portion of the worldwide sale of Games television broadcast rights,
international and domestic sponsorships, licensing and merchandising, ticket sales and
fundraising.

The Games Venue Development budget is made up of equal contributions from the
Government of Canada and Province of British Columbia.

The current operating budget to stage the 2010 Winter Games is $1,629,269,000. This is net of
$197,217,000 in marketing royalty rights from its revenue that will be paid to the International
Olympic Committee (IOC), International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and Canadian Olympic
Committee (COC).

Revenue sources for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games include the following:


                                                                                                  $
 IOC Contribution                                                                                 579,700,000
 Less – cost of providing Olympic Broadcast Services (OBS)                                       (178,000,000)
 IOC Net contribution                                                                             401,700,000
 Other IOC revenue                                                                                 35,000,000
 IOC International Sponsorship Program                                                            201,404,000
 Domestic Sponsorship                                                                             760,000,000
 Ticketing                                                                                        231,854,000
 Licensing & Merchandising                                                                         46,026,000
 Paralympic revenue                                                                                40,000,000
 Other                                                                                            110,502,000
 TOTAL REVENUE                                                                                   1,826,486,000
 Less: Marketing rights royalties                                                                (197,217,000)
 NET REVENUE                                                                                     1,629,269,000




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The budget for Games operating expenditures, by division, is as follows:

 DIVISION                                                                                             $
 Revenue, Marketing and Communications                                                             126,427,000
 Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue Management                                                      186,436,000
 Service Operations and Ceremonies                                                                 548,130,000
 Technology and Systems                                                                            398,500,000
 Human Resources, Sustainability and International Client Services                                 153,144,000
 Finance and Legal and CEO Office                                                                  116,632,000
 Project Contingency – Games Operations                                                            100,000,000
 Total expenditures                                                                               1,629,269,000




                                                                                            On Feb. 12, 2007, The
                                                                                            Vancouver 2010
                                                                                            Countdown Clock,
                                                                                            presented by Omega,
                                                                                            Official Timekeeper, was
                                                                                            unveiled to mark the
                                                                                            three-year countdown to
                                                                                            the Olympic Games
                                                                                            Opening Ceremony on
                                                                                            Feb. 12, 2010.




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1.5.4    Vancouver 2010 Winter Games Venue Development Budget

The budget for building new venues and renovating existing facilities in order to stage the 2010
Winter Games is $580 million, as outlined in the table below. This is funded equally by the
Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.

Venue construction revenues                                                                        $
Canada                                                                                           290,000,000
BC                                                                                               290,000,000
Total                                                                                            580,000,000
Venue construction expenditures
Venues constructed by Partners with VANOC $ Contribution
UBC Ice Hockey arena (UBC Winter Sports Centre)                                                   38,445,000
Richmond Speed Skating Oval                                                                       63,110,000
Whistler Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village                                                37,500,000
Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village                                               30,000,000
Whistler Broadcast and Press Centre                                                                3,000,000
Training Venues / Other Grants                                                                     7,400,000
Venues constructed / upgraded by VANOC
Hillcrest Curling Venue                                                                           38,000,000
Whistler Athlete Centre                                                                           16,000,000
Whistler Sliding Centre                                                                          104,900,000
Whistler Nordic Competition Venue                                                                119,740,000
Cypress Freestyle and Snowboard Venue                                                             15,800,000
Whistler Alpine (Whistler Creekside)                                                              27,635,000
Hastings Park Skating Venue (Pacific Coliseum)                                                    23,700,000
Other                                                                                              6,270,000
Subtotal                                                                                         531,500,000
Contingency                                                                                       55,300,000
Less: Sponsor VIK Contribution                                                                   (6,800,000)
TOTAL                                                                                            580,000,000


In keeping with Vancouver 2010 Bid commitments, the goal of VANOC’s venue construction
program is to complete the competition sites as early as possible to reduce complexity and
maximize athlete training and testing opportunities. On March 15, 2007, VANOC reconfirmed
the goal of ensuring that athletes and officials will have early access to the venues when it was




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announced that venues for 13 of 15 sport disciplines will be made available for training and
competition during the 2007/2008 winter season.


1.5.5    Executive Summary Conclusion

This Business Plan represents the culmination of more than three years of research and study.
It blends the experience of the last two Winter Games – Salt Lake 2002 and Torino 2006 – with
the expertise and knowledge of VANOC staff and partner officials. The plan updates the
assumptions made by the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation and paints a more realistic, current
and responsible financial picture of what it will take to stage Games in 2010 that will touch the
soul of the nation and inspire the world. As the Games approach, this plan will be revised,
tested and refined as new information becomes available. A disciplined approach to budget
management and decision making will ensure that the end result will be Games staged within
the available financial resources of VANOC and its partners that leave a positive financial
legacy.




The new UBC Winter Sports Centre takes shape. The venue,                    The Whistler Sliding Centre construction site.
along with Vancouver’s General Motors Place, will host ice                  The 1,450-metre track will host bobsleigh, luge
hockey and ice sledge hockey during the 2010 Winter Games.                  and skeleton in 2010. Photo – November 2006.
Photo – April 2007.




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2.       BACKGROUND

Every business needs a plan. An entity as complex as an organizing committee for the Olympic
and Paralympic Games requires an especially robust plan based on sound strategy and forward
thinking. One of the key lessons learned from previous Games organizers is that change is
certain and constant. A good plan allows for change. This one does.

The VANOC Executive and the Board of Directors require a sound business plan to make
decisions, monitor performance and fulfill their core responsibilities. This plan will serve that
purpose. It will provide the Board and its committees the context against which to measure
activities and understand the progression of planning. With a project-oriented business like the
2010 Winter Games, planning progress is best monitored against the expected Games-time
deliverables and milestones along the path. Fiscal year performance provides the Board,
management and stakeholders with an appreciation of how resources are being managed year-
to-year as milestones are achieved. This plan and business model will provide the Board with its
foundation for good decision making.


2.1 Building of the Business Plan

This Business Plan represents the second such plan prepared by the Vancouver Organizing
Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC). The first, known as
Version 1, was approved by the VANOC Board of Directors in July 2005. The Board, and
especially its Finance Committee and staff, spent many hours reviewing and discussing key
elements of the plan. It was, however, a largely top-down exercise that reflected the state of
planning at that time. The Version 1 plan included a discussion of future business plans
including an indication that Version 2 would be developed in late 2006 when function managers
had been hired and function planning was sufficiently advanced. This would be the first “ground
up” Business Plan and Budget.

This section summarizes the main steps taken to develop and validate the 50 function business
plans that were ultimately merged to create the VANOC Version 2 Business Plan. Business
planning began in fall 2005 and continued to be a significant priority throughout 2006.

Robust business planning processes were designed to provide assurance to the VANOC Board
that key assumptions, risks and opportunities were fully investigated, validated and planned for.
Accordingly, there was a high level of oversight from the VANOC Finance and Risk
Management teams and a fully engaged Executive Team at every step, led by the CEO.

The goals of the business planning processes were to have every function build a
comprehensive and credible business plan, to test the plans through a series of due diligence
review processes and to then integrate the validated plans into the consolidated VANOC
Business Plan with a balanced budget that enables VANOC to deliver on its strategic priorities
and objectives.




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These goals were achieved. Furthermore, elements of the plan have evolved into effective
ongoing management tools such as the Games planning Master Schedule that are vital to
delivering extraordinary Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in 2010.

2.1.1    Setting the Strategic Direction

Through a series of workshops and discussions with key stakeholders, the Executive Team
developed VANOC’s mission, vision, values, seven strategic objectives and the 2010 desired
performance outcomes.

VANOC’s strategic objectives were a guide to the team throughout the planning process,
especially when priorities were being set. Both the function business plans and this VANOC
Business Plan are aligned with, and enable, the achievement of the VANOC Strategic Plan.

2.1.2    Determined Function Scope

In fall 2005, workshops were held with each of the function teams to identify and confirm the
function’s scope/roles and responsibilities and mission, interdependencies and issues. The
workshops resulted in all functions having scope definitions prior to initiating the detailed
business planning process.

2.1.3    Completed Research, Including Previous Games Experience

Considerable research was undertaken leading up to, and as part of, the Torino 2006 Winter
Games and prior to writing the business plans. This research and benchmarking continued
throughout the planning processes.

The starting point for research was the IOC Olympic Games Knowledge Management System
(OGKM) extranet site with benchmark information, reports and presentations from previous
Games organizers. The Games functions technical manuals and regular meetings with IOC
function counterparts were valuable planning aids.

The IOC also offers OGKM workshops and a network of experts with Games experience. More
than 20 OGKM workshops have been delivered to VANOC staff teams and partners. Many of
the workshops focused on addressing specific business planning issues and challenges.

Eighty VANOC employees, along with many partners, experienced the magnitude and
complexity of the Torino 2006 Winter Games in person and participated in the OGKM Observer
Programs. In addition, 16 VANOC staff members worked directly for the Torino Organizing
Committee (TOROC) on secondments for training purposes.

The five-day Torino Debrief Session held in Vancouver in July 2006 was also a valuable
opportunity to discuss TOROC’s experience – what worked well, the challenges faced,
opportunities and recommendations for improvement.




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Another solid source of information is in the VANOC team itself. VANOC has deliberately hired
experienced people early. Many members of the VANOC Team (both partners and VANOC
employees) have in-depth Games experience and an extensive network of Games contacts,
while others have valuable corporate experience, including best practice and market information
for exploring new and creative solutions. This combination of skills and experience helped us
challenge the status quo and find creative solutions.


2.1.4    Writing and Updating Function Business Plans

Using a common function business plan template and a series of facilitated sessions, all
VANOC functions drafted their preliminary function business plans by May 31, 2006. These
plans include:

         Mission and performance outcomes
         Roles and responsibilities
         Contractual obligations
         Customers
         Services delivered to and received from other VANOC functions
         Issues
         Key planning assumptions
         Key delivery strategies
         Key deliverables and schedules
         A workforce plan

The final update of the function business plans was completed in November 2006 to ensure all
function plan information was sufficiently detailed and accurate to be included in the VANOC
Business Plan. However, as new information becomes available, each function business plan is
subject to further updates and more detail.

2.1.5    Cross-Function Reviews and Validations

Once the preliminary function business plans were drafted, the next step was to build a common
understanding of the various planning assumptions made across all of VANOC functions. A
cross-function review of the draft function business plans was completed. The objectives of the
review were to verify interdependencies, cross-function planning assumptions and services, to
identify gaps, duplications or inconsistencies, and resolve them.

Functions received a summary of the services they were expected to deliver and presented with
key planning assumptions that were linked to their function and identified in other plans.
Discrepancies and duplications were identified, discussed and reconciled. Services and key



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assumptions were confirmed and function business plans were updated. This exercise was
repeated several times as the budgets changed and plans were modified.

Another form of cross-function review was building the VANOC Master Schedule. Individual
function schedules were integrated into the VANOC Master Schedule. The schedule addressed
identified gaps, duplicates, sequencing and timing issues.


2.1.6    Built Detailed Budgeting Models and Workforce Plan

The preliminary budget and workforce plan information was consolidated and reviewed with the
Executive Team in May 2006. The Executive Team provided direction and recommended
budget targets for each function. The Finance team also provided functions with a set of
standard budgeting guidelines.

Over the summer 2006, function teams worked with their function business managers and
Workforce representatives to develop detailed function budgets and workforce plans that were
aligned with their business plan deliverables and services. Budget assumptions and cost
parameters were refined; the associated resource requirements (people, goods and services)
were quantified and then tested and validated. A detailed budget model was built for each
function.


2.1.7    Financial and Workforce Due Diligence Reviews Completed

In August 2006, financial review sessions were held with every function. The responsible
function and its executive and the finance and planning teams reviewed the function business
plan and budget in detail. Planning and budgeting assumptions were challenged with the goal of
ensuring that every expense was critical, realistic and consistent across all functions. Gaps,
overlaps/redundancies, opportunities, efficiencies and uncertainties were identified and
addressed.

There were a series of benchmarking exercises. Budgets and workforce plans were compared
to previous organizing committee statistics, with a focus on the Torino 2006 and Salt Lake 2002
Games. Two expert advisors with previous organizing committee experience completed a
comprehensive review of the function budgets and workforce plans and recommended changes.
The finance and workforce teams then met with every function to review and update their
workforce plans, budgets and business plan.

After the financial and workforce reviews were completed, function leads created an executive
summary of their business plan, budget and workforce summaries. These summaries formed
the basis of the Executive Team, Board of Directors and VANOC partner presentations.




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2.1.8 Executive Team Workshops – Balancing Resources and Budgets across the Functions
and Setting the VANOC Business Plan Framework

The Executive Team spent much of September 2006 in intensive business planning workshops
to review every function business plan, challenge planning assumptions, explore creative
solutions and recommend changes to function plans and budgets.

The focus then turned to gaining a deep understanding of the integrated VANOC picture,
including the consolidated budget, contingency plans, risk assessments, overall priorities, trade-
offs and opportunities with a final evaluation against expectations set out in VANOC’s strategic
plan.

The appropriate level of contingency, the risk profile and setting specific budget priorities
sparked healthy and open debate. Every alternate scenario was thoroughly discussed.

After these sessions, work began to consolidate the information and understanding into a
document that would clearly describe all material elements of the VANOC Business Plan.


2.1.9    Board of Directors and IOC Review Sessions Completed

The VANOC Board of Directors participated in a two-day business planning review session in
mid-October 2006 with a further review in early November. The objective was to build a clear
understanding and confidence in the overall business plan and processes by which it was
developed. The material risks, issues and opportunities, key deliverables, planning
assumptions, challenges, opportunities and risks were all discussed. The consolidated VANOC
budget, contingency plan and risk profile were also discussed.

The session also provided management with valuable input, insight and direction as to how
VANOC can best reach its goal of achieving a balanced budget and finalize the VANOC
Business Plan in the first quarter of 2007.

In March 2007, VANOC concluded its negotiations with the IOC related to the amount of the
IOC revenue contribution and the sharing of costs in a number of areas including Olympic
Broadcast Services (OBS). The results of these negotiations are reflected in this Business Plan.


2.2 Future Business Plans

With the approval of this Business Plan, VANOC has a new starting point for a series of plan
revisions and budget re-allocations that will take place between now and Games time. Looking
ahead, VANOC’s business planning and budgeting will be a very dynamic process governed by
a rigorous set of checks and balances that ensure planned expenditures at any point in time are
always met with secure revenue sources.




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Version 3 of the plan and budget is expected to be completed in fall 2008. It will be based on 18
months of further detailed operational planning and early Test Events. Version 3 will largely be
an exercise at further validating our budget assumptions and forecasts, helping to ensure the
budget continues to be realistic and achievable. By then, our operating plans will be well
advanced. This work will be completed in about 16 months in advance of the Games and will
reflect an even higher degree of confidence in final costs and revenues associated with staging
the Games.


2.3 The VANOC Environment

VANOC operates in a complex, multi-stakeholder environment. Its plans and budgets are
subject to extensive oversight by its government partners, the International Olympic Committee,
the International Paralympic Committee, International Sport Federations (IFs) and others. There
are high expectations from government partners, the public, numerous special interest groups,
the media, the sport community and others that the Organizing Committee must live up to. At
every stage, VANOC’s actions will be under close scrutiny. With a policy of openness and
transparency, VANOC will continue to earn the public’s confidence and trust.

Politically, VANOC has the support of all levels of government. However, elections are
anticipated between now and 2010 at the federal level, provincially in BC, in Vancouver and
Whistler and also in the venue communities of Richmond and West Vancouver. Changes in
governments could change the environment VANOC operates within, however VANOC will
continue to plan based on the ongoing support of all of its partners as demonstrated to date.
Clearly, this support is essential to VANOC’s success in staging the Games.

Canada and British Columbia continue to experience robust economic growth with strong
investment, low unemployment and intense competition for skilled labour in some sectors. While
the very positive business and employment picture is welcome, it does pose challenges in terms
of cost pressures. This has been most visible in the construction sector and venue development
costs reflect this fact. See further details in Appendix 6: The Working Environment.


2.4 Pre-existing Contracts and Commitments

The operations of VANOC are subject to several key agreements and commitments. Some are
very fundamental to VANOC’s operations and its obligations. In many cases, these agreements
were made during the Bid phase, which have subsequently been assigned to VANOC and drive
many of the assumptions in the Organizing Committee’s planning. Key agreements include the
following:




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2.4.1    Multiparty Agreement (MPA)

Dated November 2002, parties to the MPA are the Government of Canada, the Province of
British Columbia, the Canadian Olympic Committee, the Canadian Paralympic Committee, the
City of Vancouver (COV) and the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW). VANOC joined on
October 31, 2003. The MPA has three primary objectives:

         Define, in advance, the parties’ respective roles in VANOC; hence the VANOC structure,
         Letters Patent and bylaws
         Secure the commitments of the parties to each other to ensure the success of the
         Games
         Define the contributions (financial and non-financial) that each of the Government
         partners will make to the Games


2.4.2    Host City Contract (HCC)

Dated July 2003, parties to the HCC are the COC, IOC and COV. VANOC joined in December
2003. The HCC sets out the relationship and respective rights and obligations of the parties
related to organizing and hosting the Games. It includes extensive VANOC obligations that are
incorporated into this plan. The HCC also requires that Vancouver host the Paralympic Winter
Games and establishes the standards for those Games by a reference to an agreement
between the IPC and IOC.


2.4.3    Marketing Plan Agreement (MPA2)

Dated April 2005, parties to MPA2 are the IOC and VANOC. MPA2 sets out the comprehensive
marketing relationship between VANOC and the IOC and their respective sponsors and
licensees, including the grant to VANOC of the right to market the Vancouver 2010 Olympic
brand in Canada and the right to retain most of the revenues derived from this marketing effort.
MPA2 also details the terms and conditions under which VANOC’s Marketing Plan is to be
implemented in Canada and the IOC’s commitments to pay to VANOC a portion of the revenues
from the IOC’s international sponsorship program – The Olympic Partner Programme (TOP).


2.4.4    Joint Marketing Plan Agreement (JMPA)

Dated June 2003, parties include the COC and COV. VANOC joined the agreement in
December 2003. The JMPA creates a simplified and unified marketing structure for Olympic
marketing within Canada for the Games. The JMPA includes the compensation structure
payable to the COC for granting to VANOC exclusive marketing rights in Canada related to the




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IOC, the Olympic Movement, the COC and the Games for the period January 1, 2005 through
December 31, 2012.


2.4.5    Venue Agreements

A number of venue agreements were completed during the Bid phase, by the Vancouver 2010
Bid Corporation, and most have since been joined by VANOC. With some additional
agreements recently completed, most are now in place. While most elements are covered in
these agreements, some have certain points requiring further definition. These agreements are
reflected in this Business Plan.


2.4.6    Shared Legacy Agreement

Dated November 2002, parties are the Lil’wat and Squamish First Nations, the Government of
British Columbia and the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation. The agreement sets out shared
legacy commitments to First Nations arising from the 2010 Games. They include: commitments
of shared ownership of the Whistler Nordic and sliding venues through the Whistler Legacies
Society, Olympic housing legacy, contracting opportunities and an Aboriginal youth sports
legacy.


2.4.7    Canadian Paralympic Committee (CPC) Joint Marketing Agreement

VANOC has entered into a Joint Marketing Agreement with the CPC. Dated January 1, 2005,
the agreement addresses marketing issues pertaining to VANOC and the CPC.


2.5 Other Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games

The two Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games held this decade provide valuable lessons and
learning resources for Vancouver 2010. VANOC has consulted extensively with those involved
in the Salt Lake 2002 and Torino 2006 Winter Games in the development of its operational
plans and function budgets. The Olympic Games Knowledge Management (OGKM) service also
provides the ongoing transfer of knowledge from previous Games.




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2.6 Core Assumptions

2.6.1    Inflation, Cost Escalation and As-Spent Dollars

The Vancouver 2010 Winter Games financial plan is built in “as-spent” Canadian Dollars. This
means that an item budgeted to cost $1 million in 2009 will in fact cost $1 million and not a
figure that is increased due to inflation or cost escalation. This approach differs significantly from
that adopted in the Bid phase where the IOC required that all budgets be submitted in fixed
2002 USD.

Inflation is assumed to be generally consistent with that of the past several years: an annual
change in the CPI index of approximately 2.0 per cent. Higher annual rates of inflation are
allowed for in specific expenditure categories where current trends demands. Examples are
energy and construction costs.

2.6.2    Foreign Currency

This budget is stated in Canadian Dollars (CAD). However, significant revenues of VANOC will
be received in United States Dollars (USD) and in Euros (€) and most will be converted to
Canadian Dollars to meet what are, for the most part, Canadian Dollar expenditures. VANOC
will also have some foreign currency payment obligations. As these amounts are confirmed,
VANOC removes the net future foreign exchange risk by securing in advance the rates at which
the foreign currency amounts will eventually be converted to Canadian Dollars. This is done
through contracts (hedges) with a major bank counterparty and are disclosed in each quarterly
reporting of VANOC’s financial results. Where such hedge contracts have yet to be entered into,
the prevailing spot foreign exchange rates have been assumed in the budget forecast.

VANOC’s foreign exchange risk management strategy is to use hedging to protect our current
budget by removing in the order of 90 per cent of the risk of a strengthening Canadian Dollar
diminishing the value of future foreign denominated cash flows. In so doing, it will not be
necessary in VANOC budgeting to make predictions as to the future exchange rates in
converting foreign currency amounts as these rates will be determined in advance.

2.6.3    Taxes

As VANOC is a not-for-profit corporation incorporated under Part II of the Canada Corporations
Act, it is not subject to Canadian income tax. It is, however, required to withhold Canadian taxes
on certain transactions with foreign individuals or companies.

VANOC is fully subject to the 7.0 per cent provincial sales tax (PST) required by British
Columbia. PST, where it applies, is included in budget estimates. Consistent with practice at
past major games, certain assumptions have been made in respect of transactions for which
VANOC anticipates that a remission of import duties and PST will be granted.




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VANOC is also subject to Canada’s 6.0 per cent Goods and Services Tax (GST). As a not-for-
profit entity, VANOC is not automatically entitled to a full recovery of its input tax credits. A
detailed assessment of VANOC’s tax position and development of its tax strategy is underway.
Under the terms of the Host City Contract, VANOC may be responsible for foreign or Canadian
taxes associated with transactions with members of the Olympic Family, generally the IOC,
Olympic Broadcast Services (OBS) or The Olympic Partner Programme (TOP).

The Government of Canada, in its budget tabled in March 2007, has proposed: 1) to waive any
non-resident withholding tax liability of the IOC and IPC for any payment made after 2005 and
before 2011; 2) to amend the Income Tax Act to ensure that non-resident athletes and other
non-resident individuals are not taxed as a direct result of their participation in the Games; and
3) to remit all or a portion of the customs duties, excise taxes and GST/HST on certain goods
imported into Canada in connection with the Games.

2.6.4    Completeness

Building a plan to cover a period of three years into the future in an environment of change is
challenging. Even with the significant amount of work done, both during and since the Bid, there
are areas where the ability to accurately predict future events is limited. To deliver the most
complete estimates possible, VANOC relied on:


         Research – Each function team has carefully researched the requirements of their
         particular functions. Research has included reviewing IOC technical manuals, accessing
         Olympic Games Knowledge Management (OGKM) materials, observation of the Torino
         Games, attendance at the Torino 2006 debrief sessions in July 2006, meeting with
         managers experienced at Torino, Salt Lake 2002 and other Games and other sources.

         Comparison to other Games – Financial results from the Salt Lake 2002 Games have
         been analyzed. VANOC managers have met on numerous occasions with key staff from
         both the Salt Lake and Torino 2006 Organizing Committees, including key members of
         their executive teams. Relationships were established with colleagues in both cities that
         allowed for a very full and extensive review of their operations and results.

         Experience and expertise – VANOC staff includes several individuals who have
         worked on one or more Olympic or other major Games. Most functions have a games-
         experienced leader or have accessed the services of a games-experienced person. This
         experience has added to their understanding of requirements and possible risks.

         Contingency – Understanding there will be changes to the plan and budget to reflect
         new information, changes in underlying assumptions and other factors, a project
         contingency is included in the budget. The contingency for the Games operating budget
         is planned to ensure that costs associated with unforeseen events and other challenges
         can be accommodated.



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2.6.5    Value in Kind (VIK)

VIK goods and services are the product of marketing agreements. Sponsors provide to VANOC
specified goods and services as partial or complete payment for marketing and other rights that
they obtain from VANOC. VIK typically comprises a substantial portion of an organizing
committee’s budget. VANOC anticipates VIK to be in excess of $400 million. In budgeting and
recording VIK transactions, VANOC follows Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting
Principles (GAAP). For the purposes of building this Business Plan, transactions anticipated to
be in the form of VIK are priced at estimated levels that would be paid in the marketplace in the
absence of a sponsorship agreement.


3.       RISKS

Any project of the size and complexity of the Olympic and Paralympic Games inherently
involves some risk. Throughout the planning process, risks specific to functions have been
identified. In many cases, mitigation strategies have also been identified. Foreign exchange risk,
for example, is largely removed through a hedging program as described in section 2.6.2. The
Risk Management Plan, included as part of this Business Plan, addresses a strategy for dealing
with project risk which is one of VANOC management’s most important responsibilities.

Many risks were identified in the Bid phase and in VANOC’s early foundation planning phase.
The most significant of these risks are identified below and discussed in more detail elsewhere
in this Plan.

As with all Games organizing committees, VANOC has some exposure to the certain risks in
achieving its strategic objectives and mandate.

Financial risks: In the context of its Business Plan and Budget, VANOC faces financial risk as
revenues and expenditures transition from planned activities, to contractual commitments, to
actual results.


During the first transition from planning to commitments, risk arises in the form of:


         Planning gaps – expenditures are required that were not identified in the Plan due to
         either oversight or changes in circumstances. This risk is mitigated through the extensive
         planning activities described in section 2 of this Plan and through the continuous
         monitoring and adjustment of the Plan.
         Changes in market pricing – the risk that scope is properly defined but, when entering
         into the procurement phase, pricing is materially different from expectations. While a
         certain element of this risk is beyond VANOC’s control, it is mitigated by extensive
         research, sound procurement practices and some ability to manage scope.




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         Revenue shortfall – While a great deal of effort goes into generating revenues sufficient
         to meet or exceed expenditure requirements, risk is always present until payment is
         received. Risk comes in the form of possible failure to reach revenue targets and in
         credit risk associated with future revenue streams. 69 per cent of VANOC’s anticipated
         revenue has now been committed. This is a high level given that the Games are fewer
         than three years away.
During the transition from commitments to actual results, risk arises in the form of:
         Credit risk – Credit risk for the venue program is considered very low as commitments
         are in place from government partners. VANOC receives revenues from the IOC and
         from numerous private sector companies. Credit risk is mitigated through partnering with
         sound, established companies and managing credit through contractual agreements.
         Performance risk – the ability of contractors and suppliers to deliver on commitments
         made to VANOC is critical because of the fixed time frame of the Games. Effort is made
         to mitigate performance risk through a thorough procurement process that emphasizes
         performance risk minimization as a key element of awarding of contracts.


VANOC is dependent upon receiving revenues from its senior government partners (BC and
Canada) to finance the cost of venue development activities. The major sources of operating
revenues are received from sponsorships, the sale of international television broadcast rights,
merchandise sales and ticket sales. The amount of broadcast and sponsorship revenue is
dependent upon negotiations with the IOC, which have now been concluded with the results
reflected in this Business Plan.


In addition, as much of VANOC’s revenue is received in foreign currencies, the risk of continued
appreciation of the Canadian Dollar is being mitigated through the use of hedging contracts.
Finally, given the nature of the Games, VANOC faces some risk of unanticipated costs in
staging the Games.


Performance Risks: VANOC has an active Risk Management Program in place. Where
practical and possible, risks and uncontrollable conditions, such as weather, are incorporated
into planning activities and mitigation strategies are adopted. The Risk Management Program
includes a number of activities aimed at ensuring that operating plans and activities are
appropriately ready for the Games. These include Test Events, simulations, extensive training
and other activities.


Performance risk associated with the key contractors and suppliers associated with the Games
is addressed through the procurement process.




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Reputation Risks: VANOC’s reputation must be maintained at the highest standard to give
confidence to its partners, sponsors and other stakeholders, and to maintain the public’s trust.


4.       VANOC APPROACH

VANOC’s mandate is clear. It is responsible for two key areas: 1.) building and/or upgrading the
venues to host the 2010 Winter Games, and 2.) financing, organizing and staging the Games.
Although the Games are taking place in the Vancouver-Whistler region, VANOC’s staff and
partners are working together to ensure the power and influence of the Games extend across
Canada.


4.1 VANOC Vision

A stronger Canada whose spirit is raised by its passion for sport, culture and sustainability.


4.2 VANOC Mission

To touch the soul of the nation and inspire the world by creating and delivering an extraordinary
Olympic and Paralympic experience and lasting legacies.


4.3 Values and Guiding Principles

Five values, each with guiding principles, have been identified. These form the foundation of the
VANOC way of dealing with its people, its partners, its stakeholders and issues faced on an
ongoing basis.

Team

         We will foster a safe environment in which to challenge each other’s ideas, uphold the
         obligation to dissent, but demand mutual respect. By focusing on the collective and not
         individual effort – everyone will cross the finish line together.

         As a collective group, VANOC shares accountability across the organization for the
         success of the Games

         We will incorporate the nation-building potential of the Games in all our plans and
         actions, reaching out to Canadians in all regions of the country and in locations all
         around the world, in Canada's two Official Languages




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         We will develop effective partnerships that will ensure inclusivity and leverage our legacy

         We will take a leadership role in stakeholder management with our key partners and
         sponsors

Trust

         We will act at all times with the highest standards of honesty and integrity and will
         demonstrate the highest standards of ethical behaviour and mutual trust

         We will demand of ourselves, our partners, our suppliers, our employees and all
         participants in the Games those same standards of ethical behaviour

         We will be fiscally responsible and accountable in all areas of operation by managing
         Olympic funds prudently

         We will initiate, drive and support efforts to ensure a strong, sustainable post-2010
         legacy for enhancing Canada’s capacity in sport, arts and culture, facilities, human skills
         and training, learning opportunities, volunteerism, business investment and tourism

         We will offer the opportunity for all Canadians to rediscover the value of their country
         and celebrate it on the world stage through athletic endeavours, culture, employment,
         volunteer roles, business opportunities, Games attendance and mass media

Excellence

         We will support efforts to improve the sport performance of Team Canada prior to and
         during the 2010 Games, and to enhance long-term sport performance in Canada

         We will commit to achieving individual and collective performance excellence in all areas
         of VANOC through teamwork and collaboration

         Working with our partners, we will promote social, cultural, health, and sport and
         recreation excellence

         We will be accountable for balancing our commitment to performance excellence with a
         strong emphasis on personal sustainability and a healthy lifestyle




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Sustainability

         We will be accountable for ensuring fiscal responsibility in all areas of operation and will
         manage Games funds prudently

         We will ensure inclusive participation in all aspects of the Games through employment,
         volunteerism, performance (sport, arts and cultural), goods and services supply,
         consultation and as spectators and consumers

         We will promote the diversity that gives our country and our community its enduring
         strength

         We model and work with our partners, our suppliers, and all participants in the Games to
         ensure the highest standards of honesty, integrity, ethical behaviour and mutual trust are
         followed

         We will be accountable to environmental stewardship in the building and delivery of the
         Games

Creativity

         We will value non-territorial and non-hierarchical behaviour, flexibility, adaptability and
         entrepreneurship

         We will encourage contagious enthusiasm, fun, good humour, engagement and
         optimism

         We will always be looking for new ways to improve, never being satisfied with the status
         quo

         We will inspire new ideas by having a work environment where people can speak up, try
         new things and not be afraid of failure


4.4 VANOC Strategy

In building Canada’s Bid for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and in assembling the
management team to carry out the project, a number of core strategies were set. VANOC’s
mission, vision and values are stated earlier in this plan. The following represent key strategic
objectives that are driving VANOC’s activities:




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         Engage the nation by sharing the journey to create a distinctly Canadian Olympic and
         Paralympic experience

         Create the conditions that will provide an extraordinary experience for athletes and all
         Games participants

         Build a team that passionately lives our values in order to achieve extraordinary
         performance

         Take responsibility for successful relationships with all of our partners in order to
         optimize their participation in, contribution to and legacy from Canada’s Games

         Generate sufficient revenue and manage costs and risk in order to ensure a positive
         financial legacy

         Be a disciplined and entrepreneurial organization with sound business processes,
         controls and tools that enable us to effectively manage the business of planning and
         staging the Games

         Manage the social, environmental, and economic impact and opportunities of our
         Games, in ways that will create lasting benefits, locally and globally


4.5 Project and Contingency Management

Appendix 2 addresses in more detail the steps and practices followed to manage and control
the Games project from both a financial and schedule perspective. Best practices from past
Games have been combined with best Canadian practices to work most effectively with the
management structure in place at VANOC.

VANOC’s goal is to manage its contingency resources to adequately protect the Games budget.
The plan is to take advantage of every opportunity to preserve its contingency into Games time
by aggressively pursuing new revenue sources and maintaining a strong internal discipline on
costs.

This Business Plan includes two contingencies:

         Games operations contingency – $100 million
         Venue construction contingency – $55.3 million

The project contingency for Games operations will be managed centrally. Should draws on
contingency be required, a rigorous and disciplined approach will help guarantee that
appropriate resource allocation decisions are made. The processes for budget and contingency
management are rigorous with decision making vested in senior management. Management



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information systems are in place to effectively track our financial status at any point in time and
ensure decisions can be made on a fully-informed basis and in a timely manner. Significant
draw downs of central contingency will require Board approval, further protecting the
effectiveness of financial planning and control.

The Games operating expenditures of $1.63 billion are comprised of project costs to date, value
in kind (VIK) goods and services, salaries and future cash obligations. The latter amount of
$722 million in future cash expenditures is very well protected by the $100 million contingency.

The venue construction contingency is managed under the same processes as above with the
added VANOC obligation of adhering to the Performance and Accountability agreement
between VANOC and the Province of British Columbia.


4.6 VANOC Organizational Structure

For the purposes of planning and budgeting, VANOC has been divided into 50 functions, each
accountable to one of the Executive Team. The current allocation of functions is on the VANOC
Organizational Chart on page 89.


5.       LEGACIES OF THE 2010 WINTER GAMES

The central theme of bidding for and hosting the 2010 Winter Games is to create sustainable
legacies. In addition to hosting an outstanding Games with superior conditions that will inspire
top performances by athletes, cultural performers, the workforce and our host communities,
VANOC’s goal is to leave legacies – physical and human – that will last long after the final
medal of the Games is awarded.

From the creation of new sport and recreation facilities, to a well-trained group of event experts
and volunteers, the impact of the 2010 Winter Games will endure well beyond the 27 days of
competition.

At this stage of planning, VANOC projects the following legacies that will result from hosting the
Games:
         New and renovated sport and community facilities
         Support for athletes and high-performance sport
         Increased awareness of Paralympic sport and athletes
         Creation of barrier-free access to sport and community facilities
         Increased awareness and understanding of Aboriginal peoples in Canada (First Nations,
         Inuit and Métis)




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         Advancement of sustainability practices and demonstration of how Games can be
         produced in an environmentally-sensitive, inclusive, safe and financially-responsible way
         Development of athlete villages in Vancouver and Whistler resulting in post-Games non-
         market housing
         Games employees and volunteers trained in event planning and execution
         New model for governments and community (such as First Nations, inner-city residents
         and organizations and persons with disabilities) to work together to address social
         issues with community engagement
         National pride and accomplishment of what a city, region and country can do when
         people come together to celebrate sport, culture and sustainability
         Increased awareness and pride in Canada’s linguistic duality and cultural diversity
         A continuing platform for long-term tourism promotion


Further details about the current state of Games legacies planning are available in Appendix 15.


5.1 Venue Legacies

The Vancouver 2010 venue development program is focused on maximizing the use of existing
facilities and building new venues that maximize the potential for post-Games uses. Working
with its partners, VANOC’s venue plan incorporates ideas of how the new facilities will operate
after the Games for the continued development of high-performance and recreational sport and
community uses.

The 2010 Games venues are being developed with a sustainable footprint that will leave a
legacy of green buildings designed to conserve natural resources such as water, materials and
energy throughout their operations. Efficiencies in building design will create a legacy of lower
operating costs for future venue owners achieved through the capture and re-use of waste heat
and/or rain water. Details of the post-Games use for each venue are noted in Appendix 15.


5.2 Sport Legacies

Certain sport equipment used during the Games will be donated after the Games to equip
venues for post-Games use. National Sport organizations (NSOs) will have access to the
equipment for future training and event hosting. After the Games, medical equipment will be
turned over to a number of communities for various legacy uses.

Launched in January 2005, Own the Podium 2010 is a national sport technical initiative
designed to help Canada’s winter athletes win the most medals at the 2010 Olympic Winter




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Games in Vancouver, and place in the top three nations (gold medal count) at the 2010
Paralympic Winter Games.

The initiative is a collaborative effort supported by all of Canada’s winter NSOs and major winter
sport funding partners, including the Government of Canada, through Sport Canada, the
Canadian Olympic Committee (COC), the Canadian Paralympic Committee (CPC), the Calgary
Olympic Development Association (CODA), the Government of British Columbia, VANOC and
several of VANOC’s corporate sponsors, including Bell Canada.

Own the Podium 2010 has established needed partnerships with governments, sport agencies
and corporate sponsors to develop long-term funding stability for the winter sport system.

The heightened awareness of athlete and amateur sport needs and the anticipated
performances of Canadian athletes at the 2010 Winter Games are expected to create an
increase in the level of support from all sectors for amateur sport after the Games.


5.3 Community Legacies

The 2010 Winter Games will leave important human legacies generated from the participation of
people in the Games – from working for the Organizing Committee, to volunteering for the
Games, to experiencing the thrill of competition as a spectator, to watching the stories unfold on
television and the Internet as new sport heroes make their mark in 2010.

The Games will create a legacy around the development of skills. The Games provide valuable
opportunities to enhance the region’s hospitality and event hosting expertise along with training
and the development of new skills for the Four Host First Nations (FHFN), Aboriginal people and
inner-city communities as they participate in delivering the Games services.

Some 25,000 volunteers will be recruited to help stage the Games. This unique experience of
contributing to an international event will create an enhanced talent pool of volunteers for BC
and Canada and provide increased awareness about the passion for, and benefits of,
volunteerism across the country.


5.4 Economic Legacies

VANOC’s operating budget will largely be spent in British Columbia and the rest of Canada.
From the salaries of Organizing Committee employees to the production of official Games
merchandise, much of the overall operating budget is money that would not have been invested
in the BC and Canadian economies without the Games.

The Games serve as an important platform for long-term tourism promotion. Some three billion
people will be exposed to the host cities, region, province and Canada through global television
broadcasts. International media exposure increases awareness and pushes potential



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international visitor volume to the region to a much higher plateau. Vancouver, Whistler, British
Columbia and Canada will have their profiles significantly raised throughout the world.

New facilities in the Vancouver-Whistler area will help create and enhance opportunities for the
region to bid on future major sport events. One example may be an opportunity to create a
North American circuit for sliding sports events with sliding tracks located in Lake Placid, Salt
Lake, Calgary and now Whistler.

VANOC, its government partners and corporate sponsors will collaborate on Games-time
showcasing of business and sustainability innovation to demonstrate BC and Canada’s
leadership in integrated solutions to local and global sustainability challenges.


6.       SCHEDULE

The Games are all about timing. From the initial Vancouver 2010 bid idea in 1996 to the
awarding of the Games on July 2, 2003, to the Opening Ceremony on February 12, 2010, the
planning spans many years.


6.1 Phases of the Games

There are six phases to the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games project:

Foundation planning/organization building (2003-05)

VANOC has completed the foundation planning phase. The phase ran from the time of its
incorporation until mid-2005. During this phase, VANOC’s Executive Team was hired, venue
construction began, marketing activities were initiated and early major sponsors signed up, the
Olympic Games emblem was established, operational planning at a high level was initiated and
key systems, including financial systems and policies and procedures, were put into place.
Staffing during this phase grew to approximately 100. Foundation planning culminated with the
completion of Version 1 of the VANOC Business Plan.

Strategic planning (2005-06)

The second phase was strategic planning. During this phase, key strategic plans were prepared
in support of the next Business Plan and Budget. Decisions were made with respect to key
building blocks, function organization and risk mitigation.

VANOC team members attended the Torino 2006 Games to experience the Olympic and
Paralympic Winter Games to test and further refine key planning assumptions. An extensive
debrief meeting was held following the Torino Games. Staffing during this phase grew from 100
to approximately 250. Staff members were skewed towards senior managers, many with Games




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experience. This phase was completed with the preparation of the Business Plan and Games
operating budget.


Overall Concept and detailed operational planning (2007-08)

The overall concept and detailed operational planning phase is the longest phase of the Games
project. It runs from late 2006 until approximately one year before the Games. During this
phase, detailed operational plans are built, the budget is re-examined, all operational activities
are planned and integrated across the organization and Test Events are held. Venue
development is completed. Non-competition venues are secured. Marketing activities continue
in an effort to sign up the majority of Games sponsors. The ticketing program is launched.
Staffing during this phase grows from 250 to approximately 800. Volunteer recruitment is
initiated.

Games readiness (2008-09)

The “venuization” or Games-readiness process covers the final 12 to 18 months preceding the
Games. During this phase, the organization shifts from its function focus to venue operations.
Detailed venue operational plans are developed and tested. Further Test Events occur.
Simulations are run to ensure planning is complete. Staff members begin to physically move
from central offices to venue locations. Staffing grows from about 800 to 1,200. Volunteer
training is conducted. Part-time staff members are hired.

Games time – Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (January-March 2010)

Most Games functions begin operations with the opening of the Olympic Villages on February 4,
2010 and continue to operate until the closing of the Paralympic Village on March 24, 2010. The
duration of Games operations is some 60 days, and includes the Olympic athlete training
period, the Olympic competitions, the transition between both Games, the Paralympic athlete
training period and finally the Paralympic competitions.

Wind-up and dissolution (2010)

The wind-up and dissolution phase begins at the close of the Olympic Winter Games for
Olympic venues and operations and continues following the Paralympic Winter Games. Assets
are recovered and returned to owners or disposed of by sale or donation. Venue overlay is
removed. Venues are restored as required and returned to venue owners. Both Athletes’
Villages are closed. Staff is reduced from its full operational level to about 50 and then to zero.
Final accounts are prepared and audited. A final report is written and transfer of knowledge
materials are provided to the IOC. The surplus, if any, is distributed, according to the terms of
the Host City Contract (20 per cent to the COC, 60 per cent for the general benefit of sport in
Canada and 20 per cent to the IOC). The Board of Directors is then dissolved.




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6.2 Master Schedule

VANOC’s integrated planning team has prepared a Games Master Schedule to assist senior
management and function leaders in preparing for the Games. The level of detailed use of the
scheduling service by each function varies depending on the specific needs of that function and
the nature of its work.

The Master Schedule is an essential tool to progress planning towards critical Games
deadlines. Developed through coordination with each VANOC function, the IOC, IPC,
government partners and sponsors, the Master Schedule provides VANOC with the information
it needs to effectively plan, manage, integrate and communicate its activities. To keep it
manageable, the Master Schedule includes only those core activities that are critical to
delivering the Games and the VANOC strategic plan. It summarizes the plans of VANOC’s
many function areas and its multiple partners into one integrated, centrally managed schedule.


6.3 Games Time Planning Roadmap

The Games Time Planning Roadmap is a communication and coordination tool that VANOC
has developed based on the IOC’s Games Readiness Integrated Plan (GRIP). It highlights
milestones and deliverables from the VANOC Master Schedule that have an impact on Games
time planning and operations and that typically impact at least five functions from an integration
perspective.

The milestones and deliverables on the roadmap are organized into major planning streams,
including Customer Experience, Services, Staff, Stuff, Space and Command, Control and
Communications (C3).

The purpose of the Roadmap is to facilitate the alignment and integration of the major Games
Time planning streams and to allow VANOC functions to anticipate future organization-wide
planning initiatives. The Roadmap was developed and is managed by a cross-function team
referred to as the Games Operations (GO) Team. It is governed by VANOC’s Games Time
Operations Steering Committee which is responsible for overseeing VANOC’s Games-time
preparations and operations.


6.4 Key Dates of the Games in 2010
      Olympic Village opening – February 4, 2010
      Olympic Winter Games – February 12 to 28, 2010
      Olympic Village closing – March 3, 2010
      Paralympic Village opening – March 5, 2010
      Paralympic Winter Games – March 12 to 21, 2010
      Paralympic Village closing – March 24, 2010




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7.       VANOC BUDGET

This section outlines the current Vancouver 2010 Winter Games operating budget (revenues
and expenditures) along with a function-by-function breakdown.

7.1 Revenue

This table includes the major sources of revenue for VANOC and the respective budget
amounts.

                                                                                                  $
 IOC Contribution                                                                                 579,700,000
 Less – cost of providing Olympic Broadcast Services (OBS)                                       (178,000,000)
 IOC Net Contribution                                                                             401,700,000
 Other IOC Revenue                                                                                 35,000,000
 IOC International Sponsorship Program                                                            201,404,000
 Domestic Sponsorship                                                                             760,000,000
 Ticketing                                                                                        231,854,000
 Licensing & Merchandising                                                                         46,026,000
 Paralympic Revenue                                                                                40,000,000
 Other                                                                                            110,502,000
 TOTAL REVENUE                                                                                   1,826,486,000
 Less: Marketing rights royalties                                                                (197,217,000)
 NET REVENUE                                                                                     1,629,269,000

IOC Contribution: VANOC has recently completed negotiation with the IOC to establish the
level of funding to be provided by the IOC out of international television revenues and from other
sources. The amount used in this plan is based on the conclusion of the negotiations. The
amount is net of the cost of providing the host Olympic Broadcast Services. Through the Host
City Contract, VANOC is responsible for OBS costs of operation.

Other IOC Revenue: Represents an additional contribution from the IOC.

IOC International Sponsorship Program: A portion of the proceeds the IOC collects from its
international sponsorship program known as TOP (The Olympic Partner Programme) goes to
Games organizing committees. For the purposes of this plan, valuation has followed discussion
with the IOC and is based on levels and categories sold for the Torino 2006 Games, updated




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where appropriate to reflect current contractual agreements between the IOC and its TOP
partners. The final amount includes cash and VIK.

Domestic Sponsorship: The budget is based on a three-tiered program and includes
sponsorships of the Olympic and Paralympic Torch Relays. To date, more than $615 million of
the budget has been committed through signed sponsor agreements and term sheets.

Ticketing: VANOC’s goal is to have the highest sell through rate of any Games. Our research
suggests that interest in the Games will be very high and that this is expected to translate into a
high demand for tickets. We believe that there is a strong alignment between the number of
tickets available for selected sports and the anticipated demand. Ticketing revenue is based on
a specified pricing model, venue capacities, sell-through rates and other key assumptions. Total
projected ticket revenue is based on selling 90 per cent of available tickets for all sporting
events, 75 per cent for the Paralympic Winter Games Opening and Closing Ceremonies, and 94
per cent for the Olympic Winter Games Opening and Closing Ceremonies. Ticket pricing is
subject to the approval of the IOC and is expected to be finalized in 2008. The largest proportion
of ticketing revenue will be generated from the Opening and Closing Ceremonies and the ice
hockey competitions.

Licensing & Merchandising: The budget consists of royalty payments from VANOC licensees
and net proceeds from retail operations.

Paralympic revenue: At the time of the bid for the 2010 Winter Games, the governments of
Canada and BC each committed $20 million towards the Paralympic Games.

Other revenue: This revenue comes from a variety of sources, some confirmed and the rest
from areas to be further planned and activated over the next three years. Key areas targeted for
other revenue include Internet revenue, asset disposal, food and beverage, Test Events and the
Rate Card program.

Committed revenue: The following graph highlights that 69 per cent of VANOC’s operating
revenue is now committed.




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                                                      Operations Revenue
                                                                                                    % Rec'd or
                                                  Received     Committed       Balance to Go        Committed

       Domestic Sponsorship                                                              $760.0        81%

              IOC Contribution                                       $436.7                            100%

         IOC Int'l Sponsorship                       $201.4                                            71%

                      Ticketing                      $231.9                                                0%

   Licensing & Merchandising              $46.0                                                            39%

                   Paralympic         $40.0                                                                100%
                         Other              $110.5                                                         2%

                   [$ millions] 0     100     200    300     400   500   600    700   800      900 1,000

                                               Percent of Operations Revenue Rec'd or Committed        69%




Marketing Rights Royalties: The IOC and COC shares of marketing revenues are determined
by existing agreements and the level of revenue earned by VANOC. The IOC is entitled to a
percentage of all commercial cash revenue earned by VANOC (primarily Canadian sponsorship,
ticketing and licensed product royalties) and a percentage of all VIK commercial revenues
(through sponsorship). Royalties payable to the IOC on VIK revenue are payable in cash. In
addition, the IOC deducts a percentage of the value of TOP sponsorships as a management
fee.

The Joint Marketing Plan Agreement, described in section 2.4.4, calls for a royalty payment to
the COC based on revenues generated from Canadian sponsorships, the licensed merchandise
program, and the TOP program. The payment is calculated as 16 per cent of cash revenues
and 12 per cent of VIK revenues. The minimum payment to the COC under the JMPA is $73
million; the maximum payable is $110 million. This plan estimates that the maximum level will
be paid to the COC.




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7.2 Expenses

 DIVISION                                                                                                 $
 Revenue, Marketing and Communications                                                                 126,427,000
 Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue Management                                                          186,436,000
 Service Operations and Ceremonies                                                                     548,130,000
 Technology and Systems                                                                                398,500,000
 Human Resources and Sustainability                                                                    153,144,000
 Finance and Legal and CEO Office                                                                      116,632,000
 Project Contingency – Games Operations                                                                100,000,000
 Total Expenditures                                                                                  1,629,269,000



7.3 Revenue, Marketing and Communications

Revenue, Marketing and Communications includes 11 functions, generally related to activities
aimed at generating revenue from commercial sources and supporting those commercial
partners. Additionally, the division is responsible for communications activities that involve a
range of responsibilities including Communications, Media Relations, Community Relations,
Editorial Services and Internet Management. The division is also responsible for the
development and management of the VANOC Brand and Creative Services and the
development and execution of the Olympic and Paralympic Torch Relays.

The respective function budgets and staffing plans are as follows:

Function                                                                                          $
Sponsorship Sales & Servicing                                                                    21,184,000
Licensing & Merchandising                                                                         7,225,000
Commercial Rights Management                                                                      4,035,000
Ticketing                                                                                         9,083,000
Communications                                                                                    6,393,000
Community Relations                                                                              10,619,000
Editorial Services                                                                               10,442,000
Media Relations                                                                                   3,613,000
Internet Management                                                                               7,446,000
Brand and Creative Services                                                                      15,588,000
Torch Relays                                                                                     30,799,000
REVENUE, MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS                                                         126,427,000




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                                       2007             2008              2009             2010
Total employees                         78               123              161               240

Sponsorship Sales and Servicing: Key activities include the development of sales strategies
for the generation of the $760 million domestic and torch relays sponsorship revenue stream,
execution of sales strategies and providing service to corporate partners. In addition to providing
servicing to national sponsors that are contracted by VANOC, the marketing team provides
servicing to the TOP partners.

The function operations budget includes staffing, travel and administration, sales materials and
collateral, costs for sponsor launches, sponsor hosting, sponsor conferences and workshops,
and sponsor recognition advertising and signage.

Sponsorship Sales and Servicing                                                                   $
Staff, planning, administration & sales activities                                               12,996,000
Sponsor conferences, recognition and events                                                       8,188,000
Total                                                                                            21,184,000

Licensing and Merchandising: The function is responsible for VANOC’s licensing programs
and for working with VANOC’s contracted licensees. In addition, the function is responsible for
all VANOC retail operations, online sales, and retail marketing. In addition to workforce costs,
the function budget includes administrative costs, costs for the outfitting the retail superstore
during the Games and costs associated with VANOC promotional merchandise.

Licensing & Merchandising                                                                        $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 7,225,000
Total                                                                                             7,225,000

Commercial Rights Management: Primary responsibilities for this function include the
development of commercial rights and brand protection policies and guidelines, education and
communication of those policies and implementation of VANOC’s brand protection strategy,
including anti-ambush activities. The function budget includes staffing and program costs to
support these initiatives, including a provision for anti-ambush advertising.

Commercial Rights Management                                                                     $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 4,035,000
Total                                                                                             4,035,000




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Ticketing: The Ticketing function is responsible for ticket program planning to deliver the ticket
revenue budget of more than $230 million. Included in the program are general sales and
marketing programs, communication activities and logistics surrounding the sale and distribution
of tickets. Key operation budgeted expenditures include advertising and ticket program
development costs.

Ticketing                                                                                        $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 5,062,000
Ticket marketing                                                                                  4,021,000
Total                                                                                             9,083,000

Communications: Communications is responsible for strategic communications, management
of external communications and the centralized planning and management of VANOC’s
advertising resources. Key components of the function budget include advertising and staffing
costs.

Communications                                                                                   $
Staff, planning, events & administration                                                         6,393,000
Total                                                                                             6,393,000

Community Relations: Community Relations is responsible for the engagement of all
Canadians through community and public events, national tours, information centres and
community outreach programs. The function budget includes staffing and operational costs to
support community tours and events, launches and the operation of information centres.

Community Relations                                                                              $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 6,029,000
Events and programs                                                                               4,590,000
Total                                                                                            10,619,000

Editorial Services: This function is responsible for all pre-Games, Games-time and post-
Games publications involving writing, editing, production coordination and translation. The most
significant cost of this budget is the printing and production costs of the publications.

Editorial Services                                                                               $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 1,805,000
Publications                                                                                      8,637,000
Total                                                                                            10,442,000




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Media Relations: Media Relations is responsible for developing media plans and guidelines,
centralized management of public affairs issues and press operations integration. The function
budget includes staffing and operational costs to support media information distribution, media
briefings and press conferences.

Media Relations                                                                                  $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 3,613,000
Total                                                                                             3,613,000

Internet Management: This function is responsible for the content design and management of
the pre-Games and Games-time website, Torch Relay, Ceremonies and Cultural Olympiad
sites, Extranet and Intranet, and Internet-based consumer service delivery. The function budget
includes development, testing, translation and implementation costs. Cost for the hosting
infrastructure for the website is included in the Technology and Systems function.

Internet Management                                                                              $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 2,257,000
Services and content development                                                                  5,189,000
Total                                                                                             7,446,000

Brand and Creative Services: The primary responsibilities of this function are brand strategy
and management, Vancouver 2010 brand and design elements, including: Games emblems,
sponsor marks, mascots, Look of the Games, torch, cauldron, medals, development of
advertising and promotions, video production, photography, music, brand research and concept
testing. Key components of the budget include staffing, creative consultants/artists, market
research and design production costs.

Brand and Creative Services                                                                      $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 7,650,000
Creative, design & production services                                                            7,938,000
Total                                                                                            15,588,000




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Torch Relays: This function is responsible for all aspects of the Olympic and Paralympic Torch
Relays – planning, administration, management, operations, marketing and communications.
The function budget includes administration and management costs, transportation, marketing,
communications, torchbearer expenses, travel, accommodation and staffing costs.

Torch Relays                                                                                     $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 7,299,000
Olympic Torch Relay                                                                              21,165,000
Paralympic Torch Relay                                                                            2,335,000
Total                                                                                            30,799,000



7.4 Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue Management

The Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue Management division includes seven functions
generally related to the delivery of services to athletes, International Sport Federations (IFs),
National Olympic Committees (NOCs) and National Paralympic Committees (NPCs). The single
most important element of Sport is the delivery of fair competitions conducted to the standard
laid out by the governing IF. The division is also responsible for operating the Games
competition and training venues, for ensuring that all expected services are met and that
operational plans and procedures are developed and implemented for all venue activities. The
division is responsible for the integration of Paralympic Games planning across all Organizing
Committee functions. The respective function budgets and staffing plans are as follows:

 Function                                                                                          $
 Sport                                                                                            57,393,000
 Paralympic Planning                                                                               2,629,000
 Medical Services                                                                                  9,773,000
 Anti-Doping                                                                                       4,120,000
 NOC-NPC Services                                                                                 16,078,000
 Venue Management                                                                                 88,641,000
 Event Services                                                                                    7,802,000
 SPORT, PARALYMPIC GAMES & VENUE MANAGEMENT                                                      186,436,000


                                       2007             2008              2009           2010
 Total employees                        40                96              188             242




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Sport: The Games are primarily about sport and athletes. This was the focus of the Vancouver
2010 bid planning and remains a critical strategy with VANOC. Sport’s priority is to ensure that
athletes compete in a fair and optimal environment that allows them to perform to their potential.
A key priority of Sport is to ensure that the athlete environment meets the highest standards,
and that when an athlete departs the 2010 Games, he/she feels the Games were the best
sporting experience of his/her career.

Sport’s primary responsibility is to deliver the field of play and sport equipment for all Olympic
and Paralympic sport competitions. In addition, the function is responsible for the development
and management of the competition schedule, audio/video and entertainment production at all
competition events, entry qualification and classification of athletes, IF and IPSF services,
weather forecasting (in conjunction with Environment Canada) and pre-Games venue
operations at the Whistler Sliding Centre, Whistle Nordic Competition Venue and Hillcrest
Curling Venue.

The Sport budget is largely driven by the level of service required, often dictated by IFs, NOCs
and the IOC and benchmarked against the levels provided by the Salt Lake 2002 and Torino
2006 Winter Games. Major costs in Sport include field of play requirements for outdoor venues.
Other costs include staffing, sport production, weather stations and monitoring, costs associated
with training events and general travel and administration related to working with the IFs, IOC,
IPC, NOCs, NPCs and NSOs.

Sport                                                                                            $
Sport staff, planning & administration                                                           2,444,000
Alpine sports                                                                                     9,985,000
Freestyle and snowboard                                                                           4,446,000
Ice sports                                                                                       15,515,000
Nordic sports                                                                                     7,199,000
Sliding sports                                                                                    4,019,000
Sport services                                                                                    7,597,000
Sport venue production                                                                            6,188,000
Total                                                                                            57,393,000



Paralympic Planning: The function’s primary responsibility is maintaining VANOC’s working
relationship with the IPC and CPC. In addition, the function works to raise awareness of the
Paralympic Games and to ensure the Paralympic Games are properly considered in VANOC’s
operations and transition planning. The function budget is primarily comprised of staffing costs,
special events (Paralympic days and awareness events), planning and implementation of the
Paralympic attendance program and barrier-free design consulting. Costs associated with the
staging of the Paralympic Winter Games are captured within each function budget.




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Paralympic Planning                                                                              $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 2,629,000
Total                                                                                            2,629,000

Medical Services: The Medical Services function is responsible for Games-time medical
services for athletes, team officials, workforce, IOC/IPC Family, spectators and media. The
service is provided through two Polyclinics located within the Athlete Villages and is delivered by
a trained workforce, volunteers, medical professional contractors, liaison with local heath
authorities, external agencies and providers of supplies and equipment. VANOC’s budget
includes provisions for medical imaging equipment and services, medical professional
contractors, staffing, training and other administrative costs.

Medical Services                                                                                 $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 3,632,000
Medical services                                                                                 6,141,000
Total                                                                                            9,773,000

Anti-Doping: The Anti-Doping function is responsible for VANOC’s doping control/anti-doping
program. The program includes Games-time testing programs and the operation of a WADA-
accredited anti-doping lab during the Games. The function budget includes administrative costs,
staffing/contracted staff and costs for recruitment and training.

Anti-Doping                                                                                      $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 1,718,000
Services & equipment                                                                             2,402,000
Total                                                                                            4,120,000




NOC/NPC Services: This function is responsible for VANOC’s relationships with all of the
international NOCs and NPCs to ensure delivery of NOC and NPC delegation needs and
expectations. Key activities include NOC/NPC relations, communications, chefs de mission
seminars, delegation registration meetings and the NOC and NPC assistants program.

The function budget includes costs for meetings and seminars, Games-time operations, staffing
and the Athlete Support Grant program. Games organizing committees pay for the cost of flying
all team athletes and certain officials from the capital city of their home countries to the Host
City.




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NOC / NPC services                                                                               $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 5,016,000
Services and programs                                                                             2,430,000
Athlete support grants                                                                            8,632,000
Total                                                                                            16,078,000



Venue Management: Venue Management is responsible for operating the Games competition
and training venues, for ensuring that all client group needs and services are met and that
operational plans and procedures are developed and then implemented for all venue activities.
The main goal is to lead the different functions to an integrated delivery model. Additionally, the
function is responsible for negotiating venue use agreements with venue owners and for the
central management of all VANOC’s Test Events.

Besides staffing costs including training and communications, the significant components of the
function budget include facility rental and operating costs and test event costs. The costs for
Test Events vary largely based on the specific arrangements made for each sport depending on
the participation of other parties and the nature of the event. Facility rental costs include
payments to private venue owners, including Whistler/Blackcomb Mountains, Cypress Mountain
and General Motors Place.

Venue Management                                                                                  $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 14,869,000
Venue use agreements                                                                             57,678,000
Test Events                                                                                      16,094,000
Total                                                                                            88,641,000



Event Services: Event Services is responsible for planning, training and deploying the event
workforce. Working closely with Venue Management, Event Services is responsible for venue
operation planning, venue workforce planning and training and during Games time leads the
workforce that engages with the spectator from end-to-end, including ticket taking, marshalling,
ushering and communications.

The budget includes costs for Games-time paid and volunteer staffing along with job-specific
training, administration and special equipment.

Event Services                                                                                   $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 7,802,000
Total                                                                                             7,802,000




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7.5 Service Operations and Ceremonies
The Service Operations and Ceremonies division includes 14 functions primarily responsible for
the provision of services to athletes and officials, broadcasters, media, the Olympic Family,
sponsors, spectators and the VANOC workforce. Services include the provision of signage,
space, food, transportation, accommodation, logistics, cleaning and facility operations.
Additionally, the division has the responsibility for Ceremonies and the Cultural Olympiad.

The respective function budgets and staffing plans are as follows:

Function                                                                                          $
Look of the Games                                                                                18,936,000
Overlay                                                                                     134,689,000
Food and Beverage                                                                                36,430,000
Olympic and Paralympic Villages                                                                  25,832,000
Accommodation                                                                                    23,314,000
Security Integration                                                                             10,306,000
Transportation                                                                              124,109,000
Logistics                                                                                        43,072,000
Snow Removal, Cleaning & Waste                                                                    9,493,000
Cultural Olympiad                                                                                20,045,000
Ceremonies                                                                                       64,332,000
Broadcast Integration                                                                            23,376,000
Press Operations                                                                                 10,247,000
Government Service Integration                                                                    3,949,000
SERVICE OPERATIONS & CEREMONIES                                                             548,130,000


                                       2007             2008              2009           2010
Total employees                         65               149              294             487



Look of the Games: Look of the Games is responsible for providing a seamless and
memorable visual experience at the venues, villages and airport. Delivery includes the treatment
application, installation, maintenance and transition to the Paralympic Games. The key costs
involved with delivery include banners, barricade covers, fence fabric, poles, structures,
surrounds and fascia and installation/removal labour.




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Look of the Games                                                                                $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 4,005,000
Look- graphics, hardware & structures                                                            11,931,000
Wayfinding – signage                                                                              3,000,000
Total                                                                                            18,936,000

Overlay: The Overlay function is responsible for developing an integrated venue design and
installing the temporary infrastructure required to provide a good working and spectator
environment for all Olympic and Paralympic client groups. Key costs include trailers, temporary
seating, temporary washrooms and fencing, site adaptation, labour and administration.

Overlay                                                                                           $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 22,028,000
City venues – competition venues                                                                 27,318,000
City venues – non-competition venues                                                             14,740,000
Mountain venues – competition venues                                                             37,205,000
Mountain venues – non-competition venues                                                          6,772,000
Villages                                                                                         26,626,000
Total                                                                                       134,689,000

Food and Beverage: Food and Beverage is responsible for delivering safe and high-quality
food and beverage products to all constituent groups, during the Olympic and Paralympic
Games. Key costs include equipment costs, food costs and labour.

Food and Beverage                                                                                $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 2,836,000
Kitchen outfitting                                                                                5,464,000
Athlete catering                                                                                  9,973,000
Venue build-out                                                                                   2,811,000
Workforce catering                                                                               15,346,000
Total                                                                                            36,430,000


Olympic and Paralympic Villages: The Athletes’ Villages function is responsible for VANOC’s
Olympic and Paralympic Village planning, oversight of the development and implementation of
all operations, services, temporary facilities and equipment required to operate the Olympic and
Paralympic Villages. The Villages will include approximately 4,800 beds housed in Vancouver
and Whistler. Key costs include furniture, housekeeping, maintenance, entertainment, retail
subsidies and temporary labour.




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Olympic and Paralympic Villages                                                                  $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 9,663,000
Housekeeping                                                                                      3,243,000
International plaza & events                                                                      2,569,000
Rooms division – furniture, fixtures and equipment, supplies                                      6,438,000
Support services                                                                                  3,919,000
Total                                                                                            25,832,000



Accommodation: The Accommodation function is responsible for securing, managing and
providing and/or coordinating lodging for specific categories of accredited people attending or
participating in the 2010 Games, and ensuring that quality and operational standards are met.
Key costs include room rental costs, cost recovery from groups using rooms and the reservation
system.

Accommodation                                                                                    $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 6,403,000
Workforce, officials & other accommodation                                                       16,911,000
Total                                                                                            23,314,000



Security Integration: The Security Integration function is responsible for working in close
collaboration with the national and local public safety authorities operating as the Vancouver
2010 Integrated Security Unit (V2010ISU) to coordinate overall planning. This function also
manages venue security pre- and post-Games during overlay and decommissioning phases.
The key cost driver is contract security rates for the provision of pre- and post-Games asset
protection. The budget provided for by VANOC is separate and distinct from the $175 million
Games security budget funded directly by Canada and BC.

Security Integration                                                                             $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 2,985,000
Site security                                                                                     7,321,000
Total                                                                                            10,306,000




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Transportation: The Transportation function is responsible for planning and implementing
systems, policies and procedures that provide for the transport of people to and from every
Olympic and Paralympic Games venue, facility and related site. VANOC is directly responsible
for developing and providing appropriate transportation systems to meet the needs of different
groups as well as collaborating with external stakeholders and authorities within existing public
and private transport systems to deliver spectator transport. Key costs are bus rental, bus driver
costs, vehicle fleet costs, fuel, parking, user cost recovery and incremental TransLink (public
transit) service costs.

Transportation                                                                                    $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 21,060,000
Bus systems                                                                                      52,372,000
Fleet vehicle systems                                                                            32,232,000
Parking                                                                                           6,191,000
Traffic management                                                                                1,800,000
Paralympic transportation                                                                        10,454,000
Total                                                                                       124,109,000


Logistics: The Logistics function is responsible for management of the assets and materials of
the Olympic and Paralympic Games (excluding Athletes’ Villages) through the lifecycle of the
commodity, including material planning, receipt, storage, distribution/deployment at venues and
the recovery and disposition of these items, inclusive of competition venues, non-competition
venues, ceremonies, and Look of the Games. Key costs include warehouse costs, the
distribution fleet and fuel costs, international freight costs, furniture fixtures and equipment
costs.

Logistics                                                                                         $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 16,151,000
Freight                                                                                           2,145,000
Distribution                                                                                      5,537,000
Warehouse                                                                                         9,245,000
Furniture, fixtures and equipment                                                                 9,994,000
Total                                                                                            43,072,000



Snow Removal, Cleaning and Waste: The Snow Removal, Cleaning and Waste function is
responsible for planning, designing and implementing a cleaning and waste management
system to meet VANOC’s Zero Waste Commitment, and a snow clearing and removal system.
The program will be delivered via contracts with janitorial service providers and snow clearing
and removal service providers. Key costs include labour, equipment rental and consulting costs.




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Snow Removal, Cleaning & Waste                                                                   $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 2,113,000
Cleaning                                                                                          3,807,000
Waste management                                                                                   901,000
Snow removal                                                                                      2,672,000
Total                                                                                             9,493,000



Cultural Olympiad: The Cultural Olympiad function is responsible for planning and presenting
an exciting, innovative and accessible Olympic and Paralympic arts and cultural program and
festivals. Key costs include funding for Cultural Olympiad and Arts Festival programs such as
visual and public art.

Cultural Olympiad                                                                                 $
Cultural Olympiad                                                                                20,045,000
Total                                                                                            20,045,000

Ceremonies: The Ceremonies function is responsible for the planning and staging of Olympic
and Paralympic Opening and Closing Ceremonies, Victory Ceremonies, Team Welcome
Ceremonies and the IOC Congress Opening Ceremony. Key costs include labour, performers,
feature talent, production and fabrication costs and technical production.

Ceremonies                                                                                        $
Olympic ceremonies                                                                               58,480,000
Paralympic ceremonies                                                                             5,852,000
Total                                                                                            64,332,000

Broadcast Integration: The Broadcast Integration function is responsible for liaising between
Olympic Broadcast Services (OBS) and VANOC to ensure planning, preparation and the
provision of the facilities and services required for the operation of the Olympic Broadcast
System. Key costs include the Main Media Centre (MMC) lease and operations costs,
Paralympic Host Broadcast services and user groups cost recovery.

Broadcast Integration                                                                            $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 1,694,000
Host broadcast – Paralympic Games                                                                 4,000,000
Main Media Centre                                                                                17,682,000
Total                                                                                            23,376,000




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Press Operations: The Press Operations function is responsible for planning, preparation and
provision of services required for the efficient and professional operation of accredited written
and photographic media and their technical and support staff. The delivery of this scope of work
includes the operation of the Main Press Centre, Venue Press Centres, Photo Services Centre
and the Olympic News Service (ONS). Key costs include consulting costs, short-term labour
and Photo Service Centre equipment.

Press Operations                                                                                 $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 7,461,000
Contracted services                                                                               2,786,000
Total                                                                                            10,247,000

Government Service Integration: The Government Service Integration function is responsible
for liaising with government partners to negotiate city service agreements, urban domain
coordination and license applications. Key costs include travel and hosting, workshops and
meetings.

Government Service Integration                                                                   $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 3,949,000
Total                                                                                             3,949,000




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7.6 Technology and Systems

The Technology and Systems division comprises a critical part of Games operations and
planning. Technology and Systems include: Energy Services, Technical Infrastructure,
Information Systems, Results, Internet (Technical), and Accreditation.

The respective function budgets and staffing plans are as follows:

Function                                                                                          $
Energy Services                                                                                  46,907,000
Technical Infrastructure                                                                    267,512,000
Information Systems                                                                               6,268,000
Timing and Scoring, Results                                                                      63,169,000
Internet (Technical)                                                                              6,044,000
Accreditation                                                                                     8,600,000
TECHNOLOGY & SYSTEMS                                                                        398,500,000


                                       2007             2008              2009           2010
Total employees                         37                77              140             209

Energy Services: Working in close collaboration with the venue construction and overlay
teams, and in consultation with corporate partners, the Energy Services function is responsible
for the provision and implementation of all permanent and temporary, reliable, redundant power
infrastructure required for the Games. Key activities include planning and implementing of
electrical safety initiatives, emergency preparation and the testing of operating plans and
Games-time power infrastructure operations. The function works also closely with the VANOC
Sustainability team to explore sustainable energy solutions for the Games.

The function budget includes the costs for temporary generator rentals, power distribution
equipment and cabling, site labour, utility distribution equipment, electricity consumption and
temporary generator bio-diesel fuel.

Energy Services                                                                                  $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 3,077,000
Energy infrastructure & consumption                                                              28,350,000
Other power costs                                                                                15,480,000
Total                                                                                            46,907,000




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Technical Infrastructure: The responsibilities of the Technical Infrastructure function cover the
entire range of technology equipment and infrastructure required for the Games including:

         Venue technology: Equipment and infrastructure to support the timing and scoring
         systems, video and scoreboards, security, broadcast and media requirements.

         Telecom Systems: The Games require an extensive telecommunications network to
         support the venues and interconnect them to the Broadcast Centre and VANOC
         headquarters and Data Centre. A wireless telecommunications infrastructure is also
         required for cellular traffic, WiFi access and support for two way radios. All telecom
         systems for the Games will be delivered by Bell Canada, a Premier National Partner.

         VANOC Office Support: provides for the overall technology needs of VANOC staff, such
         as computers, networks, printers and telephones.

In addition, this function is responsible for technical rooms such as data centres, the operations
centre and equipment rooms, providing computer hardware, operating systems and software.

Key to delivering the required services is leveraging and managing the integration of technology
sponsors and partners. Arrangements already exist with several key technology partners
including Bell Canada (telecom), Ricoh (reprographics) and Atos Origin (system integration).
Additional TOP Sponsors are expected to contribute to the 2010 Games in the areas of wireless
devices, computer equipment and video boards and TVs.

VIK comprises approximately 70 per cent of the Technical Infrastructure budget. Many of the
largest costs are driven by the service requirements of each sport and of broadcasters and the
media.

Technical Infrastructure                                                                          $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 24,380,000
Games systems & integration                                                                      84,889,000
Hardware, software & systems delivery                                                            58,916,000
Venue technology                                                                                 25,655,000
Telecommunications                                                                               70,808,000
Information security                                                                              2,864,000
Total                                                                                       267,512,000

Information Systems: Key activities for this function include the identification, selection and
implementation of business systems for VANOC including finance, workforce, project
management and issue tracking. Additionally the function will provide Games management
systems including, accommodation, transportation, arrivals and departures, protocol, Rate Card,
logistics and other systems.



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Information Systems                                                                              $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 4,332,000
Business systems                                                                                  1,936,000
Total                                                                                             6,268,000

Timing and Scoring, Results: The results function is responsible for providing timing and
scoring systems (timing equipment, scoreboards and sportsboards), results systems,
information diffusion systems, print distribution services and results data capture and
distribution. The responsibilities described are provided mainly through Atos Origin and Omega,
both TOP Sponsors. As a result, VANOC’s role is mostly overseeing, coordinating and testing.
The Vancouver 2010 Winter Games will be the 24th Olympic Games for Omega in terms of
providing timing and scoring systems.

Timing & Scoring, Results                                                                        $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 6,452,000
Results services & equipment                                                                     56,717,000
Total                                                                                            63,169,000

Internet (Technical): The Internet (Technical) function is responsible for providing the
infrastructure required to host VANOC’s Internet requirements. The majority of the budget is
provided via VIK from Bell Canada. The content of VANOC’s Internet sites is managed by the
Revenue, Marketing and Communications division.

Internet Technical                                                                               $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 1,344,000
Technical services & equipment                                                                    4,700,000
Total                                                                                             6,044,000

Accreditation: Accreditation’s key activities include registering all Games participants and
granting access privileges by issuing Olympic/Paralympic identification and accreditation cards.
The function will manage VANOC’s accreditation centres and facilities where the accreditation
cards will be issued. The function is responsible for collecting and validating all accreditation
applications. The significant components of the function operation budget include accreditation
system costs, operations cost for the accreditation centres and facilities, volunteer training and
general administration.

Accreditation                                                                                    $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 5,082,000
Systems & services                                                                                3,518,000
Total                                                                                             8,600,000




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7.7 Human Resources, Sustainability and International Client Services

The Human Resources, Sustainability and International Client Services division is responsible
for all VANOC workforce, paid and volunteer, including the recruitment, training, outfitting and
retention of the workforce.
By Games time, VANOC anticipates a total workforce of more than 55,000. This projection
includes 1,400 paid staff, 3,500 temporary staff, 25,000 volunteers, 10,000 contractors and
15,000 ceremony participants.
The division leads the development of VANOC’s corporate culture and develops VANOC human
resources policies and procedures. It is also responsible for ensuring that VANOC meets its
Official Languages requirements. Additionally, the division is responsible for VANOC’s initiatives
surrounding sustainability and Aboriginal participation.

The respective function budgets and staffing plans are as follows:

Function                                                                                          $
Human Resources                                                                                  91,545,000
Workforce                                                                                        34,601,000
Sustainability and Aboriginal Participation                                                      15,653,000
International Client Services                                                                    11,345,000
HUMAN RESOURCES, SUSTAINABILITY & INTERNATIONAL                                             153,144,000
CLIENT SERVICES


                                       2007             2008              2009           2010
Total department
employees                               52                69              115             139


Human Resources: The Human Resources function is responsible for the development of HR
policies, procedures and systems, employee recruitment, retention and recognition, cultural
development, training, the development and implementation of health, wellness and safety
programs and staff outplacement after the Games. Staff costs include the HR team as well as
VANOC’s Executive Team. This function also includes responsibility for embedding Canada’s
linguistic duality through all areas of the Games planning and service delivery.

The function budget includes staffing costs, recruitment advertising, agency fees and other
recruitment related costs, training costs, costs for developing and operating the HR system and
outplacement service fees. Additional compensation costs include provisions for annual salary
escalation for all VANOC staff and their retention.




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Human Resources                                                                                   $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 35,224,000
HR Programs & services                                                                           11,745,000
Additional compensation costs                                                                    44,576,000
Total                                                                                            91,545,000

Workforce: The Workforce function is responsible for strategic workforce planning, developing
pre-Games and Games-time volunteer programs, volunteer training, centralized recruitment,
coordination and assignment of volunteers for all functions, design and delivery of workforce
and volunteer uniforms and workforce communications.

The Workforce and Volunteer budget is driven primarily by the volunteer numbers and includes
costs for uniforms, recruitment, retention and training.

Workforce                                                                                         $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 10,137,000
Workforce programs & uniforms                                                                    24,464,000
Total                                                                                            34,601,000

Sustainability and Aboriginal Participation: This function is responsible for supporting the
integrated delivery of sustainability in all aspects of the Games. This involves managing
environmental stewardship and impact reduction by documenting VANOC’s compliance with the
Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) requirements and delivery of specific
sustainability initiatives; collaboration with government and communities to plan and implement
social inclusion and accessibility initiatives (targeting Vancouver’s three inner-city communities,
youth and women at risk, urban Aboriginals and people with disabilities) and Aboriginal
Participation. The function is also responsible for developing policies and systems to measure
and report on sustainability performance management and for assisting VANOC with
implementing sustainable procurement processes and promoting and advancing sustainability
concepts.

Key expenditures include specialized consultancy costs, stakeholder dialogues, development
and implementation of a sustainability management and reporting system and financial
contributions towards sustainability participation and legacy programs.

Aboriginal Participation is responsible for the overall planning and integration of Aboriginal
elements into the Games, including the delivery of VANOC obligations to the Four Host First
Nations (FHFN), supporting the FHFN Secretariat, enhancing opportunities for Aboriginal
participation, liaising with the broader Canada-wide Aboriginal community and tracking and
reporting on Aboriginal partnerships and participation in the Games. The function budget
includes costs to support Aboriginal community events, communication materials and
contributions to FHFN Aboriginal programs.




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Sustainability & Aboriginal Participation                                                        $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 6,868,000
Programs                                                                                          8,785,000
Total                                                                                            15,653,000

International Client Services: International Client Services is responsible for the management
of all pre-Games and Games-time IOC/IPC meetings, Olympic/Paralympic Family services at
Games time, management of the Games Observer program, management of the Olympic and
Paralympic Family hotels, language and interpretation services at competition venues, IOC
meetings and the Main Media Centre and pre-Games and Games-time dignitary and protocol
services. The budget includes IOC and IPC meeting event costs, dignitary hosting costs,
contracted venue coordinators, flags and language interpretation services and equipment.

International Client Services                                                                    $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 4,116,000
Services, operations and events                                                                   7,229,000
Total                                                                                            11,345,000




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7.8 Finance, Legal and CEO’s Office

The Finance, Legal and CEO’s Office division includes nine functions as well as the budget for
the overall project contingency. The functions provide centralized services to all VANOC
functions in the areas of Legal Services, Administration, Finance, planning, Risk Management
and Procurement.

The respective function budgets and staffing plans are as follows:

Function                                                                                          $
Legal Services                                                                                   15,379,000
Administration                                                                                   38,902,000
Finance                                                                                          23,592,000
Project and Information Management                                                                5,036,000
Risk Management & Assurance Services                                                             14,883,000
Procurement                                                                                       4,004,000
CEO Office                                                                                        2,608,000
Government & Partner Relations                                                                    1,094,000
Venue Construction Administration                                                                11,134,000
FINANCE AND LEGAL AND CEO OFFICE                                                            116,632,000


                                       2007             2008              2009           2010
Total employees                         87               102               99             107

Legal Services: The Legal Services function provides legal services to internal clients including
support to VANOC functions in the drafting and negotiation of contracts and with interpretation
and enforcement of contracts. The Legal function also engages in brand management and
works with the Commercial Rights Management function on required programs and legislation.
The Legal function is responsible for VANOC’s privacy program and Freedom of Information
(FOI)/Access to Information (ATI) management and corporate secretary services to the VANOC
Board of Directors.

Key budget costs for this function include cost for in-house lawyers and paralegals, external
contracted lawyers or firms and costs associated with the support of the VANOC Board of
Directors.

Legal Services                                                                                    $
Staff, planning & outside legal services                                                         13,690,000
Board & committees                                                                                1,689,000
Total                                                                                            15,379,000




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Administration: Administration is responsible for VANOC’s Vancouver and Whistler corporate
office facilities and on-going space planning to meet VANOC’s workforce requirements.
Administration’s key activities include reception, general office administration, internal food
services, meeting room management, travel management, stationery, business cards and office
supplies. Additionally the function provides facilities management for VANOC, its co-located
partners and other existing tenants.

The operations budget includes provisions for office rent and operation, office renovations
including fit-out, supplies and services, office furniture and moves.

Administration                                                                                    $
Office facilities                                                                                24,587,000
Office staff, services & administration                                                          14,315,000
Total                                                                                            38,902,000

Finance: The Finance function is responsible for financial reporting and accounting services,
budget development and management, tax services, oversight of the Rate Card program,
treasury and foreign exchange management and dissolution planning and execution. Additional
budget provisions for financial systems, consultants and external advisors are included.

Finance                                                                                           $
Staff, professional services & administration                                                    14,772,000
Interest and banking fees                                                                         8,820,000
Total                                                                                            23,592,000

Project and Information Management: The function provides a central service to all VANOC’s
functions and assists in the development of processes and tools to support integrated Games-
wide planning including operation readiness exercises. Project and Information Management
manages the VANOC Master Schedule. Additionally, the function provides information
management services including maintaining and managing VANOC information management
systems, corporate records, research and reference services. Project and Information
Management costs also include consulting, report production, systems costs and other
administrative costs.

Project & Information Management                                                                 $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 3,555,000
Information services                                                                              1,481,000
Total                                                                                             5,036,000




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Risk Management and Assurance Services: The function is responsible for all VANOC
insurance coverage except employee benefits. Risk Management and Assurance Services
provides a comprehensive risk management framework, content and reporting for all VANOC
functions. In addition the function’s key activities include assurance services including internal
audit, corporate policy management, claims management and venue safety oversight.

Key budget items in addition to staffing include insurance premiums, advisory services and
general administrative costs.

Risk Management & Assurance Services                                                              $
Insurance & advisory services                                                                    12,549,000
Staff, planning & administration                                                                  2,334,000
Total                                                                                            14,883,000

Procurement: The Procurement function provides centralized procurement services and
contract management support for all VANOC functions. Additionally, the function leads the
development, implementation and monitoring of VANOC’s procurement policies and
procedures. The main components of the function budget are staffing and procurement
advertising.

Procurement                                                                                      $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 4,004,000
Total                                                                                             4,004,000


CEO Office: The budget for this function includes support costs, IOC relations and
programming costs associated with the CEO Office, such as the Olympic Truce.

CEO Office                                                                                       $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 2,608,000
Total                                                                                             2,608,000

Government and Partner Relations: The function is responsible for managing VANOC’s
relationships and interactions with its key government partners. The function budget includes
staffing and administrative costs related to these activities.

Government & Partner Relations                                                                   $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 1,094,000
Total                                                                                             1,094,000




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Venue Construction Administration: This area includes centralized administrative and
staffing costs related to VANOC’s venue development program. Additionally, VANOC’s
operations budget is contributing $6.8 million of VIK provided by VANOC’s domestic sponsors.
The budget for this contribution is reflected in this function budget.

Venue Construction Administration                                                                $
Staff, planning & administration                                                                 4,834,000
Sponsor VIK used in venue construction                                                            6,300,000
Total                                                                                            11,134,000




7.9 Project Contingency – Games Operations

Project Contingency – Games Operations                                                     $100,000,000

This amount represents VANOC’s central project contingency for the Games operating budget.
Contingency management is a key element of the Games project control strategy and is
outlined in more detail in Section 9 and in Appendix 2. A contingency is required to address the
risk that final estimates of expenditures and revenues are different from those currently
projected assumed in the budget, including allowance for unplanned events either prior to or
during Games time.

VANOC fully expects to leave a positive financial legacy. The $100 million is adequate and
represents 14 per cent of the uncommitted non-salary cash expenditures ($722 million).

VANOC’s goal is to manage the project efficiently and continue to uncover new sources of
revenues that will enable us to protect the contingency. However, the contingency is in place to
draw upon when necessary.




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7.10 Paralympic Games

Paralympic Games planning and delivery is integrated with the planning and delivery for the
2010 Olympic Winter Games. All function teams are responsible in their respective areas for
delivering all the requirements for both the Olympic Games and the Paralympic Games.
Functions have budgeted for the incremental costs to deliver the Paralympic Games within their
respective function budgets. In identifying incremental Paralympic costs the overriding principle
is one of direct cost. Only the costs directly attributable to the planning and delivery of the
Paralympic Games have been included. Summarized below is the aggregate of these
incremental costs captured within existing budgets.

 VANOC DIVISION                                                                                    $
 Revenue, Marketing and Communications                                                            5,759,000
 Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue Management                                                    17,374,000
 Service Operations and Ceremonies                                                               43,226,000
 Technology and Systems                                                                          22,428,000
 Human Resources, Sustainability and International Client Services                                3,475,000
 Finance and Legal                                                                                 538,000
 INCREMENTAL PARALYMPIC OPERATING COSTS                                                          92,800,000




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8.       VENUE DEVELOPMENT (CONSTRUCTION) BUDGET

The governments of Canada and British Columbia have agreed to jointly fund new construction
and upgrades to existing venues for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

The scope of venue construction includes the planning, construction and delivery of all
competition venues required for the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games on a timely basis
and in a fashion consistent with VANOC’s values and pre-existing commitments.

The current venue construction budget is as follows:

Venue construction revenues                                                                        $
Canada                                                                                           290,000,000
BC                                                                                               290,000,000
Total                                                                                            580,000,000
Venue construction expenditures
Venues constructed by Partners with VANOC $ Contribution
UBC Ice Hockey arena (UBC Winter Sports Centre)                                                   38,445,000
Richmond Speed Skating Oval                                                                       63,110,000
Whistler Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village                                                37,500,000
Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village                                               30,000,000
Whistler Broadcast and Press Centre                                                                3,000,000
Training Venues / Other Grants                                                                     7,400,000
Venues constructed / upgraded by VANOC
Hillcrest Curling Venue                                                                           38,000,000
Whistler Athlete Centre                                                                           16,000,000
Whistler Sliding Centre                                                                          104,900,000
Whistler Nordic Competition Venue                                                                119,740,000
Cypress Freestyle and Snowboard Venue                                                             15,800,000
Whistler Alpine (Whistler Creekside)                                                              27,635,000
Hastings Park Skating Venue (Pacific Coliseum)                                                    23,700,000
Other                                                                                              6,270,000
Subtotal                                                                                         531,500,000
Contingency                                                                                       55,300,000
Less: Sponsor VIK Contribution                                                                   (6,800,000)
TOTAL                                                                                            580,000,000




Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
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                                             Venue Construction Revenue
                                                                                                      % Rec'd or
                                             Received      Committed          Balance to Go
                                                                                                      Committed


               Contributions -                                                                          100%
                                                                          $580.0
               Canada and BC



                   [$ millions] 0   100    200   300     400   500      600     700   800     900   1,000

                                    Percent of Venue Construction Revenue Rec'd or Committed 100%



UBC Ice Hockey arena: The venue will host ice hockey during the Olympic Games and ice
sledge hockey during the Paralympic Games. It is being built by UBC. The venue is scheduled
for completion in summer 2008.

Richmond Oval: The venue is being built by the City of Richmond. The venue will host speed
skating. The venue is scheduled for completion in fall 2008

Whistler Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village: The Village is being built in partnership
with the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW). VANOC’s contribution to the project is $37.5
million. The RMOW is funding the balance of the project, the costs of which will be recouped
from the sale of housing units after the Games. The venue is scheduled for completion in fall
2009.

Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village: The Vancouver Olympic and
Paralympic Village is being built in partnership with the City of Vancouver. VANOC has granted
$30 million towards the overall cost of the project. The COV has contracted the construction of
the village to a third-party developer that will recoup the cost through the sale of housing units
after the Games. The venue is scheduled for completion in fall 2009.

Whistler Broadcast and Press Centre: This venue will be used as a broadcast and press
centre during the Games. VANOC has made a contribution towards the upgrading of the facility,
the Whistler Conference Centre, by Tourism Whistler.

Training Venues / Other Grants: The budget includes VANOC contributions towards the
upgrades of the Trout Lake and Killarney ice facilities in east Vancouver, both of which will be
used as training locations for various sports during the Games. In addition the budget includes a
grant to the RMOW.

Hillcrest Curling Venue: The venue is being built in partnership with the City of Vancouver. It
will host curling during the Olympic Winter Games and wheelchair curling during the Paralympic
Winter Games. VANOC’s contribution is $38.0 million. The venue is scheduled for completion in
fall 2008.




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Whistler Athlete Centre: The venue is being built in conjunction with the Whistler Olympic and
Paralympic Village. Venue construction is VANOC’s responsibility and will be used to house
athletes training in Whistler both pre-, during and post-Games.

Whistler Sliding Centre: The Whistler Sliding Centre will host bobsleigh, luge and skeleton
events. VANOC is responsible for the venue’s construction which is scheduled for completion by
the end of 2007. VANOC will operate the venue up to, and including, Games time, while the
Whistler Legacies Society will own and operate the venue post-Games.

Whistler Nordic Competition Venue: The venue will host cross-country skiing, Nordic
combined, ski jumping and biathlon events during the Olympic Winter Games and cross-country
skiing and biathlon during the Paralympic Winter Games. Located in the Callaghan Valley, the
venue is scheduled for completion in fall 2007. VANOC is responsible for the construction of the
venue and will operate the venue through to Games time. The Whistler Legacies Society will
own and operate the venue post-Games.

Cypress Freestyle and Snowboard Venue: The venue will host freestyle skiing and
snowboard competitions. Scheduled for completion in fall 2007, the project is VANOC’s
responsibility. Significant budget components include upgrades to the mountain’s snow-making
systems, construction of the snowboard half-pipe and earthworks and landscaping to the
snowboard and freestyle competition courses. The freestyle courses became the first 2010
Winter Games site to be competition-ready in November 2006.

Whistler Alpine (Whistler Creekside): Located on Whistler Mountain, the alpine venue will
host alpine skiing events. The budget includes upgrades to the snow-making capabilities on the
course and course improvements including earthworks and landscaping. The venue is
scheduled for completion in fall 2007.

Hastings Park Skating Venue (Pacific Coliseum): The venue will host figure skating and
short track speed skating. The project budget includes allowances for upgrades to the venue
including expansion to an international-size ice surface and upgrades to the ice plant. The
venue is scheduled for completion by the end of 2007.

Other: Includes amounts for certain BC Place Stadium improvements, sustainability
enhancements at various venues and general venue program administration and overhead
costs.

Venue Construction Contingency: The venue construction budget currently contains its own
current central contingency of $55.3 million to offset any risks still inherent in the completion of
the various projects. This contingency is separate from the $100 million Games operating
contingency. It is expected that by the completion of all of the venue projects, most of the venue
contingency will be used. Utilization of the contingency is governed by the Performance and
Accountability Agreement with the Province of BC and conditions placed on VANOC by the
Government of Canada.




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Sponsor VIK Contribution: The VANOC Operations budget is contributing $6.8 million of VIK
supplied by its sponsors.


9.       GAMES OPERATIONS CONTINGENCY MANAGEMENT

Contingency management is a key element of the Games project control strategy and is
outlined in more detail in Appendix 2. An operating project contingency is required to address
the risk that final expenditures and revenues will be different from those currently projected in
the budget, including allowance for unplanned events either prior to, or during, the Games. The
amount takes into consideration the level of project complexity and length of planning horizon to
Games time.

Of the $1.63 billion Games operating budget, there is about $722 million in uncommitted cash
requirements. The contingency represents about 14 per cent of this amount. The budget also
shows about $505 million in forecasted but not yet uncommitted revenues. The $100 million
contingency thus represents about 8 per cent of the combined uncommitted cash expenditures
and revenues. We believe this is a healthy level of budget protection.

Over the next three years, the level of contingency will change as projections become more
certain. A residual contingency balance will be carried into Games time to address unexpected
costs arising from weather and other uncontrollable elements. Contingency is also needed in
order to protect against significant unplanned events.

Our goal is to preserve as much of this contingency as possible as we head toward the delivery
of the Games. We fully intend to leave a positive financial legacy. This will be achieved by an
unrelenting pursuit of new and creative revenue opportunities, and tight controls over spending.


9.1 Cash flows

Summary cash flows associated with the project are contained in the Consolidated Function
Budget Summary in the following tables. In developing the estimated cash flows, it was
assumed that venue funding would match expenditures, a position consistent with the intentions
of the funding partners. The timing of operating and venue construction expenditures are as
developed during the budgeting process. Timing of revenue is less easily forecast as it depends
on the completion of sponsorship and other contracts. It is also dependent on third parties such
as the IOC. The timing or advancements of single contracts can significantly impact cash flows.
A line of credit has been established with RBC Financial to address the cash requirements
arising from the temporary mismatch of incoming and outgoing cash flows.




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10.      BUDGET SCHEDULES

Schedule 1 – VANOC Business Plan – Budget Summary: Operations (April 2007)

Schedule 2 – VANOC Business Plan – Budget Summary: Venue Development (April 2007)

Schedule 3 – VANOC Business Plan – Consolidated Budget Cashflows (April 2007)

Schedule 4 – VANOC Business Plan – Operations Budget by Department




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VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                    SCHEDULE 1
BUDGET SUMMARY – April 2007

OPERATIONS                                                                                         Years ended July 31
                                                        To 2006          2007            2008             2009            2010          2011               2012           Total

Revenue
IOC Contribution                                           9,040,000    125,669,000     102,688,000      143,198,000     199,105,000                                       579,700,000
Less – cost of providing OBS Service                     (2,127,000)    (29,574,000)    (24,166,000)     (33,700,000)    (88,433,000)                                    (178,000,000)
IOC Net Contribution                                       6,913,000      96,095,000      78,522,000     109,498,000     110,672,000                                       401,700,000
Other IOC Revenue                                                                                                          35,000,000                                       35,000,000
IOC International Sponsorship Program                          4,000     16,649,000      20,913,000       60,968,000     102,870,000                                       201,404,000
Domestic Sponsorship                                      46,463,000    118,470,000     106,807,000      149,152,000     302,965,000    18,521,000         17,622,000      760,000,000
Ticketing                                                                                                141,273,000       90,581,000                                      231,854,000
Licensing & Merchandising                                  3,404,000       1,115,000      4,013,000       10,258,000       27,236,000                                       46,026,000
Paralympic Revenue                                                           800,000      1,600,000        9,200,000       28,400,000                                       40,000,000
Other Revenue                                              1,292,000         400,000        800,000       33,308,000       71,202,000    3,500,000                         110,502,000

Total Revenue                                             58,076,000    233,529,000     212,655,000      513,657,000     768,926,000    22,021,000         17,622,000    1,826,486,000

Less: Marketing Rights Royalties                        (20,320,000)    (21,172,000)    (23,682,000)     (37,863,000)    (78,483,000)   (8,502,000)        (7,195,000)   (197,217,000)

NET REVENUE                                               37,756,000     212,357,000    188,973,000      475,794,000     690,443,000    13,519,000         10,427,000    1,629,269,000

Function

Sponsorship Sales & Servicing                              3,116,000       2,954,000      5,383,000        4,975,000       4,756,000                                       21,184,000
Licensing & Merchandising                                    620,000         821,000      1,170,000        1,907,000       2,707,000                                        7,225,000
Commercial Rights Management                                 433,000         483,000        972,000        1,042,000       1,105,000                                        4,035,000
Ticketing                                                                  1,168,000      1,741,000        2,889,000       3,285,000                                        9,083,000
Communications                                             2,142,000         875,000      1,260,000        1,201,000         915,000                                        6,393,000
Community Relations                                        1,141,000       1,887,000      3,287,000        2,618,000       1,686,000                                       10,619,000
Editorial Services                                           278,000         822,000      1,165,000        1,755,000       6,422,000                                       10,442,000
Media Relations                                              368,000         614,000        769,000          966,000         896,000                                        3,613,000
Internet Management                                          616,000         827,000      1,707,000        1,707,000       2,587,000           2,000                        7,446,000
Brand & Creative Services                                  2,330,000       3,856,000      4,408,000        3,299,000       1,695,000                                       15,588,000
Torch Relay                                                   21,000         274,000        812,000        7,679,000      22,013,000                                       30,799,000

Marketing and Communications                              11,065,000      14,581,000     22,674,000       30,038,000      48,067,000           2,000                      126,427,000

Sport                                                      2,618,000       3,718,000     15,674,000       15,805,000      19,578,000                                       57,393,000
Paralympic Planning                                          108,000         309,000        512,000          980,000         720,000                                        2,629,000
Medical Services                                             196,000         587,000        867,000        1,558,000       6,565,000                                        9,773,000
Anti-Doping                                                   37,000         262,000        763,000        1,416,000       1,642,000                                        4,120,000
NOC/NPC Services                                              41,000         534,000      1,162,000        8,596,000       5,745,000                                       16,078,000
Venue Management                                             879,000      20,402,000      8,365,000       15,864,000      43,131,000                                       88,641,000
Event Services                                                               418,000        837,000        2,880,000       3,667,000                                        7,802,000

Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue Mgmt.                    3,879,000      26,230,000     28,180,000       47,099,000      81,048,000                                      186,436,000

Look of the Games                                             41,000         377,000      1,078,000        6,603,000      10,837,000                                       18,936,000
Overlay                                                    2,285,000       3,833,000      4,873,000       27,786,000      95,912,000                                      134,689,000
Food and Beverage                                                            132,000        517,000          838,000      34,943,000                                       36,430,000



              Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
              Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
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VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                    SCHEDULE 1
BUDGET SUMMARY – April 2007

OPERATIONS                                                                                          Years ended July 31
                                                          To 2006          2007            2008            2009             2010          2011             2012          Total


Olympic and Paralympic Villages                                432,000         646,000      1,012,000       2,523,000       21,219,000                                    25,832,000
Accommodation                                                  639,000         973,000      1,363,000       1,527,000       18,812,000                                    23,314,000
Security Integration                                            31,000         404,000        858,000       1,555,000        7,458,000                                    10,306,000
Transportation                                                 989,000       2,809,000      4,041,000      10,800,000      105,470,000                                   124,109,000
Logistics                                                       39,000       1,334,000      3,309,000      13,223,000       24,637,000      530,000                       43,072,000
Snow Removal, Cleaning & Waste                                  22,000         172,000        431,000         809,000        8,059,000                                     9,493,000
Cultural Olympiad                                              648,000         967,000      1,712,000       3,007,000       13,711,000                                    20,045,000
Ceremonies                                                   1,192,000         846,000      1,046,000      21,541,000       39,707,000                                    64,332,000
Broadcast Integration                                           29,000         216,000        327,000       1,495,000       21,309,000                                    23,376,000
Press Operations                                                               475,000      1,184,000       1,852,000        6,736,000                                    10,247,000
Government Services Integration                               325,000          844,000        960,000       1,040,000          780,000                                     3,949,000

Service Operations and Ceremonies                            6,672,000      14,028,000     22,711,000      94,599,000      409,590,000      530,000                      548,130,000

Energy Services                                                220,000       7,295,000      2,944,000         448,000       36,000,000                                    46,907,000
Technical Infrastructure                                     5,503,000      38,352,000     49,382,000      76,007,000       98,221,000       47,000                      267,512,000
Information Systems                                            333,000       1,825,000      2,170,000       1,382,000          558,000                                     6,268,000
Timing and Scoring, Results                                                  6,023,000     12,343,000      22,437,000       22,366,000                                    63,169,000
Internet (Technical)                                          131,000          383,000      1,425,000         878,000        3,174,000       53,000                        6,044,000
Accreditation                                                                  357,000        963,000       3,840,000        3,440,000                                     8,600,000

Technology and Systems                                       6,187,000      54,235,000     69,227,000     104,992,000      163,759,000      100,000                      398,500,000

Human Resources                                             13,701,000       8,177,000      9,675,000      12,844,000       46,548,000      600,000                       91,545,000
Workforce                                                      307,000         945,000      2,958,000       5,399,000       24,992,000                                    34,601,000
Sustainability & Aboriginal Participation                    1,913,000       4,376,000      3,640,000       2,982,000        2,742,000                                    15,653,000
International Client Services                                2,709,000         712,000      1,042,000       1,948,000        4,934,000                                    11,345,000

Human Resources and Sustainability                          18,630,000      14,210,000     17,315,000      23,173,000       79,216,000      600,000                      153,144,000

Legal Services                                               4,341,000       2,687,000      2,939,000       3,013,000        2,294,000      105,000                       15,379,000
Administration                                              12,102,000      11,997,000      5,075,000       5,547,000        4,102,000       79,000                       38,902,000
Finance                                                      4,734,000       3,942,000      3,956,000       5,168,000        4,556,000      836,000          400,000      23,592,000
Project and Information Management                           1,348,000       1,279,000        776,000         871,000          762,000                                     5,036,000
Risk Management & Assurance Services                         1,087,000       2,101,000      2,140,000       4,338,000        5,217,000                                    14,883,000
Procurement                                                    577,000         732,000        700,000       1,046,000          949,000                                     4,004,000
CEO Office                                                     676,000         421,000        508,000         538,000          465,000                                     2,608,000
Government & Partner Relations                                  10,000         183,000        316,000         328,000          257,000                                     1,094,000
Venue Development Administration                             3,715,000       5,619,000      1,800,000                                                                     11,134,000

Finance and Legal                                           28,590,000      28,961,000     18,210,000      20,849,000       18,602,000     1,020,000         400,000     116,632,000

Project Contingency                                                                        10,000,000      30,000,000       60,000,000                                   100,000,000

Total Operating Expenses                                    75,023,000    152,245,000     188,317,000     350,750,000      860,282,000     2,252,000         400,000    1,629,269,000

Net Surplus (Deficit)                                     (37,267,000)      60,112,000        656,000     125,044,000     (169,839,000)   11,267,000       10,027,000              0


                Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
                Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                         Page 75 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                           SCHEDULE 2
BUDGET SUMMARY – April 2007

VENUE DEVELOPMENT
                                                                                                   Years ended July 31
                                                        To 2006          2007            2008             2009           2010          2011       2012     Total


Canada                                                    72,090,000    123,430,000      81,600,000       12,880,000                                       290,000,000
BC                                                        81,000,000    134,350,000      64,310,000       10,340,000                                       290,000,000

Total Venue Development Revenue                          153,090,000    257,780,000     145,910,000       23,220,000                                       580,000,000


UBC Ice Hockey Arena (UBC Winter Sports Centre)               72,000      35,088,000      3,063,000          222,000                                        38,445,000
Richmond Speed Skating Oval                               33,177,000       8,983,000     18,790,000        2,160,000                                        63,110,000
Whistler Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village                        29,000,000      6,500,000                       2,000,000                         37,500,000
Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic (Athletes) Village       30,000,000                                                                                        30,000,000
Training Venues / Other Grants                             3,825,000       6,245,000        230,000          100,000                                        10,400,000
Hillcrest Curling Venue                                      626,000      17,614,000     16,940,000        2,820,000                                        38,000,000
Whistler Athlete Centre                                       41,000       7,079,000      6,660,000        2,220,000                                        16,000,000
Whistler Sliding Centre                                   29,223,000      49,277,000     26,400,000                                                        104,900,000
Whistler Nordic Competition Venue                         28,730,000      61,505,000     29,505,000                                                        119,740,000
Cypress Freestyle and Snowboarding Venue                   1,126,000       8,829,000      5,845,000                                                         15,800,000
Whistler Alpine (Whistler Creekside)                       4,569,000      17,551,000      5,515,000                                                         27,635,000
Hastings Park Skating Venue (Pacific Coliseum)             3,895,000      11,265,000      8,540,000                                                         23,700,000
Other                                                        615,000       1,465,000      4,190,000                                                          6,270,000

Subtotal                                                 135,899,000    253,901,000     132,178,000        7,522,000      2,000,000                        531,500,000

Contingency                                                                              37,000,000       17,000,000      1,300,000                         55,300,000

Less: Sponsor VIK Contribution                             (700,000)     (3,500,000)     (2,600,000)                                                        (6,800,000)

Total Venue Development Expenditures                     135,199,000    250,401,000     166,578,000       24,522,000      3,300,000                        580,000,000


Net Surplus (Deficit)                                     17,891,000       7,379,000    (20,668,000)      (1,302,000)    (3,300,000)                                 0




              Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
              Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                       Page 76 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                             SCHEDULE 3
CONSOLIDATED BUDGET CASHFLOWS – April 2007

                                                                                                           Years ended July 31
                                                            To 2006            2007             2008              2009             2010           2011              2012          Total


OPERATIONS
  Revenue                                                    37,756,000       212,357,000      188,973,000       475,794,000      690,443,000     13,519,000        10,427,000   1,629,269,000

  Expenses                                                   75,023,000       152,245,000      188,317,000       350,750,000      860,282,000      2,252,000          400,000    1,629,269,000

                                                   Net      (37,267,000)       60,112,000          656,000       125,044,000     (169,839,000)    11,267,000        10,027,000              0


                         Cumulative cash (borrowings)       (37,267,000)       22,845,000       23,501,000       148,545,000      (21,294,000)   (10,027,000)                               0



VENUES
  Revenue                                                   153,090,000       257,780,000      145,910,000        23,220,000                                                      580,000,000

  Expenses                                                  135,199,000       250,401,000      166,578,000        24,522,000        3,300,000                                     580,000,000

                                                   Net       17,891,000         7,379,000      (20,668,000)       (1,302,000)      (3,300,000)                                              0


                         Cumulative cash (borrowings)        17,891,000        25,270,000        4,602,000         3,300,000                                                                0



TOTAL CASH (BORROWINGS)                                     (19,376,000)       48,115,000       28,103,000       151,845,000      (21,294,000)   (10,027,000)                               0


* VIK is included in both revenue and expenses as incurred and therefore has no impact on net cash flow.




             Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
             Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                             Page 77 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                   SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06           2007             2008           2009           2010          2011              2012            Total


Revenue

IOC Contribution                                             9,040,000    125,669,000     102,688,000     143,198,000    199,105,000                                      579,700,000
Less – cost of providing OBS Service                       (2,127,000)    (29,574,000)    (24,166,000)    (33,700,000)   (88,433,000)                                   (178,000,000)
IOC Net Contribution                                         6,913,000      96,095,000      78,522,000    109,498,000    110,672,000                                      401,700,000
Other IOC Revenue                                                                                                          35,000,000                                      35,000,000
IOC International Sponsorship Program                           4,000      16,649,000       20,913,000     60,968,000    102,870,000                                      201,404,000
Domestic Sponsorship                                       46,463,000     118,470,000      106,807,000    149,152,000    302,965,000    18,521,000        17,622,000      760,000,000
Ticketing                                                                                                 141,273,000      90,581,000                                     231,854,000
Licensing and Merchandising                                 3,404,000       1,115,000        4,013,000     10,258,000      27,236,000                                      46,026,000
Paralympic Revenue                                                            800,000        1,600,000      9,200,000      28,400,000                                      40,000,000
Other Revenue                                               1,292,000         400,000          800,000     33,308,000      71,202,000    3,500,000                        110,502,000

TOTAL REVENUE                                              58,076,000     233,529,000      212,655,000    513,657,000    768,926,000    22,021,000        17,622,000    1,826,486,000

Less : Marketing Rights Royalties                         (20,320,000)    (21,172,000)    (23,682,000)    (37,863,000)   (78,483,000)   (8,502,000)       (7,195,000)   (197,217,000)

NET REVENUE                                                37,756,000     212,357,000      188,973,000    475,794,000    690,443,000    13,519,000        10,427,000    1,629,269,000


Sponsorship Sales & Servicing

Staff, planning & administration                            1,936,000       2,397,000        3,337,000      3,374,000      1,952,000                                      12,996,000
Sponsor conferences, recognition and events                 1,180,000         557,000        2,046,000      1,601,000      2,804,000                                       8,188,000

Function Total                                              3,116,000       2,954,000        5,383,000      4,975,000      4,756,000                                      21,184,000

Licensing & Merchandising

Staff, planning & administration                              620,000         821,000        1,170,000      1,907,000      2,707,000                                       7,225,000

Function Total                                                620,000         821,000        1,170,000      1,907,000      2,707,000                                       7,225,000

Commercial Rights Management

Staff, planning & administration                              433,000         483,000         972,000       1,042,000      1,105,000                                       4,035,000

Function Total                                                433,000         483,000         972,000       1,042,000      1,105,000                                       4,035,000

Ticketing

Staff, planning & administration                                            1,088,000        1,376,000      1,156,000      1,442,000                                       5,062,000
Ticket Marketing                                                               80,000          365,000      1,733,000      1,843,000                                       4,021,000

Function Total                                                              1,168,000        1,741,000      2,889,000      3,285,000                                       9,083,000



               Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
               Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                         Page 78 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                   SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06           2007            2008            2009           2010         2011               2012     Total

Communications

Staff, planning, events & administration                    2,142,000         875,000       1,260,000       1,201,000       915,000                                 6,393,000

Function Total                                              2,142,000         875,000       1,260,000       1,201,000       915,000                                 6,393,000

Community Relations

Staff, planning & administration                              727,000       1,110,000       1,544,000       1,600,000      1,048,000                                6,029,000
Events and programs                                           414,000         777,000       1,743,000       1,018,000        638,000                                4,590,000

Function Total                                              1,141,000       1,887,000       3,287,000       2,618,000      1,686,000                               10,619,000

Editorial Services

Staff, planning & administration                              137,000         283,000        452,000          555,000        378,000                                1,805,000
Publications                                                  141,000         539,000        713,000        1,200,000      6,044,000                                8,637,000

Function Total                                                278,000         822,000       1,165,000       1,755,000      6,422,000                               10,442,000

Media Relations

Staff, planning & administration                              368,000         614,000        769,000            966,000     896,000                                 3,613,000

Function Total                                                368,000         614,000        769,000            966,000     896,000                                 3,613,000

Internet Management

Staff, planning & administration                              455,000         198,000         374,000         651,000        579,000                                2,257,000
Services and content development                              161,000         629,000       1,333,000       1,056,000      2,008,000          2,000                 5,189,000

Function Total                                                616,000         827,000       1,707,000       1,707,000      2,587,000          2,000                 7,446,000

Brand & Creative Services

Staff, planning & administration                              457,000       1,501,000       2,013,000       2,229,000      1,450,000                                7,650,000
Creative, design and production services                    1,873,000       2,355,000       2,395,000       1,070,000        245,000                                7,938,000

Function Total                                              2,330,000       3,856,000       4,408,000       3,299,000      1,695,000                               15,588,000




               Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
               Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                        Page 79 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                     SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06           2007            2008            2009           2010           2011               2012     Total

Torch Relay

Staff, planning & administration                               21,000         186,000        696,000        2,361,000      4,035,000                                   7,299,000
Olympic Torch Relay                                                            88,000        116,000        4,851,000     16,110,000                                  21,165,000
Paralympic Torch Relay                                                                                        467,000      1,868,000                                   2,335,000

Function Total                                                 21,000         274,000        812,000        7,679,000     22,013,000                                  30,799,000


REVENUE, MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS                        11,065,000      14,581,000      22,674,000      30,038,000     48,067,000            2,000                126,427,000


Sport

Sport staff, planning & administration                        860,000         409,000         408,000         427,000         340,000                                  2,444,000
Alpine Sports                                                  82,000         592,000       7,508,000       3,135,000     (1,332,000)                                  9,985,000
Freestyle and Snowboarding                                     32,000         240,000       1,745,000       2,456,000         (27,000)                                 4,446,000
Ice Sports                                                    339,000         681,000       1,072,000       3,896,000       9,527,000                                 15,515,000
Nordic Sports                                                 250,000         783,000       2,134,000       2,473,000       1,559,000                                  7,199,000
Sliding Sports                                                223,000         421,000       1,248,000       1,064,000       1,063,000                                  4,019,000
Sport Services                                                832,000         564,000       1,228,000       1,514,000       3,459,000                                  7,597,000
Sport Venue Production                                                         28,000         331,000         840,000       4,989,000                                  6,188,000
Pre-Games Operations

Function Total                                              2,618,000       3,718,000      15,674,000      15,805,000     19,578,000                                  57,393,000

Paralympic Planning

Staff, planning & administration                              108,000         309,000        512,000            980,000      720,000                                   2,629,000

Function Total                                                108,000         309,000        512,000            980,000      720,000                                   2,629,000

Medical Services

Staff, planning & administration                              196,000         480,000        715,000        1,147,000      1,094,000                                   3,632,000
Medical Services                                                              107,000        152,000          411,000      5,471,000                                   6,141,000

Function Total                                                196,000         587,000        867,000        1,558,000      6,565,000                                   9,773,000




               Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
               Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                        Page 80 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                           SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06           2007            2008            2009           2010         2011       2012     Total

Anti-Doping

Staff, planning & administration                               37,000         164,000        375,000            626,000      516,000                         1,718,000
Services and equipment                                                         98,000        388,000            790,000    1,126,000                         2,402,000

Function Total                                                 37,000         262,000        763,000        1,416,000      1,642,000                         4,120,000

NOC/NPC Services

Staff, planning & administration                               41,000         529,000       1,146,000       1,676,000      1,624,000                         5,016,000
Servcies and programs                                                           3,000          14,000         880,000      1,533,000                         2,430,000
Athlete support grants                                                          2,000           2,000       6,040,000      2,588,000                         8,632,000

Function Total                                                 41,000         534,000       1,162,000       8,596,000      5,745,000                        16,078,000

Venue Management

Staff, planning & administration                              879,000       1,352,000       2,907,000       5,228,000      4,503,000                        14,869,000
Venue use agreements                                                       19,050,000                                     38,628,000                        57,678,000
Test Events                                                                                 5,458,000      10,636,000                                       16,094,000

Function Total                                                879,000      20,402,000       8,365,000      15,864,000     43,131,000                        88,641,000

Event Services

Staff, planning & administration                                              418,000        837,000        2,880,000      3,667,000                         7,802,000

Function Total                                                                418,000        837,000        2,880,000      3,667,000                         7,802,000


SPORT, PARALYMPIC GAMES & VENUE MGMT.                       3,879,000      26,230,000      28,180,000      47,099,000     81,048,000                       186,436,000


Look of the Games

Staff, planning & administration                               41,000         232,000        828,000        1,490,000      1,414,000                         4,005,000
Look – graphics, hardware and structures                                       95,000                       4,063,000      7,773,000                        11,931,000
Wayfinding – signage                                                           50,000        250,000        1,050,000      1,650,000                         3,000,000

Function Total                                                 41,000         377,000       1,078,000       6,603,000     10,837,000                        18,936,000




               Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
               Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                        Page 81 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                          SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06          2007            2008              2009         2010         2011       2012     Total

Overlay

Staff, plannning, design, permits and administration       2,285,000       3,643,000       4,873,000         5,996,000    5,231,000                        22,028,000
City Venues – comp venues                                                    190,000                         5,426,000   21,702,000                        27,318,000
City Venues – non-comp, training & support venues                                                            2,948,000   11,792,000                        14,740,000
Mountain Venues – comp venues                                                                                6,737,000   30,468,000                        37,205,000
Mountain Venues – non-comp & support venues                                                                  1,354,000    5,418,000                         6,772,000
Villages                                                                                                     5,325,000   21,301,000                        26,626,000
Overlay – Scope & Reconciling Allowance

Function Total                                             2,285,000       3,833,000       4,873,000        27,786,000   95,912,000                       134,689,000

Food & Beverage

Staff, planning & administration                                             132,000         517,000          838,000     1,349,000                         2,836,000
Kitchen Outfitting                                                                                                        5,464,000                         5,464,000
Athlete Catering                                                                                                          9,973,000                         9,973,000
Venue Buildout                                                                                                            2,811,000                         2,811,000
Workforce Catering                                                                                                       15,346,000                        15,346,000

Function Total                                                               132,000         517,000          838,000    34,943,000                        36,430,000

Olympic & Paralympic Villages

Staff, planning & administration                             432,000         646,000       1,012,000         2,523,000    5,050,000                         9,663,000
Housekeeping                                                                                                              3,243,000                         3,243,000
International Plaza & Events                                                                                              2,569,000                         2,569,000
Rooms Division – FF&E, supplies                                                                                           6,438,000                         6,438,000
Support Services                                                                                                          3,919,000                         3,919,000

Function Total                                               432,000         646,000       1,012,000         2,523,000   21,219,000                        25,832,000

Accommodation

Staff, planning & administration                             639,000         941,000       1,419,000         1,744,000    1,660,000                         6,403,000
Workforce, officials & other accommodation                                    32,000         (56,000)        (217,000)   17,152,000                        16,911,000
Accommodations – Booking fees & recoveries
Media accommodation system

Function Total                                               639,000         973,000       1,363,000         1,527,000   18,812,000                        23,314,000




           Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
           Comité d'organisation des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d'hiver de 2010 à Vancouver (COVAN)
                                                                                   Page 82 of 196
VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                 SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06           2007            2008            2009            2010         2011            2012     Total

Security Integration

Staff, planning & administration                               31,000         404,000        858,000            955,000       737,000                              2,985,000
Site Security                                                                                                   600,000     6,721,000                              7,321,000

Function Total                                                 31,000         404,000        858,000        1,555,000       7,458,000                             10,306,000

Transportation

Staff, planning & administration                              989,000       1,221,000       2,159,000       5,617,000      11,074,000                             21,060,000
Bus Systems                                                                                                   670,000      51,702,000                             52,372,000
Fleet Systems                                                               1,588,000       1,882,000       4,452,000      24,310,000                             32,232,000
Parking                                                                                                                     6,191,000                              6,191,000
Traffic Management                                                                                                          1,800,000                              1,800,000
Paralympics                                                                                                      61,000    10,393,000                             10,454,000

Function Total                                                989,000       2,809,000       4,041,000      10,800,000     105,470,000                            124,109,000

Logistics

Staff, planning & administration                               39,000       1,134,000       1,827,000       3,936,000       9,215,000                             16,151,000
Freight                                                                       150,000         191,000         356,000       1,448,000                              2,145,000
Distribution                                                                   50,000         219,000       1,979,000       3,289,000                              5,537,000
Warehouse                                                                                     469,000       2,367,000       5,879,000     530,000                  9,245,000
FF&E                                                                                          603,000       4,585,000       4,806,000                              9,994,000

Function Total                                                 39,000       1,334,000       3,309,000      13,223,000      24,637,000     530,000                 43,072,000

Snow Removal, Cleaning & Waste

Staff, planning & administration                               22,000         172,000        431,000            809,000       679,000                              2,113,000
Cleaning                                                                                                                    3,807,000                              3,807,000
Waste Management                                                                                                              901,000                                901,000
Snow Removal                                                                                                                2,672,000                              2,672,000

Function Total                                                 22,000         172,000        431,000            809,000     8,059,000                              9,493,000

Cultural Olympiad

Cultural Olympiad                                             648,000         967,000       1,712,000       3,007,000      13,711,000                             20,045,000

Function Total                                                648,000         967,000       1,712,000       3,007,000      13,711,000                             20,045,000




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VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06          2007            2008              2009          2010         2011            2012     Total

Ceremonies

Olympic Ceremonies                                         1,152,000         809,000       1,009,000        19,178,000    36,332,000                             58,480,000
Paralympic Ceremonies                                         40,000          37,000          37,000         2,363,000     3,375,000                              5,852,000

Function Total                                             1,192,000         846,000       1,046,000        21,541,000    39,707,000                             64,332,000

Broadcast Integration

Staff, planning & administration                              29,000         216,000         327,000           495,000       627,000                              1,694,000
Host Broadcast Paralympics                                                                                   1,000,000     3,000,000                              4,000,000
Main Media Centre                                                                                                         17,682,000                             17,682,000

Function Total                                                29,000         216,000         327,000         1,495,000    21,309,000                             23,376,000

Press Operations

Staff, planning & administration                                             475,000       1,183,000         1,791,000     4,012,000                              7,461,000
Contracted Services                                                                            1,000            61,000     2,724,000                              2,786,000

Function Total                                                               475,000       1,184,000         1,852,000     6,736,000                             10,247,000

Government Service Integration

Staff, planning & administration                             325,000         844,000         960,000         1,040,000      780,000                               3,949,000

Function Total                                               325,000         844,000         960,000         1,040,000      780,000                               3,949,000


SERVICE OPERATIONS AND CEREMONIES                          6,672,000      14,028,000      22,711,000        94,599,000   409,590,000     530,000                548,130,000


Energy Services

Staff, planning & administration                             220,000         495,000         394,000          448,000      1,520,000                              3,077,000
Energy infrastructure and consumption                                      6,800,000       2,550,000                      19,000,000                             28,350,000
Other power costs                                                                                                         15,480,000                             15,480,000

Function Total                                               220,000       7,295,000       2,944,000          448,000     36,000,000                             46,907,000




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VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                 SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06          2007            2008               2009          2010         2011            2012     Total

Technical Infrastructure

Staff, planning & administration                           1,056,000       2,362,000       4,160,000          9,185,000     7,586,000      31,000                 24,380,000
Games systems and integration                                             29,556,000      16,528,000         24,801,000    14,004,000                             84,889,000
Hardware, software & systems delivery                      2,584,000       3,652,000      18,665,000         20,262,000    13,753,000                             58,916,000
Venue technology                                             159,000         341,000       3,711,000          6,244,000    15,200,000                             25,655,000
Telecommunications                                         1,704,000       2,056,000       4,687,000         14,789,000    47,556,000      16,000                 70,808,000
Information Security                                                         385,000       1,631,000            726,000       122,000                              2,864,000

Function Total                                             5,503,000      38,352,000      49,382,000         76,007,000    98,221,000      47,000                267,512,000

Information Systems

Staff, planning & administration                             208,000         855,000       1,399,000          1,312,000      558,000                               4,332,000
Business systems                                             125,000         970,000         771,000             70,000                                            1,936,000

Function Total                                               333,000       1,825,000       2,170,000          1,382,000      558,000                               6,268,000

Timing & Scoring, Results

Staff, planning & administration                                             351,000       1,000,000          2,586,000     2,515,000                              6,452,000
Results services & equipment                                               5,672,000      11,343,000         19,851,000    19,851,000                             56,717,000

Function Total                                                             6,023,000      12,343,000         22,437,000    22,366,000                             63,169,000

Internet (Technical)

Staff, planning & administration                             131,000         143,000         379,000           418,000        273,000                              1,344,000
Technical services and equipment                                             240,000       1,046,000           460,000      2,901,000      53,000                  4,700,000

Function Total                                               131,000         383,000       1,425,000           878,000      3,174,000      53,000                  6,044,000

Accreditation

Staff, planning & administration                                             343,000         740,000          1,836,000     2,163,000                              5,082,000
Systems and services                                                          14,000         223,000          2,004,000     1,277,000                              3,518,000

Function Total                                                               357,000         963,000          3,840,000     3,440,000                              8,600,000


TECHNOLOGY AND SYSTEMS                                     6,187,000      54,235,000      69,227,000        104,992,000   163,759,000     100,000                398,500,000




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VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                           SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                        FY04-06          2007            2008           2009         2010         2011            2012     Total

Human Resources

Staff, planning & administration                         12,710,000       5,422,000       5,674,000      5,756,000    5,062,000     600,000                 35,224,000
HR programs and services                                    991,000       2,095,000       2,008,000      2,271,000    4,380,000                             11,745,000
Additional Compensation Costs                                               660,000       1,993,000      4,817,000   37,106,000                             44,576,000

Function Total                                           13,701,000       8,177,000       9,675,000     12,844,000   46,548,000     600,000                 91,545,000

Workforce

Staff, planning & administration                            307,000         840,000       1,746,000      3,869,000    3,375,000                             10,137,000
Workforce programs & uniforms                                               105,000       1,212,000      1,530,000   21,617,000                             24,464,000

Function Total                                              307,000         945,000       2,958,000      5,399,000   24,992,000                             34,601,000

Sustainability & Aboriginal participation

Staff, planning & administration                          1,091,000       1,658,000       1,493,000      1,474,000    1,152,000                              6,868,000
Programs                                                    822,000       2,718,000       2,147,000      1,508,000    1,590,000                              8,785,000

Function Total                                            1,913,000       4,376,000       3,640,000      2,982,000    2,742,000                             15,653,000

International Client Services

Staff, planning & administration                            221,000         381,000         723,000      1,445,000    1,346,000                              4,116,000
Services, Operations and Events                           2,488,000         331,000         319,000        503,000    3,588,000                              7,229,000

Function Total                                            2,709,000         712,000       1,042,000      1,948,000    4,934,000                             11,345,000


HUMAN RESOURCES & SUSTAINABILITY                         18,630,000      14,210,000      17,315,000     23,173,000   79,216,000     600,000                153,144,000


Legal Services

Staff, planning and outside legal services                3,817,000       2,454,000       2,643,000      2,635,000    2,102,000      39,000                 13,690,000
Board & committees                                          524,000         233,000         296,000        378,000      192,000      66,000                  1,689,000

Function Total                                            4,341,000       2,687,000       2,939,000      3,013,000    2,294,000     105,000                 15,379,000




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VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06           2007            2008            2009           2010         2011            2012        Total

Administration

Office Facilities                                           7,772,000       7,187,000       3,418,000       3,425,000      2,706,000      79,000                   24,587,000
Office staff, services and administration                   4,330,000       4,810,000       1,657,000       2,122,000      1,396,000                               14,315,000

Function Total                                             12,102,000      11,997,000       5,075,000       5,547,000      4,102,000      79,000                   38,902,000

Finance

Staff, professional services & administration               2,447,000       2,672,000       2,993,000       3,418,000      3,156,000      86,000                   14,772,000
Interest and banking fees                                   2,287,000       1,270,000         963,000       1,750,000      1,400,000     750,000         400,000    8,820,000
CFO Contingency

Function Total                                              4,734,000       3,942,000       3,956,000       5,168,000      4,556,000     836,000         400,000   23,592,000

Project & Information Management

Staff, planning & administration                              753,000         727,000        654,000            757,000     664,000                                 3,555,000
Information Services                                          595,000         552,000        122,000            114,000      98,000                                 1,481,000

Function Total                                              1,348,000       1,279,000        776,000            871,000     762,000                                 5,036,000

Risk Management & Assurance Services

Insurance and Advisory Services                               728,000       1,506,000       1,630,000       3,829,000      4,856,000                               12,549,000
Staff, planning & administration                              359,000         595,000         510,000         509,000        361,000                                2,334,000

Function Total                                              1,087,000       2,101,000       2,140,000       4,338,000      5,217,000                               14,883,000

Procurement

Staff, planning & administration                              577,000         732,000        700,000        1,046,000       949,000                                 4,004,000

Function Total                                                577,000         732,000        700,000        1,046,000       949,000                                 4,004,000

CEO Office

CEO Support, including staff & administration                 676,000         421,000        508,000            538,000     465,000                                 2,608,000
Executive Team

Function Total                                                676,000         421,000        508,000            538,000     465,000                                 2,608,000




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VANOC BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                                                                    SCHEDULE 4
Operations Budget by Function

                                                         FY04-06           2007            2008            2009             2010          2011             2012           Total

Government & Partner Relations

Government and Partner Relations                               10,000         183,000        316,000            328,000        257,000                                     1,094,000

Function Total                                                 10,000         183,000        316,000            328,000        257,000                                     1,094,000

Venue Development

Staff, planning & administration                            3,715,000         619,000         500,000                                                                      4,834,000
Sponsor VIK                                                                 5,000,000       1,300,000                                                                      6,300,000

Function Total                                              3,715,000       5,619,000       1,800,000                                                                     11,134,000


FINANCE & LEGAL                                            28,590,000      28,961,000      18,210,000      20,849,000       18,602,000     1,020,000         400,000     116,632,000


Subtotal - all expenditures                                75,023,000     152,245,000     178,317,000     320,750,000      800,282,000     2,252,000         400,000    1,529,269,000

Project Contingency – Operations                                                           10,000,000      30,000,000       60,000,000                                   100,000,000

Total expenditures                                         75,023,000     152,245,000     188,317,000     350,750,000      860,282,000     2,252,000         400,000    1,629,269,000




TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                         75,023,000     152,245,000     188,317,000     350,750,000      860,282,000     2,252,000         400,000    1,629,269,000

TOTAL REVENUE                                              37,756,000     212,357,000     188,973,000     475,794,000      690,443,000    13,519,000       10,427,000   1,629,269,000

SURPLUS (DEFICIT)                                         (37,267,000)     60,112,000        656,000      125,044,000     (169,839,000)   11,267,000       10,027,000              0




               Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)
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11.      VANOC ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE (CHART)




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APPENDICES




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12.      APPENDIX 1: MARKETING AND SPONSORSHIP PLAN

1. OBJECTIVES

VANOC’s marketing program has been created to generate sufficient revenue to fund an
outstanding 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Specific financial targets are as
follows:

         Domestic sponsorship revenue of $760 million, including sponsorship for the Torch
         Relays

         Ticket sales revenue of more than $230 million

         Licensing and merchandising net revenue of $46 million

2. DELIVERABLES

This plan covers the majority of the revenue generating responsibilities of VANOC. The four
functions within this plan, along with a summary of the primary responsibilities of each
respective function, are as follows:

Sponsorship Sales and Service

         Establish strategies for maximizing domestic sponsorship revenue through the targeting
         of quality companies in appropriate categories

         Execute the plan, estimated to include the completion of agreements with approximately
         50 sponsors

         Develop and execute a sponsor service plan for both domestic and TOP sponsors to
         ensure sponsors receive positive returns on their investment

Ticketing

         Establish strategies for optimizing ticket sales revenue, including the marketing,
         allocation and distribution of tickets

         Develop and execute strategies to ensure maximum usage of sold tickets to minimize
         empty seats at all sport events and ceremonies




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         Acquire ticket agency services as required to ensure the effective sale and distribution of
         tickets to the public and Olympic Family

         Conduct a ticket selling process that is fair and transparent, ensuring a positive
         experience for ticket buyers

Licensing and Merchandising

         Develop and manage a comprehensive licensed merchandise program generating
         royalty revenue for VANOC and a wide range of quality products to consumers

         Develop a retail program for VANOC licensed products for both pre-Games and Games
         time sales

         Develop a coin program

Commercial Rights Management

         Protect the Olympic and Paralympic brands by ensuring that all use of the Olympic and
         Paralympic brands in Canada is appropriately authorized

         Take steps to provide legal protection of all terms, brands and marks that invoke the
         Olympic Movement

         Investigate and take action against unauthorized brand uses using a fair and balanced
         approach

3. ASSUMPTIONS

The following assumptions are key to the success of the marketing plan and the generation of
the targeted level of revenue:

         The Canadian economy will remain relatively strong, with no recession, through Games
         time

         The Games will be embraced as “Canada’s Games,” based partly on the efforts of
         VANOC to engage the entire nation

         The image of the Olympic and Paralympic movements and brands will continue to be
         positive in Canada and worldwide




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         Ambush marketing will be prevented and the Olympic brand strongly protected through
         the implementation of new protective legislation. The Government of Canada has
         recently introduced such legislation.

         Vancouver 2010 will continue to be viewed positively by the public

4. BACKGROUND

Marketing Plan Agreement (MPA2)

A preliminary marketing plan was prepared in November 2004 as an appendix to the Marketing
Plan Agreement (MPA2) with the IOC. The MPA2 sets out the rules, policies and procedures
that must be followed in the execution of the marketing plan. It covers such elements as
revenue and cost-sharing formulas, ambush marketing prevention obligations, responsibilities to
TOP sponsors and category release procedures. This marketing plan adheres to the
requirements of MPA2.

MPA2 provides VANOC with the right to sell all marketing rights to the 2010 Olympic and
Paralympic Winter Games and the Canadian Olympic Teams through 2012. Olympic marketing
rights can only be sold for the Canadian territory. Olympic rights outside of Canada belong to
the IOC and are licensed to respective National Olympic Committees.

Joint Marketing Agreements

VANOC has entered into joint marketing agreements with each of the COC and the CPC. In the
agreement with the COC, VANOC acquired all the marketing rights of the COC and the
Canadian Olympic Teams for the period 2005-2012. The COC will receive a percentage of the
benefits generated by VANOC through sponsorship agreements in return for these rights. The
maximum compensation the COC will receive under this agreement is $110 million. Based on
sponsorship sales to date, and as targeted in this plan, it is estimated that the COC will receive
the maximum amount of $110 million.

Under the agreement with the CPC, VANOC has guaranteed CPC revenues at 2004 levels and
will assist the CPC in selling Canadian Paralympic Team rights for the 2005-2012 period.
VANOC has not actually acquired the marketing rights. In return for the revenue guarantee and
marketing support, the CPC will offer VANOC Tier 1 sponsors the first right to acquire the CPC
marketing rights in their product category. At the time of writing this plan, VANOC sponsors
have entered into agreements with the CPC generating aggregate revenue in excess of
VANOC’s guarantee thereby, eliminating VANOC’s exposure.




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TOP (The Olympic Partner Programme) Sponsorship Program

The IOC manages a program of international sponsorships that provide worldwide marketing
rights to certain corporations. This program generates revenue for the IOC and its partners
including organizing committees, as well as ensuring a continuity of association and supply over
several Games. The program is known as the TOP program. Agreements under the TOP
program are generally tied to four-year periods, or quadrennials, to tie into the cycle of Olympic
Games. The TOP VI program covers the Torino 2006 and Beijing 2008 Games. TOP VII covers
the Vancouver and London Games.

The IOC currently has 12 partners in the TOP VI program and one international sponsor. At the
time of writing this plan, seven partners are confirmed for TOP VII. It is expected that most, but
not all TOP partners from TOP VI will renew through TOP VII. The product categories granted to
TOP sponsors are not available to VANOC in the Canadian sponsorship program.


5. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

To create an environment to be successful in achieving the revenue objectives in this plan,
VANOC will:

         Create awareness and excitement, across Canada, of the Olympic and Paralympic
         movements and the 2010 Games

         Make the Games relevant to the entire country fostering the spirit of Canada’s Games

         Generate interest and excitement in the corporate community

         Target companies and industries that are profitable and can afford the required
         investment levels

         Create opportunities for sponsors to activate their sponsorships and maximize their
         return on investment throughout the entire term of the sponsorship agreements

         Be creative in developing unique activation programs that are tailored to each sponsor’s
         needs and objectives

         Protect the Olympic Brand and protect VANOC sponsors from ambush marketing
         activities, thereby ensuring sufficient funds are generated to host the Games and leave a
         positive legacy for amateur sport in Canada




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         Create a positive image and build a solid reputation of fiscal responsibility

Sponsorship Sales and Service

It is anticipated that VANOC will enter into 40 to 50 sponsorship agreements, most of which are
expected to be exclusive in the product category to which sponsor belongs. There are three
tiers of sponsors, with differences in the pricing within each tier.

The Tier 1 category of sponsors is fully sold. For Tier 2 and Tier 3 categories, a variety of sales
processes will be followed. Market circumstances will determine the way sales efforts proceed.

The minimum level of investment required for entry into each sponsorship tier in return for
Olympic and Paralympic marketing rights for the period ending December 31, 2012, has been
set as follows:

         Tier 1 - $50 million
         Tier 2 - $15 million
         Tier 3 - $3 million

Outside consultants or sports marketing firms will not be used to sell sponsorships.

At the time of writing this plan, commitments have been obtained for $615 million in domestic
sponsorships (81 per cent of the total target). Internal projections have been established as
follows to increase this to the total target of $760 million.

         March 31, 2007                                 $615 million
         December 31, 2007                              $665 million
         December 31, 2008                              $745 million
         December 31, 2009                              $760 million

Tier 1 National Partners

The sales program for National Partners is complete with six National Partners. This small,
exclusive group will make significant financial investments with VANOC and will play major roles
in taking the Games to every corner of Canada.

The companies and categories comprising Tier 1 are:

         Bell Canada – Telecommunications Services
         Hbc – Department Stores/General Merchandise Retailer
         RBC Financial Group – Investment/Retail Banking
         General Motors – Motor Vehicles
         Petro-Canada – Fuel, Oil and Gas
         RONA – Home Improvement



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Tier 2 Official Supporters

The plan is to reach agreements with approximately 10 to 12 Tier 2 supporters. Agreements
have been announced to date with the following companies:

         Air Canada – Airline
         British Columbia Lottery Corporation – Lotteries and Gaming
         Canadian Pacific – Freight Railway Services
         Insurance Corporation of British Columbia – Vehicle Insurance
         Jet Set Sports – Hospitality Services
         Ricoh Canada – Document Solutions
         Royal Canadian Mint – Numismatic and Circulation Coins
         Teck Cominco – Mining and Metals

Tier 3 Official Suppliers

The plan is to reach agreements with approximately 25 to 30 Official Suppliers. The majority of
revenue in this tier will be in the form of VIK. The categories in this tier will be determined mainly
by operational VIK requirements. To date, agreements have been announced with the following
companies:

         Birks and Mayors Inc. – Jeweller
         Dow Canada – Heat Transfer and Insulation Materials
         EPCOR – Water Utility
         Haworth – Office Furniture
         Nortel – Converged Network Equipment
         Vincor – Wine
         Weston – Bread and Baked Goods
         Workopolis – Online Recruiting

Ticketing

The objectives of the ticketing program are to:

         Conduct the ticket sales program in an open, fair and customer-friendly manner

         Sell all tickets to sporting competitions and ceremonies

         Ensure that sold tickets are used, thereby eliminating empty seats at competitions




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Tickets for the Olympic and Paralympic Games sport events and ceremonies will go on sale to
the general public in Canada 18 to 24 months prior to the Games. Prior to the public on-sale
date, sales to the Olympic Family will be conducted. Olympic Family groups include: Canadian
and international sponsors, the IOC, IFs, and NOCs. To prepare for these sales processes, the
following activities have or will be undertaken:

         Olympic Games Knowledge Management session with the IOC and TOROC ticketing
         experts

         Ticket pricing research including analysis of prices at several previous winter games and
         local market research

         Development of an Expression of Interest for a ticket services provider, and ultimate
         selection of ticketing services partner

         Meetings with Olympic Hospitality Advisory Group companies and TOP sponsors to get
         feedback on best practices and timeline development

         Development of ticket packaging options

Licensing and Merchandising

Licensed merchandise consists of products bearing the trademarks of VANOC and the
Canadian Olympic Committee which will be available for sale in the retail market. They will also
be purchased by VANOC sponsors to promote their association with the Olympic Games. The
licensing and merchandising programs began shortly after the launch of the Official Emblem of
the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in April 2005.

The objectives of these programs are to produce royalty revenue, to promote the Vancouver
2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and to provide consumers with collectibles and
souvenirs.

The general process to be followed, to reach agreements with licensees, will be through the
issuance of RFPs.

The significant majority of licensed merchandise revenue at past Olympic Games has come
from the apparel and pin categories. It is expected that VANOC will have the same experience.
These have been the initial categories offered to licensees.

To date, VANOC has announced licensing agreements with 20 Canadian companies in the
following categories: hard good products and collectibles, including pins, ski and snowboard
accessories, glassware, sunglasses, umbrellas, gloves, mitts, toques and activewear.



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Other steps to be taken in conjunction with the issuance of these licenses include the
establishment of relationships and procedures with the Canada Border Services Agency to
prevent illegal importation of products into Canada and the preparation and implementation of a
security plan for the protection of licensed products.

Commercial Rights Management

VANOC’s Legal Services function and Commercial Rights Management team will work closely
together to ensure that the appropriate steps are taken to protect intellectual property and
ensure that unauthorized use of property is monitored, investigated and resolved wherever
possible through amicable measures. Legal action will be a last resort.

The Government of Canada has recently introduced legislation which is expected to strengthen
the protection around the Olympic brand and facilitate effective protection of Olympic marks and
associations.




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13.      APPENDIX 2: PROJECT CONTROL AND DEFICIT AVOIDANCE PLAN

1. SCOPE

Project control in the Olympic and Paralympic Games context refers to the processes by which
the project can be managed to ensure that the overall event can be properly delivered on time
and on budget. Project control ensures the many diverse parts of the Games organization are
working together, that inefficiencies are minimized and that the standard of delivery is
maintained at a high level. Budget management is a subset of project control.

Budget management is largely a financial service, although by definition its success depends
entirely on an ability to create an environment of respect for time and budget and an
understanding of the extensive cross-function interrelationships and dependencies that exist in
a Games organizing committee and with its many partners.

Budget management processes at VANOC are aimed at matching expenditure levels to
revenue, thereby achieving an ending position that sees expenditures remain at levels below
revenues. The Games require certain minimum levels of expenditure to deliver the minimum
acceptable facility and service levels. As the level of confirmed revenue increases, expenditures
are managed such that resources are focused on areas of most impact and highest operational
risk. Establishing which areas are most important is a role of the Executive Team and Board of
Directors and takes into account pre-existing commitments and input from the IOC, IPC, IFs,
IPFs and Canadian stakeholders.

VANOC has established a structure of financial and budget controls designed to ensure the
project is delivered within approved budget parameters.


2. OBJECTIVES AND DELIVERABLES

The objectives of budget management include:

         Ensuring that the Games are delivered on budget and within financial policy parameters
         established by the organization

         Ensuring that function leaders have the tools and information to effectively manage the
         financial outcomes of their areas of responsibility

         Providing a control mechanism to identify and react to any potential deficit positions. A
         control mechanism that will trigger immediate corrective action in the event that a deficit
         is forecast at any time.




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Core responsibilities of budget management include:

         Budget creation

         Ongoing budget management, including financial reporting

         Financial policies and procedures

         Contingency management

         Deficit avoidance process

Budget management will deliver the mechanisms and processes by which the highly complex
work of planning and executing the Games will be conducted in an orderly and controlled
fashion. Games planning does not lend itself easily to such an activity because:

         It is non-repetitive, with each step occurring once

         The deadline is absolutely fixed and immovable

         Competition for limited resources is strong

         The degree of outside influence and expectation from the IOC, IFs, IPC, government
         partners and stakeholders is very high

         There is a multitude of varied challenges and non-standard processes are a common
         occurrence

3. BACKGROUND

Vancouver follows a rich tradition of host cities that have helped to establish processes to
control their Olympic and Paralympic projects. While each version of the Games tends to
become more complex, and while each city and country is presented with its own set of unique
challenges, there are some proven techniques that can support an orderly conduct of the
Games. VANOC has adopted a multi-faceted approach to tackle the challenges associated with
planning the 2010 Games.




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Build a strong team

VANOC has taken care to recruit talented professionals, who are accomplished in their areas of
responsibility and committed to the responsible planning and operation of the Games. The
VANOC team includes people with significant past Games and major event experience, which
will greatly assist the planning and project control processes.

Canada has a strong base of managers and leaders that are experienced in major events. A
significant proportion of VANOC’s initial employees bring relevant Games or project experience.
Where the needed expertise is not available locally, VANOC has sought it out internationally.

Past Games

The Salt Lake 2002 Winter Games provided Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation and now VANOC
planners a close look at a Winter Games in action. Many relationships established with Salt
Lake organizers have contributed greatly to the knowledge base for VANOC. Salt Lake
organizers have been generous sharing their time and expertise to assist VANOC.

Similarly, relationships were established with the organizers of the Torino 2006 Games. The
TOROC team was very helpful to VANOC. A number of visits to Torino took place to review
financial systems and also to observe the Games. A core part of the budget management
strategy will be to incorporate as much past learning as possible into VANOC plans and
processes from both events.

IOC and OGKM

The IOC has developed a knowledge transfer service that shares with future organizers much of
the information available from the Salt Lake 2002, Torino 2006, Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004
Games. This program included an extensive debrief on the Torino Games, held in Vancouver in
the summer of 2006. VANOC has taken, and will continue to take, advantage of the extensive
OGKM knowledge base as well as face-to-face meetings with Games experts. VANOC also will
benefit from the experience and advice of the IOC Coordination Commission, under the
leadership of René Fasel. VANOC is also contributing to the knowledge base of the OGKM
system to assist future Games organizing committees.

Other means

The VANOC team has sought out Games information from other sources. These have included
athletes, NOCs, IFs and others.




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4. STAKEHOLDERS

Internal

VANOC Executive Team – The Executive Team will be responsible for implementing and
executing the entire project at VANOC. In so doing, the Executive Team must fully understand
the overall plan and its required integration of activities.

VANOC employees and volunteers – Actions taken by employees or volunteers of functions
must be aligned with VANOC’s overall plan and required integration of activities.

VANOC Board of Directors – Responsibility for oversight of VANOC, the Board and its
Committees require consistent communication about VANOC’s plan and progress. The Audit
Committee carries a high level of responsibility for the integrity of VANOC’s financial practices.
The Finance Committee oversees and approves all major financial transactions.

External

Member partners and venue communities – Canada, BC, First Nations, Vancouver, Whistler,
COC, CPC, Richmond and West Vancouver. These stakeholders have considerable interest in
the overall success of the Games. Many are providing financial support or services back to
VANOC.

Government of British Columbia and the Government of Canada – Each of these partners
is a significant investor in VANOC’s venue program and will have interests specific to that
program.

Government of British Columbia – having provided a guarantee to the IOC of a potential
financial shortfall of VANOC, specifically in relation to any obligations it may have to the IOC,
British Columbia has a special status respecting matters of project control and budget
management.

The public – The budget management plan will provide structure and accountability to decision-
making and resource use as needed and required for an event of this scale.

International Olympic Committee – The IOC will be able to assess VANOC’s overall progress
through progress reporting.

International Paralympic Committee – The IPC provides advice and guidance on the planning
for the Paralympic Winter Games.




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5. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Business planning as an iterative process

No project of the size and complexity of the Olympic and Paralympic Games can be covered by
a single business plan. Effective planning is an iterative process requiring constant and
continuous refinement as time moves forward. The integrated plan is multi-faceted and covers a
complex web of interrelated activities. Each has its own natural schedule and its own set of
relationships with other parts of the plan.

An effective business plan is not a document to be written and put on a shelf but is a living
document that undergoes multiple reviews, updates and changes. New information is constantly
fed into the plan as work reveals itself. This is true not only of the overall business plan, but also
each function business plan, which will evolve over time as planning progresses.

Vertical and horizontal financial transparency

A key element of managing VANOC’s financial operations is ensuring that transparency exists
in financial operations. Vertical transparency refers to openness from top to bottom of the
organization from the Board of Directors to all staff. Vertical transparency ensures that decisions
with financial impact are made from a place of knowledge regarding impacts.

Horizontal transparency is openness across the organization. To be effective in managing their
areas of responsibility, function managers need to know where they stand against their own
budget targets. They must also be sufficiently aware of other areas of the organization so as to
avoid silo-based decisions.

Strong corporate governance

Several committees of the Board of Directors have been established. The Board has
established its basic governance structure. Two of the committees, the Audit and Finance
Committees, play key roles in the budget management and control processes. Finance
Committee reviews and approves budgets and approves significant changes thereto. The
Finance Committee approves all contracts above a threshold level. In addition to its financial
approval levels, Finance Committee considers matters of risk facing VANOC.

The Audit Committee plays a strong role in addressing matters of finance and risk. It reviews all
internal and external audit reports and considers issues of internal financial control.

Integration of function business managers into organization

VANOC employs a team of function business managers to implement its financial controls and
services throughout the organization. This model has been used successfully at past Olympic
Games and also in Canadian projects, including EXPO 86, the Victoria 1994 Commonwealth
Games and the Winnipeg 1999 Pan American Games.



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Function business managers maintain a direct reporting relationship within Finance through the
director of financial planning. They also maintain a strong dotted line relationship to Games
function heads. They are generally co-located with their function team, not within Finance. The
mandate of function business managers is to combine financial control with financial service.
The role of function business managers is based on the premise that control is more effectively
conducted from within the function team rather than outside.

Policy and procedure framework

VANOC has established a comprehensive policy and procedural framework as part of its overall
project control strategy, including budget management and financial authorities. Strong, clear
policies that are well thought out and shared extensively throughout the organization are one of
the key ingredients in creating an environment of control within VANOC. Other elements of the
policy and procedural framework will include procurement policies and processes, central
procurement support, legal and risk evaluation of material transactions.

Budget management policies have been developed to facilitate the effective, ongoing control of
financial resources. These processes are customized to reflect the project environment the
Games represent and include the regular (no less frequently than quarterly) evaluation of every
function’s financial position and forecast. Heavy emphasis is placed on understanding what
future requirements are required in each area. Budgets are modified regularly to reflect new
information. The budget always reflects the organization’s best estimate of its final outcome. We
do not wait until a year or more has passed to adjust course or take corrective action. This
active and engaged approach to budget management is a best practice amongst Games
projects and was successfully used in the Salt Lake 2002 Games, EXPO 86, the Victoria 1994
Commonwealth Games and the Winnipeg 1999 Pan Am Games.

Accurate, timely and comprehensive financial reporting

All elements of financial planning require excellent financial reporting to keep function business
managers and function heads well informed of the status of their projects. In the project
environment, financial reporting must integrate both traditional and historical reports with
forward-looking reports that incorporate outstanding commitments and forecasts. The pace of
Games preparation demands that reporting be timely and accurate. It is also VANOC’s intention
to include reports respecting the project Master Schedule with its regular financial reporting.
These reports will allow for the immediate identification of any significant deviations from
schedule if they occur.

Further, senior management and the Board of Directors require comprehensive reporting to
properly fulfill their oversight and planning roles. VANOC will ensure that its financial reporting
meets these high standards. Financial reporting will include the following:

Management Reports – Prepared monthly and comprising detailed reports of actual revenue
and expenditures, outstanding commitments and forecasts at completion. With the adoption of
this Business Plan, these reports will also include information about budget transfers.



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Board Reports – The Finance Committee meets monthly and receives, as part of its
information package, a regular financial report that will show, at a summarized level, actuals,
budgeted amounts and a discussion of key variances. The Board of Directors meets bimonthly
and also receives a similar financial report.

Partner Reports – On a regular basis, VANOC reports the progress of the Organizing
Committee to its partners.

Quarterly public reports – Consistent with its value of openness, VANOC has adopted the
practice of releasing its financial results on a quarterly basis.

Focus on areas of greatest financial risk

Organizing committees undertake a tremendous range of transaction and business activities.
The Finance team will focus its energies on areas of greatest financial risk to the organization.
Through the use of its function business managers, Finance will identify, model and track key
variables for each major function. Because of the diversity of an OCOG’s operations, drivers will
differ for each function. Issues are identified for senior management action and escalated to
Finance Committee as required.

Manage risk

VANOC faces a wide range of risks. These are addressed in the Risk Management Plan. A risk
and assurance team has been put in place to properly identify and manage risk.

Integration of key support functions

VANOC has, or will have, a number of key support functions where the primary responsibility is
not an area of Games delivery. Rather, the responsibility is in support of teams delivering the
Games or in support of external requirements such as governance or control. These functions
include Finance, Project Management, Procurement, Human Resources and Legal Services.
The service functions will work in an integrated fashion to maximize the level of service provided
while simultaneously affecting a strong degree of accountability and control. Past experience
has demonstrated that great project services lead to better control.

Deficit avoidance

As the project moves from its foundation planning phase and into strategic and then operational
planning, the rate and level of financial commitments escalate rapidly. This generally occurs
around G-3 years through G-1 year. While all of the above strategies play a part in effecting
financial and operational control over the project, a specific deficit avoidance strategy requires
an additional layer of financial monitoring and action.




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Consistent and continuous updating of financial forecasts and budgets will be employed to
ensure that careful attention is paid to financial performance. Regular analysis is conducted to
match revenue commitments with expenditure commitments to ensure the latter does not get
too far ahead of the former. The Vancouver 2010 Winter Games Budget is sufficiently detailed
and understood by Finance to permit for changes as circumstances allow. Levels of service will
be thoroughly understood. “Must-have” budget elements have been distinguished from ”nice-to-
haves.”

Timely, accurate and meaningful reporting and discussion will be provided to the Finance and
Audit Committees, and to the Board of Directors as a whole. With the Finance Committee
meeting monthly and the Audit Committee and Board of Directors meeting bimonthly, gaps
between opportunities for discussion with the Board are not long. If troubles are on the horizon,
senior management will know about them and the Board will be promptly informed with
proposed actions to effect a solution.

Remedial measures

Ensuring a balanced Games budget in the context of Games planning is not something that will
be achieved through the application of a formula or previously prescribed set of actions. Should
a deficit appear in any area likely or probable, the circumstances around the projection must be
analyzed. Consideration will be given to the set of factors causing a change in forecast and also
to the point in project planning and/or execution; management will provide options to the
VANOC Board to close any gap.

By making sure that the circumstances underlying any potential deterioration of the
organization’s financial position are well understood, financial and function managers are able to
quickly assemble an appropriate plan to address the situation. The high degree of attention paid
to financial results by management, the Board of Directors, government partners and the public
ensure that careful attention is always paid to both historical and prospective results.

Games Operations contingency management

VANOC’s budget management policies and procedures address how contingency will be used
to manage the overall operating budget of the Games. Contingency will be managed centrally
by the Finance function working in conjunction with the Executive Team. The contingency
balance in the Games operating budget is $100 million. This figure represents approximately 8
per cent of combined uncommitted non-salary cash expenditures ($722 million) and
uncommitted revenues ($505 million) and a higher percentage (more than 14 per cent) of the
remaining cash expenditures, excluding salaries. This level of contingency is considered
adequate given the extensive level of planning that has gone into the budget estimates.

Contingency management is a key element of the Games project control strategy. Contingency
is required to address the risk that final expenditures and revenues are different from those
currently assumed in the budget, including allowance for unplanned events either prior to or
during Games time. The amount takes into consideration the level of project complexity and



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length of planning horizon to Games time. Over the next three years the level of contingency is
expected to change as projections become more certain and either less contingency is needed
or amounts are drawn from the central contingency. A residual Games operations contingency
balance will be carried into Games time to address any unexpected costs arising from weather
and other uncontrollable elements

Contingency allocations may be required to address scope changes, cost changes or revenue
shortfalls. Our goal is to preserve as much contingency as possible as we approach the delivery
of the Games. This will involve aggressively pursuing new sources of revenues while
maintaining strong discipline over VANOC expenditures. VANOC intends to leave a positive
financial legacy.

VANOC’s working budget will be monitored on an ongoing basis through a finance team that is
integrated with function leaders. As new needs are identified or funds become available due to
changed circumstances, these changes flow through the central contingency. Significant
changes to project scope or budget require the approval of the Board of Directors. Expenditure
commitments will be limited to those that are in budget and can be funded by known revenue
commitments.

An ongoing assessment of budget risk will be prepared by the Finance team. The purpose of
the assessment will be to facilitate the appropriate allocation of Games operations contingency
by tracking areas of budget concern that are not solidified to the extent of requiring a
contingency allocation.

Venue Construction contingency management

VANOC’s venue development (construction) budget includes a contingency of $55.3 million.
With more than two thirds of the total budget now spent or committed, and given the current
state of planning and risk assessment, this level of contingency is considered sufficient. It is
expected that portions of the contingency will be allocated to specific projects as the need is
established and quantified. Allocations of contingency will be made in accordance with both
VANOC financial policy (which requires Board approval) and the Performance and
Accountability agreement between VANOC and the Province of BC. This agreement provides
boundaries for the allocation of contingency over time that are in place to ensure that the total
budget is not exceeded.




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14.      APPENDIX 3: RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

1. INTRODUCTION

VANOC acknowledges that all activity carries an associated element of risk. It is essential for
the Organizing Committee to manage risks at all levels of the organization because of the
diverse activities which VANOC is required to undertake to accomplish its mission of
successfully staging the Games in 2010, recognizing that it is not possible to transfer all risks
through insurance policies, contracts or waivers. To be able to manage risks effectively, the
Committee will need to identify, assess and address, at a minimum cost, all significant risks to
VANOC.

2. SCOPE

Risk management is critical to the success of VANOC. As a core management capability, all
areas of the VANOC organization must practice risk management during the course of
developing strategic plans, preparing operational plans and budgets, managing projects, writing
contracts, making general decisions and setting up systems. The development, implementation
and application of an effective risk management framework will enhance VANOC’s capability to
achieve its goals, maximize opportunities and minimize losses. VANOC will strive for the
continuous improvement of its risk management process. All employees, volunteers,
secondees, co-located personnel, personal service contractors, consultants and directors share
the responsibilities of risk management.

Risk Management and Assurance Services will: facilitate and coordinate the effective
identification, prioritization, treatment, and monitoring of all significant risks facing VANOC;
purchase insurance to transfer risk as required; manage insurance claims; direct and coordinate
loss control programs and contingency and emergency response planning; and provide
assurance services (including Internal Audit). It will participate in operational readiness planning
and exercises and the development and implementation of Games-time incident reporting and
claims management systems, and oversee venue safety management and insurance claims
management at Games time.

3. OBJECTIVES AND DELIVERABLES

The Objectives of this Plan are:

         To establish a risk management framework, employing a balanced, systematic and
         proactive approach to managing risk and integrating this approach into VANOC’s culture

         To increase awareness of risk management at all levels of VANOC




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         To confirm the responsibility of all personnel for managing risks within their areas of
         responsibility

         To improve the quality of decision making and to safeguard assets (people, finances,
         property and reputation) through the application of risk management practices

         To develop and implement a framework and vocabulary for communicating and reporting
         risks

The key deliverables of this plan are:

         Comprehensive and robust risk management framework, content and reporting

         Assurance services, including internal audit and internal consulting review reports

         All VANOC’s insurance coverage except employee benefits

         Key corporate policies

         Operational planning, Games-time insurance claims management, venue safety
         oversight

4. BACKGROUND

The Multiparty Agreement requires that a risk management plan be part of the overall VANOC
Business Plan.

A preliminary strategic plan for risk management was written in 2005 as part of Version 1 of the
VANOC Business Plan. It was designed to guide activities during the strategic planning phase
of the Organizing Committee, and to be replaced by this Risk Management Plan.

The Risk Management and Assurance Services function was established in March 2006 when
the vice president of this area joined VANOC.




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5. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Strategies

Risk Management

VANOC will develop, implement and maintain an enterprise-wide Risk Management (ERM)
process which includes the systematic application of management policies, procedures and
practices to the tasks of identifying, assessing, mitigating, monitoring and reporting on risk.
VANOC will develop and support the culture, processes and accountability structures which
facilitate the implementation of the ERM process. Risk Management and Assurance Services
will document each stage of the ERM process. The vice president of this function will consider
the use of external resources when the organization needs additional knowledge, skills and
competencies to implement the ERM process.

Risk management is an ongoing process and, as an integral part of VANOC’s culture,
processes and accountability structures. It is a responsibility shared by all personnel at every
level of the organization.

Assurance and Internal Audit Services (Internal Audit)

Internal Audit is an independent, objective assurance and internal consulting function designed
to add value and improve VANOC’s operations. It will help VANOC accomplish its objectives by
using a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk
management, control and governance processes.

In June 2006, an Audit Charter and preliminary Audit Plan were submitted to, and approved by,
the Audit Committee of VANOC’s Board of Directors. By way of the Audit Charter, the Audit
Committee has given Internal Audit the right to audit the entire organization, and thus Internal
Audit has free and unrestricted access to any and all VANOC records, information systems,
properties and personnel in the course of its activities. The vice president of Risk Management
and Assurance Services has regular in camera meetings with the Audit Committee. The Audit
Plan sets out a schedule of internal audit and internal consulting review projects based upon
key risks.

Corporate Policy Development

Policy development is of critical importance in a new and rapidly growing organization. It will link
VANOC’s vision and strategies to our daily activities, provide general guidelines to decision
makers and provide clarity and consistency when dealing with accountability issues and
important issues and activities.




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Insurance

Risks will be transferred through the purchase of multiple lines of insurance coverage, in
keeping with prudent business practice, VANOC’s risk tolerance, the requirements of the
Multiparty Agreement, the Host City Contract and various venue agreements.

Operational

Risk Management and Assurance Services, in consultation with Venue Management and other
functions as appropriate, will establish the format, process and timing for the creation of
contingency, business continuity and emergency response plans. It will engage external
resources to assist with operational readiness planning and exercises. It will oversee venue
safety management, and will design and operate a claims management system.




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15.      APPENDIX 4: PROCUREMENT PLAN

1. INTRODUCTION

The mission of the Procurement function is to ensure that VANOC obtains the best value for
goods and services acquired through a process that is fair, transparent and open, to ensure
timely delivery of all required goods and services, to ensure the rights of sponsors are protected
and to integrate sustainability objectives of environmental performance, Aboriginal participation
and social inclusion into procurement activities.

Many of VANOC’s most important suppliers are its sponsors. Wherever possible, the first
avenue of approach for major procurement needs is to assess whether the goods and/or
services can be provided by an existing or new sponsor. This plan anticipates that more than
$500 million worth of goods and services will be acquired as value in kind from sponsors.
VANOC’s Marketing, Finance and Procurement teams work closely together to ensure that
opportunities for acquiring goods and services through value in kind are identified and pursued.

2. BACKGROUND

A centralized Procurement function has been created for the purpose of obtaining the best value
for goods and services acquired through competitive processes.

Based on volumes from the Salt Lake City 2002 Winter Games, VANOC can expect to issue
approximately 7,000 purchase orders and 3,000 contracts for goods and services with a
combined value of more than $1 billion.

3. SCOPE

This Procurement Plan describes the services to be provided by a fully centralized service-
based Procurement function, the function’s objectives and deliverables, implementation strategy
and its implementation schedule. The Plan and all associated policies, procedures and
processes will support the requirements for both the Olympic and Paralympic Games before,
during and after the 2010 Winter Games. The Plan will also be used for any procurement
services required for Test Events.

The Procurement function will strive to achieve the following performance outcomes:

         Goods and services required to stage a successful Games in 2010 have been acquired
         in a cost-effective and timely manner and to a high standard of quality

         VANOC has a reputation for delivering in a consistent and fair manner with suppliers and
         for scrupulously maintaining high standards of integrity in its procurement activities




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         The VANOC Procurement function has set the leadership example and operating model
         for use by future Olympic Games organizing committees and public and private sector
         organizations with respect to effective procurement where sustainability principles of
         environmental performance, Aboriginal participation and social inclusion have been
         integrated in procurement activities

         Maximum use is made of existing and potential value-in-kind opportunities.

Major areas of responsibility for the Procurement function include:

         Establishing and managing procurement policies and procedures

         Procurement planning

         Strategic sourcing

         Managing the acquisition process

         Ensuring sponsorship and value-in-kind initiatives are integrated into procurement
         activities

         Developing, monitoring and reporting on procurement sustainability initiatives such as
         environmental performance, Aboriginal participation and social inclusion.

         Awarding contracts

         Contract administration and performance management

Procurement will also acquire goods and services required to stage Test Events. Some of the
Procurement staff may be assigned temporary non-procurement roles during Test Events that
are similar to ones they will undertake during the Games.

Key customers of the Procurement function include:

         Suppliers and potential suppliers

         Sponsors and Licensees

         Internal VANOC functions




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         General public

         VANOC Finance Committee and Board of Directors

         Member Partners and Stakeholders: Government of Canada, Four Host First Nations,
         Government of British Columbia, City of Vancouver, Resort Municipality of Whistler,
         Canadian Olympic Committee, Canadian Paralympic Committee, City of Richmond,
         District of West Vancouver

While Procurement works closely with all internal functions to ensure the capital and operational
needs of the Games are met on time, within budget and in the quality required, it relies on key
functions such as Legal, Risk Management, Security Integration, Information Services and
Finance to ensure it delivers on VANOC’s promise of open, fair and transparent competitive
bidding processes.

4. OBJECTIVES AND DELIVERABLES

The objectives and deliverables of the Procurement function are to:

         Maximize the value and quality of goods and services received for money spent through
         open, fair and transparent competitive processes

         Ensure purchased goods and services are delivered to the right location at the right time
         in the right quantity

         Employ ethical and professional procurement practices and standards and scrupulously
         avoid conflicts of interest

         Plan and schedule procurements in accordance with needs

         Integrate and advance VANOC’s sustainability principles of environmental performance,
         Aboriginal participation and social inclusion

         Ensure all goods and services are procured consistent with budget considerations and
         policies

         Utilize the most appropriate procurement process in relation to the value and complexity
         of each procurement

         Minimize financial and other risks associated with each procurement




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Internally, these objectives will be met by:

         Consulting with internal functions and participating in early planning and forecasting of
         all goods or services required from the pre-Games to post-Games periods

         Maintaining open and frequent communications with all VANOC functions

         Work closely with Sustainability and Aboriginal Participation and Official Languages
         functions to identify opportunities for influencing suppliers to adopt or enhance their own
         sustainability practices and help VANOC meet its obligations and commitments.

Externally, these objectives will be met by:

         Communicating major procurement opportunities for suppliers to bid or submit
         expressions of interest and/or proposals to VANOC by posting such opportunities on the
         VANOC and BC Bid websites

         Ensuring that every major procurement opportunity includes a review of the suppliers’
         sustainability and/or Aboriginal participation opportunities by including a statement of
         VANOC’s sustainability principles and by requesting specific supplier involvement in
         sustainability initiatives in our bidding documents

         Including service performance levels and metrics in supply contracts for both goods
         and/or services

         Ensuring contract terms and conditions are performed by VANOC and supplier(s) to
         satisfactory completion

5. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Key business strategies of the Procurement function include:

         Functioning as a centralized business unit within the Finance function

         Adopting best procurement practices in the acquisition of goods and services

         Providing coaching and training for all VANOC staff on procurement policies and
         processes

         Conducting fair, open and transparent procurement processes




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         Maximizing the value and quality of goods and services received for the money spent

         Minimizing cash purchase transactions by maximizing the utilization of sponsor VIK

         Conducting itself with the highest degree of ethics and integrity

         Arranging delivery of goods and services on time and to a high standard of quality

         Using benchmarks and metrics to track and measure procurement performance

         Advancing VANOC’s sustainability principles of environmental performance, Aboriginal
         participation and social inclusion

         Becoming a legacy model for future Games, and for Canadian business to follow




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16.      APPENDIX 5: HUMAN RESOURCES PLAN

1. INTRODUCTION

The mission of the Human Resources division is to plan, deliver, train and retain high quality,
volunteer and paid staff and contractors necessary to stage the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic
Winter Games. Human Resources (HR) practices will be fair, equitable and transparent while
being guided by best HR management practice and lessons learned from previous organizing
committees.

Through the MPA, VANOC is committed to creating a Workforce plan including an employment
equity plan for all workforce.

VANOC has developed a structure within the Human Resources and Workforce division that will
streamline processes for recruiting, retaining and training the Workforce using a centralized
management control system. The structure is simple yet effective, dividing Workforce into three
main areas, Workforce Management, Planning and Operations. The recruitment of paid and
volunteer workforce will be done by the same team using the same processes. The attraction
strategy may be different but the process is the same. This will enable VANOC to leverage the
expertise of the recruitment team and maximize efficiencies. The Workforce plan will be
managed centrally and with quarterly divisional reviews.

The VANOC Human Resources Plan will be managed in a creative and collaborative approach
to maximize the secondment, VIK, co-op and volunteer opportunities within the Workforce plan.
The operations and Games-time planning of Workforce will focus on training, retaining and
recognizing pre-Games and Games-time Workforce. Redeployment of key members of the
recruitment team and other functions within VANOC at Games time to the venues will ensure
continuity and reduce the need for many temporary hired positions at Games time.

This operational approach to Workforce management, planning and operations is designed
enable flexibility and ensure readiness 30 days before the first volunteer must open the Olympic
and Paralympic Villages.

2. SCOPE

This plan summarizes the key strategies associated with the planning for Workforce
requirements, recruitment and selection of paid and volunteer Workforce and the development
and implementation of all required policies and procedures. A primary objective is to deliver
Workforce and Human Resources major milestones and key deliverables according to the
VANOC Master Schedule.




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3. OBJECTIVES

The overall goal of VANOC Human Resources is to create:

         An engaged and inspired Workforce that together creates a positive legacy experience
         for BC, Canada and the world

         An aligned Workforce that understands its contributions to the mission and vision and
         who effectively model the attitude, behaviours and spirit of the Games as per VANOC
         values: team, trust, excellence, sustainability and creativity

         A committed Workforce that is passionate and optimistic about the Olympic and
         Paralympic Games

         A diverse, talented group of individuals that leverage and appreciate each other’s skills
         and abilities

         A Workforce which can boast ample bilingual resources to deliver on VANOC’s Official
         Languages commitment

The Games-time goal of VANOC Human Resources is to have an integrated Workforce plan
that ensures a one-team approach regarding recognition, training and overall engagement, so
that the full team is motivated and driven to deliver extraordinary Games.

In addition, this plan ensures optimal redeployment of all VANOC staff from pre-Games to
Games-time roles to reduce the number of temporary positions at Games-time and maximize
the talent and experience developed during the planning and readiness phase of this project.
This plan will ensure systems will be developed and operational to deliver fully-trained, engaged
and informed Games-ready workforce.

4. BACKGROUND

This plan is influenced by the commitments made in the Vancouver 2010 Bid Book, Multiparty
Agreement and Host City Agreement. The principles captured in those agreements form the
basis of the philosophy and guiding principles for the Workforce Strategy:

         Sustainability
         Transparency
         Accessibility
         Equality
         Inclusivity




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         A Commitment to ensure the 2010 Winter Games are for all Canadians and that both of
         Canada’s Official Languages are used throughout the Games

The composition of the Workforce will ensure a diverse group that is representative of Canada
and that meets commitments with VANOC partners, including the Four Host First Nations
(FHFN), the Government of Canada and sponsors. The desired culture of VANOC is “one team”
to ensure it is clear to all function leaders that while HR takes the lead on defining the culture
and developing leadership and team development programs, it is each leader’s responsibility to
facilitate, nurture and develop the one-team culture within their respective division. Workforce
has adopted this culture through the integration of Workforce and HR to maximize efficiencies of
the function and streamline processes to reduce overall costs of recruitment, training and
systems development.

The unique combination and high volumes of recruitment, training and retention have shaped
this integration plan, and has driven the team to look for efficiencies in every aspect of the
operations, management and planning of the Workforce.

Currently, the BC job market is the tightest it has been in more than 15 years. This tight labour
market will increasingly become tighter as the Games approach. VANOC will compete with the
industries that will support the Games (hospitality, tourism, transportation and retail), therefore,
it will be necessary to employ creative ways to attract and retain the right people while still
maintaining transparency, accessibility and inclusion for all Canadians.

Canadians expect to have accessibility to the Games and in VANOC’s quest to build a stronger
Canada and successfully deliver the Games, VANOC will recruit locally and nationally a diverse
workforce providing access to opportunities for all Canadians. Where specific expertise is
required, the Organizing Committee may target around the globe.


5. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

The Workforce and Human Resources functions will merge into one team – an integrated
workforce model – to create a Games-ready model and streamline processes to maximize
efficiencies in the areas of recruitment, training, recognition and systems reporting. This will be
accomplished by implementing a three pillar structure comprised of:

Workforce Operations

This area will look after training, retention and recognition as well as scheduling assignment and
of workforce at Games-time. The Workforce experience of the Games will be the main
responsibility of this group, including uniform distribution, feeding, accommodations and any
other activity that would impact the overall experience of the workforce. Retention and
recognition will be a major focus for this group, both pre-Games and at Games time ensuring
the workforce members feel valued and inspired to deliver extraordinary Games. Training and
educating the workforce will be an ongoing process for this group and it has already begun with



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leadership sessions and basic orientation. Effective training will ensure VANOC is able to
provide an educated and informed Workforce at Games time for all functions. A detailed training
strategy to facilitate this process is currently under development.

Workforce Planning

Workforce Planning will act in a cross-function role to ensure service levels are delivered across
VANOC. This group will sit on cross-function Games-time planning groups, be responsible for
systems and reporting (including Executive-required reports), all compensation to Games time,
and Workforce Plan management. This will include maximizing VIK, secondment, co-op and
volunteer positions to offset the need for hiring and increased costs. This is a very integral role
in the overall success of the Workforce team, as this group will act as the conduit to the rest of
the divisions.

Workforce Management

Workforce Management’s main responsibility will be attraction and recruitment of all workforce –
paid and volunteer. Workforce Management will engage the community and ensure sponsors
and the business community feel involved in the Games. Workforce Management will ensure
the Games are accessible to all Canadians through our transparent recruitment process. This
group will also engage the educational institutions and ensure VANOC has engaged the youth
of British Columbia to experience the Games and feel part of the leading up to and during the
2010 Winter Games. Another role of this group will be to ensure adequate outplacement of the
workforce as the Games come to a close. A plan has been developed to ensure the workforce
remains engaged and motivated through the 2010 finish line. This activation will begin in 2009.


The core elements of VANOC’s strategic human resources plan include:

Defining the Culture

VANOC culture has been established through the strong alignment of the Vision, Mission,
Values and Guiding Principles, setting the stage for the tone and behavioural attributes of the
2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. This strategy has established a foundational
framework to ensure all staff is part of one team.

Workforce Strategy

This defines the strategy for engaging and inspiring a workforce of paid staff and volunteers.
This is the overarching strategy influencing an integrated approach to recruitment, training,
recognition and the general treatment of an integrated workforce. Additionally, the strategy
guides the hiring, training, motivating, retaining and decommissioning of all paid staff and
volunteers of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games




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Workforce Recruitment Strategy

This defines the parameters for seeking and selecting, locally and nationally, a diverse
workforce – both paid and volunteer. This strategy ensures access to opportunities for all
Canadians while confirming that global hiring will be used for specialized skills.

Workforce Engagement and Retention Strategy

This is the overarching strategy which links recruitment, compensation, recognition, employee
communication, training, socialization and health and wellness to the motivation of employees.
Key retention tactics are defined in the pre-Games and Games periods.

Workforce Communications

In close partnership with the VANOC Communications team, a workforce communications plan
is being developed and executed for all staff, volunteers, contractors and partners. This plan
includes intranets to serve the needs of the Games workforce and events that inform, inspire
and motivate the workforce in the preparation, staging and windup of the Games.

Leadership, Team and Culture Development Strategy

A subset of the Workforce engagement and retention strategy, this is the operational strategy
for delivering one of VANOC’s strategic objectives: “build a team that passionately lives our
values in order to achieve extraordinary performance.”

Legacy of Safety Program

This is an operating program that frames the foundation to ensure a safe and healthy workplace
as well as a safety-conscious workforce.

Technology Strategy

With a focus on early development and collaboration with sponsors, VANOC is building the
infrastructure including technology interfaces, databases, distribution systems and scheduling
systems that will ensure members of the paid and volunteer workforce for both the Olympic and
Paralympic Games are registered, clothed, skilled, accredited and scheduled according to
Games requirements.

6. OUTCOMES

The Human Resources division has identified a number of desired outcomes, from a workforce
perspective for the 2010 Winter Games. They include:




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A great place to work, a legacy for other Games

The goal is to have staff members feel that VANOC was a great place to work and an
outstanding Organizing Committee that was able to leave improved templates for other
organizing committees.

The strategies to achieve this objective are:

         Work collaboratively with the VANOC Communications function to develop and
         implement a strong internal communications strategy that will help build and maintain
         our culture

         Develop a strong value proposition for potential candidates aligned with VANOC’s brand

         Build and leave a diverse talent pool for the region beyond 2010. This will be
         accomplished through the implementation of an attraction strategy that will include
         approaches and sourcing tactics to attract individuals from across Canada (to deliver on
         VANOC’s Canada’s Games approach) and individuals from various groups of interest
         such as Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, Aboriginal and francophone populations and
         people with disabilities.

         Leave a skills development legacy and more specifically, enhance the talent pool for
         inner-city communities and Aboriginal people in the post-2010 market

         Work collaboratively with WorkSafeBC to develop and implement a Games safety
         training program that will leave a safety legacy in BC after the Games

Teamwork delivering extraordinary results

VANOC’s goal is to deliver high-performing teams that will deliver extraordinary results in
keeping with VANOC’s values.

The strategies to achieve this objective are:

         Centralize recruitment of all new hires based on a strong values-match assessment

         Provide employee orientation with a very solid focus on VANOC’s values

         Offer French language training to all paid staff in order to develop VANOC’s bilingual
         resources




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         Establish sound management practices around employee workloads and solutions to a
         more work/life balance

         Develop and implement team and leadership development programs

         Build and offer management workshops on common people practices

         Complete an annual employee engagement survey and implement appropriate follow-up

         Personal sustainability – engrain corporate athlete elements in our HR programs,
         internal communications, leadership and team development programs to sustain
         employee energy up to, and during, the delivery of the 2010 Games

Appropriate human resources to deliver the Games

The HR division’s goal is ensure that all Games functions have the necessary human resources
they need to successfully deliver their business objectives.

The strategies to achieve this objective are:

         Maintain recruitment in-house for all paid staff and redeploy this workforce into Games-
         time roles to offset the need to recruit temporary positions, resulting in substantial
         savings

         Outsource recruitment for short-term temporary staff while monitoring the quality control
         of initial values-match screening

         Keep abreast of the current and future labour market and the influencers and plan
         sourcing strategies accordingly

         Build and implement retention strategies to ensure that compensation programs
         continue to be competitive in the market and sensitive to labour strategies

         Implement a health and wellness program that will emphasize the need to have a
         healthy balanced life

         Develop and implement an outplacement program

         Prepare and implement a change plan for the venuization stage of Games planning




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7. PRE-GAMES VOLUNTEER PROGRAM/TEST and TRAINING EVENTS

Test and training events are critical to all functions to assess operational efficiencies prior to the
Games and make service level and operational adjustments. Workforce will support the test and
training events by assisting with training, recruitment, recognition and uniforms for the
Workforce required to run VANOC-sanctioned Test Events. A Pre-Games Volunteer Program
(PGVP) has been developed to address test and training events and assist the functions, mainly
Sport, in training and engaging a suitable workforce for these events. All pre-Games volunteers
will be required to reapply in 2008 for the general call to volunteers to ensure that VANOC
remains transparent in its recruitment processes. However, pre-Games volunteers will receive
priority treatment during the process based on past performance during the test and training
events.

All Games-time volunteers for Test Events will be recruited, registered, assigned and scheduled
centrally. Bilingualism will also be considered in the recruitment process.


8. WORKFORCE ORIENTATION AND TRAINING

VANOC is committed to delivering extraordinary Games, and the way this will be delivered is
through its people. The training strategy views the workforce as an asset and a key enabler of
success. As such, Games-ready training at VANOC needs to be not only informational and skill-
building, but must exceed expectations and create memorable experiences for those
participating.

To ensure a consistent understanding of the one-team approach by VANOC when dealing with
all visitors, the general orientation of the workforce will be managed by VANOC staff and not
outsourced. However, other forms of training, such as safety and customer service, may be
outsourced with quality control provided by VANOC Workforce function.

General orientation will be provided on a face-to-face basis to all Workforce, with training in both
Vancouver and Whistler.

Broad Training Objectives

         To touch and inspire the people who will be delivering on the VANOC mission

         To create a positive and engaging learning experience for participants

         To equip the VANOC Workforce with the right skills, right information and right attitudes
         for success

         To build a sense of personal ownership for the success of the Games




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         To foster an intimate knowledge and passion for Vancouver, Whistler, BC, Canada and
         the Games

         To serve as an ongoing selection tool to ensure the right people are in the right places at
         the right times

Broad Training Outcomes

         An engaged and inspired workforce

         Passionate people who are ready to work to create an extraordinary Games experience

         An informed and skilled workforce with the leadership, technical, and interpersonal
         aptitude necessary for success




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17.      APPENDIX 6: THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT

1. INTRODUCTION

The 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games will be the highest profile international event
ever hosted by Vancouver, surpassing the profile and impact of EXPO 86. Canada is no
stranger to hosting Olympic Games, having hosted the Montreal 1976 Olympic Summer Games
and the Calgary 1988 Olympic Winter Games. But the transformation of global communications
and media, in speed and reach, will make Vancouver 2010 an international event without
precedent. Above all other international events, the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter
Games have the potential to serve as a global showcase of the beauty, diversity and spirit of
Vancouver, of British Columbia and of Canada. All Canadians, and particularly British
Columbians, have high expectations for the Games. Canadians will expect the resources and
partnerships are in place to make the most of the cultural, promotional and commercial potential
of this uniquely powerful sporting event.

Vancouver 2010 enjoys government support and commitment at all levels: the City of
Vancouver, the Resort Municipality of Whistler, the Province of British Columbia and the
Government of Canada. Each has contributed significant financial, professional and creative
resources, first, to win the bid, and now, to stage successful Olympic and Paralympic Winter
Games. All parties are working together to ensure that all necessary elements are in place to
make Vancouver-Whistler an outstanding Games host. Beyond constructing the venues for the
Games, a number of key infrastructure upgrades will be in place to ensure the safe and efficient
transportation of athletes, media, visitors, goods and services.

While at the Games, competitors and visitors will enjoy the unique flavour of Canada: its
exceptionally high quality of life, linguistic duality and cultural diversity, innovative commitment
to the environment and prosperous, technologically-advanced economy. The 2010 Winter
Games are intended to be more sustainable and inclusive than ever before, as Vancouver and
Whistler are communities that were built and thrive on these ideals. As one of the most
multicultural cities in the world, Vancouver’s distinctive energy will both appeal to, and reflect,
visitors from around the world.

2. POLITICAL OVERVIEW

All three levels of government will face elections before 2010. While the players may change, it
is anticipated that political support for the 2010 Games will withstand any changes of
government.

2.1 Federal Political Environment

In January 2006, the minority Conservative government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper was
elected – the second minority government to be elected in fewer than three years. In December
2006, the Liberal Party of Canada elected Stéphane Dion as leader. While the minority



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government makes for an interesting dynamic on the federal political stage, it is not expected to
have a negative impact on federal support for the 2010 Winter Games. Both the Conservative
and previous Liberal governments have shown demonstrable commitment to the Games both
through financial contributions and government programs.

In response to a perception of poor Canadian medal showings at previous Games, the federal
government has committed $55 million to the Own the Podium 2010, which is being matched by
a combination of provincial and corporate funds, to address the issue of amateur sport funding
The program’s goal is for Canada to be the number one nation in medal count at the 2010
Olympic Winter Games, and in the top three nations at the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games.

2.2 British Columbia Political Environment

The provincial scene is stable. Premier Gordon Campbell and the BC Liberal Party have
enjoyed majority rule since 2001. The next fixed provincial election date is scheduled for May
2009.

While there is robust support in British Columbia for the 2010 Winter Games, there is also a
small group of critics who have questioned the wisdom of hosting the Games and have used the
Games as a platform for highlighting other social issues such as poverty and homelessness.

2.3 Municipal Political Environment

Sam Sullivan was elected Mayor of Vancouver in 2005, after serving on city council for 14
years. He will govern through 2008 when the next municipal election is due. A city experiencing
an economic boom, Vancouver is facing growth issues related to transportation, infrastructure,
homelessness and crime. These are issues that could shape the outcome of the 2008 civic
election and should not to be overlooked as the City of Vancouver prepares for the 2010 Winter
Games.

3. ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Canada is continuing to enjoy one of the strongest economies in the world, low levels of
unemployment, interest rates and inflation. Canada continues to demonstrate an attractive
investment climate with competitive tax regimes, balanced budgets and falling public debt.
Near-term weakness in the US economy, however, is forecast by the Bank of Canada to slow
economic growth through 2006-08.

Weakness in the US economy could result in lower Canadian exports to the United States,
which is expected to be offset by exports to the Asia Pacific, where growth continues apace,
especially in China. This expectation would have to be revisited should the correction to the US
housing market be more pronounced – an issue closely watched by BC’s forest industry, the
largest sector in the provincial economy.




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Canadian domestic demand is projected to continue to support economic expansion through
2008. Consumer spending is forecast to remain firm, owing to further gains in disposable
income and household net worth. Housing investment, however, is expected to decline slightly
in 2007 and 2008, as home building activity begins to levels off in BC, Ontario and Quebec.

Forecasters expect the British Columbia economy to outperform the Canadian economy as a
whole, with GDP growth projected to reach 3.4 per cent in 2007 and 3.3 per cent in 2008. The
provincial unemployment rate stands at an all-time low and domestic demand continues to be
the main source of growth for British Columbia. Key economic drivers include strong
employment gains, healthy consumer spending, steady housing activity and continued strength
in non-residential construction. Labour shortages, commodity price volatility and the impact of
the slowing US housing market on BC’s lumber industry have been identified as key risks and
challenges in the year ahead.

Driven by the province’s physical beauty, BC is home to a healthy tourism sector that now
accounts for close to four percent of the province’s GDP and six per cent of provincial
employment, primarily in the accommodation and food industry, transportation and retail. After
rebounding in 2004 from the global downturn in travel caused by the events of September 11,
2001, the province continues to experience growth in tourism, a trend that will only accelerate
as the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games approach. As testimony to BC’s growing importance to
Canadian tourism, the Canadian Tourism Commission was relocated to Vancouver in 2005.

British Columbia’s strong economic growth and increasing population translates into the need to
modernize existing infrastructure. All three levels of government are actively involved in major
infrastructure upgrade projects, several of which are not designed specifically to serve 2010
Games needs but will now be ready in time to serve the Games-time needs and well beyond.
Work is underway on key projects that will help alleviate traffic congestion, including: the
Canada Line public transit project that will run from the Vancouver airport to Richmond to
downtown Vancouver, an upgrade of the Sea-to-Sky Highway that runs between Vancouver and
Whistler and the twinning of the Port Mann Bridge.

As Canada’s western port of entry and egress, Vancouver is Canada’s gateway to and from the
Asia-Pacific region. The Port of Vancouver is Canada’s largest, handling more than $43 billion
worth of business each year with more than 90 countries. In order to ensure that British
Columbia and Canada can be key players in the burgeoning Asia-Pacific, the provincial and
federal governments have invested over $3 billion in the Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor
Initiative. The Initiative brings together governments and the private sector to identify and work
cooperatively on infrastructure upgrades – roads, bridges, rail and port facilities.

4. SOCIAL OVERVIEW

Canada is viewed, internationally, as a good global citizen and a socially progressive and
prosperous nation. However, the country still continues to address long-term social challenges,
ranging from health care to homelessness, immigration to the environment, from education
(early childhood to post-secondary) to quality child care.



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The environment is also a top-of-mind issue for many Canadians and British Columbians and it
was a major platform in the recent provincial Throne Speech outlining government priorities.
Considered the “green” province of Canada, BC’s economic rejuvenation is closely tied to the
health of the environment. As the birthplace of the Greenpeace movement and home to
Canadian environmental leader Dr. David Suzuki, the environment is a topic of ongoing interest
and public debate. British Columbia promotes itself as a “pristine wilderness” tourism destination
and BC’s economic might also rests on its natural resource industries – forestry, mining and
energy.

To reflect the environmental, social and economic opportunities and challenges inherent in
staging the Games, the Organizing Committee developed six sustainability performance goals
that have received wide praise, especially the focus on social inclusion and access given that
several venues are located near Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, which suffers some of the
highest rates of drug use, crime and homelessness in the nation. If these objectives are
realized, the 2010 Winter Games could contribute a meaningful and lasting impact to the
Downtown Eastside and to BC’s First Nations people while providing the opportunity for Canada
to showcase its progressive and inclusive social policies.

5. CULTURAL OVERVIEW

Canada is renowned for its embrace of cultural diversity, its concept of a “mosaic” of cultures
and peoples who, together, define Canada’s cultural landscape. A bilingual country, Canada
boasts a rich French-Canadian heritage that weaves its way through the fabric of its language
and arts, with BC being home to the third-largest French-speaking community outside Quebec.

The neighbourhoods of Vancouver and cities and towns across Canada are home to people
from every nation and ethnic identity living in an atmosphere of mutual tolerance and respect.
Visitors to the 2010 Winter Games will experience Vancouver’s integrated diversity and the rich
and unique traditions, language, art and culture of British Columbia’s First Nations. The 2010
Winter Games will be unique in their inclusion of the First Nations peoples. One of the six
sustainability pillars of Vancouver 2010 is Aboriginal Participation and Collaboration. Chief
Gibby Jacob, a Squamish First Nation chief, sits on VANOC’s Board of Directors. The Games
will specifically showcase the Four Host First Nations – the Lil’wat, Musqueam, Squamish and
Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, who have pledged their support of and their participation in the
2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

Further contributing to Vancouver’s distinctive cultural scene is its active and progressive arts
scene, ranging from the mainstream to the fringe. A truly cosmopolitan city, Vancouver is home
to some of Canada’s best-known musical talent, artists and authors. The city is home to more
than 100 publicly and privately-run art galleries representing traditional, contemporary and First
Nations artists.




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6. OLYMPIC GAMES ENVIRONMENT

The IOC instituted numerous reforms in 2000 and is under the leadership of President Jacques
Rogge.

Its current structure, including active athletes in the membership of the IOC Session and the
Executive Board, ensures that members with recent experience competing at Olympic Games
are participating in the governing of National Olympic Committees (NOCs) and International
Sports Federations (IFs).

In terms of mission, the IOC has focused its efforts on enhancing the organization and
operations of the Olympic Summer Games and Winter Games. This has translated into the
refinement of each step of Games organization, from the candidature process, with its aim to
produce better qualified host cities, to the coordination process, with its aim to transfer
knowledge from one organizing committee to another.

The fight against doping has been, and will continue to be, another major focal point for the
Olympic Movement. The creation of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in 1999 has
provided resources in this fight. Canada continues to be a world leader in the anti-doping
movement both scientifically and through the high profile work of WADA’s Canadian Chair, Dick
Pound. The recent adoption of the global convention on fighting doping in sport is a significant
step in the harmonization of public and private rules and resources in this effort.

Enhanced communications and transparency have had a significant impact on strengthening
the IOC’s reputation. In recent years, there have been more open and proactive
communications between the IOC and organizing committees.

The IOC is also pursuing other themes such as promoting sport development, peace through
sport, education and life experiences through sport, women’s participation in sport and
sustainability.

On July 4, 2007, in Guatemala City, the IOC will announce the host city of the 2014 Olympic
Winter Games. The contenders for these Games are Sochi, Russia; Salzburg, Austria; and
PyeongChang, South Korea. Both Salzburg and PyeongChang were candidate cities for the
2010 Winter Games.

In 2008, the Olympic Summer Games will be held in Beijing, China, from August 8 through
August 24. In 2009, the IOC is scheduled to announce the host city for the 2016 Summer
Games and will host the 13th Olympic Congress in Copenhagen, Denmark. Finally, the IOC will
is to host an event in 2009 to invite the NOCs and their athletes to gather in Vancouver the
following year to celebrate the XXI Olympic Winter Games.




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18.      APPENDIX 7: VENUE AGREEMENT PLAN

1. OBJECTIVES

During the bid phase, the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation concluded a number of venue
agreements with facility owners regarding the use of such facilities as Games competition and
non-competition sites during the 2010 Winter Games. This was one of the bidding requirements
for the International Olympic Committee. Once the Games were awarded to Vancouver,
VANOC continued to work on use agreements with facility owners, as required for the Games.

This plan summarizes the key strategies associated with the conclusion of competition and non-
competition (including support facilities) venue use agreements required for the Games.

The key venues include:

Competition Venues                                        Non-Competition Venues


Whistler Creekside                                        Trout Lake Rink
Cypress Mountain                                          Killarney Rink
General Motors Place                                      Vancouver International Airport
Pacific Coliseum                                          BC Place Stadium
Hillcrest/Nat Bailey Stadium Park                         Whistler Celebration Site
UBC Winter Sports Centre                                  Main Media Centre
Richmond Oval                                             Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village
Whistler Sliding Centre                                   Whistler Olympic and Paralympic Village
Whistler Nordic Competition Venue                         Logistics Warehouse
                                                          Whistler Broadcast and Press Centre




2. DELIVERABLES

         To ensure all venue use agreement negotiations follow a standard approach

         To ensure all applicable functions within VANOC have provided input into, and signed
         off, on the venue use agreements




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         To conclude suitable venue use agreements with the venue owner of each venue
         required for the Olympic and Paralympic Games

3. BACKGROUND

During the bid phase, agreements were completed with proposed competition venue owners
and with owners of several key venues intended for non-competition use (such as Ceremonies,
Main Press Centre, International Broadcast Centre and Athletes’ Villages). These agreements
were made by the Bid Corporation based on the knowledge, information and budgets available
at that time. The agreements contained provisions governing issues including, where
appropriate, exclusive and shared use periods, cost allocation, insurance, marketing rights and
facility construction or modification.

4. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Extensive work was done, both during the bid phase and since, to identify key elements of
venue operating agreements. In many cases, the majority of these issues are addressed and
agreed to in the existing agreements. As planning advances, there is a requirement for more
detailed and specific information. Amendments to the agreements, are on occasion, relatively
minor while at other times fundamental changes are required. Depending on the type of site, the
venue use agreement process is led by either Venue Management or the relevant function such
as the Logistics function which is responsible for warehouses.

It is VANOC’s intention to reduce operational risk and uncertainty by completing venue use
agreements as early as is feasible given the need for certain operational information and the
objectives of both VANOC and its venue owners. Where the venue is used for both Olympic and
Paralympic purposes, a single agreement is preferred, modified as required to reflect changes
in requirements.

The nature of venue use agreements can vary from very simple to very complex. They can
impact a single function or many functions. Once the team has conducted an initial assessment
of the circumstances, consideration is given to the most appropriate method of moving the
agreement forward.

Template venue use agreements have been created to provide a starting point for internal
discussion and for engaging the venue owner. These templates ensure that all key issues are
appropriately addressed in the agreement.

VANOC Legal Services will work with the venue owner’s legal representative to prepare a final
document ready for Province of British Columbia approval (where applicable), IOC approval
(where applicable) and recommendation for VANOC Board approval.




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19.      APPENDIX 8: GAMES SECURITY – CONCEPT, PARTNERS AND INTEGRATION

1. INTRODUCTION

The security of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games will be organized and delivered
by the federal and BC governments through the Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit
(V2010ISU). In delivering on this mandate, V2010ISU will cooperate with VANOC.

Cooperation, coordination and integration of the activities of these two key participants will be
regulated by a Memorandum of Understanding, expected to be concluded between the parties
in 2007.

With the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) as the lead agency, V2010ISU will include
representatives from the following agencies: Vancouver Police Department (VPD), West
Vancouver Police Department (WVPD), the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and
the Canadian Forces (CF). V2010ISU will integrate its planning and actions with VANOC.

Integration with the Vancouver 2010 Organizing Committee will be provided thorough the
VANOC Security Integration function.

During the Games, the V2010ISU will have a Security Command Centre that operates closely
with the VANOC Security Integration Desk within the VANOC Main Operations Centre to deliver
the integrated security operation.

Guiding Principles

In carrying out their mission, VANOC’s government partner agencies who are key participants in
the security of the 2010 Winter Games, will be guided by the following basic principles:

         Deliver safe and secure Games for all participants, visitors and residents

         Ensure rule of law is observed in all safety and security undertakings and that the
         planning and operations of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games security is
         in strict compliance with the substance and spirit of Canadian law

         The key factor of success of the Games is developing an integrated security approach
         between the key partners: VANOC and V2010ISU

         Minimize impact of Games security operations on local residents without compromising
         level of security




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2. OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the security plan for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games are as follows:

         Plan, organize and deliver security measures for the spectators, venues, transportation,
         logistics, Olympic and Paralympic Family, sponsors and the media

         Guarantee the operational integration and co-operation between multiple agencies:
         VANOC, IOC, Canadian public safety agencies, municipalities, external Games partners
         and stakeholders

         Define appropriate security measures in the 2010 Winter Games venues for asset
         protection

         Conclude the Memorandum of Understanding between VANOC and V2010ISU and
         define roles and responsibilities among all the partners involved in delivering security of
         the Games

3. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

V2010ISU will organize, plan and implement security measures for the Games.

VANOC Security Integration will act as coordinator and integrator:

         Internally, between all VANOC functions
         Externally, between VANOC clients, partners, V2010ISU

VANOC Security Integration will be responsible for asset protection during pre-Games, Games
time and post-Games.

4. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Security planning and delivery for the 2010 Winter Games will occur in the following stages:

Strategic Planning (2004-06)

The security services required for the Games were identified by V2010ISU with input from
VANOC. The roles of the various agencies will be defined through the MOU process. VANOC’s
Security Integration function business plan established the role of the Security Integration and
the required level of integration with V2010ISU. VANOC and V2010ISU will produce a model
that will serve as a legacy for major event planning in Canada.




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Concept of Operations (2005-07)

V2010ISU, as the leading partner in organizing security of the Games, will develop a concept of
operations as the basis for all operational planning to follow. All security planning will be
integrated and managed by one lead agency, the RCMP, to ensure efficient and effective use of
resources. VANOC will provide critical input to V2010ISU to ensure the concept of operations
takes into account all specific security requirements for Games operations. The deployment of
resources will be based on intelligence-led threat assessment. V2010ISU has a budget of its
own to provide Games security that is separate and distinct from the VANOC operating budget.

Operational Planning and Organizational Regime principles (2008-09)

This phase will establish the regime that will be used to plan, implement, test and refine the
operational details for how security and public safety services will be provided to the 2010
Games such as:

    •    A master schedule for V2010ISU, integrated with VANOC, detailing key deliverables,
         responsibilities and milestones

    •    Planning methodology, organizational framework and a related MOU will be used to
         coordinate and integrate the security services provided to the Games by the federal,
         municipal and other partners involved

Function Operational Planning (2008-09)

Security operational plans for the functions that have Games-time roles will be developed in
conjunction with V2010ISU. This includes but is not restricted to Sport, Transportation,
Logistics, Accreditation, Protocol, Accommodation, Media Relations, Olympic and Paralympic
Villages and Food and Beverage.

Venue Operational Planning (2008-09)

A model venue operational plan will be developed as the master template for venue security
operations. Venue-specific operational plans will be developed by the venue security
commander, on the basis of the master venue operational plan. Security operational planning
will include special operational plans for the selected Test Events.

Games-time Readiness (2009 – January 2010)

To ensure the feasibility of operations, this stage will be devoted to training, testing and
simulating venue security operations by individuals and teams. V2010ISU Games readiness
activities will include joint testing and simulations with VANOC. Both table top and live exercises
will be used to further enhance the operational plans.




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Games-time Operations (February and March 2010)

Games-time operations will be conducted through:

         V2010ISU Security Command Centre
         VANOC Security Integration Desk within the Games Main Operations Centre
         Venue level security operation
         Integrated functioning of all of the above mechanisms

Dissolution and final report (Post-Games, 2010)

VANOC will provide asset protection of the identified critical assets during the venue dissolution
phase using a contracted security company. A joint final report on the Games security operation
will be completed and submitted by VANOC Security Integration and V2010ISU. This report will
be included in the Olympic Transfer of Knowledge process for the next Games organizers.




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20.      APPENDIX 9: CULTURAL PLAN

1. INTRODUCTION

VANOC’s culture and ceremonies plan is designed to deliver exceptional ceremonies, arts,
cultural and educational programs for the 2010 Games that fulfill IOC Olympic Charter
requirements, celebrate sport and showcase the cultural diversity of Canada and the global
community in a fiscally and environmentally responsible manner.

2. SCOPE

Cultural Olympiad

The Cultural Olympiad is charged with presenting exciting, innovative and accessible Olympic
and Paralympic education, arts and cultural programs and festivals, thereby strengthening the
reputation of Canada while promoting the nation’s cultural, educational and economic well-
being.

Significant pre-Games celebrations will be produced in February and March of 2008 and 2009,
building interest as well as local and national capacity, for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic
Arts Festivals. Education programs will launch in September 2007. These will make
unprecedented use of the Internet.

Beginning January 22, 2010, and extending to the closing of the Paralympic Games on March
21, 2010, Cultural Olympiad staff will produce, co-produce, market and promote hundreds of
performances, exhibitions, and symposia that comprise the Olympic and Paralympic Arts
Festivals. In addition, Cultural Olympiad staff will work closely with the local community of
artists, producers, presenters, festivals and venues to ensure they maximize the legacy benefits
of the Olympic and Paralympic Arts Festivals to build their network of national and international
partners.

Ceremonies

The Olympic Opening and Closing Ceremonies and Paralympic Opening and Closing
Ceremonies are critical to the operation of each Games. The Victory Ceremonies bestow
recognition on the athletes for their achievements while providing opportunities for public
celebration. Each Olympic and Paralympic Ceremony must be distinct, accomplish the required
protocol and present spectacles that inspire and entertain.

The ceremonies, particularly the Olympic Opening, generate the largest television and live
audiences of the Games, and are therefore vital to establishing the overall theme and tone of
the events. The Ceremonies also provide the host community and nation with an unsurpassed
opportunity to present itself to the world.




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3. OBJECTIVES

Vancouver’s people share a unique mix of classical art forms and rich heritage cultures. At the
same time Vancouver is young, on the edge, an international leader in contemporary arts and
new media development. Vancouver pushes the boundaries of new frontiers, is dedicated to
discovery and is keen to innovate. VANOC’s goal is to both inspire Games audiences and
advance the state of the arts with programs that celebrate excellence, diversity and
extraordinary achievement.

The Vancouver 2010 Culture and Ceremonies function will present a wide-ranging calendar of
diverse projects, events and activities.

The universal objectives of these distinct and related programs are:

         To deliver a joyous celebration of physical and creative ability

         To complete the protocol, cultural and ceremonial functions mandated by the Olympic
         Charter and to deliver the content and messages of Olympism and Paralympism,
         including sport, culture and sustainability

         To enhance the experience of the Games through a celebration of arts, culture and
         creativity

         To broaden and extend the scope of the Games by maximizing the participation of the
         local, national and global community in an outstanding display of artistic and cultural
         endeavour

         To provide a seamless integration between the core Games themes and the programs
         delivered by Culture and Ceremonies

         To transcend borders- between nations (international borders), physical (the limits of the
         body, mind and spirit), cultural (boundaries of various cultures), human (the drive to
         expand the human experience)

         To illuminate Canadian values including our passion for creativity, respect for diversity,
         democracy and fair play

         To highlight fundamental aspects of our unique culture, such as Canada’s linguistic
         duality and multicultural makeup and Canada’s anglophone, francophone and Aboriginal
         heritage




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         To engage the host country in “Canada’s Games,” from coast to coast to coast

         To reflect Canadians’ character as creators, innovators and contributors to world
         progress

         To create memorable, positive impressions of the host country and community to
         enhance regional and national pride as well as international respect for Canada’s unique
         identity

4. DELIVERABLES

                                                                                                 Paralympic
                       Programs                                      Olympic Games                 Games
Cultural Olympiad Programs
         Pre-Games Celebrations                                                •                     •
         Education                                                             •                     •
         Olympic Arts Festival                                                 •
         Paralympic Arts Festival                                                                    •
Congress Welcome Ceremonies                                                    •                     •
Team Welcome Ceremonies                                                        •                     •
Opening Ceremony                                                               •                     •
Closing Ceremony                                                               •                     •
Medal Ceremonies                                                               •                     •

5. BACKGROUND

Culture is enshrined in the Olympic Charter as one of the three pillars of the Olympic Movement.
The Olympic spirit is defined as “a philosophy of life, exalting and combining in a balanced
whole the qualities of body, will and mind” and the Charter mandates a “blending of sport with
culture and education.”

The Olympic ideal focuses on the broadest context of a harmonious life encompassing much
more than sport competition:

         “Olympism seeks to create a way of life based on the joy found in effort, the educational
         value of good example and respect for universal fundamental ethical principles. To attain
         the goals of the Olympic Movement “requires mutual understanding with a spirit of
         friendship, solidarity and fair play.”




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VANOC is required to produce a series of cultural and educational programs that include both
English and French elements under the terms of the Multiparty Agreement, including the
Olympic and Paralympic Opening and Closing Ceremonies, Victory Ceremonies, Cultural
Olympiad and Olympic and Paralympic Arts Festivals.

         “We always say there is a difference between sports and the Olympic Games. The
         Olympics is much more than sport – it is sport and culture.” (Juan Antonio Samaranch,
         IOC President, 1998)

6. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Strategies to implement the Vancouver 2010 culture and ceremonies plans are to:

         Create an in-house core management team to define overall programs, objectives,
         strategies, outcomes and themes, to ensure the interface with other VANOC Functions,
         to provide overall function business and financial management, and to oversee the
         artistic development and production of its programs

         Engage all ten provinces and three territories in order to reflect the diversity of Canada
         and to deliver a “Canada’s Games” cultural program

         Consult with its Multiparty Agreement partners and local First Nations to seek input and
         participation in developing policies on various ceremonies and cultural programs.

         Work with VANOC’s Official Languages function to leverage partnerships with
         francophone communities across the country in order to integrate French culture and
         artistic components in areas of Culture and Ceremonies planning

         Explore and select delivery models based on the specific requirements of each of the
         Culture and Ceremonies programs, including in-house and external delivery as well as
         commissioned, produced, co-produced and endorsed forms of project fulfillment.
         Projects will utilize the appropriate mix of delivery styles required to maximize
         effectiveness and efficiency.

         Develop partnerships in order to maximize delivery featuring local and regional
         participation, and in order to leave legacies of experience, knowledge and
         understanding. Financial partnerships will be a key strategic element in order to stretch
         the Culture and Ceremonies’ budgets wherever possible.

         Work in close conjunction with 2010 Legacies Now, and especially Arts Now, in order to
         increase capacity and creative capability broadly throughout the province to prepare




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         BC’s arts, cultural and creative groups to participate in the Olympic and Paralympic
         Culture and Ceremonies programs

         Use a broad interpretation of “arts and culture” when developing or considering
         programming in order to enhance accessibility and participation

7. SCHEDULE

The following are the key dates for the Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad and the Ceremonies
programming for the 2010 Winter Games:

Cultural Olympiad


         Education Programs                                       September 2007 – March 2010
         Pre-Games Celebration Program                            February – March 2008 and
                                                                  February – March 2009
         Olympic Arts Festival                                    January 22 – February 28, 2010
         Paralympic Arts Festival                                 March 12 – 21, 2010

Ceremonies


         Olympic Team Welcome Ceremonies                          February 6 – 12, 2010
         Olympic Congress Opening Ceremony                        February 9, 2010
         Olympic Opening Ceremony                                 February 12, 2010
         Olympic Closing Ceremony                                 February 28, 2010
         Olympic Victory Ceremonies                               February 13 – 28, 2010
         Paralympic Team Welcome Ceremonies                       March 6 – 12, 2010
         Paralympic Opening Ceremony                              March 12, 2010
         Paralympic Closing Ceremony                              March 21, 2010
         Paralympic Victory Ceremonies                            March 13 – 21, 2010




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21.      APPENDIX 10: HEALTH SERVICES PLAN

1. INTRODUCTION

The Medical Services function is part of the VANOC Sport, Paralympic Games and Venue
Management Division. VANOC Medical Services will provide medical care for athletes and team
officials, Olympic and Paralympic Family members, media, workforce and spectators for the
Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. It will also provide medical services
for official pre-Games Test Events.

VANOC Medical Services has developed excellent working relationships with the BC Ministry of
Health, the BC 2010 Games Secretariat, Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) and BC Ambulance
Service (BCAS). The Vancouver 2010 Winter Games health plan will use the hospitals of the
Vancouver Coastal Health network that covers the full Games hosting region.

The athlete and Olympic Family hospital will be Vancouver General Hospital and the designated
spectator hospital will be St. Paul’s Hospital. Both athletes and spectators, depending on the
particular situation and severity, could be seen and treated at Richmond General Hospital, Lions
Gate Hospital (particularly in the neurosurgical services), Squamish Hospital (particularly for an
acute abdominal emergency such as a ruptured spleen) or the Whistler Health Care Centre. In
addition, through federal, provincial, and particularly Vancouver Coastal Health services,
VANOC will offer full public health evaluation for illness surveillance, food, water and air quality
plus disaster planning, including the utilization of a mobile field hospital at Whistler.

The BC Ambulance Service will coordinate first aid and will provide paramedic managers at
each athlete and spectator venue. In addition, BCAS will coordinate a seamless helicopter
service incorporating Blackcomb Helicopters and BC Ambulance Service helicopters. Medical
Services also includes Anti-Doping services for the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.
Services will include doping control stations at each athlete competition venue and in each of
the two polyclinics as well as a doping control laboratory. Anti-Doping is beyond the scope of
this plan.

2. OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the VANOC Medical Services function are to plan and deliver medical and
health care for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and to leave sustainable
legacies for sport medicine and sport science, locally and nationally, following the Games.
Medical Services will be responsible for some 7,000 Olympic and Paralympic Games athletes,
coaches and team officials, 10,000 media members, 50,000 workforce and tens of thousands of
spectators.




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3. ORGANIZATION

Medical Services and Anti-Doping are within the Sport Division of VANOC and are served by an
Advisory Group and a Steering Committee. The Advisory Group meets four to five times per
year and has representation from the BC Ministry of Health, the British Columbia 2010 Olympic
and Paralympic Winter Games Secretariat (BC Secretariat), Vancouver Coastal Health, BC
Ambulance Service, RCMP/Security, Sport Med BC, emergency/disaster preparedness and
public health authorities. A flow-through strategy for procurement of therapy equipment,
pharmaceuticals, medical supplies and equipment from Vancouver Coastal Health has been
established. Memoranda of Understanding and Agreements are being established with the BC
Ministry of Health, BC Secretariat, Vancouver Coastal Health, BC Ambulance Service and Sport
Med BC.

The Steering Committee also meets four to five times per year and has representatives from
primary care sports medicine, emergency medicine, therapy, orthopaedic surgery,
neurosurgery, trauma, athlete venue medical, spectator medical, imaging, Paralympic Games,
hospital liaison-internal medicine and ski patrol.

4. GAMES-TIME MEDICAL COVERAGE

Games-time medical coverage will be provided for athletes and team officials, Olympic and
Paralympic Family members, media, the workforce and spectators. This will be achieved on the
athlete side through a polyclinic in each village plus athlete medical stations located strategically
at each competition venue, and, in addition, teams of mobile medical and paramedical
personnel.

Each athlete and spectator venue medical station will consist of four areas:

         A nursing station with triage and medical encounter utilizing the IOC sponsor Atos
         Origin’s system

         A full emergency room with defibrillator, monitors, oxygen, suction and emergency
         equipment and supplies

         A minor surgery and assessment for medical and musculoskeletal problems

         A physiotherapy/acute management room

Each athlete medical venue will be managed by a team of medical personnel, including a sport
physician/emergency physician, an orthopaedic surgeon and a physiotherapist. This team will
be supplemented with a paramedic manager.




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5. POLYCLINICS AT OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC (ATHLETES) VILLAGES

Two polyclinics, one in Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village and the other in Whistler
Olympic and Paralympic Village, will each be fully equipped 10,000 sq. ft. facilities that will
include:

         primary care sport medicine
         emergency medicine
         trauma services
         surgical consultants – orthopaedic surgery, neurosurgery, hand and plastic surgery
         gynaecology
         full imaging service with digital x-ray, MRI, CT scan
         fixed and portable ultrasound
         medical laboratory for complete blood count, urinalysis, blood chemistry and cultures
         pharmacy
         dental clinic
         eye clinic and ear, nose and throat clinic

Additional consultant services within the polyclinic include dermatology, internal medicine,
cardiology, respirology, infectious disease, gastroenterology, neurology, a nutritional consultant
for individual counselling and consulting with food services regarding meals, and sport
psychology.

Therapy will be coordinated by the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games chief therapist and will
include physiotherapy, massage therapy, chiropractic services, acupuncture, athletic therapy
and podiatry.

There will be a rehabilitation gym, and a massage and recovery clinic will be adjacent to the
polyclinic and beside the Village fitness centre. There will be a doping control station in each
polyclinic. There will be translation services for the polyclinic and patients being transferred to
hospital.

6. ATHLETE VENUES

Medical personnel will include sport physicians, emergency physicians, orthopaedic surgeons, a
vascular surgeon for speed skating and a neurosurgeon for high speed events. Mobile medical
teams will cover the field of play and depending on the venue, will consist of physicians,
physiotherapists, paramedics, nurses, first aiders and ski patrol. Other members of the medical
team at athlete venues will be physiotherapists, massage therapists and athletic therapists.
There will be full supplies and services, including automatic defibrillators, oxygen, two
ambulances per site and an air ambulance.




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7. TRAUMA TEAMS

Each trauma team will consist of two trauma surgeons, two trauma nurses and two trauma
paramedics.

Trauma teams will support venue athlete medical teams at Cypress Mountain for freestyle,
snowboard and ski cross, the Whistler Sliding Centre for bobsleigh, luge and skeleton and at
Whistler Creekside for alpine events.

8. PRE-COMPETITION ATHLETE MEDICAL COVERAGE

Pre-competition athletic medical will be covered by physiotherapists, massage therapists,
athletic therapists and sport physicians.

Supplies are being coordinated through the materials manager from Vancouver Coastal Health
(VCH) with a flow-through process using VANOC procurement processes and procedures and
VCH buying power. These supplies include treatment tables, ice chests and taping supplies.

Training Site Athlete Medical Coverage

The training site athlete medical coverage will include physicians onsite at high speed training
sites and on call for curling. Each site will have physiotherapists, certified athletic therapists and
sport first aiders. Supplies will include basic first aid and CPR kit, stretchers, treatment tables,
ice chests, blankets and taping supplies.

9. VENUE SPECTATOR MEDICAL COVERAGE

This area will provide medical services to spectators, Olympic/Paralympic Family members,
media/ broadcasting and the workforce. This will be achieved at each venue by the Venue
Spectator Medical Station (with similar structure to the athlete medical station) plus teams of
mobile first aiders and paramedics in the spectator areas of arenas and mountain sites.
Spectator medical personnel will include a physician manager, physicians, physiotherapist, first
aiders, paramedics and the mobile team. The spectator medical stations will be fully supplied
and equipped with automated external defibrillators, oxygen and two ambulances per site.

Non-competition Venues

A team of physicians, nurses, physiotherapists and first aiders will service accreditation, media
and broadcast centre, workforce medical clinic, opening and closing ceremonies, medal
ceremonies, other cultural events, International Zone and the Airport. Ambulances and
paramedics will also be used for opening and closing ceremonies. There will also be medical
teams for athletes, Olympic and Paralympic Families and performers.

As previously noted, Vancouver General Hospital will be the Olympic/Paralympic Family
Hospital. Currently, the new Ambulatory Care Centre at VGH is being considered for the



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Olympic/Paralympic Family and athletes. At each of the three Olympic Family hotels and one
Paralympic Family hotel there will be medical stations which will be staffed with nursing staff
24/7 and physicians at scheduled times will be and on call 24/7. In addition there will be
physiotherapy, massage therapy and chiropractic care available.

Transportation of Injured and ill

There will be dedicated ambulances (with Paramedics) in service during the Games. Many
ambulances will be stationed at venues, both competition and non-competition. Helicopter
service will be a blended seamless service for air ambulance and transport helicopter provided
by Blackcomb Helicopter and BC Ambulance Service.

NOCs/NPCs (National Olympic and Paralympic Committees)

Medical spaces as per the IOC technical manual for the Olympic Village will include a room for
physicians and therapists with basic equipment, laundry, ice machine, recycling and bio-
hazardous waste materials containers. Additional goods and services will be offered to
NOCs/NPCs through the Rate Card program. Additionally, bookable space and dedicated
physiotherapists will be made available.

10. TEST EVENT MEDICAL COVERAGE

VANOC Medical Services will provide coverage for athletes, International Federation members
and spectators during the official Test Events for the 2010 Winter Games. Coverage will be
achieved through portable medical stations both for athletes and spectators.

11. DISASTER PLANNING

An integrated emergency and disaster planning committee has linked VANOC, Vancouver
Coastal Health Emergency Management, Vancouver General Hospital Trauma Centre and the
Provincial Emergency Planning Group (PEP). There is a direct link to the Vancouver General
Hospital Trauma Centre. Specific plans for emergency responses at each venue are underway.
Table top exercises will occur, and Test Events will be used for full simulations of
disaster/emergency situations at Vancouver and Whistler.


12. PUBLIC HEALTH

The VANOC Public Health Plan includes the establishment of a public health working group,
organizing and planning for illness surveillance and pathogenic identification and assistance
with injury surveillance monitoring, linking with the IOC medical encounter system.




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13. PROTOCOLS

Specific protocols are now being developed for venues, including field of play, venue medical
stations and the polyclinics. There will be standardized procedures for immediate evacuation,
closed-head injury, spinal injury, hypothermia, cardiac and respiratory arrest, the collapsed
athlete, allergic reaction, venue disaster plans, female athlete triad and haematological issues in
sport.

14. BACKGROUND

Public Health Delivery Bodies

At the time of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games Bid, a committee was formed to assess
medical needs and budgets for the Games. This committee included members from the BC
Ministry of Health, the BC 2010 Bid Secretariat and Vancouver Coastal Health. A preliminary
medical services budget was developed as part of the bid. Since that time, the Medical Services
function has been established at VANOC, along with its Advisory Group.

VANOC Medical Services has outlined the scope of involvement of the BC Ministry of Health
and the BC Games Secretariat, Vancouver Coastal Health, BC Ambulance Service and Sport
Med BC. The contribution of each has been defined with memoranda of understanding and
agreements. Specifically, with Vancouver Coastal Health, agreements for secondment of key
staff have been organized (as previously outlined). In addition, the contribution from Vancouver
Coastal Health includes public health support with public health nurses for polyclinics, a
pharmacy coordinator and medical laboratory coordinators for both polyclinics and also trauma
and disaster coordination. This program has been integrated with the Provincial Emergency
Preparedness Plan and also with support from the federal government both for public health,
illness surveillance and with a biological laboratory and field hospital at Whistler, if Whistler was
to be cut off by road and air. Sport Med BC’s role will include training for first aiders through its
online training courses and recruitment through its database of first aiders and other sport
medical and paramedical personnel. Sport Med BC will link with the BC Ambulance Service to
organize and supply medical coverage for the Torch Relay.

Staffing

Preliminary staffing of the VANOC Medical Services function has been completed. The director
of medical services has been working part-time since May 2006 and full-time since September
2006. In addition, managers of therapy, athlete venue medical and spectator venue medical
have been appointed and persons will commence work full-time in these roles in July 2007,
November 2007 and February 2008, respectively. Managers of ER/sport medicine, orthopaedics
and therapy have been appointed for each specific athlete medical venue, for both the Olympic
and Paralympic Games, and managers have also been appointed for several spectator venues.

VANOC Medical Services has appointed managers of pharmacy, imaging, eye, ENT and dental
clinics, orthotic and bracing clinics, wheelchair repair, chiropractic, general surgery, plastic



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surgery, orthopaedics, neurosurgery, trauma, vascular surgery, dermatology, gynaecology,
internal medicine, gastroenterology and cardiology. Initial workforce for training and Test Events
will be done through the existing Sport Med BC database. VANOC Medical Services is working
with VANOC’s Workforce division to initiate the VANOC Medical Services recruitment process
and to ensure a bilingual resource component. In total, 1,700 Medical Services volunteers will
be recruited for the Olympic Winter Games and 700 for the Paralympic Winter Games.

15. STRATEGIES

Specific timelines were established in 2006 with the initial appointments of the chief medical
officer, director of medical services, chief therapist and athlete and spectator medical venue
managers. The overall organizational plan and partnerships were established.

In 2007, the focus will be on recruitment, training and retention of medical volunteers to supply
the athlete and spectator venues, non-competition venues and polyclinics. In addition, there will
be extensive preparation for training and Test Events, with full development of specific protocols
for venues and polyclinics and recruitment of paramedics and integration at each venue of the
venue manager, medical managers, ski patrol and the paramedic manager. An initial inventory
for budgeting purposes was established in 2006 with procurement for medical supplies and
equipment largely coming from a flow- through process with Vancouver Coastal Health, to be
established in 2007.

2008 and 2009 will be dedicated to further training and Test Events. The table top and specific
emergency measures exercise programs for both Whistler and Vancouver Test Events will
occur. Further training with helicopter, including long line rescue procedures and linking ski
patrol, VANOC mobile medical teams and paramedics will occur. The latter half of 2009 will be
devoted to the stocking of the athlete and spectator medical stations and the two polyclinics.
Once these sites are fully equipped, specific training will occur utilizing our protocols within
these facilities.




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22.      APPENDIX 11: COMMUNICATIONS PLAN

1. SCOPE

This plan summarizes the strategies associated with developing and maintaining effective
relationships and communications with key communities, stakeholders, influencers and the
general public resulting in high general awareness and strong public support for, and
engagement in, the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games. The plan includes strategies for
communications services, media relations and specialized sport communications, editorial
services, Internet management, marketing, community relations and workforce communications.

2. STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS STEERING COMMITTEE

In March 2007, the Strategic Communications Steering Committee was formed to effectuate
VANOC’s communications strategy as it pertains to the success of the organization’s public-
facing key initiatives. Composed of Members of the VANOC Board and members of the VANOC
Executive Team, the Committee is responsible for overseeing the decision-making process of
key initiatives; providing input and advice to VANOC function managers and/or work groups
responsible for key initiatives; providing regular reports to the Board on decisions being made
and the progress of developments of the key initiatives; and making recommendations to the
Board where decisions relating to the initiatives require Board approval.

3. OBJECTIVES AND DELIVERABLES

The goals of the communications plan for the 2010 Winter Games are to:

         Communicate the story about the planning for and staging of the 2010 Games (including
         VANOC’s vision, values and guiding principles) consistently and effectively to local,
         regional, national and international audiences. Key objectives include consistently
         positive public poll results for support and awareness, strong ticket sales, a popular and
         engaging Internet site and an actively engaged and motivated workforce.

         Define how the Games will be presented creatively and establish the character and
         personality of VANOC and the Games. The key deliverable is a variety of brand-
         centered communications tools that effectively convey the VANOC story.

         Proactively communicate key messages through the development of professional
         relationships with the media, and effectively communicate issues that may arise as a
         result of the preparations for, and staging of, the Games

         Ensure that VANOC is guided in all its communications endeavours by a commitment to
         accountability and transparency



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         Celebrate and communicate success with honesty and modesty and manage adversity
         honestly and openly

         Ensure maximum inclusivity through communications that effectively address a broad
         range of audiences

         Ensure its partners receive appropriate recognition for their contribution to, and
         assistance with, the Games

         Ensure both Official Languages are reflected in mass communications to the general
         public

         Ensure maximum sustainability through communications that effectively use the Internet
         and other online tools to broadly communicate

As a centralized service function at VANOC, Communications serves a broad variety of internal
and external groups.

Internally, all VANOC functions rely on Communications to some degree. Every time a function
communicates internally or externally, it has the opportunity to reinforce the VANOC brand and
to contribute to the image and reputation that will shape VANOC’s internal and external
reputation. Communications is developing develop close working relationships with every
function to ensure the Organizing Committee’s messages are communicated accurately,
effectively and consistently. All written, electronic and creative communications involve
Communications. Many functions will work alongside with Communications, such as the CEO
Office, Workforce, Brand and Creative Services, Marketing and Cultural Olympiad and
Ceremonies. Other functions will work with Communications on an as-needed basis; however
effective communications in every area is fundamental to a successful Games.

Externally, the local, national and international media will rely on Communications to be kept
informed of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games planning, VANOC’s accomplishments and its
challenges in order to effectively communicate to their audiences. Other external groups, such
as VANOC’s partners and the International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic
Committee, will work in close partnership with VANOC’s Communications team and will be
major users of work produced by this function.

Communications also assumes practical responsibility for ensuring that external and internal
communications, as appropriate, are undertaken in Canada’s two Official Languages. This is
critical to meeting VANOC’s obligations under the Official Languages Act, to reflect Canada’s
linguistic duality and to ensure all Canadians have the opportunity to understand and share in
the ownership and spirit of the Games.




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Key functions are as follows:

Communications Services

         Develop an overarching Communications plan for both proactive and reactive
         communications strategies in all key areas, including a crisis communications plan

         Define and manage the consistency, accuracy and brand focus (personality) of
         VANOC’s key messaging to all internal and external parties

         Partner in the development and execution of a strategic research program that will
         inform, guide and provide valuable feedback on the communications program

         Ensure the strategic provision of a host of communications services including: editorial
         services (translation, writing, editing, accuracy checking and publication management),
         Internet management, media relations and community relations to all VANOC
         departments and external stakeholders

Media Relations and Specialized Sport Communications

         Communicate day-to-day information about VANOC and the Games leading up to,
         during and immediately following the Games to the local, regional, national and
         international media

         Plan and execute media conferences, photo opportunities, media briefings and news
         releases to proactively communicate and respond to issues

         Respond to media enquiries and arrange media interviews

         Develop and execute, in partnership with the Canadian Olympic Committee, a strategic
         communications program in support of, and on behalf, of the Own the Podium 2010
         program

Community Relations and Marketing Communications

         Create and manage programs to engage communities in the Games, including special
         events and execution of a Canada’s Games strategy

         Work with VANOC’S government and other Games partners to identify and address
         issues arising from hosting the Games, including community consultation




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         Meet public demand for speakers, presentations and participation at events

         Manage the Vancouver and Whistler information centres

         Manage the overall advertising strategy for VANOC to ensure effective messaging
         coordination and prudent spending

         Work in close partnership with the Marketing team, direct the marketing communications
         for VANOC and our family of sponsors, including the brand protection communication
         plan development and execution

Editorial Services

         Provide editorial overview, design, edit and print services for all VANOC departments to
         ensure consistency of information, accuracy, tone, messaging and efficiencies in
         production costs

         Provide writing, editing, fact checking, event photography and translation services to all
         VANOC departments

         Manage the print production process, ensuring consistent application of VANOC graphic
         standards

         Take the lead role in the compilation of the official Post-Games Report required by the
         IOC Charter

Internet Management

         Develop the overall website/Internet/intranet strategy including, functionality, look and
         design and content to ensure maximum effectiveness of internal/external
         communications and to maximize opportunities for sustainable communications

         Manage the website as a highly effective tool to facilitate business processes, including
         employment and volunteer applications, procurement and revenue generation including
         but not exclusively, ticket and merchandise sales

         Ensure website content is consistent, reflects VANOC’s communication priorities and is
         the main source of information on the 2010 Winter Games




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Workforce Communications

         In close partnership with the Workforce team, develop and execute a workforce
         communications plan for staff, volunteers, contractors and partners

         Develop and manage a host of intranets and extranet to serve the information needs of
         the Games workforce

         Plan and execute events that inform, inspire and motivate the workforce in the
         preparation, execution and windup of the Games




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23.      APPENDIX 12: VANOC SUSTAINABILITY POLICY

1. BACKGROUND

Olympic and Paralympic Games can help bring about important social, economic and
environmental benefits if they are planned, managed and conducted in a way that minimizes
adverse impacts and maximizes positive opportunities.

The first two pillars of the Olympic Movement are sport and culture. In 1994, environment
became the third pillar in the Olympic Charter. Since then, most Games host cities have
developed organization-wide environmental policies and management systems for
implementing and monitoring performance on their environmental commitments and
requirements.

In 1999, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) committed to use sport to help advance
sustainable development. In 2003, it adopted a set of social, economic and environmental
indicators (the Olympic Games Impact reporting project) to be reported on by all host cities as a
means of measuring and telling the story of the difference made by the Olympic Family.

During the bid phase (2001-03), the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation responded to input and
expertise from the region’s citizens with a vision and plan that reflected broadly-held public
values. The desire to host Games that create value by being both environmentally innovative
and socially inclusive is reflected in VANOC’s sustainability commitments and objectives.

Vancouver 2010 and London 2012 are the first Winter and Summer Games, respectively, to
formally incorporate sustainability principles and practices in the planning, staging and legacy of
the Games.

2. DEFINITION OF SUSTAINABILITY

At VANOC, sustainability means managing the social, economic and environmental impacts and
opportunities of the Games to produce lasting benefits – locally and globally.

3. SUSTAINABILITY POLICY

VANOC’s vision is to create a stronger Canada whose spirit is raised by its passion for sport,
culture and sustainability. For this reason, Sustainability is a corporate value, a strategic
objective and one of 50 Games functions at VANOC.

VANOC’s Corporate Sustainability Policy provides the foundation at the governance level for an
integrated and systems-based approach to making the organization’s sustainability
commitments and aspirations operational.




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3.1 Policy Scope

This policy applies to any decision-making activity over which VANOC has direct influence and
authority and that may create a material impact (positive or negative, cost or reputation) on the
delivery of VANOC’s sustainability performance objectives.

Based on Vancouver 2010 Bid commitments, VANOC’s corporate strategic objectives and
business plans and ongoing dialogue with key partners and stakeholders, VANOC has
developed six corporate-wide sustainability performance objectives. They are:

         Accountability
         Environmental Stewardship and Impact Reduction
         Social Inclusion and Responsibility
         Aboriginal Participation and Collaboration
         Economic Benefits
         Sport for Sustainable Living

3.2 Engagement

A hallmark of the application of a sustainability ethic in a business context is the ability to
identify and respond to the needs and interests of groups affected by the activities of the
business in a way that is appropriate to its purpose, structure and fiscal context. A multi-party
approach to hosting the 2010 Winter Games has been a cornerstone of VANOC’s strategy since
the bid phase and is reflected in a variety of agreements and commitments.

Key VANOC partners and stakeholders included in the scope of the Organizing Committee’s
sustainability activities include senior governments, local governments and First Nations, the
International Olympic Committee, the International Paralympic Committee, the Canadian
Olympic Committee, the Canadian Paralympic Committee and community and non-government
stakeholders affected by the Games.

4. POLICY OUTCOMES AND IMPLEMENTATION

4.1 External Reporting

VANOC’s delivery on its six sustainability performance objectives will be tracked and evaluated
through a series of specific measures and/or indicators that will be reported annually in a
sustainability report.




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4.2 Internal Planning and Execution

The VANOC Executive and senior leadership team will provide leadership and resources to
support implementation of the Organizing Committee’s six sustainability performance objectives.
The Sustainability function at VANOC will administer this policy and associated procedures
through VANOC’s Sustainability Management and Reporting System (SMRS). The SMRS will
define sustainability performance targets and outcomes, foster an integrated approach within
our Organizing Committee to delivering them and provide the basis for transparent reporting
and evaluation. VANOC’s SMRS will be based on widely-accepted business management
practices and standards as they relate to a short-lived project-oriented organization.

VANOC’s Sustainability team will manage corporate-wide sustainability programs or activities
including engagement with critical external stakeholders on sustainability strategies and
VANOC’s obligations under the Inner-City Inclusive Commitment Statement. VANOC’s SMRS
will also track and report on VANOC’s performance, with our government partners, on protocols
and commitments made during the bid phase to the Four Host First Nations.

VANOC business managers will identify risks and opportunities that may influence successful
implementation of the six sustainability performance objectives. In consultation with VANOC’s
Sustainability and Aboriginal Participation teams, relevant opportunities and requirements will
be identified in all function business plans, service catalogues, the VANOC Master Schedule
and staff incentive and recognition.

4.3 Governance

VANOC will establish an external advisory committee, the Board Advisory Committee on
Sustainability Performance (BACSP), which will review publicly available information regarding
VANOC’s activities and outcomes relative to its six sustainability performance objectives and
provide the results of its review to the VANOC Sustainability and Human Resources Committee.

5. RELATED COMMITMENTS

Implementation of VANOC’s sustainability strategy is managed in conjunction with several key
commitments, as outlined in the following documents:

         2002 Multiparty Agreement for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games

         2003 Host City Contract for XXI Olympic Winter Games, specifically VANOC’s obligation
         to participate in the IOC’s Olympic Games Impact (OGI) reporting project.

         2003 Inner-City Inclusive Commitment Statement




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Four Host First Nations

         2002 Shared Legacy Agreement (Squamish and Lil’wat)

         2003 Memoranda of Understanding (Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh)

         2005 Protocol (Statement of Principles) Governing the Relationship between VANOC
         and the Four Host First Nations

         British Columbia and Canadian Environmental Assessment Acts requirements


6. AREAS OF SHARED RESPONSIBILITY

6.1 VANOC, Government of Canada, Province of BC, City of Vancouver, Resort
Municipality of Whistler and 2010 Legacies Now Society

Delivery of bid phase commitments to the Four Host First Nations and Vancouver’s three inner-
city communities is a responsibility VANOC shares with its government partners. Games-related
initiatives in these two areas have their own implementation processes in which VANOC
participates on a collaborative basis with government and other parties.

6.2 Four Host First Nations

The Olympic Movement has recognized the importance of increasing the participation of
Indigenous peoples in the Olympic Movement and the 2010 Games are being held in the
traditional territories of: the Lil’wat, Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations,
known collectively as the Four Host First Nations.

VANOC has a legal obligation to consult the Four Host First Nations with pre-existing rights in
their respective traditional territories.

Commencing in 2002, VANOC, the Government of British Columbia and the Government of
Canada have entered into a series of agreements with the Four Host First Nations to advance
their involvement in all aspects of the Games, including governance, economic and cultural
benefits, participation in environmental approval processes, sport development, and legacy. In
November 2005, a Protocol Agreement with the Four Host First Nations was signed that made
VANOC the first organizing committee in the history of the Winter Games to recognize
Aboriginal peoples as partners in the Games. An independent Four Host First Nations
Secretariat has been established for the purpose of managing collaboration among the Four
Host First Nations and between the Four Host First Nations and VANOC and the two senior
levels of government.




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6.3 Inner-City Communities (Vancouver)

Guided by an independent assessment of the impact of hallmark events on vulnerable urban
communities, the Inner-City Inclusive Commitment Statement was developed to ensure that the
legacy of the 2010 Winter Games was one of creating direct benefits and managing potential
adverse impacts for Vancouver’s inner-city neighbourhoods. The Inner-City Inclusive
Commitment Statement was submitted to the IOC as part of the Vancouver 2010 Bid and has
been endorsed by VANOC and its federal, provincial and municipal government partners.




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24.      APPENDIX 13: OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

1. INTRODUCTION

In keeping with Canada’s linguistic duality and cultural diversity, VANOC is working closely with
francophone communities across the country to promote Canada’s two Official Languages and
activate the nation-building potential of the Games through all areas of VANOC’s planning and
service delivery.

The scope of VANOC’s activities includes:

Partnership with francophone communities

         Signing a protocol agreement with francophone organizations to assist VANOC in
         delivering bilingual Games
         Determine an action plan outlining the structure of this collaboration
         Integration of Official Languages commitments in the planning of strategic and
         operational phases of the Games
         Working closely with VANOC functions to integrate Official Languages requirements
         throughout the Organizing Committee

Monitoring and Reporting System

         Establish mechanisms that will allow VANOC to track progress

2. RESPONSIBILITIES

The responsibilities of VANOC’s Official Languages function include:

         Engagement of the francophone communities in VANOC’s key areas of planning and the
         provision of services
         Implementation of a recruitment strategy to engage paid staff and volunteers with the
         ability to communicate fluently in both French and English
         Development of a workplace culture that values staff with knowledge of the French
         language, provides appropriate training opportunities, develops a community of interest
         with francophone organizations and integrates cultural appreciation throughout the
         workplace
         Ensuring the integration of Canada’s Official Languages in communication and
         marketing materials as well as cultural activities and programs
         Delivery of client, athlete, emergency and specialized services as well as signage,
         protocol activities and ceremonies in both Official Languages



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3. ASSUMPTIONS

VANOC’s Official Languages function recognizes and adheres to the language requirements as
set out in the Olympic Charter (Chapter 2, Section 24).

This plan meets the Host City Contract (Section 69) and the MPA (Section 8 and Annex A)
requirements.

The requirement to use both of Canada’s Official Languages in the planning, execution, and
evaluation of the Games is fully aligned with VANOC’s values and guiding principles.

The financial requirements generated by the Official Languages initiatives are accounted for in
the Human Resources, Sustainability and International Client Services divisional budget and in
relevant VANOC functions.

The partnership with francophone communities will facilitate VANOC in reaching its Official
Languages objectives.

Translation services will be delivered centrally at VANOC through the Revenue, Marketing and
Communications division.

4. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

The parties involved in delivering VANOC’s Official Languages requirements include:

External Groups

         Government of Canada
             o The Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages
             o 2010 Federal Secretariat
             o Department of Canadian Heritage
             o Commissioner of Official Languages
         Provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick
         Other provincial, territorial and municipal governments
         Province of British Columbia
         City of Vancouver
         Resort Municipality of Whistler
         Members and organizations of the French linguistic minority communities, principally:
             o Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique
             o Fondation canadienne pour le dialogue des cultures
         Members and organizations of l’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie



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         VANOC’s sponsors and official suppliers
         The IOC, IPC, IFs and athletes
         COC and CPC
         Members of the public

Internal

    •    VANOC employees (paid staff and volunteers) and third-party service providers
         appointed by and/or selected by and/or acting on behalf of VANOC

4. STRATEGIES

4.1 Official Languages function at VANOC (OL)

A Linguistic Policy will be established outlining VANOC’s Official Languages requirements
through all phases of the Games. Once approved by the VANOC Executive Team, it will be
communicated to all VANOC staff.

All functions must take VANOC’s linguistic obligations into account and have an explicit
responsibility to take tangible steps to incorporate Canada’s Official Languages in their service
delivery activities.

OL will meet with key function leaders in order to explain their official languages requirements
along with the rationale for implementation, as well as to facilitate the integration of those
requirements in their operational plans and to offer support and solutions throughout the
planning process.

OL will create a bilingual workplace by continuing to deliver the following initiatives:

         Organize and administer French as second language training, available to all staff, in
         order to meet and/or exceed our workforce bilingualism objectives
         Organize activities and events relating to French culture destined to promote the
         language and VANOC’s commitment to bilingualism
         Hold information sessions with francophone communities to encourage them to apply at
         VANOC for both paid and volunteer opportunities

4.2 Key VANOC Functions

Human Resources – Official Languages will play a role in developing the Human Resources
division’s strategies for paid staff and volunteers. Specifically, the recruitment, orientation and
external communication strategies for all staff (paid or volunteer) will be addressed in both
Official Languages. Advertisements for workforce opportunities are released concurrently with




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either the French advertisement appearing in local/provincial minority language print or
electronic media. If minority language media services are not available, advertisements will
appear in the English media in both English and French.

Revenue, Marketing and Communications – VANOC’s Revenue, Marketing, and
Communications division will ensure that all planned promotional, media and public information
material produced and distributed prior to, during and after the Games is provided
simultaneously in both Official Languages. This includes the production of official Games
programs in both Official Languages as it relates to this function. Advertisements are released
concurrently with either the French advertisement appearing in local/provincial minority
language print or electronic media. If minority language media services are not available,
advertisements will appear in the English media in both English and French.

The division will ensure VANOC’s external website is available in both Official Languages.
Every effort will be made to ensure that an equivalent amount of supportive documentation and
third-party material is available in each Official Language. Translation services at VANOC will
be delivered as a central function under the Revenue, Marketing and Communications division.
The division will be responsible for ensuring there is sufficient resource capacity to deliver
information to the public simultaneously in both Official Languages prior to and during the 2010
Winter Games.

Sport – Services and administration information will be available to the Olympic Family,
athletes, coaches, technical officials and other delegation members in English and French. All
public address announcements at the venues will also be in English and French.

Finance – To the extent reasonably possible, VANOC’s Finance division will ensure that
external procurement requests for goods and services are available in both Official Languages
and will also ensure that service providers acting on behalf of VANOC will meet similar linguistic
obligations and standards. At a minimum, VANOC will provide summaries of all posted
procurement opportunities in both Official Languages.

Technology and Systems – VANOC’s Technology and Systems function will seek data in real
time while ensuring that employees have access to available technology in (either or) both of
Canada’s Official Languages. The function will provide French and English language versions of
public-facing systems such as the Vancouver 2010 website (vancouver2010.com) and the
volunteer portal. It will also provide system design that will include multilingual functionality for
the delivery of background information, for media use. VANOC will identify solutions to ensure
the capacity to deliver information simultaneously in both languages during the Games. This
function is responsible for the provision of event results simultaneously in both Official
Languages.

Service Operations – Prior to, during and after the Games, VANOC will ensure that official
signage relating to the Games, including that of VANOC’s partners, official sponsors, suppliers,
hotels and all venues, are in English and French. Identification passes and tickets will also be in
both languages as well as written material giving administrative information for delegation



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members. As well, this function is responsible for the provision of background information for
media use, in bilingual format.

Cultural Olympiad and Ceremonies – These functions will play a central role at showcasing
Canada’s cultural and linguistic duality by incorporating elements of Canada’s Official
Languages in the Cultural Olympiad, festivals, displays, public address announcements and
ceremonies.

5. IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE

The schedule to implement VANOC’s Official Languages commitments includes:

         December 2005 – Collaborative agreement signed with francophone communities

         July 2006 – Developed planning guide to integrate Official Languages in key VANOC
         functions

         March 2007 – Establish progress activity report with key performance indicators

         April 2007 – Align francophone community action plan with VANOC’s Official Languages
         strategy

6. BACKGROUND

The Multiparty Agreement sets out many conditions and responsibilities that all Parties agreed
to abide by. One of the conditions was [J (ix)] “with respect to Olympic activities, strive to
present themselves to the public and the Olympic family in both Official Languages.” In addition,
VANOC has specific language obligations under the Olympic Charter (Ch. 2, section 24), the
HCC (section 69) and Canada’s Official Languages Act.




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25.      APPENDIX 14: EVALUATION MECHANISMS

Evaluation mechanisms associated with the Games can be defined as being of three different
groupings:

         Those mechanisms associated with evaluating and monitoring the progress VANOC is
         making towards delivering on its primary objective: that of delivering the Games on time
         and on budget. Many of these elements are focused on issues of schedule and budget.
         Mechanisms associated with ensuring that VANOC respects commitments made to its
         stakeholders during the bid phase and thereafter. This group looks at specific outcomes
         and also how the Games are executed.
         Mechanisms associated with considering the longer-term objectives of its key
         stakeholders. Most key stakeholders became involved with the Games in an effort to
         achieve certain long-term outcomes.

The majority of this section deals with the first group of mechanisms. These are areas where
VANOC exercises a considerable degree of control or influence.

The second group is largely addressed through VANOC’s Sustainability Management and
Reporting System (SMRS), based on a Corporate Sustainability Policy approved by the VANOC
Board and procedures for implementation. This is addressed in Appendix 12. The SMRS is
designed to ensure that commitments and outcomes are tracked, monitored and reported upon.
Regular evaluation and reporting from this system will be summarized and publicly released in
an annual Corporate Sustainability Report to ensure accountability for these commitments.
Performance data contained in the post-Games Sustainability Report will be independently
verified. VANOC’s Sustainability Reporting process also includes provisions for ongoing
community consultation and continuous improvement.

The third group consists of issues largely the responsibility, or at least, in the interest of
stakeholders including VANOC’s government and sport partners. The group would include
issues such as the impact of the Games on tourism, health and participation in sport, and on
elite athletics. These are areas where VANOC’s limited lifespan does not allow for longer-term
evaluation. They are also areas where stakeholders have existing follow-up mechanisms and
the tools for appropriate monitoring and evaluation.

As the Games project unfolds, it becomes necessary to ensure that progress and strategic
decisions are evaluated on an ongoing basis. Such evaluation should be designed to ensure
that the organization does not veer unintentionally off track as a result, perhaps, of a sequence
of small decisions rather than one or more obviously significant ones. There are a number of
mechanisms available to VANOC that can support the need to evaluate progress.




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Schedule Management

VANOC’s integrated planning team has prepared a Games Master Schedule to assist senior
management and function leaders in preparing for the Games. The level of detailed use of the
scheduling service by each function varies depending on the specific needs of that function and
the nature of their work. However, a minimum level of participation in the centralized scheduling
will be required to ensure overall integration of plans.

Project management and project reporting techniques are combined to generate higher level
“dashboards” that identify progress on milestones as well as challenges or risks encountered.
The dashboard is designed to allow effective oversight by those empowered to effect corrective
action.

The Master Schedule is an essential tool to move progress planning forward on critical Games
deadlines. Developed through coordination with the VANOC functions, IOC, IPC, government
partners and sponsors, the Master Schedule provides VANOC with the information it needs to
effectively plan, manage, integrate and communicate its activities.
To keep it manageable, the Master Schedule includes only the core activities that are critical to
delivering the Games and the VANOC strategic plan. The Master Schedule summarizes the
plans of VANOC’s many functions and its multiple partners into one integrated, centrally
managed schedule.
The format of the Master Schedule is a user-friendly database that can be filtered and sorted
multiple ways. Each activity has single point accountability, an expected completion date, and is
ranked as follows:


Milestones are significant VANOC achievements that are essential/core to delivering the
Games and to achieving VANOC’s strategic objectives. The schedule has fewer than 100
milestones.


Deliverables are significant results (internal or external) that contribute to the achievement of a
milestone. Generally, milestones have four to six deliverables. There is often more than one
function or team working towards a given milestone. To highlight these interdependencies,
deliverables are grouped together for an integrated view of the schedule.


Key Actions are the key steps to achieve the deliverables. This level of detail is included in the
Master Schedule because it has a cross-function and/or partner impact or dependency that
requires greater coordination and communication.




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There are many thousands more tasks not tracked centrally in the Master Schedule. These are
detailed activities (such as smaller project plans, typically of shorter duration or requiring
minimal resources to complete) or large complex areas (such as Venue Development,
Technology and Overlay) that require comprehensive project controls, including schedules.
These tasks are managed within the function itself. If necessary the detailed function schedules
can be accessed. Functions such as Venue Development, Overlay and Technology have
schedules with tens of thousands of activities.

Developing the Master Schedule

  1. As part of the business planning process, each function area developed a schedule.
     Functions identified the key activities/deliverables and completion dates associated with
     their strategies and delivery models identified in their business plans.

  2. The information gathered from the Olympic Games Knowledge Management System and
     the IOC and IPC Winter Model Schedules was a valuable reference tool. The Winter
     Model includes obligations and recommended activities and timing, based on previous
     Games experience.

  3. Using the information from the function schedules, Project Management worked with the
     Executive and the VANOC Games Time Operations Steering Committee to identify
     VANOC’s milestones.

  4. Leaders from each function worked with Project Management to:

                rank the activities
                align deliverables with VANOC’s milestones
                check the logic and sequencing of activities
                ensure consistency and alignment across all of the functions (e.g. cross-checking
                activities according to impact on customer groups)

  5. The IOC and IPC were consulted to ensure they were satisfied that VANOC’s obligations
     were adequately incorporated and that, overall, the schedule met their monitoring and
     reporting needs (Note: VANOC is contractually required to have the IOC and IPC approve
     and receive regular updates of the VANOC Master Schedule).

  6. Workshops were held with the federal, provincial and municipal government partners. The
     structure and format of the schedule has been established. The partners have provided
     feedback and will add their deliverables and/or comments and key actions in due course,
     once they have completed reviewing VANOC business plans and have developed their
     detailed plans.




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Oversight, Tracking and Communications
The Master Schedule is a dynamic tracking mechanism and VANOC will continue to refine it as
planning progresses. To ensure adequate oversight, tracking and communication, change
management is integrated into VANOC’s Monthly Management Report process. The Monthly
Management Report includes a Gantt chart of VANOC’s milestones and deliverables for the
following six months and highlights any changes to them.
Each month, VANOC functions report completed items and request any necessary schedule
changes. Within the report, delivery issues are identified and assessed and are monitored until
resolved. Monthly reports are reviewed by the responsible member of the VANOC Executive
Team and then by a cross-function team to ensure impacts are thoroughly assessed and
challenged.
Once approved by the Executive Team, the report is distributed to VANOC Board of Directors
and the Senior Leadership team and the Master Schedule is updated. Government partners and
the IOC and IPC receive monthly updates through their primary points of contacts.

IOC Coordination Commission Meetings

The Olympic Games Coordination Commission is formed shortly after the election of a host city
to oversee and assist the organizing committee (OCOG) in the planning, construction, and
implementation of the Olympic Games. The Coordination Commission acts as a liaison between
the IOC, the OCOG, the International Federations (IFs) and the National Olympic Committees
(NOCs). The Commission includes representatives of the IOC, the IFs, the NOCs and an athlete
representative as well as experts in the fields of media, environment and TV technology. The
Commission is a critical component of oversight and evaluation conducted by VANOC’s
international stakeholders

The 2010 Winter Games Coordination Commission has met on several occasions since 2003
and now meets twice yearly. VANOC is required to report on its progress to the IOC’s expert
commission. The process of preparing for, and reporting to, the Commission adds an important
layer of accountability and also validation for key decisions taken by VANOC. The Commission
provides advice to VANOC to enhance Games planning. Should the Commission disagree with
VANOC’s approach or be concerned about any element of its planning, VANOC is made aware
of it. In most cases, concerns raised by a Coordination Commission will be accompanied by a
recommended course of action. The presence of the Coordination Commission provides an
effective check and balance against VANOC activities.

In addition to regular Coordination Commission visits, IOC working groups also visit Vancouver
for project reviews. These working groups review VANOC plans across a full range of Games
preparations.




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Centralized Project Reporting

As the organization grows in size and complexity, a structured and centralized form of project
reporting becomes a critical tool to allow senior management, the Board of Directors and
VANOC’s government partners to adequately monitor the progress of preparation and
readiness. In addition to ad hoc reports prepared on specific issues as required, a more formal
form of centralized reporting has been adopted.

The monthly report now includes financial, schedule, risk- and issue-tracking components to
allow key leaders to assess progress and make critical decisions.

VANOC reports the results of its financial operations to the public on a quarterly basis through
the release of its financial statements and management discussion and analysis.

Venue Construction

The venue construction program follows sound and proven project management techniques and
is subject to a variety of control and evaluation mechanisms including:

         Weekly schedule, budget and project reviews with each project management team
         Regular reviews with internal stakeholders who represent key user groups
         Weekly venue construction executive reviews of each project
         Reviews by a construction advisory committee comprised of recognized construction
         experts in BC
         Close working relationships with municipal, partner, contractor and other experts

The venue program is closely monitored by VANOC’s Executive and its Board of Directors
working through the Finance Committee. The Performance and Accountability Agreement
between VANOC and BC adds a further layer of project control by requiring regular reporting to
the Province and careful and specific management of venue construction contingency.




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26.      APPENDIX 15: LEGACIES OF THE 2010 WINTER GAMES

1. INTRODUCTION

Since Vancouver entered the domestic competition in 1998 for a chance to host the 2010 Winter
Games, there has been a constant theme centred on the creation of legacies. The Games will
be more than 17 days of Olympic and 10 days of Paralympic competition. They will result in
legacies and benefits for the host communities, sport, the country and the global Olympic and
Paralympic movements.

The Vancouver 2010 Winter Games are a hallmark event for Canada. The Games provide an
international stage to:

         Showcase our country, values, unique cultural experience, abilities, achievements and
         commitment to sustainability to the rest of the world

         Demonstrate our commitment to athletic achievement and Olympic and Paralympic
         ideals

         Promote Canada’s multiculturalism and its linguistic duality

         Promote Canada as a place to visit and invest, and as an accessible destination for
         people with disabilities

         Stimulate economic activity and job creation before, during and after the Games.

         Make social inclusion, particularly of groups that have not traditionally benefited from the
         Games, one of the legacies of the Games

         Create legacies through investments in sports facilities, cultural and sports endowment
         programs and major infrastructure improvements

         Increase appreciation and recognition within the international diplomatic community and
         other international dignitaries of the Vancouver, Whistler and surrounding areas

         Provide a continuing platform for long-term tourism promotion

Since the early bid phase, the 2010 Winter Games plan has always been focused on what the
impact will be, long after the after the Flame is extinguished in 2010.




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As soon as the Games were awarded to Vancouver on July 2, 2003, work commenced to put
the successful bid plans into action. VANOC, working with its government, sport and First
Nations partners, has made a number of refinements and updates to the bid plans in the last
four years. Each change and each decision has been linked to strengthening the Games
delivery plans, maximizing efficiencies and improving the legacies.

The venue development focus is to generate the conditions necessary to host outstanding
Games in 2010 and ensure the Games will leave sport, cultural, community, tourism, human,
social, environmental and economic legacies.

2. VANCOUVER 2010 SPORT VENUES LEGACIES

The Vancouver 2010 venue development program is focused on maximizing the use of existing
facilities and building new venues that maximize the potential of post-Games uses. Working with
its partners, VANOC’s venue plan incorporates ideas of how the new facilities will operate after
the Games for the continued development of high-performance and recreational sport and
community uses for both able-bodied people and for people with a disability.

With an investment of $580 million by the Governments of Canada and British Columbia,
VANOC has worked with local partners to help deliver a venue program that will provide
spectacular theatres for sport in 2010 and facilities that will provide summer and winter sport,
community and recreational legacies after the Games.

An additional investment of $110 million by the Governments of Canada and British Columbia
has created the 2010 Games Operating Trust. The trust was established to ensure the long-
term financial viability of certain venues thereby adding very substantial community and sport
assets to the Vancouver-Whistler region.

The 2010 Games venues are being developed with a sustainable footprint and will leave a
legacy of green buildings designed to conserve natural resources such as water, materials and
energy throughout their operations. Efficiencies in building design will create a legacy of lower
operating costs for future venue owners achieved through the capture and re-use of waste heat
and/or rainwater.

2.1 Venue-by-venue summary of legacy mode operations

Hillcrest/Nat Bailey Stadium Park

During the Games, the venue will host curling and wheelchair curling. After the Games, the
curling venue will become a multi-purpose community recreation centre that will include an ice
hockey rink, gymnasium, library and six to eight sheets of curling ice. Attached to and being
constructed with the new curling venue/community centre is a new aquatic centre with a 50-
metre pool and leisure pool to be managed by the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation.




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UBC Winter Sports Centre

During the Games, the venue will host ice hockey and ice sledge hockey in a new 7,000 seat
competition arena. After the Games, the venue will become a recreational and high-
performance multi-sport legacy facility with 5,000 seats. The new training arena will be easily
convertible for ice sledge hockey training and competition post Games.

Pacific Coliseum

During the Games, the Pacific Coliseum will host figure skating and short track speed skating. In
2005 and 2006 a number of improvements were completed to update the Coliseum, originally
built in 1968. Renovations included accessibility upgrades, the replacement of 16,000 seats and
the ability to convert the ice surface to international size as well as updated mechanical and
electrical systems. Remaining improvements to the ice plant and dehumidification system will be
completed in 2007.

After the Games, as the largest building within the Hastings Park complex, the Pacific Coliseum
will continue to serve as a venue for diverse events such as ice shows, boxing, basketball,
hockey, concerts, large assemblies and trade and consumer shows.

Richmond Oval

During the Games, the Richmond Oval will be an outstanding theatre for speed skating with a
new 400-metre track housed in a 33,750-square-metre facility. After the Games, the facility will
become an international centre of excellence for sports and wellness. The building’s flexible
design will allow it to be used for a variety of sport and community functions. The facility will be
the centrepiece of a major new urban waterfront neighbourhood in Richmond featuring a mix of
residential, commercial and public amenity development.

Whistler Creekside

During the Games, Whistler Creekside will host the alpine skiing events. Improvements include
the contouring and reshaping of the men’s and women’s downhill courses, additions to the
existing snow-making system and an enhanced reservoir for snow-making. After the Games,
Whistler Creekside will continue to offer a world-class ski area to recreational skiers and will be
a site for future international competitions and Canadian team training.

Whistler Sliding Centre

During the Games, the Whistler Sliding Centre will feature bobsleigh, luge and skeleton events
on a new 1,450-metre track on Blackcomb Mountain. After the Games, the track will be
operated under the direction of the Whistler Legacy Society, supported by an endowment trust
that was established by the federal and provincial governments as part of their 2010 Winter
Games venues investment. This high-performance competition centre, located in the heart of
the Whistler/Blackcomb resort, will introduce sliding sports to the area’s many visitors. It also



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has the potential to be part of a North American competition circuit with tracks that were built for
previous Games in Lake Placid (1980), Calgary (1988) and Salt Lake (2002).

Whistler Nordic Competition Venue

During the Games, the Whistler Nordic competition venue will host biathlon, cross-country
skiing, ski jumping and Nordic combined events in new facilities in Whistler’s Callaghan Valley.
After the Games, the Nordic venue will be operated by the Whistler Legacies Society, supported
by an endowment trust that was established by the federal and provincial governments as part
of their 2010 Winter Games venues investments. Post-Games use is still under consideration.
The trails can be used in a variety of ways for the enjoyment of local residents, visitors and
athletes from recreational to high-performance sport.

Paralympic Games biathlon rifles will be left at the venue for post-Games training and
competitions in this sport.

Cypress Mountain

During the Games, Cypress Mountain will host freestyle skiing and snowboard. Venue upgrades
include modifications to existing runs, a new in-ground halfpipe, a snow-making system and
water reservoir, lighting, a new freestyle site for aerials and moguls, and a re-graded parallel
giant slalom course. The enhancements to Cypress Mountain in 2010 will enhance the Cypress
experience for recreational and competitive users.

Killarney and Trout Lake ice rinks – Vancouver

Ice rinks at both Killarney and Trout Lake community centres will be renovated and upgraded
and used as practice venues during the 2010 Winter Games. Following the Games, the rinks
will be converted for community use.

3. VILLAGES

Two full-service Olympic and Paralympic Villages are being built for the 2010 Winter Games.
After the Games, the villages in Vancouver and Whistler will create supportive housing in
Vancouver and will help address long-term, affordable employee housing needs in Whistler.

Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village

VANOC is working with the City of Vancouver to create an exciting urban waterfront Olympic
and Paralympic Village on former industrial lands along southeast False Creek. After the 2010
Winter Games, many of the buildings of the Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village will be
converted to residential housing for families. In addition to restoring contaminated lands, the
legacy neighbourhood will feature innovative community energy systems, the highest quality
green buildings and habitat corridors through parks and green space.




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The Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village is the first phase of a new mixed-use
community and will contribute about 1,100 residential units, 250 of which will be non-market
(supportive) housing units.

Whistler Olympic and Paralympic Village

The Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) in partnership with VANOC, will convert the
Olympic and Paralympic Village into its newest resident housing neighbourhood. The Village is
being designed firstly to serve as the Whistler athletes village for the 2010 Olympic and
Paralympic Games. It will then become a permanent mixed-use neighbourhood designed to
support Whistler’s goal of housing 75 per cent of its employees within the community. In
addition, this village will be a model sustainable neighbourhood, incorporating the latest in green
building design and energy systems.

The Whistler Athlete Centre (WAC) is a housing and training facility for Canada’s best current
and future athletes, and allows them to affordably access local world-class terrain during their
training periods. The WAC will be operational both before and after the 2010 Games. These
facilities will accommodate up to 350 athletes and includes a fitness training centre. The legacy
rooms will be furnished with materials acquired and used for the Games. The WAC will keep
accessible rooms in the mix allowing the centre to be used by athletes with a disability for
training purposes post Games. The WAC supports goals of the Own the Podium 2010 Program,
a health, fitness and youth legacy as well as an event hosting legacy.

WAC, in conjunction with the RMOW, will provide the Whistler Gymnastics Club with a
permanent home after the Games. RMOW will also transform the decommissioned municipal
landfill into a variety of community sport fields.

4. ACCESSIBILITY

As part of its venue construction program and Games-time operations, VANOC is committed to
providing meaningful access to people with a disability. To that end, VANOC has developed
guidelines to help ensure that access for people with a disability is addressed in the venue
design. The guidelines use British Columbia Building Code as a minimum standard and exceed
these in areas of special importance to the Games and its participants. At Games time, the
barrier-free guidelines set the minimum level of access to be provided at all Olympic and
Paralympic venues. The barrier-free guidelines cover the sport venues, villages,
accommodations and special event sites. VANOC is currently working on barrier-free guidelines
for Game-time transport.

All the barrier-free guidelines developed for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games
will be made available to VANOC partners and stakeholders, to be used by organizations and
jurisdictions in their major event planning and hosting capacities.




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5. TRANSPORTATION

The Vancouver 2010 Bid, and now the 2010 Winter Games, are catalysts to transportation
infrastructure improvements that have been on the community agenda for quite some time. The
Games have helped set a time frame for these improvements which include the development of
the Canada Line (rapid transit line connecting Vancouver, Richmond and the Vancouver
International Airport) and the Sea-to-Sky Highway improvement project.

As governments and local transportation agencies such as TransLink and the Vancouver
International Airport Authority work together to create a safe and efficient Games-time
transportation plan, a legacy will be a more integrated, inclusive approach to planning and
delivering transportation within the Greater Vancouver and Howe Sound areas.

6. CULTURE

Cultural Olympiad

The Cultural Olympiad will contribute to the commissioning and development of new works of
performing and studio arts. These commissioned works will live on in the community as
performing arts repertoire and populate studio arts exhibitions long after the Games.

Through the Cultural Olympiad’s support of public art, VANOC will contribute to the creation of
public art work that will stand as a legacy in the community after the Games. Public art works
have already been commissioned by the City of Richmond for the Oval project, including an
exterior art installation designed by Musqueam First Nation artist Susan Point.

By connecting major national and international artists with Vancouver and Whistler area artists
and arts organizations, the Cultural Olympiad will help expand cultural networks and build
creative capacity within the regional arts community.

The Olympic and Paralympic Arts Festival will raise awareness of Canadian cultural products by
the global community and increase exports of featured work. Major international producers,
programmers and curators will attend the Arts Festivals and will experience extraordinary
Canadian works of art, some of which will be invited to tour or exhibit at subsequent festivals
and events around the world.

Opening, Closing and Victory Ceremonies

Ceremonies will provide opportunities to showcase existing Canadian world-class entertainers
and to promote new and up-and-coming artists and acts and, through enhanced exposure to a
worldwide audience, leave a legacy of new business opportunities and enriched visibility for
Canadian artists.




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Through the scale of the ceremonies production and technical requirements, the Opening and
Closing Ceremonies will leave a legacy of enhanced BC and Canadian expertise in performing
arts and large-scale event presentation knowledge, skills and creativity.

Education

VANOC’s education-related initiative will generate a substantial increase in the number of
teachers subscribing to COC and CPC education programs and create an ongoing community
among the non-profit groups developing curriculum resources for teachers in the areas of sport,
culture and sustainability. This will, in turn, strengthen the overall sector.

7. ABORIGINAL PARTICIPATION

The 2010 Winter Games will leave a lasting legacy for Aboriginal peoples across the country by
helping to build relationships that will continue beyond the Games, building understanding of the
diverse cultures and contributions of Aboriginal peoples and contributing to sport, economic and
cultural development.

The Games will be held on the traditional and shared traditional territories of the Lil’wat,
Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations – known collectively as the Four Host
First Nations. These First Nations are recognized as partners in the planning and hosting of the
Games – a first in Olympic and Paralympic Games history, and a legacy in itself.

VANOC is working with its partners to realize legacies for the Four Host First Nation
communities. Some of the legacies so far include the contracts awarded to Resource Business
Ventures and Newhaven Construction for work on the Whistler Nordic competition venue,
financial contributions to the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre being built in Whistler and the
creation of a Youth Sport Legacy Fund supporting the development of Aboriginal sport. The
Squamish and Lil’wat Nations are also members of the Whistler Legacy Society and will
participate in the operation of a number of the 2010 venues following the Games.

8. FRANCOPHONE PARTICIPATION

Through its Official Languages function, VANOC is working closely with key francophone
groups across Canada to ensure that Canada’s Official Languages and cultural diversity are
promoted throughout the planning and delivery of the Games. This increased awareness will
help foster relationships between the minority francophone and majority anglophone
communities not only within British Columbia but nationally. When Vancouver welcomes the
international community in 2010, visitors will experience Canada’s linguistic duality.

9. SUSTAINABILITY ACCOUNTABILITY AND ACTION

VANOC’s Sustainability Management and Reporting System (SMRS) will manage, track and
report on the sustainability operational performance requirements across the organization. The
SMRS and VANOC’s related sustainability policy and procedures provide a template for an



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integrated and systems-based approach to putting the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation’s
sustainability commitments into action, including performance measures and stakeholder
engagement. Such a template will be a legacy for future Games organizing committees and
other project entities interested in integrating sustainability into their organizations and activities.

The commitment of VANOC and its partners to sustainability in the lead up to and during the
2010 Games will increase awareness of sustainability issues and inspire action on long-term
behavioural change on sustainable choices among VANOC workforce, sponsors, athletes,
spectators, media and the public.

10. MATERIAL LOGISTICS AND PROCUREMENT

Following the Games, certain assets, such as sport equipment, will be donated to youth persons
with disabilities, inner-city and Aboriginal communities for their use. Other creative procurement
strategies will ensure some of the Games equipment ends up in community organizations as
part of joint procurement efforts. These ideas are still under discussion.

A catalogue that contains economic, environment and socially responsible products is being
developed by VANOC and will be made available to future Games and private and public sector
organizations that have similar requirements.

11. SPORT EQUIPMENT

Sport equipment used during the Games, will be donated after the Games to equip venues for
post-Games use. National Sport Organizations will have access to the equipment for future
training and event hosting.

12. MEDICAL SERVICES

After the Games, certain medical equipment used in the Olympic and Paralympic Villages, and
at the venues, will be turned over to a number of communities for various legacy uses.

13. OWN THE PODIUM 2010

Launched in January 2005, Own the Podium 2010 is a national sport technical initiative
designed to help Canada’s winter athletes win the most medals at the 2010 Olympic Winter
Games in Vancouver, and to place in the top three nations (gold medal count) at the 2010
Paralympic Winter Games.

The initiative is a collaborative effort supported by all of Canada’s winter National Sport
Organizations (NSOs) and the major winter sport funding partners, including the Government of
Canada, through Sport Canada, the Canadian Olympic Committee (COC), the Canadian
Paralympic Committee (CPC), the Calgary Olympic Development Association (CODA), the
Government of British Columbia, the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic
and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) and several of VANOC’s corporate sponsors.



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Own the Podium 2010 has established needed partnerships with governments, sport agencies
and corporate sponsors to develop long-term funding stability for the winter sport system.

The heightened awareness for athlete and amateur sport needs coupled with the anticipated
performances of Canadian athletes at the 2010 Winter Games are expected to create an
increase in the level of support from all sectors for amateur sport after the Games.

14. TECHNOLOGY AND SYSTEMS LEGACIES

Technology and Systems is working with its partners and sponsors to determine technology
legacy opportunities for the project. In addition to the technology contributions in terms of IT
equipment and timing and scoring systems for the new venues VANOC is building, several
other significant opportunities should present themselves as the project evolves. These are
most likely to be in the form of equipment donations and skills training.

Additionally, the Olympic and Paralympic Games are a catalyst for several infrastructure
initiatives which will enhance the communities in the province of BC, and in particular
communities in the Sea-to-Sky Corridor through the expansion of cellphone and data-
connection coverage in the region.

15. VANCOUVER2010.COM WEBSITE

The Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games website is demonstrating how a
modern communications tool can help excite, inspire and inform people about the Games.
VANOC has decided to make the bilingual website the primary source of information about the
Games in an effort to reduce the reliance on traditional communications methods such as
printed documents, reports, brochures and publicity materials.

In legacy mode, certain sections and features of the vancouver2010.com portal will be passed
on to existing or potential partners for integration or future management. Examples of these
sections and features could include: the education programs and functionality developed by
VANOC, and the portion of the website subscription database that has opted in to being
communicated to by partner or legacy organizations after the Games in 2010.

16. HUMAN LEGACIES

After the medals are awarded and the Olympic and Paralympic Flames are extinguished, there
will be new sport and community facilities that can be enjoyed by all segments of society well
beyond 2010. From youngsters trying on skates for the first time at the new arena at UBC to
high-performance athletes sliding down the bobsleigh track on Blackcomb Mountain in a future
World Cup race, the venues that will host the competitions in 2010 will continue to serve as
sport legacies.




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But the Games will also leave important human legacies generated from the participation of
people in the Games – from working for the Organizing Committee, to volunteering for the
Games, to experiencing the thrill of competition as a spectator, to watching the stories unfold on
television and the Internet as new sport heroes make their mark in 2010.

The Games will help create an enhanced talent pool with new skills – in particular for people in
the inner-city and Aboriginal communities.

Some 25,000 volunteers will participate in the Games. This unique experience of contributing to
an international event will create an enhanced talent pool of volunteers for BC and Canada and
will provide increased awareness about the passion for and benefits of volunteerism across the
country.

The excitement and enthusiasm generated by the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games has the
potential to create a new climate of community cooperation and volunteerism and will show the
world what’s possible when a city, region and country pull together to deliver an outstanding
major event.

Event services training

Approximately 3,500 international and national dignitaries, including Heads of State, Heads of
Government and sport organizations will attend the Games. VANOC is planning to make their
individual and collective experiences memorable. This will help to carry a positive voice around
the world about the successful Games in Vancouver. VANOC is working with protocol chiefs
from its partner groups to create a legacy of cooperation and mutual understanding in this area.
Staff and volunteers that will work with the Olympic Family during the Games will gain valuable
training and experience in this specialized area of diplomacy and protocol – skills they can use
at future events.

Sport-skilled volunteers

The Games will provide a legacy of training many new sport-skilled volunteers. An estimated
4,000 volunteers with specific sport skills will be required for Games events. These volunteers
will enable local venues to host local, national and world-calibre events beyond 2010.

Safety Legacy

VANOC and WorkSafeBC are actively working together to support worker safety and health at
all Vancouver 2010 venue construction sites. The concept will also be implemented for all
Games employees and volunteers. VANOC and WorkSafeBC are committed to ensuring that all
workers on Olympic and Paralympic venue sites are protected from workplace injury and
disease through VANOC’s goal of “zero lost time” injuries. A series of training manuals and
management programs developed for the 2010 Winter Games will be available after the Games
to serve as a model for safety for future major projects and events.




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17. PARALYMPIC GAMES LEGACIES

VANOC is working closely with the Canadian Paralympic Committee and its partners to
maximize the benefits of the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games. The Games provide an
opportunity to increase the profile of the Paralympic Movement and athletes with a disability.
With the move of ice sledge hockey and wheelchair curling to Vancouver (announced in August
2006), there is an opportunity for more spectators to experience and gain knowledge of the
Paralympic Games.

VANOC’s integrated planning approach to the 2010 Winter Games ensures that both Olympic
and Paralympic decisions are made at the same time to ensure a seamless transition between
the Games in 2010 and the creation of both Olympic and Paralympic legacies. In addition to
contributing to the building of the Paralympic brand in Canada and globally, the Paralympic-
specific legacies of the 2010 Winter Games include:

         The Athlete Centre in Whistler will keep accessible rooms in the mix, allowing the centre
         to be used by athletes with a disability for training purposes post Games.

         In legacy mode, the curling facility will remain at Hillcrest/Nat Bailey Stadium Park in
         Vancouver. This facility will be accessible for the use of wheelchair curlers and the
         development of the sport. VANOC is working with the City of Vancouver to ensure this
         venue is available for wheelchair curling after the Games.

         The UBC Winter Sports Centre will have the capability to be converted to accommodate
         ice sledge hockey

         VANOC is working with the City of Richmond to ensure wheelchair sports are on the list
         of high-performance sports located at the Richmond National Training Centre to be
         located in the facility after the Games

         On October 11, 2006, Richmond City Council approved the inclusion of a rowing and
         paddling centre (including adaptive rowing) as part of the legacy component of the
         Richmond Oval. The adaptive component of this program was a catalyst to secure the
         centre.

VANOC continues to seek opportunities to ensure a legacy for Paralympic sport.


18. ECONOMIC LEGACIES OF THE GAMES

Two economic impact studies conducted for the Province of British Columbia in 2002 stated
that, when combined with independently measured impacts from an expanded Vancouver
Convention and Exhibition Centre, hosting the 2010 Games could:



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         Generate $6.1 billion to $10.7 billion in economic activity

         Create the equivalent of 126,000 to 244,000 full-time jobs

         Result in tax revenues of $1.4 billion to $2.6 billion

These studies will be updated in the near future.

VANOC’s operating budget will largely be spent in British Columbia and the rest of Canada.
From the salaries of Organizing Committee employees to the production of official Games
merchandise, much of the overall operating budget is money that would not have been invested
in the BC and Canadian economies without the Games.

The Games serve as an important platform for long-term tourism promotion. Some three billion
people will be exposed to the host city, region, province and Canada through the global
television broadcasts. International media exposure increases awareness and can push the
international visitor volume to the region to a permanently higher plateau, with Vancouver,
Whistler, the province and Canada having their profiles raised throughout the world.

The Games provide valuable opportunities to enhance the region’s hospitality and event hosting
expertise along with training and the development of new skills for the Four Host First Nations,
Aboriginal people and inner-city communities as they participate in delivering the Games
services.

New facilities in Vancouver/Whistler will help create and enhance opportunities for the region to
bid on future major sport events. There’s an opportunity to create a North American circuit for
sliding sports events with sliding tracks located in Lake Placid, Salt Lake, Calgary and Whistler.

VANOC, its government partners and corporate sponsors will collaborate on Games-time
showcasing of business innovation on sustainability to demonstrate BC and Canada’s
leadership on integrated solutions to local and global sustainability challenges.

19. CONCLUSION

Participants in the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games will see a city,
region and country committed to the values of peace and development through sport. They will
experience Games that have directly involved people from all regions of the country and every
community in British Columbia – embracing our diverse cultures. Games athletes and visitors
will be in venues and travel on transportation systems that represent a commitment to the sport,
social, economic and environment legacies for the future. They will recognize the vision of those
involved in planning and staging the Games that creates a stronger Canada whose spirit is
raised by its passion for sport, culture and sustainability.




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27. APPENDIX 16: VANCOUVER 2010 BUSINESS PLAN – GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND
ACRONYMS

TERMS:
(Source: IOC Games Terminology, Official Core Terminology on Olympic and Paralympic Games)

Olympic Family: This is a general term used to group together the various constituents of the
Olympic Movement

Function: A function within a Games organizing committee

ACRONYMS:
BCAS                    British Columbia Ambulance Service
CEAA                    Canadian Environmental Assessment Act/Agency
COC                     Canadian Olympic Committee
CODA                    Calgary Olympic Development Association
COV                     City of Vancouver
CPC                     Canadian Paralympic Committee
CPI                     Consumer Price Index
CSIS                    Canadian Security Intelligence Service
ERM                     Enterprise Resource Management
FIS                     International Ski Federation
FHFN                    Four Host First Nations
GAAP                    Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
GMS                     Games Management Systems
GRIP                    IOC’s Games Readiness Integrated Plan
GO                      VANOC Games Operations Team
GVRD                    Greater Vancouver Regional District
HCC                     Host City Contract
ICS                     International Client Services
IF                      International Federation
IOC                     International Olympic Committee




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IPC                     International Paralympic Committee
JMPA                    Joint Marketing Plan Agreement
LEED                    Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
MMC                     Main Media Centre
MOU                     Memorandum of Understanding
MPA                     Multiparty Agreement
MPA2                    Marketing Plan Agreement
NOC                     National Olympic Committee
NPC                     National Paralympic Committee
NSO                     National Sport Organization
OBS                     Olympic Broadcast Services
OGI                     Olympic Games Impact
OCOG                    Organizing Committee of the Olympic Games
OGKM                    Olympic Games Knowledge Management
OTP                     Own The Podium 2010
PDR                     Program Definition Report
RFP                     Request for Proposal
RMOW                    Resort Municipality of Whistler
SLOC                    Salt Lake 2002 Organizing Committee
SLRD                    Squamish Lillooet Regional District
TOP                     The Olympic Partner Programme
TOROC                   Torino 2006 Organizing Committee
UBC                     University of British Columbia
VCH                     Vancouver Coastal Health
VCCEP                   Vancouver Convention Centre Expansion Project
VCEC                    Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre
VIK                     Value in Kind
V2010ISU                Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit
WADA                    World Anti-Doping Agency




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VANOC Partners and Sponsors

VANOC acknowledges the support of our sponsors and partners. Their belief in the spirit of the
Olympic and Paralympic movements allows VANOC to pursue its goal of hosting an outstanding
2010 Winter Games

Government Partners

         Government of Canada
         Province of British Columbia
         City of Vancouver
         Resort Municipality of Whistler

Sport Partners

         Canadian Olympic Committee
         Canadian Paralympic Committee

Host First Nations

         Lil’wat
         Musqueam
         Squamish
         Tsleil-Waututh

Venue City

         Richmond

Worldwide Partners

         Coca-Cola
         Atos Origin
         GE
         McDonald’s
         Omega
         Samsung
         Visa




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National Partners

         Bell Canada (Premier National Partner)
         Hbc (Premier National Partner)
         RBC Financial Group (Premier National Partner)
         General Motors Canada
         Petro-Canada
         RONA

Official Supporters

         Air Canada
         British Columbia Lottery Corporation
         Canadian Pacific
         Insurance Corporation of British Columbia
         Jet Set Sports
         Ricoh Canada
         Royal Canadian Mint
         Teck Cominco

Official Suppliers

         Birks and Mayors Inc.
         Dow Canada
         EPCOR
         Haworth Canada
         Nortel
         Vincor
         Weston Bakeries
         Workopolis




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