Spring 2009 Honors Program courses

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Spring 2009 Honors Program courses Powered By Docstoc
					Spring 2009 Honors Program courses
(Updated 11/2/08)


ANTHROPOLOGY

Course: AN 379 China: Tradition and Transition
Professor: Weller
Lecture: MWF 2:00-3:00
Honors section: M 1:00-2:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 10

Course description: Examines daily life in China and Taiwan, tracing how opposed economic
and political paths transformed a common tradition. Topics include capitalism and socialism;
politics and social control; dissidence; gender relations; religion, arts, and literature; and
pollution.


ARCHAEOLOGY

Course: AR 208 Lost Languages and Decipherments
Professor: Danti
Lecture: TR 2:00-3:30
Honors section: R 4:00-5:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 20

Course description: An overview of the archaeology of writing focusing on modern
decipherments of ancient texts. Related topics include characteristics of the world's major
language families, the nature of linguistic change, and the origin and history of the alphabet.


ART HISTORY

Course: AH 112 Introduction to Art History II: Renaissance to Today
Professor: Ribner & Zell
Lecture: TR 11:00-12:30
Honors section: W 11:00-12:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 25
Course description: Major monuments and artists. Sequential development, from the late
Renaissance to the modern period, of major styles in architecture, sculpture, painting, graphic
arts, and photography. Relationship of visual art to social and cultural trends.


ASTRONOMY

Course: AS 102 The Astronomical Universe
Professor: Brecher
Lecture: TR 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Honors section (lab): T 2:00-3:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): regular lab section (A2-
A7)
Division: natural science
Enrollment limit: 6

Course description: The birth and death of stars. Red giants, white dwarfs, black holes. Our
galaxy, the Milky Way, and other galaxies. The Big Bang and other cosmological theories of our
expanding universe. Use of the observatory.


Course: AS 203 Principles of Astronomy II
Professor: Blanton
Lecture: MWF 11:00-12:00
Honors section Lab: F 2:00-3:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): regular lab (A2-A4)
Division: natural science
Enrollment limit: 5

Course description: Coreq: (CASMA123) Astronomical measurements; time and the celestial
sphere; telescopes and observatories; the solar system, orbital motion; comparative planetology;
the sun and solar-terrestrial effects; electromagnetic radiation; spectroscopy, stellar properties
and stellar evolution; the Milky Way galaxy; galaxies; the universe. Lectures and laboratories.
Intended primarily for astronomy or physics concentrators.


BIOLOGY

Course: BI 118 Biology II (Honors)
Professor: Jacobson
Lecture: TR 12:30-2:00
Discussion: F 10:00-11:00
Lab: T 4:00-7:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: natural science
Enrollment limit: 32
Course description: Prereq: (CASCH101) (or equivalent), AP Biology score of 4 or 5 (or
equivalent), and consent of instructor. If you submit your form without attached permission
from professor Jacobson, you will not be registered for the course. Alternative to BI 108 for
well-prepared students. Selected topics in introductory molecular and cell biology, physiology,
and neurobiology are covered in greater depth, with emphasis on experimental strategies and
critical evaluation. Early laboratory sessions focus on methods; later project laboratory
emphasizes inquiry-based learning.


Course: BI 119 Sociobiology
Professor: Traniello
Lecture: TR 12:30-2:00
Honors section: M 2:00-3:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: natural science
Enrollment limit: 20

Course description: Designed for non-science concentrators to fulfill natural science divisional
requirements. The evolution of animal societies; the development of social behavior; the
adaptive significance of social organization; altruism; cooperation; mating behavior; human
sociobiology; evolutionary psychology; evolutionary biology and social thought. Three hours
lecture plus discussion.


CHEMISTRY

Course: CH 112 Intensive General and Quantitative Analytical Chemistry
Professor: Doerrer
Honors Lecture: MWF 9-10
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): Pre-lab (C1), Lab (L2-L3),
and Discussion (B1-B4).
Division: natural science
Enrollment limit: 8

Course Description: Prereq: (CASCH111) or advanced placement in calculus. First semester
prereq: one year of high school chemistry, two years of high school algebra, and chemistry
placement examination. Second semester prereq: CAS CH 111. Second semester of intensive
two-semester sequence for well-prepared students concentrating in chemistry or other sciences.
Priority given to chemistry concentrators. Brief review of stoichiometry, gas laws; extensive
consideration of equilibrium, thermodynamics, atomic and molecular structure, kinetics;
application of principles to selected elements and compounds. Correlated laboratory experiments
emphasizing applications of quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, one
hour lab lecture, four hours lab
Course: CH 212 Intensive Organic Chemistry
Professor: Schaus
Honors Lecture: MWF 10:00-11:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): Discussion section (B2-
B3), Lab (C1-C2), Pre-Lab (D1)
Division: natural science
Enrollment limit: 10

Course Description: Prereq: (CASCH211) First semester prereq: CAS CH 102, CH 108, CH
110, or CH 112. Second semester prereq: CAS CH 211. Recommended for Chemistry
concentrators. Organic compounds and their reactions; functional groups, stereochemistry,
synthesis, reaction mechanisms, and laboratory methods including qualitative organic analysis.
Industrial applications and relevance to biological systems. Three hours lecture, one hour
discussion, one hour prelab lecture, four hours lab.


CLASSICAL STUDIES

Course: CL 303 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Professor: Samons II
Lecture: TR 11:00-12:30
Honors Section: T 8:00-9:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 10

Description: The causes and consequences of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire. Topics
include Romans and barbarians; the rise and spread of Christianity; Constantine the Great; the
death of classic paganism; theories of decline; the grand strategy of the Roman Empire;
monasticism; the emergence of Byzantium and Constantinople; the origins of Islam; and the
transformation of classical art, literature, and thought and their influence on Christianity.


COMPUTER SCIENCE

Course: CS 112 Introduction to Computer Science II
Professor: Byers
Lecture: TR 11:00-12:30
Honors section: M 4:00-5:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: math/computer science
Enrollment limit: 10

Course description: Prereq: (CASCS111) or equivalent. Covers advanced programming
techniques and data structures. Topics include recursion, algorithm analysis, linked lists, stacks,
queues, trees, graphs, tables, searching, and sorting. (Counts as a CS Background Course for the
concentration.)


CORE CURRICULUM
Non-CORE students must get permission from the CORE office to take individual CORE
sections.

Course: CC 102 Core Humanities II: Late Antiquity and the Medieval World
Professor: Eckel
Lecture: T 9:30-11:00
Honors sections:
Indicate discussion choice on your registration form
       HQ: MWF 12:00-1:00 (Speight)
       HS: TR 11:00-12:30 (Eckel)
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 36 lecture; 18 per discussion section

Course Description: Focusing on ethical themes and questions from the Western and Eastern
traditions, the course includes Aristotle, Confucius, Lao Tzu, the Bhagavad Gita, Epictetus,
Vergil, the Gospels, and Dante. Chronologically, the course covers the late-classical period in
Greece, the rise and fall of the Roman Empire, and the medieval world.


Course: CC 202 Core Humanities IV: From the Enlightenment to Modernity
Professor: Jorgensen
Lecture: T 2:00-3:30
Honors section: TR 11:00-12:30
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 15

Course Description: From the philosophes and the Age of Reason through the Romantic Revolt
and the origins of modernity. Swift, Hume, Gibbon, Rousseau, Mozart's Marriage of Figaro,
Goethe's Faust, the romantic poets, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Nietzsche, Dostoyevsky's
Crime and Punishment.


Course: CC 204: The Individual and the World
Professor: Swartz
Lecture: R 2:00-3:30
Honors section: TR 3:30-5:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 15
Course Description: Focuses on the problems of modernity and the response of social theorists.
Psychological and sociological models of human identity and group dynamics are outlined and
applied to comparative family systems, gender identity, cultural role-playing, colonialism, mass
societies and totalitarianism, religion, ethnicity, and nationalism. The course concludes with a
study of American culture and the future possibilities of the social sciences. Authors read include
William James, Freud, Weber, and Erikson.


ECONOMICS

Course: EC 112 Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis
Professor: Lucas
Lecture: TR 2:00-3:30
Honors section: R 11:00-12:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 18

Course Description: Covers the same material as CAS EC 102 but more thoroughly and
rigorously and at a more advanced level. For this section, knowledge of algebra is highly
desirable.


ENGLISH

Course: EN 220 American Gothic
Professor: Otten
Honors Seminar: MWF 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 15

N.B. If you take this course to satisfy the second semester of the College Writing
Requirement (WR 150), it may not also be used to satisfy a distribution requirement
(Humanities).

Course Description: American writers seem to have a particular fondness for gloomy,
crumbling mansions, characters buried alive, haunting secrets from the past, hypnotically
powerful villains, and corpses that won't stay dead. From Poe to Hitchcock to Toni Morrison,
the Gothic mode never loses its ability to rivet us to the page or screen. Why are those stories so
compelling? And are the things that terrify in the eighteenth century (which is when the first
Gothic novels appear) the same as the things that terrify us now? In this seminar, we will
investigate the history of fear, first by trying to define the term Gothic, and then by turning to
four moments in the mode's history: its British origins in the novels of Horace Walpole and Mary
Shelley; its flourishing in the fiction of Edgar Allan Poe and the poetry of Emily Dickinson; its
role in turn-of-the-century stories of gender and science by Henry James and Charlotte Perkins
Gilman; and its persistence in contemporary fiction (Toni Morrison's Beloved) and in film
(Psycho, Seven).


GEOGRAPHY

Course: GE 100 Introduction to Environmental Science
Professor: Kaufmann
Lecture: TR 11:00-12:30
Honors section: W 1:00-2:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 15

Course Description: Introduction to basic physical, ecological, and environmental concepts
underlying the relationship between human society and the natural environment. Evaluation of
problems and options available in dealing with the areas of natural resources, pollution,
environmental degradation, and population growth.


HISTORY

Course: HI 248 Catastrophe and Cultural Memory
Professor: Schmidt
Honors Seminar: TR 9:30-11
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 15

Course Description: Examines the ways in which catastrophes—both natural and social—enter
into cultural memory. Goal is to understand how events that seem to defy comprehension are
represented in works of art and given a place in the memory of a culture.

Course: HI 292 Colonialism in Africa: Impact and Aftermath
Professor: Heywood
Lecture: TR 9:30-11:00
Honors Section: R 11:00-12:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 15

Course Description: Uses case studies of particular African societies or nations to examine
patterns of European conquest and African resistance; forms of colonial administration and
socioeconomic consequences of colonial rule; decolonization and contemporary African
liberation movements; economic and political developments since independence; and
contemporary social and cultural change.
MATHEMATICS

Course: MA 230 Honors-Level Vector Calculus
Professor: David Fried
Lecture: MWF 12:00-1:00
Honors section: W 3:00-4:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: math/computer science
Enrollment limit: 20

Course Description: Prereq: (CASMA124 OR CASMA127 OR CASMA129) Linear algebra:
linear transformations and matrices, inner products, cross products. Differentiation: tangent
spaces, directional derivatives, gradients, vector fields and flow, divergence, curl. Integration:
multiple integrals, line integrals, Green's theorem, surface integrals, Stokes's theorem, the
divergence theorem. (Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 225.)


Course: MA 442 Honors Level Linear Algebra
Professor: Kohl
Lecture: MWF 11:00-12:00
Honors section: M 1:00-2:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: math/computer science
Enrollment limit: 20

Course Description: Prereq: (CASMA225 OR CASMA230) A thorough development of the
fundamentals of linear algebra. Systems of linear equations; matrices, linear transformations,
duality; determinants, characteristic and minimal polynomials; diagonalization and normal forms
of linear transformations; inner products, unitary and self-adjoint operators, and spectral theory.
Applications to physics, probability, and statistics. (Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS
MA 242.)


PHILOSOPHY

Course: PH 100 Introduction to Philosophy
Professor: Hopp
Lecture: MWF 2:00-3:00
Honors section: M 10:00-11:00
Other Components: (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 15
Course Description: Introduction to the nature of philosophical activity through a careful study
of selected great works such as Plato's Apology, Descartes' Meditations, Lao Tze's Tao Te
Ching, Pascal's Pensées, and Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra.


Course: PH 412 Philosophy of the Enlightenment
Professor: Griswold
Honors Seminar: M 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Other Components: (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 3

Course Description: (CASPH310) and two other philosophy courses, or consent of
instructor. A critical examination of that family of philosophical and political movements that
called itself "the Enlightenment." Students analyze key texts by Descartes, Hobbes, Locke,
Smith, Rousseau, Voltaire, Diderot, Jefferson, Madison, Kant, and Hegel.


PHYSICS

Course: PY 106 Elementary Physics II
Professor: Duffy
Lecture: MWF 2:00-3:00
Honors section: W 10:00-11:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): regular Lab Section (L1-
M6); students in all PY 106 Lectures should reserve Wednesdays 6:00-8:00 p.m. for up to 3
exams per semester.
Division: natural science
Enrollment limit: 20

Course Description: Prereq: (CASPY105) or equivalent. CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies
premedical requirements; presupposes algebra and trigonometry. Principles of classical and
modern physics. Mechanics, conservation laws, heat, light, electricity and magnetism, waves,
light and optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Lectures, discussions, and laboratory.


POLITICAL SCIENCE

Course: PO 375 Russian and Post-Soviet Foreign Relations
Professor: Connor
Lecture: TR 3:30-5:00
Other Components: (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 10
Course Description: Decisive factors in the foreign relations of Russia and the other former
Soviet republics, including historical continuity and change, survival and change of ideology,
domestic politics, economic and geographical factors, military and external political
considerations. The future of arms control, nuclear weapons, the economy, and relations among
the former republics are also examined.


PSYCHOLOGY

Course: PS 205 Memory and the Brain
Professor: Eichenbaum
Lecture: TR 9:30-11:00
Other Components: (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 24

Course Description: Our memories reflect the accumulation of a lifetime of experience and, in
this sense our memories are what we are. This course explores how modern methods of cognitive
science and neuroscience have led to new insights about memory and, more generally, to a
greater understanding about the mind and brain functions that mediate cognition, emotion,
behavior, and consciousness.


RELIGION

Course: RN 101 The Bible
Professor: Zank
Lecture: MWF 12:00-1:00
Honors section: W 1:00-2:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment limit: 7

Course Description: Designed for the student who will take only one or two courses in religious
studies, this course introduces the Bible as a foundational source of Western culture. In addition
to basic knowledge of Hebrew and Christian scriptures, the student may expect to gain an
appreciation of biblical themes in Western literature and art.

Course: RN 459 Primo Levi Within Holocaust Literature
Professor: Harrowitz
Lecture: TR 12:30-2:00
Honors Section: T 2:00-3:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment Limit: 12
Course Description: A study of Primo Levi's writings and scientific, theological, and
philosophical approaches to the Holocaust. Other theorists (Arendt, Wiesel, Muller-Hill), and
other survivors' testimonies (Delbo, Borowski, Fink) are read in conjunction with Levi's works.


ROMANCE STUDIES

Course: LI 459 Primo Levi Within Holocaust Literature
Professor: Harrowitz
Lecture: TR 12:30-2:00
Honors Section: T 2:00-3:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: humanities
Enrollment Limit: 8

Course Description: A study of Primo Levi's writings and scientific, theological, and
philosophical approaches to the Holocaust. Other theorists (Arendt, Wiesel, Muller-Hill), and
other survivors' testimonies (Delbo, Borowski, Fink) are read in conjunction with Levi's works.


SOCIOLOGY

Course: SO 115 Introduction to Sociology: Law and Society
Professor: Yeager
Lecture: MWF 10:00-11:00
Honors section: W 11:00-12:00
Other Components (for which students register themselves on-line): none
Division: social science
Enrollment limit: 20

Course Description: Law and deviance as complementary aspects of the basic relationship
between the individual and society. Structure and culture of agencies that maintain law and
order. Students are expected to observe in court settings.