Mirror, Mirror - DOC by rqy18723

VIEWS: 11 PAGES: 7

									Mirror, Mirror

 Developed By                          Stephen McQuaid
 Suggested Length                      Five 40-minute classes
 Suggested Grade Level(s)              7, 8, 9
 Subject Areas                         Visual Arts, Social Studies, Mathematics



Overview
Students will investigate and create portraits of others and themselves. They will
study and refer to different styles of art to create them.

Links to Curriculum Outcomes
Students will (be expected to)
    compare examples of material and non-material elements of culture in
      different societies (social studies)
    compare and analyze how culture is preserved, modified, and transmitted
      (social studies)
    create personally meaningful imagery that reflects influence from a variety
      of historical and contemporary artists (visual arts)
    estimate and apply measurement concepts in relevant problem situations
      and use tools and units which reflect an appropriate degree of accuracy
      (mathematics)

Links to Telling Stories: Themes / Key Words
    Portrait
    Photos as documentary and art
    Genre painting-detail of everyday life

Art Works
    Self Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-205
    Sketch for Self-Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-393
    Self Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-390
    Self Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-387
    Portrait Of Mrs. Joseph Reitmeyer, Robert Harris, CAG H-85
    John Gordon Mackenzie, Robert Harris, CAG H-593
    Sketch for The Romany Girl, Robert Harris, CAG H-27
    Portrait Of Jenny Stewart, Daughter Of Fisherman, Runswick, Robert
      Harris, CAG H-231
      Study Of A Nun's Head, Robert Harris, CAG H-53
      Thrift Burnside, Studies For Grouping, Robert Harris, CAG H-240b




Lesson #1: Peek Before You Paint
Objective       Students will examine portraits done by Robert Harris. Students will
                also look at what goes into – and what is behind – a portrait, in
                preparation for making their own.

Related Art Work(s)
    Portrait Of Mrs. Joseph Reitmeyer, Robert Harris, CAG H-85
    John Gordon Mackenzie, Robert Harris, CAG H-593
    Sketch For The Romany Girl, Robert Harris, CAG H-27
    Portrait Of Jenny Stewart, Daughter Of Fisherman, Runswick, Robert
      Harris, CAG H-231
    Study Of A Nun's Head, Robert Harris, CAG H-53
    Thrift Burnside, Studies For Grouping, Robert Harris, CAG H-240b

Materials
   pencils or pens
   paper

Activities
             1. View with students the portraits done by Robert Harris. You might
                also use other portraits by Harris, or by other artists. With the
                students, hold a discussion on different aspects of portraits. Display
                and consider questions such as the following:
                 Why would someone want a picture painted of them?
                 Why would people paint portraits?
                 What goes into a portrait? What do people on both sides of the
                   canvas do?
                 What do you think would be the hardest part to paint? Why?
                 Do you think it is harder to do a self-portrait, or a portrait of
                   another person?
                 What objects do you see in the work of art in front of you?
                 What is going on in this work of art?
                 What objects in the work remind you of something else that is
                   not shown?
                 Is this work of art true to life? How real has the artist made
                   things look?
                 What ideas or emotions do you think this work of art expresses?
                   Do you have a sense of how the artist might have felt when he
                    or she made this work of art? Does it make you feel one way or
                    another?
                   What colors do you see in each painting?
                   Do the different paintings look alike? What is similar about the
                    way they look? What is different?

             2. After the discussion, have the students answer some open-ended
                questions on what they learned about portrait painting, writing their
                responses in their notebooks. Some example questions may be:
                 Who would you paint, and why?
                 What would you tell someone posing for you to do while painting
                   them?
                 What would be your first step in each portrait?
                 What would you paint first?




Lesson #2: Paint Unto Others. . .
Objective       Students will, in pairs, paint portraits of each other, using the ideas
                they discussed in Lesson #1.

Materials
   paper
   pencils
   charcoal pencils
   paints (tempera or water colour)

Activities
             1. At the start of the class, have students share some of their writings
                from the previous lesson. Have a brief discussion about the
                different responses and ideas and introduce the portrait painting
                activity. Note that students will need most of the class to do their
                portraits.

             2. Encourage students to use techniques and ideas that they learned
                in Lesson #1.

             3. Form groups of two, and have students draw or paint portraits of
                each other.

Ideas for Assessment
In addition to the works of art themselves, have students write a response about
their portrait-creating experience. Students may concentrate on points such as:
      The hardest part of doing the portrait. . .
      What they liked about the process.
      What they wanted to express with the picture
      What they noticed about the person as they made the portrait
      What they had to do which they didn‟t anticipate
      Are they happy with the outcome?
      How did they feel being the painter / subject?
      If they feel that portraits are a good way of preserving culture / history, and
       why / why not?




Lesson #3: Looking Glasses with Different Prescriptions
Objective       Students will investigate portraits done in a variety of artistic styles,
                choosing a style that they find most meaningful, and providing
                reasons for their choice.

Related Art Work(s)
Self Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-205
Sketch for Self-Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-393
Self Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-390
Self Portrait, Robert Harris, CAG H-387
________________________________________________________________

Portrait of Paul Eluard, Salvador Dali
Self Portrait with Burning Cigarette, Edvard Munch
Portrait of Wilhelm Uhde, Pablo Picasso
The Side Show (especially the „detail‟ picture), Georges Seurat
Self Portrait with Felt Hat, Vincent van Gogh

Activities
             1. Take students on a “journey” of exploration of portraits done in a
                variety of artistic styles. View with students the referenced
                “collection” of portraits and self-portraits.

             2. With each work, have them identify anything they find noteworthy.
                They may point out differences in mood / emotion, colour, shape,
                brushwork, detail, posture, setting, etc. Encourage them to be
                observant and to really look at the works.

             3. Introduce them to the various artistic styles represented in the
                works. In random order, they are:
                 Expressionism (where reality is adapted in order to express
                    the artist‟s inner vision and emotions)
                  Impressionism (where the artist strives to capture the mood of
                   a scene instead of just making a factual report. Light plays an
                   important role and the work is spontaneously executed, and
                   sometimes appears unfinished.)
                  Realism (where ordinary objects of everyday life were portrayed
                   in a realistic manner, without idealization or presentation in
                   abstract form)
                  Pointillism (which is characterized by the application of paint in
                   small dots and brush strokes)
                  Surrealism (in which the real and the unreal are mingled using
                   dreams and chance effects to create a new reality. It attempts to
                   express the workings of the subconscious and is characterized
                   by fantastic imagery and incongruous juxtaposition of subject
                   matter.)
                  Cubism (in which the subject matter is portrayed by geometric
                   forms without realistic detail, stressing abstract form at the
                   expense of other pictorial elements)

            4. Once students have understood these descriptions, review with
               them the paintings they have seen. Challenge students to place
               each painting and artist into a specific category or two. Ask
               students to explain why they placed each style and work / artist
               together. What were the cues or points that matched?

Computer Option
   Have students research their chosen artistic style to learn more about
    similar artists and works.

Ideas for Assessment
Ask students to select the style that pleases them the most, providing at least
three reasons for their choice. Their rationale should be phrased in appropriate
artistic language.




Lesson #4: Seeing Double
Objective      Students will sketch self-portraits from pictures. They will use grids
               and math to make them accurately larger, and then paint them in a
               style of their choosing. This will take two classes to complete.

Materials
   rulers / meter sticks
   pencils
   paper
      paints (water colour, tempera)
      paint brushes
      pictures of each student

Activities
             1. Have each student bring in a recent photo of him / herself. If they
                do not want to have the photograph marked on, allow them to make
                a copy.

             2. Have students create a grid of equally-sized squares on their photo,
                measuring the sides of the photo, then deciding upon dimensions
                that will fill the photo with a grid of same-sized squares.

             3. Once students have their grids made, and their measurements
                down, have them make a simple conversion which will allow them
                to make a larger depiction of the same grid / photo (increasing the
                numbers by a factor of five or ten may be easiest).

             4. Once the new grid is made, have students make sketches of
                themselves, using the original photo and grid as a guide to help
                them accurately make a larger-scale sketch.

             5. The next day / class, have students convert their sketch into a
                painting (or use their sketch as a model for one), attempting to
                imitate the style that they chose during the previous class.

Ideas for Assessment
After the self-portraits have been completed, in a written assignment, have
students compare how aspects of culture may be seen in their own picture and in
those of Harris. Ask students to explain how paintings may or may not be a good
method of preserving, changing, and transmitting our culture.

Bringing it all Together
Once the works have been completed, mount them together on a wall. You may
do this as a long border, or as a block of portraits. It may be nice to have the two
portraits that were done of each student (the self-portrait and the one by their
partner) placed side-by-side.

Suggested Resources
   The web site http://www.artchive.com/ is an excellent source of
     information about many artists, their works, and styles of art. You will find
     the works listed above on this site.
   If links on the site (or the site itself) will not work, try using
    http://www.google.ca to search for the image

								
To top